AJP-5 Allied Joint Doctrine for Operational-Level Planning (2013) uploaded by Richard J. Campbell

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The successful planning of military operations requires clearly understood and widely accepted doctrine. It is especially important for joint operations that will be conducted by multinational forces.

Text of AJP-5 Allied Joint Doctrine for Operational-Level Planning (2013) uploaded by Richard J. Campbell

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    AJP-5

    ALLIED JOINT DOCTRINE FOR OPERATIONAL-LEVEL PLANNING

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    AJP-5

    ALLIED JOINT DOCTRINE FOR OPERATIONAL-LEVEL PLANNING

    JUNE 2013

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  • NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION (NATO)

    NATO STANDARDIZATION AGENCY (NSA)

    NATO LETTER OF PROMULGATION

    AJP-5

    26 June 2013

    1. The enclosed Allied Joint Publication AJP-5, ALLIED JOINT DOCTRINE FOR OPERATIONAL-LEVEL PLANNING, which has been approved by the nations in the MCJSB, is promulgated herewith. The agreement of nations to use this publication is recorded in STANAG 2526.

    2. AJP-5 is effective upon receipt.

    3. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, usedcommercially, adapted, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photo-copying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher. With the exception of commercial sales, this does not apply to member nations and Partnership for Peace countries, or NATO commands and bodies.

    4. This publication shall be handled in accordance with C-M(2002)60.

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    RECORD OF CHANGES

    Change date Date entered Effective date By whom entered

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    PREFACE

    1. The successful planning of military operations requires clearly understood and widely accepted doctrine. It is especially important for joint operations that will be conducted by multinational forces. Allied Joint Publication (AJP) -5 is intended primarily for use by North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces and for NATO-led operations. This doctrine is also available for operations conducted by a coalition of NATO members and partner nations.

    2. AJP-5 is aimed primarily at those engaged in operational-level planning, specifically

    commanders and staffs employed in joint force command headquarters and component command headquarters. It describes the fundamental aspects of planning joint operations at the operational level.

    3. The wider audience of this publication encompasses those affected by joint

    planning; strategic command level staffs, International Military Staff elements and those headquarters operating at the high end of the tactical level.

    4. This publication reflects a clear linkage to the capstone Allied Joint Doctrine

    publication AJP-01 Allied Joint Doctrine, as well as the other NATO doctrinal keystone publications: AJP-3 Allied Joint Doctrine for the Conduct of Operations, and the AJP-4 Allied Joint Doctrine for Logistics. Additionally, the AJP-3.4.9 Allied Joint Doctrine for Civil-Military Cooperation (CIMIC) was harmonized with AJP-5.

    5. The policy and strategic guidance for this joint publication is derived from the

    Military Committee (MC) 0133/4 document, NATOs Operations Planning. It describes how planning activities and processes are integrated and coordinated to support decision-making and the production of plans, orders and directives for Allied joint operations in any type of environment.

    6. AJP-5 Allied Joint Doctrine for Operational-Level Planning will become part of

    NATOs operations planning architecture. It presents an overarching framework of the key planning principles, considerations and process steps that are followed in operational-level planning. When promulgated, AJP-5 will guide and inform a series of planning tools, notably the Allied Command Operations (ACO) Comprehensive Operations Planning Directive (COPD) and functional planning guides (FPG).

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    ALLIED JOINT DOCTRINE FOR OPERATIONAL-LEVEL PLANNING

    CONTENTS

    Page Cover Title Page i NSA Letter of Promulgation iii National Letter of Promulgation v Record of Changes vii Preface ix Contents xi Chapter 1 NATO Planning Overview Section I - Policy Directing Planning within NATO 1-1 Section II - Doctrinal Principles in Operations Planning 1-2 Section III - Planning Levels and Categories 1-8 Section IV - Operations Planning Architecture 1-10 Section V - Purpose of Operational-Level Planning 1-13 Section VI - NATO Crisis Management and Planning

    Process 1-16

    Chapter 2 Operational Art and Design within Operational-level Planning

    Section I - Operational-Level Framework and Planning 2-1 Section II - Operational Art, Analysis and Thinking 2-3 Section III - Scope and Fundamentals of Operational-

    Level Planning 2-14

    Section IV - Operational Design Concepts and Tools 2-26 Section V - Operational-Level Considerations of

    Operational Design 2-40

    Chapter 3 Conduct of the Operational-Level Planning Process Section I - Introduction 3-1 Organization for Operational-Level Planning 3-2 Information Process, Situational Understanding and

    Awareness 3-4

    Section II - Step 1 Initiation of the Operational-Level Planning Process

    3-5

    Operational Appreciation 3-6 Operational Advice 3-11 Section III - Step 2 Problem and Mission Analysis 3-12 Development of the Operational Design 3-18

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    Estimates of Initial Force / Capability and Command and Control

    3-23

    Commanders Planning Guidance and Operational Planning Directive

    3-24

    Section IV - Step 3 Courses of Action Development 3-25 Assessment of Opposing Courses of Action and other

    Factors Affecting Development 3-26

    Development of Courses of Action 3-27 Section V - Step 4 Courses of Action Analysis 3-29 Analysis of Courses of Action 3-31 Wargaming 3-32 Section VI - Step 5 Courses of Action Validation and

    Comparison 3-37

    Section VII - Step 6 Commanders Courses of Action Decision

    3-40

    Section VIII - Step 7 Concept and Plan Development 3-42 Production of the Concept of Operations 3-43 Force / Capability Requirements Development 3-46 Development of the Operation Plan in General 3-47 Planning for the Employment of Forces 3-48 Planning for Force Protection 3-55 Section IX - Step 8 Campaign Assessment and Plan

    Review / Revision 3-57

    Monitoring Campaign Progress 3-57 Planning for Conflict Termination and Transition 3-60 Section X - Operational-Level Planning Process

    Integration 3-62

    Lexicon Part I Acronyms and Abbreviations Lex-1 Part II Terms and Definitions Lex-5 List of Reference Publications Ref-1

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    CHAPTER 1 NATO PLANNING OVERVIEW Section I Policy Directing Planning within NATO 0101. Operations Planning within NATOs Contribution to a Comprehensive

    Approach. North Atlantic Treaty Organizations (NATOs) recent operations demonstrate that the international community must work together more closely than in the past and take a comprehensive approach1 to maintaining international peace and security. Such an approach requires the cooperation of all major actors, including international organizations (IO), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), agencies and relevant local bodies in the joint operations area. Effective implementation of any comprehensive action plan requires all actors to contribute in a concerted effort, based on a shared sense of responsibility, openness and determination; accounting for their respective strengths, mandates and roles, as well as their decision-making autonomy. To maximize the ability to operate within a comprehensive approach, the Alliance aims to improve the application of its crisis management response capabilities and enhance practical cooperation at all levels with other external actors, including provisions for support to stabilization and reconstruction. From the operational-level planning perspective the commander and staff must consider the impact of, and interaction with, other organisations and bodies involved in the crisis resolution process rather than focusing solely on opposing military forces. NATO policy states that at the operational level, the priority is to cooperate with other international actors in the overall planning for complex operations in which a large degree of civil-military interaction will be required2. At the theatre level, NATO force commanders must be empowered to achieve effective cooperation and coordination with indigenous local authorities and in-theatre principals from other international actors while execution operations.

    0102. Future Challenges for NATOs Operational-Level Planning.3 Contemporary

    perspective suggests that future operations will be even more complex and multidimensional than at the present time, requiring forces to adapt rapidly to changing operational scenarios. Military activities in future operational areas may be required to occur simultaneously at many points along the spectrum of conflict. Advances in technology will allow military operations to be planned and executed at a higher tempo than in the previous era of military operations. Future theatres of operation may be required to establish longer lines of communications and have very limi

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