Are learner perceptions of digital literacy skills teaching affected by demographic factors?

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Evaluating Approaches to Developing Digital Literacy Skills. Are learner perceptions of digital literacy skills teaching affected by demographic factors?. Marion Hall and Ingrid Nix Faculty of Health & Social Care, Open University Kirsty Baker Open University Library. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The SORRs project

Are learner perceptions of digital literacy skills teaching affected by demographic factors?

The Seventh International Blended Learning ConferenceUniversity of Hertfordshire,13-14 June 2012Marion Hall and Ingrid NixFaculty of Health & Social Care, Open UniversityKirsty Baker Open University Library

Evaluating Approaches to Developing Digital Literacy Skills09/07/2012For further info contact Marion Hall (m.j.hall)1Defined by European Commission as:The confident and critical use of ICT for work, leisure, learning and communication.Digital literacy skills in graduates:Demanded by employersRequired by UK HE Quality Assurance AgencyExpected by learners want relevance to workplaceBut:Learners may not fully engage in skills developmentPrioritise subject-specific learning over skillsDigital literacy

Project aims:Explore learner perceptions of skills developmentInvestigate learner perceptions of relevance of skills learning to themselves and employersDevelop understanding of factors motivating engagement with skills learningIdentify features of learning design that facilitate engagement and skills development: Evaluating Approaches to Developing Digital Literacy Skills

Data from 3 modules in Faculty of Health & Social Care:SW1 Level 1 (first year) social work moduleSW2 Level 2 (second year) social work moduleHSC2 Level 2 health and social care modulethat use different approaches to skills development, based on:Generic activities (usable by any FH&SC module)Contextualised (context-dependent/module specific) activitiesMixture of generic/contextualised activitiesCollected using mixed methods approach:Online questionnaires (N=298)Quantitative + qualitative dataAsked separately about IL and ICTSubmission rate 23%Interviews (N=18) qualitative dataData collection

Quantitative data onlyData for 3 modules combinedFocus on:Preferences for generic vs contextualised skillsPreferences for separate skills or within module?Preferences for skills at point of need or when learner decides?Perceptions of value of skills to themselvesPerceptions of value of skills to employersLooked at 3 demographic factorsGender, age, previous educationCompared groups using chi-squared tests Initial analysis

GenderMen (N=45)Women (N=226)Age35 or under (N=92)36 to 45 (N=109)46 or over (N=93)Previous educational qualifications (PEQs)Qualifications obtained before OU studyLower PEQs up to and including A-levels or equivalent (N=105)Higher PEQs further or higher education (N=110)Demographic factors

Results

Fewer than 20% learners unhappy with generic activitiesBut other 3 questions show:Much prefer skills in module context + related to study/workMore likely to complete skills if in context, especially module contextNo significant differences between any demographic groups09/07/2012For further info contact Marion Hall (m.j.hall)8

Large majority (>70%) more likely to do skills provided at point of needMinority (

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