10 th Edition, © 2011, Cengage Learning Chapter 12 Prepositions

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  • 10th Edition, 2011, Cengage LearningChapter 12Prepositions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Commonly Used PrepositionsChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*

    aboutafteralong withatbetweenbutbyexceptforwhominintoofonto

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*Use objective-case pronouns as objects of prepositions.Everyone except Leslie and her arrived early.Just between you and me, sales are declining.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • They should have (not of) walked to the restaurantWe could have (not of) received free tickets. Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-* Do not substitute the preposition of for the verb have.

    Typical Problems With Prepositions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Christine borrowed the pen from (not off of) Brandon. Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-* Do not replace the preposition from with the words off or off of.

    Typical Problems With Prepositions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Give the cash receipts to the courier.Sales reps received laptops and cell phones too.The car was too small to carry the equipment. Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-* Do not use the word to in place of the adverb too, which means additionally or excessively.

    Typical Problems With Prepositions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Challenging PrepositionsAmong, betweenBeside, besidesExceptIn, into, in toLikeChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Among, BetweenChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*Among is used to speak of three or more persons or things; between is used for two. Profits will be divided among the nine partners.Responsibility will be divided between the vice president and the general manager.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Beside, BesidesChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*Beside means next to; besides means in addition to. The carpool parking lot is beside the office.You have another option besides this one.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • ExceptChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*Use the preposition except to mean but or excluding. Use the verb accept to mean receive. All pages except three must be copied.We will now accept applications for the position.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • In, Into, In toChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*In indicates a position or location. Into as one word means three things:Entering into something.She plans to go into accounting.We will move into new facilities May 1.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • In, Into, In to

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*Making contact.Unable to stop, he ran into the back of the car in front of him.BUT Please turn the report in to your boss on time.Changing the form of something.The caterpillar changed into a butterfly.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • LikeChapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*The preposition like should be used to introduce nouns or pronouns. Do not use like to introduce clauses. Dont you think Rachel looks like her?They look as if (not like) they could be sisters.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Necessary PrepositionsBe sure to include those prepositions necessary to clarify a relationship. Be particularly careful when two prepositions modify a single object.Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • ExamplesOur appreciation for and interest in the project remain great. (Do not omit for.)What style of printing do you prefer? (Do not omit of.)She graduated from high school last year. (Do not omit from.) Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Unnecessary PrepositionsOmit unnecessary prepositions.Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*Im not sure when the meeting is scheduled (not scheduled for). Boxes were left outside (not outside of) the door.

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Terminal PrepositionsIn formal writing, careful writers avoid ending clauses with prepositions.Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*On what topic did he lecture?To whom do you wish to speak?Whom do you wish to speak to?

    Less FormalMore FormalWhat topic did he lecture on?

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*agree on mutual ideasagree to a proposalagree with a person

    Idioms are word combinations that are peculiar to a certain language. In English learn to use specific prepositions with particular words. Here are a few examples:

    Idiomatic Expressions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*angry at a thingangry with a personcorrespond to a thingcorrespond with a persondiffer from thingsdiffer with personsdifferent from (not than)Idiomatic Expressions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

  • Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved12-*expert in plan to (not on)retroactive to (not from)sensitive totalk to (tell something)talk with (exchange remarks)Idiomatic Expressions

    Chapter 12, Guffey-Seefer, Business English, 10e, Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning, All Rights Reserved

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