Alter Ego #17

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

ALTER EGO #17 spotlights LOU FINE, ARNOLD DRAKE, MURPHY ANDERSON, and more! Behind great color covers by LOU FINE (The Ray) and LUIS DOMINGUEZ (Doom Patrol), there's "FINE ART!" Golden Age colossus LOU FINE remembered by three who loved him-- plus a pulse-pounding plethora of gorgeous, rarely-see art by FINE, EISNER, CRANDALL, and others! MURPHY ANDERSON speaks with JIM AMASH about comics in the 1940s! ARNOLD DRAKE (co-creator of Doom Patrol and Deadman) talks about BRUNO PREMIANI, CARMINE INFANTINO, MORT WEISINGER, BOB HANEY, and the 1960s at DC Comics! ROY THOMAS on the Golden Age Robotman! MICHAEL T. GILBERT on the non-EC action comics of JACK DAVIS and GEORGE EVANS! FCA section featuring C.C. BECK, MARC SWAYZE, ALVIN SCHWARTZ, JAY DISBROW, and E. NELSON BRIDWELL—and more!

Text of Alter Ego #17

  • $5.95In the USA

    $5.95In the USA

    No. 17September

    2002

    Lou Fine!SPOTLIGHT ONSPOTLIGHT ON

    Lou Fine!

    Roy Thomas Super-Fine Comics Fanzine

    Roy Thomas Super-Fine Comics Fanzine

    Plus Rare Art &Artifacts by:

    NEAL ADAMSJIM AMASH

    MATT BAKERC.C. BECK

    E. NELSON BRIDWELLFRANK BRUNNERREED CRANDALL

    JACK DAVISJAY DISBROW

    LUIS DOMINGUEZ

    GEORGE EVANSMICHAEL T. GILBERTPAUL GUSTAVSON

    GIL KANERUBEN MOREIRA

    JOE ORLANDOBRUNO PREMIANI

    KURT SCHAFFENBERGERALVIN SCHWARTZMARC SWAYZE

    DAN ZOLNEROWICH& MORE!!

    Plus Rare Art &Artifacts by:

    NEAL ADAMSJIM AMASH

    MATT BAKERC.C. BECK

    E. NELSON BRIDWELLFRANK BRUNNERREED CRANDALL

    JACK DAVISJAY DISBROW

    LUIS DOMINGUEZ

    GEORGE EVANSMICHAEL T. GILBERTPAUL GUSTAVSON

    GIL KANERUBEN MOREIRA

    JOE ORLANDOBRUNO PREMIANI

    KURT SCHAFFENBERGERALVIN SCHWARTZMARC SWAYZE

    DAN ZOLNEROWICH& MORE!!

    MURPHYANDERSON,

    ALEX TOTH, et al.ON A GOLDEN AGE

    ARTIST YOU CAN REALLY SINK YOUR TEETH INTO!

    MURPHYANDERSON,

    ALEX TOTH, et al.ON A GOLDEN AGE

    ARTIST YOU CAN REALLY SINK YOUR TEETH INTO! T h

    e R a

    y T M

    &

    2 00 2

    DC

    Co m

    i cs .

  • Alter EgoTM is published 8 times a year by TwoMorrows, 1812 Park Drive, Raleigh, NC 27605, USA. Phone: (919) 833-8092. Roy Thomas, Editor. John Morrow, Publisher. Alter Ego Editorial Offices: Rt. 3, Box 468, St. Matthews, SC 29135, USA. Fax: (803) 826-6501; e-mail: roydann@ntinet.com. Send subscription funds to TwoMorrows, NOT to the editorial offices. Single issues: $8($10.00 Canada, $11.00 elsewhere). Eight-issue subscriptions: $40 US, $80 Canada, $88 elsewhere. All characters are their respectivecompanies. All material their creators unless otherwise noted. All editorial matter Roy Thomas. Arnold Drake interview 2002 Marc Svensson & Arnold Drake. Alter Ego is a TM of Roy & Dann Thomas. FCA is a TM of P.C. Hamerlinck. Printed in Canada.

    FIRST PRINTING.

    ContentsWriter/Editorial: Well, This Is Another Fine Mess You ve Gotten Us Into! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Lou FineA Comic Book Artist of Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3Dennis Beaulieu on the colorful career of a true comics master.

    A Fine Influence... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9Jim Amash examines the long, long shadow of Lou Fine.

    ...And A Fine Family! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15Three who knew and loved Lou Fine talk about his lifeand theirs.

    Murphy Anderson on Lou Fine and Fiction House . . . . . . . . . 34The Golden/Silver/Bronze Age super-artist on two fascinating topics.

    Toth on Fine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45Alex Toth says Fine just got better and better.

    Arnold Drake, FCA, Comics Crypt, & More . . . . . . . . . . Flip Us!About Our Cover: Our sincerest thanks to collector John Yon, who sent us a full-size photostat of the original art of Lou Fines fantastic Ray splash from Smash Comics #31 (Nov. 1941) so we couldget the best reproduction possible for our cover. You can see the whole splash page on page 3 of thissection. [2002 DC Comics.]

    Above: Shane Foley sent us the above Black Condor splash from a black-&-white comic publishedin Australia some years back. The story from Crack Comics #18 (Nov. 1941) was printed in full, alongwith a Fine Ray adventure as well, in the giant-size Superman #252 in 1972, which featured flyingsuper-heroes. [2002 DC Comics.]

    Vol. 3, No. 17 / September 2002Editor Roy Thomas

    Associate EditorsBill SchellyJim Amash

    Design & LayoutChristopher Day

    Consulting EditorsJohn MorrowJon B. Cooke

    FCA EditorP.C. Hamerlinck

    Comics Crypt EditorMichael T. Gilbert

    Editors EmeritusJerry Bails (founder)Ronn Foss, Biljo White,Mike Friedrich

    Cover ArtistsLuis DominguezLou Fine

    Cover ColoristsLuis DominguezTom Ziuko

    And Special Thanks to:Neal AdamsMurphy AndersonHenry BabaTim BarnesDennis BeaulieuRay Bottorff, Jr.Bart BushPearl CherryJ.R. CochranTeresa R. DavidsonFred L. deBoomAl DellingesJay DisbrowLuis DominguezJames DotyArnold & Lillian

    DrakeGill FoxElliot FineLaurie FineShane FoleyRon FrantzMichael R. GraboisDavid G. HamiltonPaul HandlerBill HarperHank HarrisonDaniel HermanBob Hughes

    Steve HurleyChris IrvingJohn JacobsonKen KaffkeAl KrackowJoe & Nadia

    MannarinoRichard MartinesTom MorehouseMichelle NolanEric Nolen-

    WeathingtonJoe PetrilakJohn G. PierceEthan RobertsBenno RothschildAlvin SchwartzDavid SiegelMarc SvenssonMarc SwayzeDann ThomasDr. Michael J.

    VassalloHames WareJohn YonEd ZenoMike Zeno

    In Memoriam Robert Kanigher

    Tom Sutton

  • by Dennis Beaulieu [Text 2002 Dennis Beaulieu.]Louis Kenneth Fine was born in Manhattan (New York City) in

    1915. A sensitive, quiet youth to begin with, his personality became evenmore introverted during his early teens after his left leg was crippled as aresult of a polio epidemic.

    Since he could no longer participate in sports and other activitiescommon for boys his age, Lou Fine channeled his youthful energy intodeveloping his God-given talent to draw. He completely immersedhimself in studying the great magazine illustration artists of his day.

    Heinrich Kley, the German pen artist sensation, was one of his

    earliestand most intenseinfluences. Fine was alsovery heavily influenced by J.C. Leyendecker and DeanCornwell, as well as by Saul Tepper, Harvey Dunn,Frank Reilly, and John R. Neill. He also studied thepaintings of Frank Brangwyn.

    His formal art training came from attending theGrand Central Art School, the Art Students League, thePratt Institute, and the New York School of Technology(where he was studying engineering at the time that hebegan his career moonlighting as an artist in theemerging field of comic books). It was during his timeat Pratt that Fine began to truly master his ability todraw the human figure in action.

    TransitionAs great a comic book artist as Lou Fine was, he

    worked in the industry for only a very brief period oftime. From late 1938 to early 1943 he produced aprolific amount of covers and interior stories for FictionHouse (3840), Fox (3940), and Quality Comics(3943). Short in stature with red hair and steel rimglasses, he entered the comics field in 1938 when, as atemporary means to earn a steady ($10 a week) income,he began working for the Eisner & Iger shop.

    The Eisner & Iger shop was a comics production

    A super-rare photo of Lou Fine, taken by his friend and fellowartist Gill Fox in downtown Stamford, Connecticut, circa 1942. (Forpics of Fine and Fox together, taken on the same occasion, see our

    Gill Fox interview in Alter Ego V3#12 and p. 19.)

    When Gill Fox sold John Yon the original art to this Fine pagefrom Smash Comics #31 (Feb. 1942), the one-time Qualityartist/editor wrote: The enclosed Lou Fine Ray splash is

    absolutely pure Lou Fine. The Ray title lettering is mylettering! Undoubtedly sobut A/Es associate editor Jim

    Amash is convinced that another, less polished artist did someof the penciling in the trio of panels at bottom. Just look atthe perspective in the first panel! Jim insistsand indeed,that small table in the background couldnt be standing in

    that relation to the desk in the foreground unless thered justbeen an earthquake! Most likely Fine counted on tying thewhole thing together with his inking. [2002 DC Comics.]

    Lou FineA Comic Book Artist of Quality

    A Comic Book Artist of Quality 3

  • house (a sweat shop) thathad recently been started byWill Eisner and Jerry Iger tocreate and produce entirecomic books for publisherswho would then print,distribute, and own the finalproduct. Comic Magazines,Inc. (the official name of theentity otherwise known asQuality Comics), was onesuch publisher.

    In 1941 Everett M. BusyArnold, the owner andpublisher of Quality Comics,hired Fine away from theEisner & Iger shop by triplinghis salary and giving him hisown studio. It is well knownamong his many admirers

    that, during his comic book days, Fine was a slow, methodicaldraftsman. Because of this trait, he would often have to workovertimefrequently all nightto reach his required page quota at theEisner-Iger shop.

    Unlike the Eisner & Iger quota that had to be met on a regular basis,Busy Arnold did not demand that Fine produce any particular numberof pages. This approach worked to Arnolds advantage, as the artistproceeded to produce a very large amount of some of his very best workduring his time as a member of the Quality staff. His beautiful interiorstories and explosive covers for Quality are revered by both profes-sionals and collectors as representing the ultimate in artistic achievementduring the early years of the comic book industry.

    StyleIn his History of Comics, Jim Steranko comments that Fine...

    developed an uncanny knowledge of the human figure in action. Hisheroes were Olympian in stature, classically featured, and exquisitely,almost delicately, proportioned. Fine lavished a wealth of stipple, line-shaded, and cross-hatched detail with a brilliant brush-line technique[giving his work a spectacular, illustrative look of which many detailswere often lost in the final reproduction. DB] not found in comicsup to that point. An expert adept at nuance of character, he lingered overfaces and hands to produce a gallery of expressive portraits etched infear, hatred, avarice, and death.

    Lou Fine had a gifted ability to draw the human figure in a number

    4 Lou Fine

    The Doll Man started in Feature Comics #27 (Dec. 1939); even in #32 (May 40)Fine