1. BSN Business Administration - University of South ??s “geodesic dome” “Geodesic Dome — an architectural design based upon his discovery that a triangle withstands pressure better and is

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  • 1. BSN Business Administration

    AKA The Bunker

    Constructed during the energy crisis of the 1970s

    Designed to conserve energy, two-thirds of the building is submerged.

    Sloped grass sides were meant to reduce environmental costs by keeping thelower part of the building cool.

    The design turned out to be flawed, as the building was prone to flooding.

    In 2004, the building was extended with a more modern design.

    Photo Copyright 2010 University of South Florida Classroom Technology Services

    2. CGS Patel Center for Global Solutions

    Photo Copyright University of South Florida University Communications & Marketing

    The Patel Center is USFs first fully-constructed sustainable building!

  • Sustainability In The Patel Center:

    Countertops are made of recycled steel shavings, glass and resin

    Toilets flush with rainwater and condensation from the a/c system

    building products were extracted or manufactured from sources in a500-mile radius of Tampa to lessen the environmental impact oftransporting materials to the campus.

    More than 90 percent of the construction waste was recycled to lessenthe impact on area landfills.

    Natural light was used to lower the need for electric lighting; thebuilding was constructed on an east-west axis to make the best useof the sunlight.

    Lights turn off automatically when an occupant leaves a room.

    Lighting in the building uses lower-cost, longer-life LED lights andefficient fluorescent fixtures.

    Solar panels on the roof heat water for use in the building.

    Glazing on the windows keeps heat out while letting light in.

    Recycled and composite materials are used throughout: wood panelingand detail are either wood-composite materials or from managedforests. For example, the doors throughout the building are made frombamboo a quick growing, inexpensive source of wood. Materials suchas granite, which once removed from the earth do not grow back,were not used.

    Low or no-emitting paints and construction adhesives were usedthroughout to improve indoor air quality.

    Outside the building, the landscaping uses native Florida plants whichare drought tolerant.

    Large trees were protected, and pine needles are used as mulch.

    Special parking spaces have been set aside for energy-efficient vehiclesand those who carpool and bike to work. (A shower room inside thebuilding was installed for employees who bike to work).

    Excerpts above by Vickie Chachere | USF.edu News

  • 3. ISA Interdisciplinary Sciences

    This is the tallest building on campus!

    In 2012, this new ISA building attainedLEED Gold Certification.

    All 40 of the attempted credits wereattained.

    This building is part of anenvironmentally-conscious campus.

    Photo Copyright University of South Florida University Communications & Marketing

    4. The Sundome

    Construction of the originalSundome was completed in 1980

    The roof was made out ofTeflon-coated fiberglass fabric, supported by air.

    In 2000, the roof was redone as a hard-top roof based on R. BuckminsterFullers geodesic dome

    Geodesic Dome an architectural design based upon his discovery that atriangle withstands pressure better and is twice as strong as a rectangle. Hediscovered that if a spherical structure was created from triangles, it wouldhave unparalleled strength.

    The Sundomes steel-frame geodesic dome roof is constructed from morethan 3,000 beams and weighs more than 400 tons.

    Photo Copyright University of South Florida University Communications & Marketing

    This building contains a Foucault's Pendulum that is suspended from the ceiling.

  • 5. ALZ Byrd Alzheimer's Center

    Photo Copyright University of South Florida University Communications & Marketing

    6 & 7. Chemistry (CHE) & ALN John & Grace Allen Building

    Photo Copyright 2010 University of South Florida Classroom Technology Services Photo Copyright University of South Florida University Communications & Marketing

    These buildings are two of USF's original buildings when it opened in 1960. After undergoing renovations, the Chemistry building (left) houses facilities for Geology, classrooms, and Chemistry Administration offices.

    The John and Grace Allen Building (right) represents the progressive history of our school, while functioning as the focal point for students ranging from graduates to incoming freshman. The Allen Building, or ALN, remains structural the same today as it did when it opened on September 26th 1960.

    As of 2008, this was the world's largest free-standing Alzheimer's research facility.

    The prominent "four-story cube that is created with semi-transparent glass symbolizes the mind and both its simplicity and complexity."

    The office space is arranged in a glass "ribbon."

  • USFs presidential home was named after Julian H. Lifsey, Jr. and his wife, Mary Ann. They privately funded the construction of the building, which is used for receptions and social gatherings hosted by the president.

    The classic contemporary antebellum structure was designed by architect Gene Leedy and dedicated in September, 1992.

    9. MSC Marshall Center

    Photo Copyright University of South Florida University Communications & Marketing

    The original Student Union was demolished in 2008, making way for the current Marshall Center. The building incorporated sustainable design elements

    You can see in-depth information about the construction and design in the 8 part series linked here: http://www.msc.usf.edu/newmsc/default.htm

    10. The FleX House

    FLeX House is a prefabricated net zero energy home prototype It is a solar-powered home. Another concept of the design is that it could be a starter home. As the family grows, the home can be expanded by adding modules.

    The fleX house was designed with hot climates in mind. One of the most striking surface features of the house serves as a key passive

    cooling strategy. A system of cypress louvers covers the house, providing shade and preventing heat gain during the hottest summer months. The louvers are movable, much like window blinds, and can be adjusted to let it light as needed.

    ORACLE PHOTO / ADAM MATHIEU

    8. Julian Hawthorne Lifsey House

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