Arnolfini Wedding Jan Van Eyck, 1434. Oil on panel. Van Eyck excelled at portraying direct and diffused light, shadow falling on a variety of surfaces,

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Text of Arnolfini Wedding Jan Van Eyck, 1434. Oil on panel. Van Eyck excelled at portraying direct and...

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  • Arnolfini Wedding Jan Van Eyck, 1434. Oil on panel. Van Eyck excelled at portraying direct and diffused light, shadow falling on a variety of surfaces, and lights effect on the illusion of distance. Chapter 10
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  • Garden of Delights Hieronymus Bosch, 1505-1510. Oil on panel. A Dutch painter, his work presents a world of images and puzzling symbols. Chapter 10
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  • Magdalen with the Smoking Flame Georges de La Tour, 1630-1635. Oil on canvas. La Tour often used a candle as the only source of light. Chapter 11
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  • Allegory of the Art of Painting Jan Vermeer, 1665-1672. Oil on panel. This painting is filled with symbolism. It is thought that the model represents Clio, the Muse of history, looking at a table full of objects that symbolize other Muses. The artist in a sixteenth-century costume might be Vermeer. The map of Holland on the wall, surrounded by pictures of twenty cities, could symbolize that Holland is the center of world art. Chapter 11
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  • The Mill Rembrandt van Rijn, 1650. Oil on canvas. Rembrandt was the greatest of Dutch painters and one of the great geniuses of the art world. The Mill is his greatest landscape and details are nonexistent because a powerful chiaroscuro eliminates them. Chapter 11
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  • Third of May Francisco Goya, 1808. Oil on canvas. Goyas dramatic work could be termed a social protest painting. It shows the slaughtering of Spanish rebels by French soldiers. Chapter 12
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  • The Horse Fair Rosa Bonheur, 1853. Oil on canvas. Ms. Bonheur, an important Realist painter, successfully persuaded her father to let her attend boarding school with her brothers. She worked in sculpture as well as painting, but it was her paintings of animals that brought her fame. Chapter 12
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  • Rouen Cathedral Claude Monet, 1894. Oil on canvas. Monet became the leading force in the Impressionist movement. Monet enjoyed directly confronting the environment, painting a single subject at different times of the day, at different times of the year, under different light. Chapter 13
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  • A Sunday on La Grande Jatte Georges Seurat, 1884. Oil on canvas. Seurat conveys color and light through the technique of pointillism, tiny dots of color which the viewers eyes visually mix together to create values. Chapter 13
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  • The Starry Night Vincent Van Gogh, 1889. Oil on canvas. Van Gogh only sold a single painting while he was alive. Yet today he is considered one of the worlds more important artists. His paintings jump alive with brilliant color and texture, with paint applied in thick impasto. Chapter 13
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  • The Red Studio Henri Matisse, 1911. Oil on canvas. In this picture of his studio, and in his other work, Matisse emphasized the idea that a painting of three-dimensional space still should remain true to the fact that a canvas is really two-dimensional. Chapter 14
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  • Diego y yo Frida Kahlo, 1940. Oil on masonite. Frida Kahlo was a self-taught artist who often painted works that were psychologically mysterious and almost always worked with figures. Chapter 14
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  • Guernica Pablo Picasso, 1937. Oil on canvas. Cubism was begun in 1907 by Picasso. He was a creative innovator of ideas and techniques and a master of many styles, he was constantly searching and changing during his long lifetime. Chapter 14
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  • The Persistence of Memory Salvador Dali, 1931. Oil on canvas. Dali became the most famous surrealist. His paintings were magical presentations using exacting realism. Chapter 14
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  • I and the Village Marc Chagall, 1911. Oil on canvas. Dreams, memories, folklore and fairy tales were all part of Chagalls paintings. Chapter 14
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  • The Banjo Lesson Henry O. Tanner, 1893. Oil on canvas. Religious and Genre themes were important to Tanner. Tanner was the most honored of all African-American artists, here and abroad. Chapter 15
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  • Government Bureau George Tooker, 1956. Egg tempera on gesso panel. This painting is the stark, almost chilling, summation of the dehumanizing of urban society that the Social Realists sought to portray. Chapter 15
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  • Kaufmann House Frank Lloyd Wright, 1936. Wrights primary concern was to develop a compatible relationship between the structure and its location so that the building would seem to grow out of its environment. Chapter 16
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  • No. 1 (Lavender Mist) Jackson Pollock, 1950. Oil enamel and aluminum on canvas. After going through realistic and abstract periods, Pollock began his series of drip paintings. His new working technique completely freed him from the use of traditional brushes and opened the door to Abstract Expressionism. Chapter 17
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  • Masterpiece Roy Lichtenstein, 1962. Oil on canvas. Lichtenstein became one of the stars of Pop Art. His art brought Abstract Expressionism to an abrupt halt. Chapter 17
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