1Group 07 IPv6 2 1.ET/06/6472 2.ET/06/6487 3.ET/06/6491 4.EE/06/6393 5.EE/06/6455 6.EE/06/6473 Group 07 IPv6

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Text of 1Group 07 IPv6 2 1.ET/06/6472 2.ET/06/6487 3.ET/06/6491 4.EE/06/6393 5.EE/06/6455 6.EE/06/6473 Group...

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  • 1Group 07 IPv6
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  • 2 1.ET/06/6472 2.ET/06/6487 3.ET/06/6491 4.EE/06/6393 5.EE/06/6455 6.EE/06/6473 Group 07 IPv6
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  • 3 1970s Arpanet / Internet Technology Invented 1980s Research / Non-Commercial Internet Service 1990s The Web and the Internet Everywhere Bill Gates decided he Invented it! 2000s The Mobile and Wireless Internet Group 07 IPv6
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  • 4 Imagine the number of people communicating in the world, the number of different languages they use, the number of different machines they use, the number of ways in which they transmit data and the different software they use. We would never be able to communicate worldwide if there were no standards governing the way we communicate and the way our machines treat data. These standards are sets of rules. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 5 The Internet Protocol (IP) is a protocol used for communicating data across a packet-switched internetwork using the Internet Protocol Suite, also referred to as TCP/IP. IP is the primary protocol in the Internet Layer of the Internet Protocol Suite and has the task of delivering distinguished protocol datagrams (packets) from the source host to the destination host solely based on their addresses.
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  • 7 Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) is the fourth revision in the development of the Internet Protocol (IP) and it is the first version of the protocol to be widely deployedIP is the primary protocol in the Internet IPv4 uses 32-bit (four-byte) addresses, which limits the address space to 4,294,967,296 (2 32 ) possible unique addresses. However, some are reserved for special purposes such as private networks (~18 million addresses) or multicast addresses (~270 million addresses). Group 07 IPv6
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  • 9 Each IPv4-based network must have the following: A unique network number that is assigned by either an ISP, an IR, or, for older networks, registered by the IANA. If you plan to use private addresses, the network numbers you devise must be unique within your organization. Unique IPv4 addresses for the interfaces of every system on the network. A network mask. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 10 The IPv4 address is a 32-bit number that uniquely identifies a network interface on a system, as explained in How IP Addresses Apply to Network Interfaces. An IPv4 address is written in decimal digits, divided into four 8-bit fields that are separated by periods. Each 8-bit field represents a byte of the IPv4 address. This form of representing the bytes of an IPv4 address is often referred to as the dotted-decimal format. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 11 32 Bits Group 07 IPv6
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  • 13 Class A0/1 - 126 Class B128 - 191 Class C192 - 223 Class D224 - 239 Class E240 - 254/255 D&E only for researches IPv4 - 192.168.1.215 8 + 8 + 8 + 8 bits =32 bits IPv6 - 3FFF :f200 :0234 :AB00 :0123 :2567: 8901: ABCD =128 bits Ex For Full Address =10010110.11010111.00010001.00001001 Group 07 IPv6
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  • 14 SUBNET MASK= A subnet mask is a number that defines a range of IP addresses that can be used in a network Subnet masks are used to designate sub networks, or subnets, which are typically local networks LANs that are connected to the Internet. Systems within the same subnet can communicate directly with each other, while systems on different subnets must communicate through a router. Class A =10.0.0.010.255.255.255 Class B =160.120.0.0160.120.255.255 Class C =192.168.1.0192.168.1.255 No Change of Particular Classes(common for that) 192.168.1.215 Network ID (Can`t Change) Host Part(Can Change) Group 07 IPv6
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  • 15 Network ID Host Part. Class C Class B Class A Write the Network part and Put the 0 to the Host part 192.168.1. Network IP -192.168.1.0 1 st Valued IP = 192.168.1.1 192.18.1.4 172.100.1.1 10.1.1.32 0 0 0 0 Network ID +1 = 1st Valied IP Group 07 IPv6
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  • 16 1)10.10.10.92 Class A N/W IP =10.0.0.0 1 st Valued IP =10.0.0.1 2)172.16.8.50 Class B N/W IP =172.16.0.0 1 st Valued IP =172.16.0.1 3) 200.100.42.45 Class C N/W IP = 200.100.42.0 1 st valued IP =200.100.42.1 10.10.10.92 172.16.8.50.42.45200.100.42 Group 07 IPv6
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  • 17 Ex- 192.168.1. =192.168.1.255 B/Cast IP-1 =Last Valued IP 1 1 1 1 IP Address N/W ID 1 st Valued ID B/Cast IPLast Valued IP 200.192.111.10 (Class C) 200.100.111.0200.100.111.1200.100.111.255200.100.111.254 10.140.112.11 (Class A) 10.0.0.010.0.0.110.255.255.25510.255.255.254 192.42.50.55 (Class C) 192.42.52.0192.42.52.1192.42.50.255192.42.50.254 168.172.221.19 (Class B) 168.172.0.0168.172.0.1168.172.255.255168.172.255.254 122.13.140.51 (Class A) 122.0.0.0122.0.0.1122.255.255.255122.255.255.254 Group 07 IPv6
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  • 18 200.100.100.40/24 Total Network bit in this IP 1)200.100.100.0/25 200.100.100. N/W =200.100.100.128 2)200.100.100.0/26 200.100.100. N/W =200.100100.192 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 128 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 128+64=192 Group 07 IPv6
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  • 19Group 07 IPv6
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  • 20 Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is an Internet Protocol version which is designed to succeed IPv4, the first implementation which is still in dominant use currently. It is an Internet Layer protocol for packet- switched internetworks. The main driving force for the redesign of Internet Protocol is the foreseeable IPv4 address exhaustion. IPv6 was defined in December 1998 by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) with the publication of an Internet standard specification, RFC 2460. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 21 The most important feature of IPv6 is a much larger address space than that of IPv4: addresses in IPv6 are 128 bits long, compared to 32-bit addresses in IPv4. The very large IPv6 address space supports a total of 2 128 (about 3.410 38 ) addressesor approximately 510 28 (roughly 2 95 ) addresses for each of the roughly 6.8 billion (6.810 9 ) people alive in 2010. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 22 IPv6 addresses are classified into three types:- unicast addresses anycast addresses multicast addresses Broadcast addresses are not used in IPv6. Each IPv6 address also has a 'scope', which specifies in which part of the network it is valid and unique. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 23 Uni cast :- In computer networking, unicast transmission is the sending of messages to a single network destination host on a packet switching network. Any cast :- Network addressing and routing scheme whereby data is routed to the topologically "nearest" or "best" node. Multicast :-Multicast addressing is a network technology for the delivery of information to a group of destinations simultaneously using the most efficient strategy to deliver the messages over each link of the network only once, creating copies only when the links to the multiple destinations split. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 24 40 Octets Variabl e Length 32 Bits Group 07 IPv6
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  • 25 Version :- 4 bits.IPv6 version number. Traffic Class :-8 bits. Internet traffic priority delivery value. Flow Label :- 20 bits. Used for specifying special router handling from source to destination(s) for a sequence of packets. Payload Length :-16 bits unsigned. Specifies the length of the data in the packet. When cleared to zero, the option is a hop-by-hop Jumbo payload Next Header :-8 bits.Specifies the next encapsulated protocol. The values are compatible with those specified for the IPv4 protocol field. Hop Limit :-8 bits unsigned. For each router that forwards the packet, the hop limit is decremented by 1. When the hop limit field reaches zero, the packet is discarded. This replaces the TTL field in the IPv4 header that was originally intended to be used as a time based hop limit. Source address :-16 bytes. The IPv6 address of the sending node. Destination address :-16 bytes. The IPv6 address of the destination node. Group 07 IPv6
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  • 26Group 07 IPv6 Two most common techniques to transition from IPv4 to IPv6 are; Dual Stack IPv6 to IPv4 Tunnels A third method is to use an extensions of IP network Address Translation (NAT) to translate the IPv4 to an IPv6 address and IPv6 to IPv4.
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