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    WORLDS COLLIDE IN 

    BATMAN VS SUPERMAN’ 

    FBI: ATTACKER’S

    PHONE POSSIBLY

     ACCESSIBLE WITHOUT

     APPLE HELP

    APPLE GOES ‘BACK TO THE FUTURE’ WITH

    SMALLER iPHONE AND iPAD PRO MODELS

    84   130

    48

    EMOJIMANIA: FANS AND BRANDS

    CRYING TEARS OF JOY 

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    TOP 10 APPS 100

    iTUNES REVIEW 104

    TOP 10 SONGS 174

    TOP 10 ALBUMS 176

    TOP 10 MUSIC VIDEOS 178

    TOP 10 TV SHOWS 180

    TOP 10 BOOKS 182

    NAVY FUNDS AUTISM󰀭SCREENING APP, HOPING FOR HELP WITH PTSD 08

    GOOGLE HELPS OFFER VASTLY FASTER INTERNET IN CUBA 30

    ONLINE LODGING SERVICE AIRBNB OPENS CUBA LISTINGS TO WORLD 36

    HIGH COURT WON’T HEAR APPEAL IN NFL VIDEO GAME LAWSUIT 44

    iPHONE SE: SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL, TOO 72

    FACEBOOK’S ZUCKERBERG MEETS WITH CHINA’S PROPAGANDA CHIEF 80

    TWITTER MARKS 10TH BIRTHDAY SEARCHING FOR FOLLOWERS, PROFITS 94

    BOX OFFICE TOP 20: ‘ALLEGIANT’ FALTERS, ‘MIRACLES’ ASCENDS 120

     JOHNS HOPKINS RESEARCHERS FIND FLAW IN IMESSAGE ENCRYPTION 140

    NEW RULES PROMISE TO SPICE UP CONTEST IN F1 146

    SCIENCE: SPACE STATION CARGO LAUNCHES BY LIGHT OF NEARLY FULL MOON 158

    HEALTH: J&J EXPANDS PROJECT THAT AIMS TO PREDICT, PREVENT DISEASES 164

    TAXI PROTEST CAUSES TRAFFIC CHAOS IN INDONESIAN CAPITAL 184

    EXPERTS SEE LITTLE CHANCE OF CHARGES IN CLINTON EMAIL CASE 188

    US CHARGES 3 IT TIES TO SYRIAN ELECTRONIC ARMY FOR HACKING 198

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     The app, which uses a general algorithm, could

    be expanded to PTSD to monitor people over time

    if speech and other signals are taken into account,

    according to Pedja Neskovic, who oversees the

    project in the Office of Naval Research.

    “It can find patterns, not just in facial

    expressions but in different kinds of data sets,

    such as brain signals and speech, and it can

    be used on a continuous basis,” he said. “It’s a

    completely new world.”

    William Unger, a PTSD expert and clinical

    psychologist at the Providence VA Medical

    Center, sees potential for an app to be used to help screen for PTSD if it can prove reliable for a

    large population over time. It’s always good to

    have additional tools, he said.

    “This is a technology in its infancy. You don’t know

    where it will go,” he said. “So does this science and

    this study really then lead to additional questions,

    additional technological developments which

    help us to move forward? It very well may. So I’m

    very excited, even though I’m saying it’s very far

    off from having utility.”

    M. David Rudd, an expert in suicide prevention

    and PTSD in military personnel, is skeptical.

    Rudd said he can’t see the extrapolation to PTSD,

    calling it “a pretty big gap to leap.” He worries

    about an app rendering erroneous results, a

    concern Unger also expressed.

    “It’s the introduction of technology where

    technology is not particularly needed and not

    particularly useful,” said Rudd, president of

    the University of Memphis. “As a society, this is

    what we do. It’s kind of the medicalization of a

    problem that’s emotional and interpersonal in

    nature. I just don’t get it.”

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     The Navy has been working with the researcher

    who developed the algorithm for the app,

    Guillermo Sapiro, for about 20 years, supporting

    his research on image processing and data

    analysis. The Navy has invested hundreds of

    thousands of dollars in the app, Neskovic said.

    PTSD often goes undiagnosed. Patients may

    not recognize the link between their symptoms

    and a traumatic event they experienced or may

    not be willing to talk about that event, while

    sometimes symptoms are obscured by other

    issues, according to research published by the

    American Academy of Family Physicians.

    Some veterans don’t want to feel like there’s

    something wrong with them and try to cope on

    their own, Unger said.

     The app, as it’s designed for autism, shows funny

    videos designed to make children smile, laugh

    or express emotions. The way their head, lips,

    eyes and nose move is recorded, encoded and

    analyzed with the camera and app. If a child isn’t

    responding, that’s also classified.

    Duke University is studying whether it’s feasible

    for caregivers to screen kids for autism using

    a mobile phone at home. The app can be

    downloaded for free.

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    Image: Gary He

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    Unlike a tool like WebMD, where the user needs

    to identify their symptoms and know the right

    questions to ask, the app does the behavior

    analysis automatically. The user just has to

    watch the videos, said Sapiro, an electrical

    engineering professor at Duke. He stressed that

    the app isn’t meant to replace specialists; it’s a

    pre-screening tool.

     The institutional review board at Duke

    approved the research. The initial results show

    that people are willing to use the app and

    they’re sending high-quality, usable videos,

    Sapiro added.

    Neskovic and Sapiro envision developing a

    PTSD app within five years. They’re investigating

    whether it could also possibly reveal signs of

    mild traumatic brain injury and depression.

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    When it comes to emojis, the future is very,

    very ... Face with Tears of Joy.

    If you don’t know what that means then you: a)

    aren’t a 14-year-old girl. b) love to hate those tiny

    pictures that people text you all the time. Or c)

    are nowhere near a smartphone or online chat.

    Otherwise, here in 2016, it’s all emojis, all the

    time. And Face with Tears of Joy, by the way, is a

    bright yellow happy face with a classic, toothy

    grin as tears fall.

    EMOJIMANIA: FANS AND BRANDS CRYING

    TEARS OF JOY

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    Image: © Christian Hartmann

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     The Face was chosen by Oxford Dictionaries

    as its 2015 “word” of the year, based on its

    popularity and reflecting the rise of emojis to

    help charitable causes, promote businesses

    and generally assist oh-so-many-more of us in

    further expressing ourselves on social media

    and in texts.

     The Beyhive knows. The collective fan base of

    Beyonce recently spammed Amber Rose with

    little bumblebee emojis when they sensed a diss

    of their queen.

     Taco Bell also knows. Emoji overseers approved

    a taco character last year after a yearlong campaign by the company to get one up and

    running, rewarding users of said taco on Twitter

    with gifts of free photos, GIFs and other virtual

    playthings to celebrate.

    So what’s it all about? Here’s a look at the past,

    present and rosy future of emojis:

    WHERE DID THEY COME FROM?

    While there’s now a strict definition of emojis as

    images created through standardized computer

    coding that works across platforms, they have

    many, many popular cousins by way of “stickers,”

    which are images without the wonky back end.

    Kimojis, the invention of Kim Kardashian, aren’t

    technically emojis, for instance, at least in the

    eyes of purists.

    In tech lore, the great emoji explosion has

    a grandfather in Japan and his name is

    Shigetaka Kurita. He was inspired in the 1990s

    by manja and kanji when he and others on a

    team working to develop what is considered

    the world’s first widespread mobile Internet

    platform came up with some rudimentary

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    Image: Miguel Medina

    characters. They were working a good decade

    before Apple developed a set of emojis for the

    first iPhones.

    Emojis are either loads of fun or the bane of

    your existence. One thing is sure: There’s no

    worry they’ll become a “language” in and of