About Madhubani-Painting GovtOfBihar

  • View
    14

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Madhubani paintings Presentation

Text of About Madhubani-Painting GovtOfBihar

  • POWERPOINT PRESENTATION ON

    GOVT. OF BIHAR

    DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIES

  • ORIGIN

    The origins fo Madhubani Painting are shrouded in antiquity, and a tradition states that this style of painting originated at the time of the Ramayana, when King Janakcommissioned artists to do paintings at the time of marriage of his daughter SITA, to Hindu Lord Ram.

    Madhubani Painting has been done traditionally by the women of villages around the present town Madhubani, the literal meaning of which is forest of honey and the areas of Mithila.

    W.G.Archer, I.C.S., then S.D.O., Madhubani brought these paintings to the attention of outside world after the great Bihar Earthquake in 1934.

  • The All India Handicrafts Board, encouraged the women of Madhubani to paint on paper instead of Walls and Floor to facilitate the sale of paintings

    Outstanding Artists such as Jagadamba Devi. Sita Devi, Mahasundari Devi, Ookha Devi, Baua Devi and Karpoori Devi and many more were discovered.

    Credit goes to Puppul Jayakar, Bhaskar Kulkarni, Upendra Maharathi and Lalit Narayan Mishra for popularising the painting both in country and abroad.

    ORIGIN

  • A style of Indian Paintings practised in Madhubani, Darbhanga, Sitamarhi, Sheohar, Part of Samastipur, Purnea and Muzaffarpur.Depict Nature and Mythological events.Themes generally revolve around Hindu Deities like Krishna, Ram, Shiv, Durga, Laxmi, Kali and Saraswati.Natural objects like Sun, Moon and Religious plants like Tulsi and Social events like Wedding also painted.Paintings done on walls during festivals and religious events and other milestones of the life cycle such as Birth, Upanayan (sacred thread ceremony) and Marriage.

    STYLE

  • Wall Painting (Bhitti Chitra)Canvas Painting (Pata Chitra).Floor Painting (Aripan).Art shifted to Drawing Paper in 1960sThis brought with it a new freedom and creativity as paper is moveablePainting on Clothes and SunmicaNow Bihari women use the style of Madhubani Paintings on Sarees, Dupattas etc with fabric paint.

    MEDIA

  • BHARANI KACHANI GERU GOBAR GODANA TANTRIC

    TYPES/STYLES

    Artist prepare colours from natural sources.Black Colour is obtained by mixing Soot with Cow dung;Yellow from Turmeric or Pollen, Blue from Indigo, Red from Kusum Flower juice or Red Sandalwood;Green from Leaves of the Apple tree, White from Rice powder, Orange from Palasha flowers.Raw materials mixed with Goat milk, gum arabic and juice from bean plants.The Colours are applied flat with no shading.There is normally a double line drawn for the outlines with the gap between the lines filled by cross or straight tiny lines.

    COLOUR SCHEME

  • Bharani Style Kachni Style Geru Style

  • Godana Style Gobar Style

  • Tantric Style

    Aripan in Kachni Style

  • NO sophisticated tools are needed in Madhubani Paintings. Artists are still unfamiliar with modern paintbrushes.One brush made from Bamboo TwigsOther used brush for filling in the space which is prepared from a small piece of cloth attached to a twig.

    TOOLS

    SOCIAL GROUPS

    Women of the Brahim CasteWomen of KayasthaWomen belonging to Scheduled CastesWomen of Minority

  • About 4,000 registered artisans are working in this field.Self help Groups have been formed.Several N.G.Os are active in Production and Marketing.

    ARTISANS

    NATIONAL AWARDEES

    SMT. JAGDAMBA DEVI - 1970SMT. SITA DEVI - 1975SMT. GANGA DEVI - 1976SMT. GODAVARI DUTTA - 1980 SMT. MAHASUNDARI DEVI 1981........

  • STATE AWARDEES

    SMT. MAHASUNDARI DEVI 1978-79SMT. KARPOORI DEVI 1980-81SMT. SHASHIKALA DEVI 1980-81SMT. HIRA MISHRA 1981-82 ..............

    CERTIFICATE OF EXCELLENCE BY THE STATE GOVT.

    LATE RAUDI PASWAN, SRI SWAROOP LAL PASWAN, SMT. PATALI DEVI, SMT. KAUSHLYA DEVI, SRI GANESH PASWAN, SMT.URMILA DEVI, SMT.SHILA DEVI, SRI RAMJI RAM, SMT.RAMPARI DEVI, SMT.CHANO DEVI, SRI SHIV NARAIN PASWAN, SRI UTTIM LAL, SMT.URMILA DEVI, SMT.PAVITRI DEVI, SMT.TRIPURA DEVI, SMT.SUMATI DAS, SMT. LALLI DEVI, SMT. VINA DEVI, SMT.MAHANAMA DEVI, SMT.YOGMAYA DEVI, MS. NAMITA KUMARI, SMT.VALESHWARI DEVI, SMT.DHARMSHILA DEVI, SMT.CHANDRAKALA DEVI, SMT.MUDRIKA DEVI.

  • As the map indicates, the Mithila region and the villages around Madhubaniare situated near the northern edge of the state of Bihar as it approaches the India-Nepal border. People of Mithila have their own language and a sense of regional identity that goes back more than 2500 years.

  • In the Hindu epic the Ramayana, the powerful king Ravanabecomes smitten with Rama'swife Sita and arranges to distract her husband in order to abduct her. He dispatches a trusted associate, capable of shape-shifting, who transforms himself into a golden deer that lures Rama away from his forest camp. As the deer is slain by Rama'sarrow, the demon emerges. But by that time it is too late: Sita has been carried away by Ravana.

  • One of the ordeals successfully completed by the youthful Krishna was to pacify the great serpent Kaliya who had been disturbing the otherwise peaceful waters of the Yamuna River. A conventional representation of the subject has Krishna lightly poised on one foot (much as he is in the paintings with the milkmaids) while standing on the serpent. The style of this painting is unusual for Madhubani art which typically seeks to fill all available space.

  • The pastoral stories of the youthful Krishna are filled with images of his exploits, pastimes, and attractiveness. There are trickster elements to some of the stories, including one that has him keeping watch in a tree while the milkmaids bathe in the river beneath him. Here he is simply tending the cows who gather around him with the same kind of devotion that is said to be directed toward him by the milkmaids and by all human souls.

  • Brandishing the weapons that were given to her by the gods, themselves incapable of defeating the great demon Mahisha, the warrior goddess Durga sets off on her lion vehicle to find and destroy him.

    Just as the goddess Durga can represent the combined fury or wrath (krodha) of the gods, the goddess Kali can represent the concentrated fury of Durga.

  • A painting with some of the kobharthemes. The married couple are alone within the confines of the honeymoon cottage or kobhar ghar. There are elements of the traditional bamboo orbansa symbolism as well as other nuptial symbols intended to ensure long and productive lives

  • A symbolically rich and powerful painting of thekohbar -- the design that goes on the formal wedding proposal and on the walls of the small cottage in which the marriage rites are completed. A traditional rural upper-casteMadhubani household is composed of four huts arranged in a rectangle around a central courtyard. One of the four is used only for the marriage ceremonies of daughters of the household. For four nights she and her husband perform rites under the supervision of women there in the kobhar ghar. In the painting, the couple are represented as approaching from the right, the husband leading the way. Above are the energies of sun and moon. To the left is the main symbol of the kobhar, an axis of bamboo (bansa) that represents the groom's lineage (baansa). Organized around it are the many subsidiary symbols.

  • 'Krishna' tending to his cows, while playing flute under a tree. Thrilled milkmaids, leaving their milk pots unattended, are lost in the music while the cows gather around him with the same kind of devotion that is shown by all the milkmaids.

    Madhubani Painting depciting"Swayamwar" scene from the epic 'Ramayana'. Beautiful Sita, adorned by jewels and ornaments, walks slowly towards Ram, while her friends wait on her. Carrying a garland of flowers in her hands, to be put around Ram's neck and solemnize the 'swayamwar' ceremony.