African-American Leadership in the Early 1900s

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African-American Leadership in the Early 1900s. April 13, 2011 Objectives : 1. TSW compare and contrast the viewpoints of two early Civil Rights leaders. 2. TSW debate the viewpoints of Booker T. Washington & W.E.B. DuBois. Black Leadership in the early 1900s 2 Views. Accomodationists - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • African-American Leadershipin the Early 1900sApril 13, 2011

    Objectives: 1. TSW compare and contrast the viewpoints of two early Civil Rights leaders.2. TSW debate the viewpoints of Booker T. Washington & W.E.B. DuBois.

  • Black Leadership in the early 1900s 2 ViewsAccomodationistsBooker T. WashingtonRising ExpectationsW.E.B. Du Bois & Ida B. Wells-Barnett

  • Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois

  • Booker T. WashingtonLived 1856-1915Born a slave in VirginiaEducated at Hampton UniversityFounder of Tuskegee University

  • Tuskegee University Early 1900sA Few classes at Tuskegee in the Early Years: History (above), Blacksmithing (top right), & Mattress making (bottom right)

  • Booker T. WashingtonViews given in The Atlanta Compromise in 1895

    Blacks should not blame whites for their situation

    Blacks should start from the bottom, work their way and be patient

    Work for economic opportunity

    Opposed agitating for black rights because it would cause setbacks

  • Booker T. WashingtonWanted programs for job training and vocational skills for black Americans

    Ask whites to give job opportunities to Black people

    B.T.W. went on to found the Urban League which provided jobs and training for blacks

    B.T.W. was unpopular with many Black leaders, but was popular with white leaders in the North and South. Why?

  • W.E.B. DuBoisBorn in Massachusetts to a free black family (1868-1963)

    Educated at Fisk, Harvard, & Berlin

    Sociology Professor at Atlanta University in 1897

  • W.E.B. DuBoisViews given in The Souls of Black Folks

    Strongly opposed B.T.W.s acceptance of segregation and Jim Crow

    Felt that white people caused problems by denying rights to Black people

  • W.E.B. DuBoisAdvocated the Talented Tenth

    Felt that talented Black students should get a good education and then help everyone else

    Felt it was wrong to expect a citizen to earn their rights

  • NAACPNational Association for the Advancement of Colored PeopleFounded by 60 people, 7 of whom were African-American (including DuBois & Ida B. Wells-Barnett)NAACP's stated goal was to secure for all people the rights guaranteed in the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the ConstitutionDuBois was the only African-American among the organization's executives (even the NAACPs president was a white man)

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