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93-30782 - Defense Technical Information · PDF file19D CAVALRY SCOUT: IS THERE ROOM FOR RECONNAISSANCE? A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff

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  • AD-A273 959

    19D CAVALRY SCOUT:IS THERE ROOM FOR RECONNAISSANCE?

    A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. ArmyCommand and General Staff College in partial

    fufillment of the requirements for thedegree

    MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE

    by

    BRICK T. MILLER, MAJ, USAB.A., Rutgers University-NCAS, Newark, New Jersey, 1981

    Fort Leavenworth, Kansas1993

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

    93-307820 1' li ii :. !1i

  • REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE form ApptovedI OMB No OO4*O1ddPu. o -gb.,~fri tcr th,% -. 31I-1 onl Of ni-atio n i %~4 efl f t mhe. to *.eraqe rlouiw~ eP)w t~eor10 't- Qe~n . tI . WW S

    tei.. 12Z4 J I.te A i110-4)01. ,, Sto trr.,! I ,, M ini, tat tu a )e Pj! pe-.c'. rr.I ..tn z,,.t (a ;C4* 0 it) I. .r, n.. C 5 c 3

    1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Ledtre bi lak 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND OATES COVERED1 6 APRIL 19931 K ASTER'S THESIS

    4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS

    19D CAVALRY SCOUT: IS THERE ROOM FOR RECONNAISSANCE?

    6. AUTHOR(S)MAJOR BRTLCK T. MILLER, AR, USA

    7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PEkFORMING ORGANIZATIONREPORT NUMBER

    U.S. Army Command, and General Staff Collzge,ATTN: ATZL-SWD-GDFort Leavenworth, Kansas 66027-6900

    9. SPONSORINGi MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND AODRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORINGSame as Block 7 AGENCY REPORT NUMB8ER

    Ii. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTESI

    12a. DISTRIBUTION, AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE

    Approved for public release; distributlon i3 unlilrrted.

    13. ABSTRACT (MdArmurn 200 w0"d) The focus of this thesis is to analyze whether or notcurrent scout doctrine, coupled uith the OSUT (One Stati-on Unit Training) andunit available training tine, permits us the time to adequately train 19D CavalrySicouts- to oc-rform reconnaissance. Furthermore, do we give, scouts prioritizedtasks, ccolitions, and -standards, or provide them with the appropriate resources',Finally, will all this allow scouts to conduct reconna-ssance up to the level ofperformance required to provide a tactical commander with thle information herequires to conduct successful combat operations?

    This thesis; examines the lirnkage between the individual tasks required toperform reconrai:s-ance and the dependency of collective tasks at the scoutplatoon level on successful execution of the individual tasks.f;

    This thezsis .uggestzs that we do not train our scouts3 based on a prioritizationof the most critical t asks_. Furthermore, we do not structure then for su~cc-:son the battlefield by limiting, resource:- needed for FL:inaccompliszhment. Thisniakes; it improb- able that they will be- 'uccessful -t Ixsrforrrirng t~hose3 criticalcollective tasks at thce platoon level. This Lhsi;conicludes: tykit "e have th(einfornation, ability, res-ources and -3ysternsi7 re. u~rrd to fioid t ainc,3 s-cout Platoond

    14. SUBJECT TERMS 15 NUMBER OF PAGES1919, Cava-Lry 'mcout S AT3 Trai niiC P/'

    ~eoni.ancu A, -T.P I r.-d vIdusi m k. 16. PRICE CODE

    17. SECURITY CL.ASSIFICATION l SEURITY CLASSIFICATION 19 !SECUkITY CLASSil-ICATiON 20. LIMITATION tul AISSTliACTOF RE IORT OFTHIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT

    UNCLA:;21F.E 7 UNo'C L%-;2 IF!ED U!I.Z.i DUL

  • 19D CAVALRY SCOUT:IS THERE ROOM FOR RECONNAISSANCE?

    A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. ArmyCommand and General Staff College in partial

    fufillment of the requirements for thedegree

    MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE

    by

    BRICK T. MILLER, MAJ, USAB.A., Rutgers University-NCAS, Newark, New Jersey, 1981

    tU79.i

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

  • MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE

    THESIS APPROVAL PAGE

    Name of candidate: MAJ Brick T. Miller, U.S. Army

    Title !f thesis: 19D Cavalry Scout: Is There Room ForReconnaissance?

    Approved by:

    Thesis Committee ChairmanCV John C. Eberle, M.A.

    A W' fl-C, Member, Graduate FacultyMAJ Ronald E. McConnell, M.A.

    L c -C, 7 Member, Consulting FacultyCOL Gerald W. McLaug in, Ph.D.

    Accepted this 4th day of June 1993 by:

    P h "' / Director, Graduate Degree

    P Brookes, Ph.D. Programs

    The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those ofthe student author and do not necessarily represent theviews of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College orany other govermental agency. (References to this studyshould include the foregoing statement.)

    ii

  • ABSTRACT

    19D CAVALRY SCOUT: IS THERE ROOM FOR RECONNAISSANCE by MajorBrick T. Miller, USA, 135 pages.

    The focus of this thesis is to analyze whether or notcurrent scout doctrine, coupled with the OSUT (One StationUnit Training) and unit available training time, permits usthe time to adequately train 19D Cavalry Scouts to performreconnaissance. Furthermore, do we give scouts prioritized

    tasks, conditions, and standards, or provide them with theappropriate resources? Finally, will all this allow scoutsto conduct reconnaissance up to the level of performancerequired to provide a tactical commander with theinformation he requires to conduct successful combatoperations?

    This thesis examines the linkage between the individualtasks required to perform reconnaissance and the dependencyof collective tasks at the scout platoon level on successfulexecution of the individual tasks.

    This thesis suggests that we do not train our scouts basedon a prioritization of the most critical tasks.Furthermore, we do not structure them for success on thebattlefield by limiting resources needed for missionaccomplishment. This makes it improbable that they will besuccessful at performing those critical collective tasks atthe platoon level.

    This thesis concludes that we have the information, ability,resources and systems required to field highly trained scoutplatoons capable of performing their reconnaissancemissions.

    iii

  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    I will take this opportunity to thank my ThesisCommittee; Colonel John Eberle, Colonel Gerald McLaughlin,Major Ronald McConnell, and Brigadier General StanleyCherrie, for the long hours they endured teaching me how tocome to grips with this problem and adequately exrress it.The Washington Army National Guard and SATS-NG aut.ior GeorgeKarhalos were invaluable to this research by providing mewith their updated SATS software for the scout platoon.Additionally, there were more than a dozen classmates andinstructors who gave me their valuable time, knowledge, andexpertizs; but, of these a special thanks goes to fivefriends aid classmates; John MacDonald, Bruce Kizer, PeteBrigham, George Stone, and Mike Rounds. I would be remissif I didn't thank my wife, Judy. Her unbiased opinion andlack of biased subject knowledge insured that all pointswere cleanly expressed and that nothing was taken forgranted. One final note--Thanks Helen and Marilyn, you weregreat.

    iv

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    APPROVAL PAGE ..................................... 1i

    ABSTRACT ................................................. iii

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .......................................... ....iv

    LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS .................. ................... vi

    CHAPTER

    I. INTRODUCTION ....................................... 1

    II. REVIEW OF LITERATURE .............................. 15

    III. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY .............................. 25

    IV. ANALYSIS .......................................... 28

    V. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ................... 49

    ENDNOTES .................................................. 62

    APPENDTX

    A. GLOSSARY OF TERMS ................................... 70

    B. TABLES AND FIGURES .................................. 74

    C. SCOUT PLATOON TRAINING REFERENCES .................. 126

    BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................. 129

    INITIAL DISTRIBUTION LIST ............... ...... ...... .............. 133

    Iv

  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

    Table Title Page

    1 Rand Corporation Reconnaissance Performance ..... 75

    2 Comparison of Recent Reconnaissance Studies ..... 76

    3 SATS Task Cross-Walk ............................ 77

    4 19D 10/20 level Common and MOS Task List ........ 79

    5 Analysis of Training Time ...................... 102

    6 Analysis of Time during Semi-annual GunneryPeriods ........................................ 103

    7 19D OSUT Training Analysis ..................... 104

    8 Battle Outcome Statistical Analysis ............ 105

    9 CHI Square Analysis of Battle Outcome .......... 107

    10 HM4MWV Scout Platoon vs. CFV Scout PlatoonAnalysis ....................................... 108

    11 Start/End of Mission Strength Analysis ......... 109

    12 Analysis of Task Deficiencies at NTC ........... Ill

    13 Proposed Reconnaissance Prioritized Task List..112

    14 Proposed Collective Task-Identify EnemyTactical Employment ............................ 113

    15 Common and MOS Task Lists for ProposedCollective Task ................................ 114

    16 Comparison of Current to Proposed TaskListings with 19D OSUT Training ................ 115

    17 Proposed Scout Platoon Weekly Training

    Schedule Template .............................. 116

    vi

  • 18 Analysis of Training Time for ProposedTraining Template .............................. 118

    19 Focus, Goals and Objectives, and Guidancefor the Scout Platoon .......................... j1 9

    Figure Title Page

    1 Training Interrelationships Model ............ 122

    2 Research Methodology ......................... 123

    3 Training Cycle Model ......................... 124

    4 CAC Institutionalized Combined ArmsTraining ..................................... 125

    vii

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