Artful thinkingmc 2006v1

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  • Artful Thinking

    ST

  • AgendaIntroductionsLooking at art: Opening Artful Thinking experienceArtful Thinking overviewGallery walkThe Observing and Describing dispositionCurricular connections

    ST or PP

  • PP

  • Think Puzzle Explore routineWhat do you think you know about this artwork?

    What questions or puzzles do you have?

    What does the artwork make you want to explore?

    PP Do as whole group. Print out routine for whole class

  • Think Puzzle Explore routineWhat are some thoughts you have about this image now that you didnt have when you first looked at the picture?

    PP Do as whole group. Print out routine for whole class

  • Artful Thinking

    Overview

    ST

  • Goal of the Artful ThinkingProgram

    To help students develop thinking dispositions that support thoughtful learning in the arts,and across school subjects.

    ST

  • How does it work? 5 componentsArtful thinking dispositionsArtful thinking routinesVisual art & curricular connections4.Visible thinking5.Study groups reflective professional practice

    Three pieces. We will say a few words about each one

  • Research background: The triadic theory of dispositions

    AbilityInclinationSensitivity

    Another slide with a triangle?

  • Which thinking dispositions?

  • Questioning & Investigating Observing & DescribingExploring ViewpointsFinding ComplexityReasoningComparing & Connecting

  • How does it work? 5 componentsArtful thinking dispositionsArtful thinking routinesArtful curricular connections4.Visible thinking5.Study groups reflective professional practice

    Three pieces. We will say a few words about each one

  • ThinkingArtsCurriculumArtful Thinking Program

    ST Explain how AT is located in curriculum and instruction

  • How do dispositions develop?

    By routinely engaging in specific patterns of behavior by doing certain things regularly

  • Thinking Routines

    Short, easy-to-learn procedures that help students engage in thinking-dispositional behavior in and across the six areas of the palette What do you think you know about this image?What puzzles do you have?What would you like to explore?THINK-PUZZLE-EXPLORE

  • Questioning & InvestigatingThink Puzzle ExploreCreative QuestionsSee Think Wonder

    Observing & DescribingBeginning Middle or EndLooking 10 x 2Elaboration GameColors, Shapes, LinesExploring Viewpoints Perceive/Know/Care about Used to thinkNow I thinkFinding ComplexityThe Complexity ScaleParts Purposes Complexities

    ReasoningClaim Support QuestionWhat Makes you say that? Comparing & Connecting Word Phrase SentenceHeadlinesConnect Extend ChallengeCreative ComparisonsArtful Thinking routines

    Change animation

  • How does it work? 5 componentsArtful thinking dispositionsArtful thinking routinesArtful curricular connectionsVisible thinking5.Study groups reflective professional practice

    Three pieces. We will say a few words about each one

  • What Artful Thinking looks like in schools

    Just a quick description of what it looks like on the ground. What youd see if you went into a school

  • Visible Thinking / Documentation of student thinking

    Just a quick description of what it looks like on the ground. What youd see if you went into a school

  • Visible Thinking / Documentation of student thinking

    Just a quick description of what it looks like on the ground. What youd see if you went into a school

  • Study groups:Professional growth and support

    Just a quick description of what it looks like on the ground. What youd see if you went into a school

  • Gallery Walk

    In pairs, tour the documentation on the wall. Spend time carefully looking at one or two exhibits. Using the palette, find examples of student thinking.

    What do you see? What do you think about that? What does it make you wonder? Share your findings with another pair.

    ST

  • Questioning & Investigating Observing & DescribingExploring Viewpoints

    Finding Complexity

    ReasoningComparing & Connecting

    ST Talk about palette, explain organized by TD, routines associated with the TD. Refer to peoples comments about the image they just looked at to illustrate the different palette areas

  • Looking: 10 x 2 routineCarefully observe the image.

    Try to list 10 observations

    PP Do routine solo, then try to get at least 5

  • Looking: 10 x 2 routineCarefully observe the image.

    List 10 observations

    Look again, make 10 more observations.

    PP Do routine solo, then try to get at least 5

  • Share your observations witha partner.

    What do you think is going onin the picture?

    What makes you say that?

    PP

  • What insight about the work did theroutine help you with?

    PP

  • Questioning & Investigating Observing & DescribingExploring Viewpoints

    Finding Complexity

    ReasoningComparing & Connecting

    PP Teachers locate the thinking they did in the previous activities on palette

  • Observing and DescribingThis disposition is about noticing and communicating impressions. Routines in this area emphasize careful and deep observation, self-awareness, and detailed description.

    ST mini lecture on Observing and describing disposition

  • Why call this disposition the disposition to Observe and describe? (Why include description?)

    In order to mobilize observations to put them to work in the service of understanding we have to describe them to ourselves.

    Often, description is the mechanism by which observation occurs. The act of describing something causes us to look closely, look again, and look anew.

    ST

  • Modes of observation--the faculties through which we receive impressions.

    The senses eyes, ears, touch, etc. give us physical impressions

    The intellect/mind gives us mental impressions

    The heart/ spirit/ conscience gives us emotional, ethical, spiritual impressions

    Modes of description--the different forms in which we express our observations. VerbalWrittenVisualKinestheticAural

    How do observation and description happen -- Where do they take place?

    ST

  • ObservationInterpretationElaboration

    ST Observations can be made and expressed in different ways, not just through language. Making observations in multiple modalities can strengthen verbal and written expression. PP write a few examples from peoples 10x2 lists, post it notes continuum.

  • Image to use with continuum here

    image here in case we need to refer to a larger image during discussion

  • Bumping up to the big picture: Why connect thinking and art?Because of how works of art make us think

    Because of what works of art make us think about

    AT encourages curricular connections along both of these dimensions

    ST Talk about curricular connections. Talk a little about what we have learned along the way, emphasizing the last connection ( conceptual/inquiry building) Informational. This can include information about topic-related history, concepts and principles, materials, technologies, relationships, setting, mood, attitudes.

  • Many ways to make connections to the curriculum

  • Curricular connection: genetics

    Give an example of a curricular connection. Could be directly from the not-yet-up part of the website. Shows a big theme along with an array of possible artworks, routines.Claim-Support-QuestionElaboration GameLooking: Ten times twoCreative QuestionsThink/Puzzle/Explore

    Nancy BursonThe Human Race Machine, 2000Martin Johnson Heade: Cattleya Orchid and Three Brazilian Hummingbirds, 1871Alexis RockmanThe Farm, 2000Thomas GrunfeldMisfit (St. Bernard), 1994 Misfit (deer/ girafe), 2001

  • Curricular connection:Density

    Give an example of a curricular connection. Could be directly from the not-yet-up part of the website. Shows a big theme along with an array of possible artworks, routines.George Bellows Cliff Dwellers, 1913Jeff Koons, Three Balls Total Equilibrium, 1985Yann Arthus-Bertrand, "The Earth from Above seriesLOC image

  • Curricular connections

    How might the ideas that emerged in our discussion connect to, or extend to, the school curriculum?

    PP

  • ResourcesArtful Thinking website: pz.harvard.edu/at curriculum connections link: www.pz.harvard.edu/at/cc_into_new.cfmVisible Thinking Website: www.pz.harvard.edu/vt

    Email:Shari_tishman@pz.harvard.edupatricia_palmer@pz.harvard.edu

    For Info about Visible Thinking: visiblethinking@pz.harvard.edu

    Books:The Thinking Classroom, Shari Tishman, Dave Perkins, Eileen Jay

    Art Works for Schools, PZ, DeCordova Museum and Underground Railway Theater

    Intellectual Character, by Ron Ritchhart

    DVD:Visible Thinking Routines: Pictures of Practice

  • www.pz.harvard.edu/atwww.pz.harvard.edu/at/cc_into_new.cfm

  • *Image: Sofonisba Anguissola, Three Sisters Playing Chess

    Encouraged by her singularly enlightened father, Sofonisba Anguissola (c. 1535-1625) was educated as a painter when the well-born young women of Renaissance Italy were consigned to sit in their palazzos and pursue needle work. Her accomplishments led to a life of drama and romance on a grand scale. She became a celebrated portrait painter at the court of Philip II of Spain.

    A grand love story unfolds, too, as she overcame many obstacles to win her beloved husband. She lived to a hearty old age, an i