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Visit to dilli haat- madhubani painting

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  • VISIT TO DILLI HAAT

    SALONIE AGRAWAL Institute of Apparel Management

    Apparel Design and Merchandising

    (14-17)

  • Table of Contents

    1. The Craft .................................................................................................................................. 1

    2. Its Origin ................................................................................................................................... 1

    3. Materials, Colors and Motifs .................................................................................................. 1

    4. Use ............................................................................................................................................. 2

    5. Costing ...................................................................................................................................... 2

    6. Use as a Designer ...................................................................................................................... 2

    7. Picture Gallery ......................................................................................................................... 3

  • The Craft

    Madhubani painting or Mithila painting is a style of Indian painting, practiced in the Mithila

    region of Bihar state, India, and the adjoining parts of Terai in Nepal

    The Mithila region, from which the name Mithila art is derived, is believed to have been the

    kingdom of King Janak. The exact location of it lies in present day Janakpur of Nepal.

    Its Origin

    The exact time when Mithila art originated is not known. According to local mythology, the

    origin can be traced to the time of the Ramayana, when King Janak of Nepal ordered his

    kingdom to decorate the town for the wedding of his daughter, Sita, to Lord Rama. The ancient

    tradition of elaborate wall paintings in Nepal and Bihar played a major role in the emergence

    of this new art form. The original inspiration for Madhubani art emerged from womens craving

    for religiousness and an intense desire to be one with God. With the belief that painting

    something divine would achieve that desire, women began to paint pictures of gods and

    goddesses with an interpretation so divine that captured the hearts of many. The paintings were

    originally done on walls coated with mud and cow dung.

    Materials, Colors and Motifs

    The painting was traditionally done on freshly plastered mud walls and floors of huts, but now

    they are also done on cloth, handmade paper and canvas with fingers, twigs, brushes, nib-pens,

    and matchsticks, using natural dyes, pigments and rice ground paste. Charcoal and soot is used

    for black, rice powder for white, turmeric for yellow, sandalwood for red, indigo for blue, and

    so on.

    Generally Madhubani painting are identified by the fact that there is no space in the

    painting/canvas left uncovered. Typically the paintings will also have a margin or a border, but

    this too will be embellished with geometrical patterns, or flowers, or other motifs. The colors

    are bright, vibrant and eye catching. There is very little shading in the paintings, though not

    entirely absent.

    Madhubani paintings mostly depict the men & its association with nature and the scenes &

    deity from the ancient epics. Popular motifs were - the sun, the moon, flowers, fish, trees,

    animals, birds, geometric patterns and religious plants like basil along with scenes from the

    royal court and social events like weddings. Traditionally, painting was one of the skills that

    was passed down from generation to generation in the families of the Mithila Region, mainly

    by women.

  • Use

    Traditionally the paintings were done on walls coated with mud and cow dung in the kohbar

    ghar or the nuptial chamber. Originally the paintings depicted an assembly of symbolic images

    of the lotus plant, the bamboo grove, fishes, birds and snakes in union. These images

    represented fertility and proliferation of life. There used to be a tradition that the newly married

    bride and groom would spend three nights in the kohbar ghar without cohabiting. On the fourth

    night they would consummate the marriage surrounded with the colorful painting. The Mithila

    paintings were done only by women of the house, the village and the caste and only on occasion

    of marriages for decoration.

    Today, Mithila painting is done on walls, floors, canvas, cloth/fabric, wooden or pottery toys,

    paper Mache products, handmade paper, greeting cards, dress material, home dcor,

    bookmarks, etc..

    Costing

    In todays time the starting price of a small bookmark with original Madhubani painting on it

    is Rs.50. The price of Mithila art varies with size bigger the size more is the price. Price also

    increases with the intricacy in doing it. Price is more for natural dyes as compared to synthetic

    one. So, it can go from Rs.50 to a million or a billion and so on.

    Use as a Designer

    Being a designing student I am really impressed by this folk art form. This is Beautiful and eye

    catching. I would love to use it in garments like Kurtis and Sarees. It can also be used on bed

    sheets, pillow/cushion covers, etc. I can also change it a bit for a better or a newer look like I

    would like to fuse two or more art forms together or bringing some small changes for example

    using fluorescent or neon colors at some places to make it look more vibrant. But no matter

    what change I make I will keep on praising the traditional Madhubani paintings and the women

    who did them.

  • Picture Gallery

    Figure 1: ram- sita swayamwar Figure 2: Fortune Fish

    Figure 3: Ardhnareshwar Figure 4: Nataraj

    Figure 5: A scene of Local Festival

  • Figure 6: Bookmarks and posters at dilli haat

    Figure 7: A vendor at a stall in dilli haat

    Figure 8: A big cloth painting at dilli haat

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