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Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary Specialisation · PDF file Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary Specialisation Practicum Courses: EDPRAC 101 EDPRAC 201 EDPRAC 305 Visiting

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  • Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary Specialisation

    Practicum Courses: EDPRAC 101 EDPRAC 201 EDPRAC 305

    Visiting Lecturer

    School Co-ordinator/Associate Teacher Meetings

    May 2013

    Vivienne Mackisack Jill Murray Sandra Chandler

  • Overview:

    o Welcome/Introduction

    o Practicum during Initial Teacher Education at the Faculty of Education

    o Teaching as Inquiry

    o Mentoring in the practicum

    o Reflective practice; a cycle of on-going learning

    o Next steps

  • “The University of Auckland’s pre-service

    teacher education programmes are

    designed to develop research-informed

    inquiry-based practitioners. We do this

    by providing opportunities for student

    teachers to develop and demonstrate an

    inquiry-based disposition in authentic

    settings”

    (Faculty of Education, Teacher Education Practice website, 2013).

  • A knowledge base for teaching

    Inquiry-led teaching requires “teaching with a travelling mind set” (de Botton, 2002) .

    Implies: • sense of purpose and priorities but… open-

    minded to change and inconvenience • searching for practices to promote/support

    learning but also grounded Indicates: • Inquiry-led teaching or ‘teaching as inquiry’ is

    less a series of practices or skills to be accumulated and more a ‘disposition’

  • The framework: “Teaching as inquiry” (Aitken & Sinnema, 2008; Ministry of Education,2007; Timperley, Wilson, Barrar, & Fung, 2007)

    Planning

    Teaching

    FOCUSING INQUIRY

    What is most important, given where my learn[ing[ is at?

    TEACHING INQUIRY What strategies might

    work best? What could I try?

    LEARNING INQUIRY What happened? Why did it happen? Implications?

    Planning Teaching

    Observation* Assessment*

    Evaluation of learning/teaching

    Reflection

    * ongoing

  • The framework: “Teaching as inquiry” (Aitken & Sinnema, 2008; Ministry of Education,2007; Timperley,

    Wilson, Barrar, & Fung, 2007)

    To prepare themselves adequately for this ‘transitioning teacher role’ during a practicum student teachers need to be able to first identify (and then practice) effective, deliberate teaching….

    What are we currently doing as visiting lecturers or associate teachers that supports

    students to become inquiry-based practitioners?n learners, teachers need to draw on various knowledge bases…specifically

  • • Write a list of 10 things you typically do when mentoring a student teacher

    • Share your list with a partner

    • Discuss which mentoring activities on your list you consider are most important for practicum mentoring

    Reflecting on personal mentoring practice

  • • Mentoring which rests on a vision of good teaching;

    • Mentoring which makes constant use of the “tools” of observation, co- planning, co-teaching, joint inquiry, critical conversation and reflection;

    • These also happen to be “the tools of continuous improvement in teaching” (Feiman-Nemser, 2001)

    ‘Educative mentoring’ – Sharon Feiman-Nemser (1998, 2001)

  • “…promotes beginning teacher development by cultivating a disposition of inquiry, focusing attention on student thinking and understanding, and fostering disciplined talk about problems of practice” (Feiman-Nemser, 2001, p.2)

    Educative mentoring…

  • Wang & Odell (2002) identified three dominant perspectives on mentoring…

    1. Humanistic – mentor provides personal/emotional support and encouragement, non-judgemental approach

    2. Situated apprentice perspective – mentor provides information, models necessary skills and techniques, acts as a guide to resources, curriculum and the practice of teaching

    3. Critical constructivist perspective - mentor and student teacher engage in collaborative inquiry into teaching practice, co-construct new knowledge, learn new skills together

    Styles of mentoring

  • • Which of Wang and Odell’s mentoring perspectives are evident in the mentoring style described in your list of mentoring activities?

    • Humanistic

    • Situated apprentice

    • Critical constructivist

    Now revisit your list of mentoring activities…

  • • How might Wang and Odell’s perspectives on mentoring support a focus on effective teaching that promotes an inquiry disposition and enhances children’s learning?

    A question to consider…

  • "no student teacher...enters the

    classroom as a complete novice. They

    bring with them a vast array of skills,

    knowledge, and understandings

    derived from other contexts"

    (Furlong, 2000, p. 14).

  • O’Connor and Diggins (2002) define reflective practice as thinking about what educators do in order to reconsider their actions and refine their practices according to these thoughts. Reflective practice is a cycle of on-going learning that occurs when we take the time to “stop, think and change” (p. 9).

    Defining reflective practice

  • Preparing beginning teachers who are ready to :

    “reflect on the impact their teaching has on learning…

    ….accept advice and know when to ask for it” (MOE &NZTC, 2011).

    …research-informed inquiry-based practitioners

    Reflection, Professional Learning

    During EDPRAC 101 and 201 the student teachers are required to…

    “reflect regularly on your own teaching, learning and/or interactions

    arising from your practice that caused you uncertainty, and analyse

    these in detail” (Practicum Brief, p. 6).

    - Some of this reflective practice will take the form of discussion

    Notes from reflective discussions are to be retained and shared with

    the associate teacher and visiting lecturer.

    - Some of this reflective practice will be documented independently

    EDPRAC 101 student teachers are taught the DATA Model

    Student teachers beginning EDPRAC201 should reflect

    competently and may be learning to critically reflect

    Evaluation and reflection are integral to effective teaching and learning.

    Evaluation Reflection Critical Reflection

    Student teachers beginning EDPRAC 305 may be refining critical

    reflection (focus given in Part B preparation)

    EDPRAC 201  305 student teachers also utilize Smyth’s framework for reflection

  • There are a number of models educators can use to reflect on their practice. Our student teachers are introduced to the DATA model

    1. Describe: - describe in detail -involves paying attention to what happened, who was involved, and their thoughts, feeling and emotions as they related to the incident. 2. Analyse: explore why - examine the underlying values, beliefs and assumptions that maintain the practice and consider sources of information to make sense of the situation.

    3. Theorise: make sense of what happened. - think about the practice from different perspectives in order to formulate a new or different understanding and consider a new or different approach. 4. Act: put the new way of thinking into practice - trying out a new or different way of doing things in order to enhance and improve practice.

    Peters, 1991

  • and then

    Smyth’s framework for reflection

    CONFRONTING: being able to subject the theories about one’s own practice to interrogation and questioning, in a way that establishes their legitimacy.

    • DESCRIBE • INFORM • CONFRONT • RECONSTRUCT

    Smyth, 1989

  • Preparing beginning teachers who are ready to :

    “reflect on the impact their teaching has on learning…

    ….accept advice and know when to ask for it” (MOE &NZTC, 2011).

    …research-informed inquiry-based practitioners

    Reflection, Professional Learning

    Student teachers completing EDPRAC 305

    must have made: Evaluation & Reflection & Critical reflection

    …part of their practice

    LEARNING INQUIRY What happened? Why did it happen? Implications?

  • Considering ‘next steps’ EDPRAC 101

    EDPRAC 201

     Required and resourced in both practicum courses

     Generate and are generated by observation and

    reflective discussions

    Mentioned throughout the EDPRAC 101 and 201 Briefs

    Each student teacher

    should be able to

    articulate ‘first steps’ for

    themselves for each

    particular practicum

  • Considering ‘next steps’ EDPRAC 305

    Considering ‘next steps’ as a PRT

  • As they develop their expertise, student teachers in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary p