Atomic Theory Time Line

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    27-Apr-2015

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Author: Jeff Houck Title: Atomic Theory Timeline Grade Level: 10 and 11 Content/Subject Area: Science Chemistry Abstract: Students will be collaboratively investigating the development of the modern atomic theory using online and text resources. Upon completing their research the student will compile a timeline using Inspiration. The timeline focuses on the major discoveries made surrounding matter and the atom and how they affected the current thoughts of the time period. The students will then share their timelines using a store front approach and compare their work with the work of others. LoTI Level: 3+ Assessment: Room circulation having groups explain timelines General class discussion upon completion of the activity Test/Quiz questions Power Point for freshman class presentations (will be used as a review for final examnot a formal portion of this project)

Standards Met: ScienceB.12.1 Show how cultures and individuals have contributed to the development of major ideas in the earth and space, life and environmental and physical sciences D.12.1 Describe atomic structure and the properties of atoms, molecules, and matter during physical and chemical interactions Information and Technology A.12.3 Use a computer and productivity software to organize and create information D.12.1 Participate productively in workgroups or other collaborative learning environments

Tools and Resources: Software: Internet Explorer or Netscape; Inspiration Hardware: 7-10 Personal Computers, LCD projector, Smart Board Web Sites: http://trackstrar.hprtec.com track #173765 Text: Chemistry by Smoot, Smith, and Price

Procedure: 1. Meet in base group. Introduce all members of the group. Make sure each person knows his/her letter. Clarify the objectives, directions, and goals. 2. Break into expert groups according to letters. Introduce all members of the group. Each member of the expert group should research the atomic scientist assigned to them (using text and Internet). All members are responsible for a complete understanding. When every one is finished all members meet and discuss the material deciding and recording the most important points. 3. When each expert group has fully discussed their scientist(s), each student returns to his/her base group. 4. Base group members then construct a timeline of all the atomic scientists using Inspiration. Each expert should explain their information focussing on how it changed the way of thinking about atoms and the atomic theory as they are constructing the timeline. 5. After all members of the base group have contributed to the timeline the base group may add graphics, etc. to their timeline. 6. Upon each groups completion, a copy of the timeline should be printed for each member and the teacher. 7. The class will then use a store front approach to present their information to the other groups in the class. Two members from the base group will stay at their station to explain their timeline to others while the other members go shopping at other groups. The students who are shopping should be comparing and contrasting their timeline with the other groups looking for key information that may be missing. 8. The members of each base group will then switch roles allowing the other members to shop. 9. The base group will then meet one final time to make sure that all members of the group have made and changes to their timelines. 10. A class discussion of the material will then take place where the teacher facilitates the construction of a general timeline focussing on the major shifts in thinking and the changes that brought them about. (This is done using a Smart Board and LCD project, but could also be done utilizing a chalkboard.)

Reflection on Project Design: The design of the Atomic Timeline project was an attempt to let the students create their own understanding of the development of the current view of the atom. Traditionally this has not been a favorite unit of the students because it just involved them taking notes on a bunch of dead people and memorizing a few facts. The new project is more self-directed and allows students to work together in cooperative groups to perform basic research and synthesize the information to shape the current views on the atom. In addition to letting the students construct their own understanding of the concepts, the Inspiration software allows the students some flexibility in how they create their timeline. They have the opportunity to use either the outline or diagram features of the program allowing them to create a representation that is most beneficial to their learning style. Reflection on Project Implementation: The Atomic Timeline project was a synthesis of two strategies used in class previously during the school year. Prior to the start of this project all students have had experience in both a cooperative jigsaw activity as well as using inspiration. As a result the students did not raise many logistical questions pertaining to the formation of the groups nor about what they were to accomplish in either their base group or their expert group. It was also very beneficial that the students had practice using Inspiration. All of the students were well versed in the capabilities of Inspiration, therefore they could spend most of their time focussing on learning the chemistry and constructing their timelines. This prior experience helped make classroom management a virtual non-issue. While the project seemed to run smoothly it should be noted that there are some changes that would enhance the project further. One suggestion is that the project should have been extended to include more current research on atomic structure (quarks, strings, etc.). It seems that students do not realize that there is ongoing research in this field that is still causing our views of the atom to evolve. In addition it would also have been helpful to have the students revisit their timeline to make additions and or changes as they discovered more information throughout the up coming weeks. The students were encouraged to make changes during the two days of the activity, but were not given the same opportunity as their understanding of the atom evolved during the whole unit. Both of these changes would have led to a better understanding for the students as well as a more comprehensive view of the atom.

ATOMIC HISTORY TIMELINECooperative Jigsaw Teaching Activity

BASE GROUP: team of five students (#1,2,3,4,and5) EXPERT GROUP: team of students with all the same numbers Group Number 1 2 3 4 5 Scientists Dalton Lavoisier & Proust Democritus & Aristotle Newton & Boyle Rutherford & Thomson

1. Meet in base group. Introduce all members of the group. Make sure each person knows his/her letter. Clarify the objectives, directions, and goals. 2. Break into expert groups according to letters. Introduce all members of the group. Each member of the expert group should research the atomic scientist assigned to them (using text and Internet). All members are responsible for a complete understanding. When everyone is finished all members meet and discuss the material deciding and recording the most important points. 3. When each expert group has fully discussed their scientist(s), each student returns to his/her base group. 4. Base group members then construct a timeline of all the atomic scientists using Inspiration. Each expert should explain their information focussing on how it changed the way of thinking as they are constructing the timeline. 5. After all members of the base group have contributed to the timeline the base group may add graphics, etc. to their timeline. 6. Upon each groups completion, a copy of the timeline should be printed for each member and teacher. 7. The class will then use a store front approach to present their information to the other groups in the class. Two members from the base group will stay at their station to explain their timeline to others while the other members go shopping at other groups. The students who are shopping should be comparing and contrasting their timeline with the other groups looking for key information that may be missing. 8. The members of each base group will then switch roles allowing the other members to shop. 9. The base group will then meet one final time to make sure that all member of the group have made and changes to their timelines.

10. A class discussion of the material will then take place