Stsenaariumidepõhine disain

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  • Stsenaariumide-phine disain

    IFI6094.DT Kasutajakeskse disaini meetodid

  • Carroll, J. M. (2000). Making Use: Scenario-Based Design of Human-Computer Interactions. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

  • Rosson, M. B., & Carroll, J. M. (2002). Scenario-Based Design. J. A. Jacko & A. Sears, The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies and Emerging Applications (lk 10321050). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Rosson & Carroll: SBD 1

    Scenario-Based Design

    Mary Beth Rosson and John M. Carroll

    Department of Computer Science and Center for Human-Computer Interaction

    Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA

    Chapter 53 in J. Jacko & A. Sears (Eds.), The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals,Evolving Technologies and Emerging Applications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002, pp. 1032-1050.

    1. The Basic Idea

    Scenario-based design is a family of techniques in which the use of a future systemis concretely described at an early point in the development process. Narrative descriptionsof envisioned usage episodes are then employed in a variety of ways to guide thedevelopment of the system that will enable these use experiences.

    Like other user-centered approaches, scenario-based design changes the focus ofdesign work from defining system operations (i.e., functional specification) to describinghow people will use a system to accomplish work tasks and other activities. However,unlike approaches that consider human behavior and experience through formal analysisand modeling of well-specified tasks, scenario-based design is a relatively lightweightmethod for envisioning future use possibilities.

    A user interaction scenario is a sketch of use. It is intended to vividly capture theessence of an interaction design, much as a two-dimensional, paper-and-pencil sketchcaptures the essence of a physical design.

    2. A Simple Example

    Scenarios are stories. They consist of a setting, or situation state, one or more actors withpersonal motivations, knowledge, and capabilities, and various tools and objects that theactors encounter and manipulate. The scenario describes a sequence of actions and eventsthat lead to an outcome. These actions and events are related in a usage context thatincludes the goals, plans, and reactions of the people taking part in the episode.

    Table 1 presents three brief scenarios in which a member of a club uses differentnetwork tools to interact with club members. In all of these scenarios, the persons goal isto visit a club and interact with her friends at the club. The scenarios contrast three waysthat such a goal might be supported by computer network technologies. Each is a potentialsolution to Sharons needs, but the user experience varies from asynchronous text-basedreading and posting, to a real-time graphical simulation of a meeting place.

    Designers can quickly construct scenarios like these in order to make envisionedpossibilities more concrete. The example contrasts three contemporary approaches toonline interactions, but not as an abstraction, not as a list of features or functions. Itcontrasts three episodes of human-computer interaction and personal experience.

  • Ohud disainiprotsessi alguses

    Disainerid vivad valida liiga kiiresti esimese ettetulnud lahenduse

    Disainerid vivad lihtsustada probleemi ja taaskasutada tuttavaid lahendusi

    Disainerid ei analsi piisavalt erinevaid ideid vi alternatiive

    (Rosson & Carroll, 2002)

  • Mis on stsenaariumid?

    Lhikesed lood inimestest ja nende tegevustest, mis

    kirjeldavad tpilisi kasutussituatsioone

    keskenduvad eesmrkidele, tegevustele ja objektidele

    jtavad vlja kasutajaliidese detailid

  • Stsenaariumide eelised

    Stsenaariumid nitavad disainiprotsessi edasiliikumist, kuid ei tekita tugevat seotust stsenaariumides kirjeldatud ideedega

    Stsenaariumid pravad thelepanu disainiideede kasutusklblikkusele

    Stsenaariumide lpetamata olemus tstatab ksimusi

    (Rosson & Carroll, 2002)

  • Stsenaariumi elemendid

    Tegevuspaik (ingl setting) kasutusepisoodi algseisukorra ja seotud objektide kirjeldus

    Tegelased (ingl actors)

    Eesmrgid (ingl goals)

    Tegevused (ingl actions) tegevused, mida tegelased teevad

    Sndmused (ingl events) sndmused, mis tegelastega juhtuvad

    Objektid (ingl objects)

    (Carroll, 2000)

  • EesmrgidHarry is interested in bridge failures; as a child, he saw a small bridge collapse when its footings were undermined after a heavy rainfall.

    He opens the case study of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and requests to see the film of its collapse. He is stunned to see the bridge first sway, then ripple, and ultimately lurch apart.

    He quickly replays the film, and then opens the associated course module on harmonic motion.

    He browses the material (without doing the exercises), saves the film clip in his workbook with a speech annotation, and then enters a natural language query to find pointers to other physical manifestations of harmonic motion.

    He moves on to a case study involving flutes and piccolos.

    (Carroll, 2000)

  • TegevusedHarry is interested in bridge failures; as a child, he saw a small bridge collapse when its footings were undermined after a heavy rainfall.

    He opens the case study of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and requests to see the film of its collapse. He is stunned to see the bridge first sway, then ripple, and ultimately lurch apart.

    He quickly replays the film, and then opens the associated course module on harmonic motion.

    He browses the material (without doing the exercises), saves the film clip in his workbook with a speech annotation, and then enters a natural language query to find pointers to other physical manifestations of harmonic motion.

    He moves on to a case study involving flutes and piccolos.

    (Carroll, 2000)

  • ObjektidHarry is interested in bridge failures; as a child, he saw a small bridge collapse when its footings were undermined after a heavy rainfall.

    He opens the case study of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and requests to see the film of its collapse. He is stunned to see the bridge first sway, then ripple, and ultimately lurch apart.

    He quickly replays the film, and then opens the associated course module on harmonic motion.

    He browses the material (without doing the exercises), saves the film clip in his workbook with a speech annotation, and then enters a natural language query to find pointers to other physical manifestations of harmonic motion.

    He moves on to a case study involving flutes and piccolos.

    (Carroll, 2000)

  • Nited

  • http://trac.htk.tlu.ee/koolielu2/wiki/Stsenaariumid

    http://trac.htk.tlu.ee/koolielu2/wiki/Stsenaariumid

  • http://trac.htk.tlu.ee/iva2/wiki/Stsenaariumid

    http://trac.htk.tlu.ee/iva2/wiki/Stsenaariumid

  • http://trac.htk.tlu.ee/digimina/wiki/Stsenaariumid

    http://trac.htk.tlu.ee/digimina/wiki/Stsenaariumid

  • http://itec.eun.org/web/guest/scenario-library

    http://itec.eun.org/web/guest/scenario-library

  • Homework and schoolwork flip

    NARRATIVE OVERVIEW: Ive been teaching for nearly ten years and have decided to try the popular idea of flipping in my class. The basic idea behind flipping is that lectures become homework, while class time is used for collaborative student work, experiential exercises, debate and lab work. Videos and other e-learning materials are used extensively during home time to deliver learning content, while class-time becomes open to experimentation and collaboration. Ive read about flipping and realize its not a fully-fledged pedagogical approach, but a philosophy meant to be used flexibly and fluidly alongside all the tools I have gathered during my career. Ive read how flipping can positively impact student learning regardless of the subject or the type of classroom.

    It is important to me that the additional classroom time gained through flipping is used as effectively as possible, and that the resources students use in their own time are of the highest possible quality and appropriate to their current levels of knowledge. A content library that is integrated with online videos checked for quality and accessibility seems the best way to ensure success. My colleagues and I have developed teaching resources, videos and online activities over the years, and Ive also kept the best revision materials developed by students at the school. Now its time to put this rich repository of content to good use in a structured approach, filling any gaps with high-quality resources available for free over the internet.

    I look within the curriculum to identify topics that lend themselves well to flipping, like those that dont require significant initial student-teacher interaction and that have high-quality resources for the at-home instructional element. I also ensure that students understand the purpose and format of flipping. I support students who lack access to resources at home to find other times and locations to view the materials. I also take advantage of a new school scheme that provides students with notebooks, to help ensure access for students and encourage them to complete their home tasks.

    After the first weeks of flipping, some initial challenges arise. I realize that class time requires a different, but just as rigorous, form of planning, and that collaborative activities and project work come with their own issues to be addressed separately. However, after some initial adjustments, the benefits become evident, as the classroom becomes a place for more effective learning activitie