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Ordinary Meeting of Council Council Chambers, Service Centre 275 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe 2 December 2013 commencing at 7.45pm Following the public forum commencing at approximately 7.30pm and may be extended to 8pm if necessary. AGENDA The Mayor’s Acknowledgement of the Wurundjeri People “Our Meeting is being held on the traditional lands (country) of the Wurundjeri people and I wish to acknowledge them as the traditional owners and pay my respects to their Elders.” Apologies and Leave of Absence Confirmation of Minutes Ordinary Meeting of Council held 18 November 2013 Disclosure of Interests Presentation A presentation will be made to Council by Womens Health in the North for participation in the Northern Region Preventing Violence against Women Strategy “Building a Respectful Community – Preventing Violence against Women”. 1. Petitions 1.1 Vesting of Reserve - 4A Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe ................................................ 3 REPORTS: 2. People Community Strengthening and Support 2.1 Alma Road, Bundoora - Investigation of Parking and Traffic Congestion ............................................................................................................. 5 2.2 Banyule Graffiti Summitt ....................................................................................... 14 3. Planet Environmental Sustainability 3.1 Energy Saving Plan .............................................................................................. 17 3.2 Funding of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program ................................................................................................................ 23

Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

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Page 1: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

Ordinary Meeting of Council

Council Chambers, Service Centre

275 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe

2 December 2013 commencing at 7.45pm

Following the public forum commencing at approximately 7.30pm and may be extended to 8pm if necessary.

AGENDA

The Mayor’s Acknowledgement of the Wurundjeri People “Our Meeting is being held on the traditional lands (country) of the Wurundjeri people and I wish to acknowledge them as the traditional owners and pay my respects to their Elders.”

Apologies and Leave of Absence Confirmation of Minutes Ordinary Meeting of Council held 18 November 2013 Disclosure of Interests Presentation A presentation will be made to Council by Womens Health in the North for participation in the Northern Region Preventing Violence against Women Strategy “Building a Respectful Community – Preventing Violence against Women”.

1. Petitions

1.1 Vesting of Reserve - 4A Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe ................................................ 3

REPORTS:

2. People – Community Strengthening and Support

2.1 Alma Road, Bundoora - Investigation of Parking and Traffic Congestion ............................................................................................................. 5

2.2 Banyule Graffiti Summitt ....................................................................................... 14

3. Planet – Environmental Sustainability

3.1 Energy Saving Plan .............................................................................................. 17

3.2 Funding of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program ................................................................................................................ 23

Page 2: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

AGENDA (Cont’d)

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 2

4. Place – Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

4.1 Metropolitan Planning Strategy ............................................................................. 29

4.2 East West Link - Comprehensive Impact Statement ............................................. 34

4.3 Options Available to Council to Address Development Sites with Issues ................................................................................................................... 45

4.4 Balaka Place Bundoora Streetscape Improvements ............................................. 56

4.5 Proposed sale of discontinued road (Rose Street) adjacent to 1065 Heidelberg Road Ivanhoe ............................................................................ 59

4.6 Northern Infrastructure Report .............................................................................. 64

5. Participation – Community Involvement in Community Life

Nil

6. Performance - Use Our Resources Wisely

6.1 Audit Committee Charter ...................................................................................... 69

6.2 Review of Councillor Discretionary Funds ............................................................. 71

6.3 Assembly of Councillors ........................................................................................ 75

7. Sealing of Documents

7.1 Sealing of Documents .......................................................................................... 79

8. Notices of Motion

8.1 Bully Free Australia ............................................................................................... 81

8.2 National Container Deposit Scheme ..................................................................... 82

8.3 School Crossing Supervision ................................................................................ 83

8.4 Deferment of Interest Charges on Second Instalment Rates and Charges ................................................................................................................ 84

9. General Business

10. Urgent Business

Closure of Meeting to the Public That in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989, Council close the Meeting to members of the public and adjourn for five minutes to allow the public to leave the Chamber prior to considering the following confidential matters.

11. Confidential Matters

11.1 contractual matters

11.2 contractual matters

Matters Discussed in Camera That all confidential matters and reports related to the above items remain confidential unless otherwise specified.

Closure of Meeting

Page 3: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

1.1

Petitions

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 3

1.1 VESTING OF RESERVE - 4A ABERCORN AVENUE IVANHOE

Author: Renee Kueffer - Subdivisions Officer, City Development

Ward: Olympia

File: P845/2013

A petition with 25 signatures has been received from residents of Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe. The petition prayer is as follows: “We the undersigned, hereby notify Banyule Council that we object to the transferring of land, that is 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe, otherwise known as “Vesting” in to Council’s name. An outline of the reasons for the objections include but are not limited to the following:

1. The owners of 4, 6-8 Abercorn Avenue, believed that the ownership of 4A as shown in the accompanying map was on their respective titles and factored into their purchase price when they acquired the respective properties;

2. The lengthy objection written by land owner in Abercorn Avenue [name removed for privacy reasons], submitted to Council’s officers, was not actually submitted to Council itself despite being told that this would happened and that further opportunities for consultation would arise from this;

3. The home at number 2 is unoccupied and there is no evidence to show that new owners were notified;

4. The owner of number 4, was not notified by Council; 5. The land in question has been in continuous use by the owners of 2, 4, 6-8.

The previous owner of 6-8 cultivated and maintained the land as is the current owner;

6. No opportunity has been afforded to the residents of the above mentioned properties for consultation about purchasing the easement from the original owner or, if he is deceased, then from his beneficiaries;

7. Once this area of land is transferred onto Council’s title, the owners of the aforementioned properties will lose the enjoyment of the land that is at the rear of their property;

8. Once the area of land is transferred into Council’s name, its use may well be irrevocably changed;

9. Paucity of time to respond.”

OFFICER COMMENT

Planning Permit application P845/2013 relates to a number of parcels of land across Banyule with the application seeking to vest the parcels in Council’s name. The petition relates to one property only which is known as 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe. The Certificate of Title indicates that the subject land was created as a Drainage and Sewerage Reserve as part of the original subdivision in 1921.

Page 4: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

1.1

Petitions

VESTING OF RESERVE - 4A ABERCORN AVENUE IVANHOE cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 4

The Vesting of Reserves into Council’s name is an administrative process being undertaken for a number of reserves across the municipality and it is not expected that any change in use of the land will occur as a result of the change of ownership. Public Notification of Planning Permit Application P845/2013 was undertaken to all abutting property owners and occupiers, and the required time to object given, in accordance with the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. The objection lodged by the head petitioner was received by Council Officers and was considered in the assessment of Planning Permit Application P845/2013, and a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit was issued under delegation on 30 October 2013. Advice from the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) on 25 November 2013 confirmed that an appeal has been lodged against Council’s Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit. Council, as the applicant for the planning application could consider formally amending the application to remove 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe from the application. This would enable the issues raised in the petition to be considered further and for Council to then decide the next steps in relation to this property separately. On this basis it would also be anticipated that following confirmation from VCAT, the appeal against Council’s Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit would be withdrawn by the objector.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1. Receives and notes the petition.

2. Formally amends Planning Application P845/2013 to remove 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe from the application and advises the relevant objector once this has occurred.

3. Advises the primary petitioner accordingly.

ATTACHMENTS

No. Title Page

1 Petition First Page 86

Page 5: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 5

2.1 ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Author: Sanjev Sivananthanayagam - Transport Engineer, City Development

Ward: Grimshaw

File: ST220

SUMMARY

A Notice of Motion brought to Council in December 2012 moved that an investigation be undertaken into possible parking and congestion issues in Alma Road, Bundoora. Alma Road is situated just north of Grimshaw Street and east of Plenty Road and close to a number of traffic and parking generators – Aldi Supermarket, Yulong Reserve, St Peters Anglican Church and various local businesses. During the site observations it was observed that vehicles were parked on both sides of Alma Road. Following the investigation, it is considered that the most appropriate parking restrictions for Alma Road is the conversion of the existing ‘No Stopping, 9am – 4pm, Sat’ parking restrictions on the east side of the street to ‘No Stopping, 8.30am – 6pm’, for all seven (7) days. Also, the extension of the ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions 20m further south than the existing is considered appropriate, to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park. As an overwhelming majority of the residents supported this proposal, it is considered appropriate to proceed with the installation of the parking restrictions. This will alleviate concerns with traffic congestion in the street. No other major traffic safety or congestion issues were identified in the street. Council’s Local Laws department will be advised to enforce the parking restrictions in the street more frequently, including on weekends.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “develop and promote safety and resilience in our community”.

Page 6: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 6

BACKGROUND Concerns were raised by residents of Alma Road in relation to parking and traffic congestion in the street with their local ward councillor. At its meeting of 17 December 2012 Council considered a Notice of Motion regarding Alma Road, Bundoora. At the meeting, Council resolved:

“That Council officers provide a report on the traffic and car parking issues that residents on Alma Road in Bundoora may be experiencing. The report should present options for how traffic congestion may be mitigated and how on-street car parking be better reserved for use by local residents. In preparing the report officers are encouraged to write to residents on Alma Road to seek their input and feedback.”

This report responds to the Council resolution. EXISTING CONDITIONS Alma Road is classified under Council’s road hierarchy as a “Local Road” (residential street) with a default speed limit of 50km/h. A locality plan of Alma Road is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1 – Locality Plan Alma Road is approximately 220m long and 7.2m wide measured between the face of kerbs. It is aligned in the north - south direction, and connects into Grimshaw Street at the southern end and Bent Street on the northern end.

Subject

Location

Page 7: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 7

Aldi Supermarket and Jetts Gymnasium are located at the intersection of Alma Road and Grimshaw Street, on the western side of Alma Road. St Peters Anglican Church is located at the intersection of Alma Road and Grimshaw Street, on the eastern side of Alma Road. A major bus stop is located on the north side of Grimshaw Street, west of Alma Road, acting as an interchange between tram and bus services. Yulong Reserve which includes numerous sports facilities is located at the intersection of Alma Road and Bent Street, on the north side of Bent Street. There are a number of businesses located on the west side of Grimshaw Street and the east side of Plenty Road, including Ray White Real Estate and an Ambulance Depot. Twelve indented 90 degree angled parking spaces are located in front of St Peters Anglican Church, on the east side of Alma Road. Two of the spaces are signed as “disabled” parking only and the remaining spaces are unrestricted. One indented parallel parking space is located in front of the Aldi Supermarket, on the west side of Alma Road. A Council car park (27 parking spaces) is located in Alma Road just north of the Aldi Supermarket. Currently there are ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions installed for Saturdays between 9am – 4pm on the east side of Alma Road, between Bent Street and the Council car park. INVESTIGATION

An investigation has been undertaken in Alma Road in relation to road safety and parking in the street. The investigation included several site observations, parking surveys and two community consultation surveys. Parking Survey Results Parking surveys were undertaken in the street to determine the level of usage (i.e. percentage of occupancy) and duration surveys to determine the period of time these vehicles were parked in the street. Parking observation surveys were undertaken over a number of weekdays and weekends. The results of the weekday surveys are listed in table 1 below.

Page 8: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 8

Table 1: Parking Observation Survey Results

Location

Su

pp

ly

18/0

6/2

013

10:3

0:0

0 A

M

18/0

6/2

013

12:0

0:0

0 P

M

24/0

6/2

013

3:0

0 P

M

25/0

6/2

013

2:0

0 P

M

27/0

6/2

013

4:0

0 P

M

23/0

6/2

013

10:0

0 A

M

20/0

7/2

013

12:0

0 P

M

Avera

ge O

ccu

pie

d

Avera

ge

Occu

pan

cy (

%)

Tue Tue Mon Tue Thu Sun Sat

Alma Road

East Side 20 0 0 0 1 0 2 4 1 5%

West Side 16 2 5 5 5 4 2 2 4 25%

Indented bays

In front of Church 12 10 12 9 8 10 12 12 10 83%

In front of Aldi 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 100%

Off Street Car Parks

Council Car Park 27 19 19 18 16 20 27 23 20 74%

Aldi Car Park 113 33 32 27 31 29 35 34 32 28%

Parking duration surveys were also undertaken in Alma Road during the weekdays. The duration survey highlighted five vehicles parking for longer periods during the day. Three of these vehicles were observed using the indented angled parking spaces in front of the Church, and two vehicles were parked on the west side of Alma Road. Site Observations Several site inspections were undertaken on different days and times. In relation to parking it was observed that:

Indented angled parking spaces at the southern end of Alma Road are heavily utilised and are operating as ‘short term’ parking spaces with a high frequency of turnover.

Aldi Supermarket customers are often utilising the indented angled parking spaces.

Motorists were observed parking at the northern end of Alma Road and walking towards Plenty Road via Bent Street.

In relation to the congestion it was observed that:

Alma Road is not wide enough to accommodate two way traffic movements when vehicles are parked on both sides.

Vehicles turning out of the indented angled parking spaces generally held up vehicles turning out of Aldi Supermarket car park and the Council car park.

Page 9: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 9

Vehicles turning right out of Alma Road into Grimshaw Street generally had to wait a short period to undertake the right turn movement, resulting in delay to vehicles wanting to turn left into Grimshaw Street.

The majority of the observed minor traffic delay issues were caused by Aldi Supermarket customers.

Vehicle speed was not observed to be a concern. Community Consultation Survey The first community consultation survey was undertaken with Alma Road residents in July 2013 to solicit their views on parking in the street and the type of parking restrictions they believed would alleviate the current traffic congestion and parking issues. Nine responses were received from a possible seventeen properties.

All nine respondents indicated that they have concerns with parking in the street.

Eight respondents indicated a need for further parking restrictions in the streets, also stating other traffic concerns which they had.

Residents listed the following as parking generators in the street.

Aldi Supermarket

Yulong Reserve

St Peters Anglican Church

Ray White Real Estate in Plenty Road

Jetts Gymnasium

Tram Stop in Plenty Road

Bus Stop in Grimshaw Street

Ambulance Depot in Plenty Road

Various local restaurants – Plenty Road and Grimshaw Street The following were listed by residents as possible parking restrictions or solutions which could be considered:

‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions, 8.30am - 6pm (all days) on the east side of Alma Road.

‘1/2P’ parking restrictions for the angle parking spaces.

Resident Parking Only.

Provision of additional indented parking along the street. The following were listed by residents as other traffic concerns in the street.

Aldi supermarket trucks – restricted access due to parked vehicles.

Congestion due to vehicles reversing out of angle parking spaces.

Congestion due to vehicles parking on both sides of the street.

Rat running to avoid the traffic signals and the speed in the street.

Signs in the street not adequate.

Turning traffic into Alma Road.

Lack of enforcement in the street on Saturdays.

Page 10: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 10

DISCUSSION The following discusses the characteristics of the subject site in relation to parking and traffic congestion, from the knowledge and data obtained from the investigation. Off-Street Parking Spaces and Angled Parking Spaces The Council car park, during weekdays and on Saturdays, was observed to be moderately used, with at least 11 of the 27 parking spaces available at all times. During the Sunday parking survey it was observed to be fully occupied. The Aldi Supermarket car park has a total of 113 parking spaces of which a maximum of 32 on weekdays and 35 on weekend were observed to be occupied. Though there are numerous parking spaces available within their car park, the customers were observed using the angle parking spaces outside St Peter’s Church, probably out of convenience. In the angled parking section, for all parking surveys, at least eight of the 12 indented angled parking spaces were occupied. It should be noted that two spaces out of the 12 are disabled parking spaces, of which only on two occasions during the parking surveys were both of these spaces occupied. During the weekend parking surveys, all the angled parking spaces were occupied. As noted previously, the indented angled parking spaces are generally operating as ‘short term’ parking spaces with a high frequency of turnover, and as such numerous vehicle changeovers were observed. The car parking duration survey indicated only three vehicles were parked for longer periods in the angled parking spaces. Given the above, installation of short term parking restrictions is not considered necessary; as the current operation caters for both short and long term parking needs. On Street Parking At all times of the parking surveys and site inspections, including the weekends, there were numerous parking spaces available in the street and a maximum of only six (6) parking spaces out of the possible 36 potential parking spaces in the street (excluding the indented parking spaces) were occupied. On street parking on the northern end of Alma Road, particularly on the western side was mostly always occupied. On occasion, it was observed that vehicles were parked on both sides of the street at the northern end, allowing just one vehicle to pass along the street. As noted there is already ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions installed in the east side of the street on ‘Saturdays between 9am – 4pm’. Residents were supportive in their opinion that the parking restrictions should be extended to include weekdays, so one side of the street is free of parking, allowing for passing vehicles. Though the parking surveys did not indicate a major issue with parking in Alma Road, it is considered that allowing parking only on one side of the street will improve the minor traffic delay issues, including access to property driveways and safety of the street.

Page 11: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 11

Given the above and previous resident feedback, it is was considered appropriate to consult the residents further on the extension of the ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions to include all days, on the east side of the street. Weekend Parking St Peters Anglican Church was operating during the Sunday parking survey (during school holidays). Church patrons were using the Council car park and the angled parking spaces in front of the Church, both of which were fully occupied during the Sunday parking survey. A further Sunday parking observation outside of the school holiday period indicated that vehicles were also parked on both sides of Alma Road, probably due to the Sunday School operating. Given the above, it is also considered appropriate to include ‘Sundays’ in the ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions. Residential responses indicate parking is an issue in the street during Church events. Due to inclement weather, sporting events were cancelled on the day of the Saturday parking survey. Notwithstanding, it was observed that illegal parking is occurring on the east side of the street where there are existing ‘No Stopping’ restrictions for Saturdays. Council’s Local Laws department will be requested to monitor the street and enforce the parking restrictions. Traffic Concerns and Congestion There were concerns raised by the residents in regard to traffic congestion when vehicles are parked on both sides of the street. The installation of ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions on one side of the street will improve access along with the safety of the street, including access improvement to property driveways. The possible minor traffic delays caused with vehicles reversing out of the angled parking spaces and with vehicles exiting the Aldi Supermarket and the Council car park at the same time is unavoidable. It is expected there will be some delays in vehicles being able to access Alma Road at times. However, it is considered appropriate to extend the length of the existing ‘No Stopping’ parking restriction 20m further south to improve vehicle movement in and out of the Council car park. Given the above, it is also deemed appropriate for the above suggested parking change to be included in the further residential consultation. As indicated previously, vehicles turning right out of Alma Road into Grimshaw Street generally had to wait a short period to undertake the right turn movement, as there is a high volume of traffic on Grimshaw Street. Given the above, vehicles turning right held up vehicles wanting to turn left into Grimshaw Street. Observations showed that delays were minimal. Installation of a ‘No Right Turn’ ban at this intersection is not considered warranted at this time. Rat running to avoid traffic signals was raised by a resident in the street. This was not identified during the site inspections. Additionally, vehicle speed was not observed to be a concern. No other traffic safety or congestion issues were identified in Alma Road.

Page 12: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.1

People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 12

PROPOSED PARKING CHANGES Following consultation and investigation, it is considered that the most appropriate changes to parking restrictions for Alma Road are:

The conversion of the existing ‘No Stopping, 9am – 4pm, Sat’ parking restrictions on the east side of the street to ‘No Stopping, 8.30am – 6pm’, for all seven days; and

The extension of the ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions 20m further south than the existing. This considered appropriate, to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park.

Given the above, a further community consultation was undertaken in Alma Road with the above proposal, in October 2013. The results of the survey are as follows. Eleven responses were received;

Nine respondents (82%) supported the proposed parking restriction changes.

Two respondents (18%) wanted to retain the existing parking arrangement. As the majority of the residents supported the proposal, it is considered appropriate to proceed with the installation of the parking restrictions. CONCLUSION

Following a Council Notice of Motion, an investigation has been undertaken to consider the possible parking and congestion issues in Alma Road. During the site observations it was observed that vehicles were parked on both sides of Alma Road. Considering the proximity to many local businesses and traffic generators such as Yulong Reserve, Public Transport and the Church, it is noted that there will be instances where parking is occurring on both sides of the road, causing access and safety concerns when parked directly opposite one another. Following the initial consultation and the investigations, it is considered that the most appropriate changes to parking restrictions for Alma Road are:

The conversion of the existing ‘No Stopping, 9am – 4pm, Sat’ parking restrictions on the east side of the street to ‘No Stopping, 8.30am – 6pm’, for all seven days.

The extension of the ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions 20m further south than the existing. This is considered appropriate, to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park.

As the majority of the residents supported this proposal, it is considered appropriate to proceed with the installation of the parking restrictions as this should help to improve access along the street. No other major traffic safety or congestion issues were identified in the street. Council’s Local Laws department will be asked to consider additional enforcement of the parking restrictions in the street, including on weekends.

Page 13: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

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People – Community Strengthening and Support

ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 13

RECOMMENDATION

That:

1. ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions for all seven days between 8.30am – 6pm, be installed on the east side of Alma Road replacing the existing parking restrictions.

2. Existing ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions be extended a further 20m south to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park.

3. Council’s Local Laws department consider additional regular enforcement of Alma Road, including weekends, as required.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

Page 14: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.2

People – Community Strengthening and Support

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 14

2.2 BANYULE GRAFFITI SUMMITT Author: Frances Gianinotti - Youth & Community Services Co-Ordinator,

Community Programs

File: 2013/831

SUMMARY

To report to Council on the outcomes of the Banyule Graffiti Summit “Getting a Grip on Graffiti” held on the 15th October, 2013.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction of “develop and promote safety and resilience in our community”.

BACKGROUND

The Banyule Graffiti Summit “Getting a Grip on Graffiti” was held on 15th October 2013 in response to Council and community interest in seeking solutions to the graffiti issues prevailing across the municipality. It was an opportunity to bring together over 60 key stakeholders from the community, government departments, organisations and Council to hear about the culture of graffiti, its impact in Banyule and collaborate to identify solutions for future consideration. In addition, the summit was a vehicle for meaningful community engagement and consultation, to inform the draft Banyule Graffiti Management Strategy (GMS).

HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues.

OVERVIEW OF KEY THEMES

The Graffiti Summit presented key information by a leading academic on the culture of graffiti and representatives of the Department of Justice and Victoria Police. Council officers presented an overview of the various graffiti strategies and activities currently implemented across Council.

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2.2

People – Community Strengthening and Support

BANYULE GRAFFITI SUMMITT cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 15

6 key themes were identified and included broad actions for future consideration as follows: Holistic Approach

Adopt a multi Council approach through the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) to tackle a common community issue with Council to take the lead advocacy role;

In hot spot areas, coordinate multiple approaches to reduce opportunities and eradicate graffiti activity;

Youth engagement

Adopt earlier intervention and proactive approaches to divert young people from illegal graffiti activities e.g. target primary school aged children;

Strengthen Council’s street art program which is working with highly marginalised young people often engaged in the illegal activity;

Understand the underlying causes of why young people engage in graffiti activity and creating diversionary activities;

Investigate opportunities to establish a mentoring program for young people engaged in graffiti activity;

Communication

Develop a comprehensive communication strategy which includes consistent processes, a coordinated website and empowers the community to take ownership of their local spaces;

Establish a ‘one stop’ reporting system within the municipality / region with easy access;

Cost and Resources

Invest in appropriately designed infrastructure to reduce opportunities for graffiti activity;

Maintain a register of tags;

Engaging Stakeholders

Engage other stakeholders to take responsibility for graffiti removal on other public owned assets e.g. Vic Roads/ Telcos / Electricity Co, etc.

Perception of Community Safety

Ensure effective information to residents on reporting and removal options;

Encourage increased police presence in hot spot areas;

UPDATE ON GRAFFITI INITIATIVES

The issue of graffiti is widespread across the community, not just in Banyule. This is evident in the range of funding initiatives on offer from both State and Federal government departments to address graffiti in local communities. Council has recently secured funding for two projects under the Graffiti Prevention and Removal Grants initiative by the Victorian Department of Justice as follows:

Graffiti: Everyone’s Business - $21,941 to undertake a 6 month demonstration project in Watsonia;

Beating Graffiti in the Village - $21,260 to undertake a major ‘blitz’ campaign in Olympic Village shopping precinct.

Page 16: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

2.2

People – Community Strengthening and Support

BANYULE GRAFFITI SUMMITT cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 16

Both projects will be completed this financial year. In addition, Council has secured 5 Portable Graffiti Removal Kits from the Department of Justice. The kits include high pressure cleaning equipment and will be located in key shopping and other hot spot precincts across the municipality for community use. It is expected that they will be in place before the end of 2013.

TIMELINES

The Graffiti Summit produced a range of potential actions for consideration by Council as part of the finalisation of the Graffiti Management Strategy (GMS). It is anticipated that the draft GMS will be updated by the end of 2013 and distributed for public comment. The final version will be submitted to Council for approval in early 2014. COUNCIL OFFICER COMMENTS At the Graffiti Summit, Council was recognised as being a lead advocate of graffiti prevention to other Councils and government tiers. The proposal was actively supported by key stakeholders on the day. As a result, Council could consider writing to the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) as soon as possible seeking support to tackle graffiti in a strategic and collaborative approach across regional and statewide boundaries. This would include the sharing of best practice and the development of potential partnerships.

CONCLUSION

The Banyule Graffiti Summit actively engaged a range of key stakeholders in discussions to provide Council clarity and purpose going into the future. It was a successful consultation mechanism to inform and validate Council’s role. Once completed and endorsed, the Banyule Graffiti Management Strategy will formally account to the community on Council’s commitment and direction in addressing Graffiti.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1. Note the six key themes arising from the Graffiti Summit being: Holistic Approach; Youth Engagement; Communication; Cost and Resources; Engaging Stakeholders; and Perception of Community Safety which will inform the finalisation of the Graffiti Management Strategy to be submitted to Council for approval in early 2014.

2. Write to the Municipal Association of Victoria outlining the outcomes of the

Banyule Graffiti Summit and seeking its support for a strategic and collaborative approach to tackling graffiti in local communities.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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3.1

Planet – Environmental Sustainability

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 17

3.1 ENERGY SAVING PLAN Author: Clayton Simpson - Resource Conservation Officer, City Development

File: BS24/055/004

SUMMARY

To consider the adoption of an Energy Saving Plan to help reduce Council’s energy use and costs. OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “deliver appropriate action on climate change”. Under this key direction, the City Plan has a goal of eventual carbon neutrality.

BACKGROUND

Following the direction of Council’s City Plan 2013-2017 and the Planet Policy and Strategy, the Energy Saving Plan is one of the five plans already adopted or being developed, including:

Water Sustainability Plan

Biodiversity Plan

Waste Plan

Environmental Stewardship Plan

Energy Saving Plan In the Greenhouse Action Strategy 2002 (GAS), Council committed to an emissions reduction target for its own operations of 30% below the 1996/97 baseline level by 2010. The 1996/97 baseline level was 16,087 tonnes of emissions and they have increased by about 2% to about 16,500 tonnes now. A 30% reduction would take emissions down to 11,261 tonnes. This reduction target has not been achieved. Council energy use and emissions will continue to increase if Council operations continue in a ‘business as usual’ fashion. Significant energy saving and emission reduction measures are needed if the City Plan goal is to be achieved.

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Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 18

HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues. ENERGY USE INTO THE FUTURE WaterMarc is a large expansion of Council services that has significant energy demands and even with its energy saving measures, it has increased Council emissions. Cogeneration (cogen) is currently being installed at WaterMarc, costing about $700,000. Cogen is more energy, emissions and cost efficient than conventional grid electricity and water boilers. With cogen, WaterMarc’s operation is estimated to increase Council annual emissions by about 3,400 tonnes or 21%. Without cogen, the increase in Council’s annual emissions is estimated to be about 6,200 tonnes or 38%. If business as usual continues into the future, energy use and emissions increases are likely to continue. Council’s energy bill is growing. From 2006/07 to 2012/13, the actual and estimated annual combined buildings, public lighting and fuel energy bill has increased by about $1.6 million to a total of about $4 million, a rise of about 65%. This rise is mostly due to the increase in energy use which the energy plan aims to constrain. ENERGY SAVING PLAN The energy saving plan incorporates key opportunities to achieve carbon neutrality by 2019/20 and constrain Council’s growing energy bill. Conceptually, the key energy saving and emissions reduction steps are:

Reduce energy use and improve efficiency of use

Substitute emissions-intense energy sources with ones that are less emissions-intense

Offset all emissions that remain after the previous steps It is estimated that the key energy saving and emissions reduction opportunities would require an investment of about $15 million by 2019/20 to achieve carbon neutrality. These investments would cut Council’s energy costs by about $16.7 million cumulatively to 2029/30 with ongoing savings thereafter. TOWARDS THE 30% REDUCTION TARGET Council did not achieve the emissions reduction target of 30% below the 1996/97 baseline level by the set date of 2010. As further detailed in Table 1, the proposed next steps in 2013/14 and 2014/15 towards the 30% target are:

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install solar hot water (SHW) panels on three large energy using buildings

implement energy efficient public lighting

consider installing the first tranche of solar photo-voltaic panels on large electricity using buildings

consider dedicated budget allocations for environmental measures in future building projects

Table 1: Next Step Towards the 30% Reduction Target

Emission changes and reduction actions

Emissions (tonnes/

year)

% of Council's

total

Emissions reduction

cost

Already occurred or underway:

Increase from 1996/97 baseline + 413 + 2%

Increase from WaterMarc + 6,200 + 38%

WaterMarc cogen - 2,800 - 17% $700,000

For 2013/14 and 2014/15

Solar hot water (SHW) panels - 100 - 0.6% $118,000

Energy efficient public lighting - 3,100 - 19% $4,700,000

Solar photo-voltaic (PV) panels (1st tranche) - 122 - 0.7% $350,000

Totals + 419 + 3% $5,868,000

To reduce the above 3% emissions increase to a nil increase, Council could consider a limited purchase of carbon offsets as per the following:

Carbon offsets (ongoing annual cost) - 419 - 3% $11,000

Totals including offsets + 0 + 0% $5,879,000

To achieve the 30% reduction target, about $9 million would need to be spent on Solar PV panels, building improvements, fuel efficient fleet and GreenPower as detailed in Table 2. As $9 million by 2014/15 is a significant investment, it is not considered immediately affordable for Council. Instead, a first tranche of $350,000 of solar PV panels and $11,000 of offsets is proposed for 2014/15. This provides a reasonable mix between energy and cost saving improvement to Council facilities and more affordable emissions reduction through offsets. The 30% reduction target will not be achieved in 2014/15 with these measures, but a good next step towards the target will be taken. The 30% reduction target is only likely to be achieved in 2019/20 with the measures detailed in the ‘achieving carbon neutrality’ section and Table 2 below. Another measure proposed for 2014/15 and beyond, but not costed or detailed in table 1 above, is for Council to consider budget allocations dedicated to environmental measures in future building projects.

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ENERGY SAVING PLAN cont’d

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These building projects could include Council offices above WaterMarc, refurbishment of the basketball stadium of the former Banksia College, Ivanhoe Community Learning Hub, future stages of the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre refurbishment and the Watsonia Hub. In principle, Council could consider a 5% to 10% budget allocation for energy saving and other environmental measures for each of these projects. As an example, if one of these building projects were to cost $15 million, Council could consider an extra $750,000 to $1.5 million for environmental measures. A 5% or more environmental (or ‘ESD’ – environmentally sustainable design) measures budget is becoming common in the building industry because, typically, energy saving returns on investment are attractive. ACHIEVING CARBON NEUTRALITY The next stage of the energy saving program would be to achieve carbon neutrality by 2019/20. This would be achieved by implementing a mix of Reduce, Substitute, Offset steps as outlined in Table 2.

Table 2: Achieving Carbon Neutrality

Emission Reduction Actions

Emissions (tonnes/

year)

% of Council's

Total (16,087 tonnes)

Emissions Reduction

Cost to 2019/20

Cost Effectiveness

($ cost to 2019/20 per

tonne saved)

Savings to

2029/30

Already underway:

Increase (1996/97) + 413 + 2%

Increase (WaterMarc_ + 6,200 + 38%

WaterMarc cogen - 2,800 - 17% $700,000 $250 $2,450,00

0

For 2013/14 to 2019/20:

SHW panels - 100 - 1% $118,000 $1,180 $270,000

Efficient public lighting - 3,100 - 19% $4,700,000

$1,516 $6,100,000

Solar PV panels - 1,000 - 6% $2,930,000

$2,930 $2,150,000

Efficient buildings - 680 - 4% $720,000

$1,059 $1,590,000

Ivanhoe Aquatic cogen - 500 - 3% $400,000 $800 $420,000

Fuel efficient fleet - 400 - 3% $4,390,000

$10,975 $3,670,000

MRET* - 1,500 - 9% Nil n/a nil

GreenPower & offsets - 12,620 - 78% $930,000 $74 nil

Totals - 16,087

- 100% $14,888,000

$925 $16,650,000

*Federal Government Mandatory Renewable Energy Target (MRET)

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CONSULTATION The Banyule Environment Advisory Committee (BEAC) has expressed concern at the limited effectiveness of Council emissions reduction efforts such that the 30% reduction target has not yet been achieved. BEAC has written to applaud Council on the decision to fund streetlights energy efficiency as a first step in a strategy to urgently reduce emissions towards carbon neutrality. The proposed energy saving plan partly satisfies BEAC’s recommendations on reducing emissions. Solar PV panels are a good next step towards the 30% target for a number of reasons, including:

Growing enthusiasm for solar PV from BEAC and the community

‘Community solar’ has been discussed by BEAC and encouraged by some members. On occasion, lessees of small Council buildings enquire about installing solar panels. Installing solar PV on large electricity using Council buildings would likely have more direct and significant outcomes. It would be likely that this form of solar PV would be encouraged by the community and BEAC. Solar PV on large electricity using Council buildings would have good demonstration value to the community as the panels tend to be more visible to the public than other energy efficiency measures.

Growing momentum for Solar PV bulk purchasing

The Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action, a partnership Banyule has with nine other Councils and the Moreland Energy Foundation, is developing a ‘Solar PV Scale Up’ project which may consider joint procurement of solar PV installations to try to improve prices. Already, over recent years, the price of solar PV has reduced noticeably.

Council capacity is more amenable to solutions like solar PV

Council personnel are focussed on implementation of energy efficient streetlights, SHW panels, the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre refurbishment and other priority projects. While capacity might be stretched in any case, at this stage, an additional ‘bolt on’ or ‘add on’ building project is preferable to energy efficiency measures that more fundamentally change buildings and facilities.

COST IMPLICATIONS Plan implementation will involve the consideration of allocating budget to implement energy saving initiatives for the 2014/15 budget and the ten year capital works plan. For 2014/15, this includes $350,000 for solar PV. As proposed in this report, it also includes an additional $11,000 for offsets in 2014/15 and annually thereafter. Beyond 2014/15, plan implementation will involve future consideration of further allocations towards more solar PV, energy efficient buildings, Ivanhoe Aquatic cogen, fuel efficient fleet, GreenPower and offsets as shown in Table 2 above. Full plan implementation would cost about $15 million by 2019/20, but there would also be savings over time. By 2029/30, accumulated energy savings would total about $16.6 million or greater depending on energy price increases.

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The environmental benefits from these types of initiatives come with financial benefits also. For example, energy savings will be complemented by water savings from the stormwater harvesting project and implementation of the recently adopted Water Sustainability Plan. By 2029/30, accumulated water savings will add at least $6 million to $16.6 million of energy savings for a total of at least $22.6 million which will grow further in the years thereafter.

CONCLUSION

To reduce Council energy use, $700,000 has already been committed to WaterMarc cogen, as has $118,000 to solar hot water panels and $4.7 million to energy efficient public lighting. To take the next step towards the 30% target, $350,000 for a first tranche of solar photovoltaic panels and $11,000 for carbon offsets is proposed for 2014/15. A total investment of about $15 million by 2019/20 could achieve carbon neutrality. This investment could constrain Council’s energy costs by $16.6 million or more cumulatively to 2029/30 with ongoing savings thereafter. RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1. Adopt the Energy Saving Plan to achieve the City Plan goal of carbon neutrality by 2019/20 and prepare an appropriate document to communicate the plan.

2. Consider the allocation of $350,000 for solar photo-voltaic panels on Council buildings in the 2014/15 budget

3. Consider the allocation of $11,000 for carbon offsets in the budget for 2014/15 and annually thereafter

4. Consider further budget allocations in the ten year capital works plan towards further solar photovoltaic panels, energy efficient building measures, Ivanhoe Aquatic cogen, fuel efficient fleet measures and purchasing GreenPower and further carbon offsets

5. Consider 5% to 10% budget allocations for energy saving and other environmental (or ‘ESD’ – environmentally sustainable design) measures for the Council offices above WaterMarc, refurbishment of the basketball stadium of the former Banksia College, Ivanhoe Community Learning Hub, future stages of the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre refurbishment and the Watsonia Hub

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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3.2

Planet – Environmental Sustainability

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 23

3.2 FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM

Author: John Milkins - Enviromental Sustainability Co-ordinator, City Development

File: BS24/055/005

SUMMARY

To allow Council to consider options with regard to the future of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program, hosted by Banyule City Council on behalf of Melbourne Water.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact”. BACKGROUND Since 2000 Banyule City Council has hosted the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program on behalf of Melbourne Water and four other Councils: Darebin, Whittlesea, Yarra and Nillumbik. The Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program is branded as a Melbourne Water initiative with support from local governments. In 2012/13 Melbourne Water contributed $44,000 to the program. The program is now under threat as Melbourne Water decided not to contribute to the 2013/14 operation of the Waterwatch program in the north east region. Council needs to consider Banyule’s support for the program which has a $172,979 budget in 2013/14. The Waterwatch program was initiated in 1993 to enable communities to become involved in the monitoring and management of waterways in their catchment. Waterwatch aims to raise knowledge in communities about water issues and to encourage water quality monitoring groups to undertake constructive action.

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FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 24

Waterwatch grew from a local to state to national program with a diverse funding basis involving local governments, businesses and catchment management authorities, depending on the program location.

At the State level, Waterwatch is supported by the Victorian State government through the Department of Environment and Primary Industries http://www.vic.waterwatch.org.au/. In the metropolitan area Melbourne Water is the agency responsible for the program, and it is now branded as a Melbourne Water initiative called Healthy Waterways Waterwatch http://www.waterwatchmelbourne.org.au/.

Across five of its seven regions Melbourne Water delivers the Healthy Waterways Waterwatch program in-house. However, since the year 2000 in two regions - north and north–east metropolitan Melbourne – Waterwatch has been hosted and delivered by Merri Creek Management Committee and Banyule City Council.

The North East program has a permanent full time Band 6 Waterwatch Coordinator role employed by Banyule in the Environmental Planning team. Funding contributions from Melbourne Water and the five Councils support this role. The role is currently vacant, and it has not been able to be advertised until partner funding contributions are finalised and committed.

Councils have contributed to the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program on a schedule of costs set by Melbourne Water across the seven regions. For the last several years MOU’s have been developed to guide the funding allocations and deliverables across the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. For many years the funding model consisted of Melbourne Water paying around one-sixth of the program cost (17%), and the local governments contributing the remaining five-sixths (83%). However, Melbourne Water also received Federal funding under the National Heritage Trust which boosted program funding. In 2010/11, noting Melbourne Water’s branding of the program, and its primary responsibility for waterway health, the North East local governments sought and gained agreement for a funding increase from around $13,000 to $44,000 per annum. This reflected an increase in the contribution from Melbourne Water from 17% to 45% to better represent state and local government sharing of costs. Melbourne Water has gone through a major four year review of its core service delivery, much like the Banyule City Plan process, which resulted in a realignment of the Melbourne Water business and a focus on regions and priority projects. Internal Melbourne Water Waterwatch staff are now part of the Communications department in Melbourne Water, and have been assigned to regions to support identified priority projects where Waterwatch has been deemed relevant. On the basis of its new structure Melbourne Water wrote to Council in November 2012 advising that it would be discontinuing its existing funding arrangements in favour of a new regional approach. The new approach required Banyule as the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program host to apply for a Melbourne Water contribution which was assessed against the other external bid from Merri Creek Management Committee and the five other internally delivered Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Programs.

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Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 25

In the five Melbourne Water delivered Waterwatch programs, no Council financial contributions are sought by Melbourne Water, as some Councils had reviewed their own commitments and the value to their Council of the Melbourne Water Waterwatch program. In the two external programs – North and North East – Councils were still expected to contribute financially. Over the next several months Banyule sought advice from Melbourne Water on their priority projects in the North East region. Melbourne Water advised that they could not provide these as that work was incomplete. Nonetheless, Banyule submitted an application to host the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program on 4 June 2013, noting concern regarding its ability to provide a fully scoped application without identified Melbourne Water priority projects. As the new financial year commenced without a Melbourne Water funding decision, Banyule City Council continued to resource the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. Currently, five months into the financial year, $23,046 of Council’s contribution of $49,878 toward the total 2013/14 Waterwatch program has been expended (46% of Banyule’s contribution). This scaled back expenditure is being undertaken by Banyule to avoid community volunteer distress in the 19 groups active across the region, reputational damage, and the possible withdrawal of local government partners in the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. However, without a Melbourne Water contribution, it is unlikely that local government partners will continue to support their program in the region. In order to progress the funding issue Banyule and Melbourne Water managers met in late July 2013. Melbourne Water requested that Banyule submit an amended application that sought Melbourne Water funding for a Banyule City Council – Melbourne Water Healthy Waterways program excluding the other Council partners, or a Healthy Waterways program delivered across the region with all North East Councils. These applications were submitted on 19 August. Costs were revised (upwards) to reflect a rate that Melbourne Water had accepted for Merri Creek Management Committee to deliver the Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program in the Northern region for 2013-14. Banyule sought urgent feedback on these revised proposals and at a Management level meeting on 15 October was verbally informed that both Banyule applications were unsuccessful. Melbourne Water advised that their total budget for the Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program across the seven regions is $100,000. In 2012-13 year the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program operational budget alone was approximately $120,000 with Melbourne Water contributing $44,000. Banyule has requested formal notification of the Melbourne Water funding decision but it has not been forthcoming. Additionally, Melbourne Water has invited volunteers to a 20 year celebration of the Waterwatch Program at Darebin Parklands and has not indicated how it will acknowledge the significant contribution of the member Councils over this time, despite a request for this advice from Banyule on behalf of local government partners.

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Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 26

Options The following options regarding the future of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program are suggested for Council’s consideration.

1. Banyule City Council Fund North East Region Program Banyule City Council makes up the funding shortfall ($44,000) resulting from the withdrawal of Melbourne Water funding. This would add to Banyule’s existing $49,878 contribution to the program.

This option is not recommended as Banyule already supports the Melbourne Water branded program to a considerable extent.

2. Seek Additional Funds From North East Region Program Councils

Banyule City Council seeks increased funding amongst the other local government partners to make up the Melbourne Water shortfall.

This option is not recommended as local government partners have already expressed dissatisfaction with previous levels of Melbourne Water funding, and local governments in the Melbourne Water run regions do not make any financial contribution to the Waterwatch program there.

3. Fund Banyule Specific Program Banyule City Council advises Melbourne Water and local government partners and volunteers that, due to a lack of funding from Melbourne Water, Banyule City Council is unable to continue hosting the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. By maintaining the Banyule funded component of the permanent Waterwatch role, and its operating costs, Banyule City Council can continue to support the State based Waterwatch program and thus the current Banyule Waterwatch volunteers who contribute to this important program. This also allows Banyule to focus exclusively on Council’s own significant commitment to waterway health and the local community benefits such as the stormwater harvesting project, Sustainable Homes Program water workshops, Friends groups planting along local creeks.

This option is recommended as it allows the continuation of the Waterwatch program in Banyule, which has been running for 20 years. Supporting the Waterwatch program also assists in meeting Banyule’s City Plan City Plan key directions 2.1 Protect and enhance our environment, 2.2 Conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact and 2.5 Act as environmental stewards. The revised Banyule program can be monitored over a 12 month period. At the conclusion of this time the program can be reviewed to assess any adjustments required, and a determination can be made about whether to continue the program.

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Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 27

CONCLUSION

Following a lack of funding support for the Melbourne Water North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program, Banyule City Council should consider its ability to continue to host the Program for Melbourne Water and the four (4) other local government partners. An opportunity exists to maintain Banyule’s commitment to the Waterwatch program at the State level. This meets relevant City Plan key directions and would focus more strongly on Banyule’s achievements in protecting waterway environments with its local community.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council: 1. Advise Melbourne Water, local government partners and volunteers that, due to

a lack of funding from Melbourne Water, Banyule City Council is unable to continue hosting the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program for Melbourne Water.

2. Continues to support the State level Waterwatch program and the 12

monitoring groups within Banyule in 2013/14.

3. Reviews the local Waterwatch program outcomes and considers its ongoing support in the 2014/15 budget.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

Page 28: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013
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4.1

Place – Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 29

4.1 METROPOLITAN PLANNING STRATEGY Author: David Cox - Strategic Planning Co-ordinator, City Development

File: MBS16/040/013 and PS11/13

SUMMARY

The Victorian Government has released the draft Metropolitan Planning Strategy (Plan Melbourne) and has requested response submissions. This gives a further opportunity to influence the shaping of the final Strategy before it is released.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in-line with Council’s City Plan key directions to:

Maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live

Strengthen local activity and employment areas

Supporting thriving commercial and retail activity

Enhance Banyule’s public and open spaces

Support sustainable transport.

BACKGROUND

Overarching strategic planning for metropolitan Melbourne is set by the Victorian Government’s Metropolitan Planning Strategy (“Strategy”). This Strategy informs the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) and priorities for future State investment. The SPPF is part of the Banyule Planning Scheme and sits above Council’s Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS). The MSS gives Council’s local strategic direction for future land use and development in the municipality. Any changes to the SPPF, such as for a new Metropolitan Planning Strategy, will affect all planning schemes across metropolitan Melbourne. The current Strategy for Melbourne is known as Melbourne 2030 and its 2008 update, Melbourne @ 5 Five Million. In 2012 the Victorian Government made progress towards a new Strategy, when a Discussion Paper was released for public comment. After its meeting on 4 March 2013 an approved Council submission was sent and work progressed with other Councils on matters of shared interest. Council’s submission raised various matters, these included:

Advocating for the Victorian Government to do effective public consultation

Supporting the ‘polycentric city’ concept and seeking clarity for activity centres

Supporting the ’20 minute city’ concept for jobs, shops, recreation and facilities to be with sustainable transport

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METROPOLITAN PLANNING STRATEGY cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 30

Seeking a focus on public places and spaces, like shopping streets, parks and facilities

Seeking greater recognition for trees and landscaping for Melbourne’s identity

Seeking adequate funding, mechanisms and land for public places and spaces, including better developer contributions, parks and cemetery needs.

Council shared a submission with the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils (Boroondara, Greater Dandenong, Knox, Manningham, Maroondah, Monash, Nillumbik, Whitehorse, Yarra Ranges and Banyule), which also made reference to these matters. A further submission was shared with Austin Health, Darebin Council and LaTrobe University for a national employment cluster to be included for northern Melbourne - in Banyule and Darebin. Council also gave input to other submissions prepared by the Northern Region Group of Councils and the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV). On 9 October 2013 the Victorian Government released their draft Strategy, Plan Melbourne. This draft has a 2050 vision for Melbourne as a ‘global city of opportunity and choice’ to ‘build the confidence, investment and employment vital for Victoria’s long-term future’. Key themes and outcomes in the draft Strategy are:

An integrated approach across land-use, transport and community and social

infrastructure

Collaboration across government tiers, the private sector and the community

will be required to deliver the strategy

Job creation and security will be ‘at the forefront of planning decisions’

Increase certainty in the planning system by protecting suburbs and delivering

intensified development in certain areas

Setting aspirations for large scale infrastructure development to support city

growth, sustainability and productivity

Identifying an emerging LaTrobe Cluster for northern Melbourne.

CONSULTATION

The draft Strategy has been released for public comment, with a deadline for written submissions on Friday 6 December 2013. The Plan Melbourne website (www.planmelbourne.vic.gov.au) provides the draft and supporting information. Submissions can be given to the Victorian Government online, via email or by post. Interested people can also be part of online discussions, through dedicated channels on YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. Council has helped raise local awareness with notices in local newspapers, posters at service centres, information on its website and through its Facebook page.

DISCUSSION

Metropolitan planning takes a metropolitan perspective to giving policy direction and

informing investment priorities for the benefit of the metropolitan community and

Victoria. The Victorian Government’s progress towards a new Strategy is already

associated with various, known priorities. These include:

Urban renewal of 250ha at Fishermans Bend

Major transport infrastructure with a new East-West road link

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METROPOLITAN PLANNING STRATEGY cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 31

Expanded central Melbourne for growth and development

Revised commercial, industrial and rural zones now in planning schemes

New residential zones, for planning schemes by July 2014.

Reviewing planning scheme controls for the middle Yarra River.

The Government has also said that the new Metropolitan Planning Authority (MPA)

will play a key role to implement the final Strategy. Council is continuing to work with

the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils and for the emerging La Trobe

Employment Cluster.

The draft Strategy has responded positively to various matters raised in Council’s

earlier submission. In summary, the draft is:

Looking to resolve planning issues for cemeteries

Establishing an Employment Cluster for northern Melbourne

Committing to future planning for public open space, boulevards and urban greening

Supporting councils to promote sustainable development

Looking to limit residential development in sensitive environments, like waterway corridors

Identifying future funding opportunities for local councils.

COUNCIL SUBMISSION

After reviewing the draft Strategy, a further Council submission can ask for some

refinements to be made before the Victorian Government releases the final Strategy.

These refinements can ask for further benefits, by:

Ensuring the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster is linked with initiatives and investment for continued urban renewal across Heidelberg West, Heidelberg Heights, Bellfield and also benefiting the Heidelberg Activity Centre.

Recognising the potential for the Bell Street Mall as an Activity Centre, Watsonia as an emerging Activity Centre, and the emerging future potential for Heidelberg as a Metropolitan Activity Centre.

Identifying regionally important development opportunities at Greensborough Station, Watsonia Station and Heidelberg Station

Recognising the increasing subregional importance of Heidelberg Station and its key role to support the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster

Recognising the importance of achieving integrated public transport and land use solutions for the La Trobe Employment Cluster

Revising the approach for investigating the future North-East link to prioritise metropolitan, circumferential freight movement to Eastlink, with a revised alignment and southern connection at Ringwood

Investigating for track duplication of the Hurstbridge rail line, between Heidelberg and Rosanna

Giving parameters to support removal of Neighbourhood Centre status for Eaglemont

Giving priority to completing Melbourne’s Off-Road Trail Network and also for cycling links into Clusters, Activity Centres, other key destinations and into neighbourhoods to support the 20-Minute Neighbourhoods concept

Giving priority to greening of neighbourhoods and treed-boulevards

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DTPLI’s ongoing leadership for the regional, middle Yarra River project, so Council and community can give feedback on draft Municipal Toolkits before the project is completed.

A draft Council submission accompanies this report in Attachment 1. This draft includes specific recommendations for the final Strategy, to address the matters outlined above.

OTHER SUBMISSIONS

Council is continuing work with the other organisations, described in this report, for shared submissions. These are:

Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils: A draft submission is attached in Attachment 2. A final submission is currently being prepared. Key matters relevant to Banyule include suggestions for: urban renewal; guiding jobs growth; additional mechanisms for housing affordability; regional transport plans; proactive financial and economic incentives for investment; active progress by MPA; Identifying infrastructure gaps in Activity Centres and coupling the final Strategy with an infrastructure plan.

La Trobe Employment Cluster: The previous Austin Health, La Trobe University, Darebin and Banyule Councils submission has been supported because the draft Strategy includes the emerging Cluster. A further submission, from these organisations, can now acknowledge this support and ask the Victorian Government to put some priority for investment in the Cluster.

Northern Region Group of Councils: The northern region group of metropolitan Councils have prepared a report known as the Northern Infrastructure Report Card. This report is being considered as a separate item to this agenda paper and although will not be lodged as a direct submission to Plan Melbourne it will help inform future infrastructure projects to assist in implementation of the Plan. It is expected that this document will be officially launched in February.

Council’s final submission can also be given to the MAV, to help inform any submission it prepares on behalf of the local government sector.

WHERE TO NEXT

Submissions to the draft Strategy are due by 6 December 2013. The State has not given a release date for the final Strategy. In addition to giving its own submission and being part of shared submissions, Council can also write to the Ministers for Planning and Transport on some key priorities. These would include: Planning 1. Strategic redevelopment at Greensborough, Heidelberg and Watsonia Stations 2. Revised designation for various centres, including the Bell Street Mall, Watsonia

and in the future Heidelberg. 3. Neighbourhood Centre designation removed for Eaglemont 4. La Trobe Employment Cluster linked with State investment 5. Middle Yarra River consultation, for reviewed planning controls.

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Transport 6. Future investment for Hurstbridge line track duplication, between Heidelberg and

Rosanna 7. Revised investigations for a realigned North-East link.

CONCLUSION

The draft Strategy has addressed various matters that Council raised in its earlier submission. Council can now consider a further submission, for refinements to be made in the final Strategy. Council can also support ongoing progress for shared submissions with the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils, La Trobe Employment Cluster, Northern Region Group of Councils and giving information to the MAV.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1. Approves the Banyule submission to the draft new metropolitan planning strategy that is an attachment to this report, and for it to be sent to the Victorian Government.

2. Supports ongoing work being done for shared submissions with the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils and the La Trobe Cluster, and for them to be sent to the Victorian Government.

3. Writes and pursues further discussion with the Minister for Planning and Minister for Transport on the key priorities described in the report.

4. Receives a future Council report, after the Victorian Government has announced a final new metropolitan planning strategy.

ATTACHMENTS

No. Title Page

1 Draft Council Submission 87

2 Draft Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils Submission 121

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4.2 EAST WEST LINK - COMPREHENSIVE IMPACT STATEMENT

Author: Cameron Baird - Engineering Services Co Ordinator, City Development

File: BS20/045/006

SUMMARY

The State Government and the Linking Melbourne Authority have recently released the comprehensive impact statement for the eastern section of the proposed East West Link. The East West Link is intended to provide a freeway standard connection from the Eastern Freeway through to CityLink running through the north of Melbourne. The link will provide an alternate east west freeway connection to the busy M1 connection running south of the city. The Impact Statement includes the consideration of Traffic and Transport impacts from the proposal. Modelling of the future traffic network has been conducted to determine the future impacts both with and without the East West Link. Comparison of the two models has enabled an assessment of the projects potential future benefits. The modelling has highlighted that in general there are net traffic volume and travel time improvements evident throughout the study area that offer overall greater benefit to the metropolitan road network. The study also noted some general minor benefits to traffic in the southern Banyule area. Further advice highlighted around 5% improvements on anticipated 2031 traffic volumes on key arterial routes through Banyule through the provision of the project. There are some concerns with the possible detrimental impact the large cost of the East West Link project will have on the provision and timelines of other competing and highly beneficial transport projects around Melbourne. There are also concerns that the East West link has been considered in isolation and has not had its benefits compared with other projects so as to maximise tax payer and transport benefits for Melbourne. A submission highlighting these concerns and requesting commitment and timing from the Government on these other projects is proposed.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “support sustainable transport”.

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BACKGROUND

Council at its meeting of 23 September 2013 in considering transport project advocacy resolved in part that:

“A5. East West Link – Council has not formed a view on this project given a lack of information regarding the project impacts, including impacts on Banyule. Council seeks further information on this project so that an informed position can be taken.”

The Linking Melbourne Authority has been charged with the delivery of the East West Link project. Following the September resolution Council made a request to the Authority for a briefing on the project and its potential impacts to Banyule. On 31 October 2013 the Linking Melbourne Authority and the State Government released the Comprehensive Impact Statement for this project. This statement is on display for comment until the 12 December 2013. Following this release on the 18 November 2013 the Authority provided a briefing to Council on this matter in line with Council’ earlier request.

COMPREHENSIVE IMPACT STATEMENT

The Comprehensive Impact Statement for the proposed East West Link is a large document that considers multiple facets of the proposal and its potential impacts. This report focuses on the Traffic and Transport components and in particular what traffic and transport impacts from the project may influence Banyule into the future. The Linking Melbourne Authority has invited feedback or submissions on this project. The feedback period closes on 12 December 2013.

PROJECT DETAILS

The East West Link in its entirety features two (2) separate components, these being an eastern and a western section. This Comprehensive Impact Statement solely considers the impacts of the eastern section of the proposal. The Eastern Section of the East West Link runs from the western end of the Eastern Freeway in Clifton Hill to join up with CityLink in Parkville, and then extending to the Port of Melbourne precinct where it may ultimately connect with the Western Section of the East West Link. The eastern section comprises a total of 4.4km of tunnel connection from the end of the Eastern Freeway through to Royal Park. This section of the project is estimated to cost between $6 – 8 billion. Figure 1 details the extents of the proposed East West Link and highlights the local study region (in blue). PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The Impact Statement raises many potential transport opportunities from the project these including:

East West Link – Eastern Section would provide an alternative to the M1 corridor and consequently reduce the reliance on the M1 corridor

Additional capacity would be provided for east-west movements, which would relieve pressure from existing east-west arterial routes

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The new link would help alleviate congestion where the Eastern Freeway terminates at Hoddle Street by providing an additional route for this traffic to travel along.

A reduction of use of local streets by freight traffic

Improved reliability of north-south tram routes

Better access to and from the Port of Melbourne and Melbourne Airport to the eastern suburbs

East West Link – Eastern Section allows for a more efficient use of the Eastern Freeway, particularly during non-peak periods

The new link provides opportunities for faster and more frequent bus services between Doncaster and CBD.

Figure 1. East West Link – Locality Plan TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORT IMPACT STATEMENT A traffic and transport impact statement has been prepared as part of the comprehensive impact statement for the project. This study considers the traffic and transport impacts of the proposal both locally and regionally. Figure 2 highlights the extent of the regional traffic study, which includes large sections of Banyule out to the

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end of the M80 ring road and along the Greensborough Highway/Rosanna Road connection.

Figure 2 – Regional Study Area Traffic Model

Traffic modelling has been conducted throughout these areas, with more detailed assessments conducted through the local areas identified in the blue area of Figure 1. The Traffic Modelling for the new link has all been assessed based on future year traffic impacts, in particular the year 2031 has been considered as the assessment year for the study. The model was calibrated to 2011 data and then extrapolated to 2031 utilising population forecasts and employment growth estimations. Two 2013 models were created, one with the East West Link and one without. The data was then compared to determine the relevant difference in impacts between the two scenarios.

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EAST WEST LINK FORECAST TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORT IMPACTS Traffic Impacts The strategic traffic modelling conducted, generally supports a reduction in adjacent arterial road traffic volumes and general network travel time improvements post East West Link implementation. In particular the report notes:

“The 2031 with East West Link – Eastern Section modelling results indicate that the East West Link – Eastern Section would improve travel times, with vehicle hours travelled per day reducing by 0.11 per cent (which equates to 4,300 hours per day). In addition, the number of vehicle kilometres travelled within the network would increase by 0.4 per cent (800,000 kilometres). The combination of these two factors would result in an overall greater benefit to the metropolitan road network, as a greater number of kilometres would be travelled within the network for less hours compared to the network in 2031 without the East West Link – indicating reduced levels of congestion.”

Further micro-simulation modelling has also been conducted on the key interchanges featured as part of the eastern section of the East West Link. This modelling has recommended certain changes to the original layout and configuration of these interchanges which is being adopted in the final design. The proposed changes demonstrate a suitable level of service is achieved in these areas and that integration with CityLink traffic should not develop undue congestion or capacity concerns. Public Transport Impacts The Traffic and Transport Impact Statement notes that:

“Within the local study area, public transport is not anticipated to be significantly impacted by East West Link – Eastern Section. No public transport routes are proposed to be altered due to the project. Additionally, the project is anticipated to provide benefits to north-south tram routes crossing Alexandra Parade.”

In particular the report notes that:

No adverse impacts are expected to any bus routes operating in the area.

Bus services on Johnston Street should improve given anticipated traffic reductions

North South tram routes should improve given anticipated traffic reductions. Cycling Impacts No new cycling routes are being proposed as part of this project; however the report notes that cycling conditions and travel times are likely to improve within the local study area given the anticipated reduction in traffic on many of the roads. Freight Impacts The Traffic and Transport Impact Statement notes that:

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“Within the local East West Link – Eastern Section would provide an alternative east-west route connecting to the Port of Melbourne and Melbourne Airport. The new link would be designed and constructed to freeway standard thereby connecting the freeway ring around the city. It is anticipated the connection to the Port of Melbourne would dramatically improve connectivity for freight vehicles travelling to north-eastern areas of Melbourne… Overall, East West Link – Eastern Section is expected to improve connectivity and travel times for east-west travelling vehicles, including freight.”

BANYULE SPECIFIC TRAFFIC IMPACTS Forecasted Local Study Region Impacts for Banyule A general 2% reduction in traffic on Bell Street and Manningham Road from the 2031 base case condition (ie. no East West Link) has been forecast through the modelling of the East West Link. Forecasted Regional Area Impacts for Banyule A complete picture of the regional impacts through Banyule has not been provided in the transport report however a snapshot of some of the impacts through parts of Banyule is available. Figure 3 and Figure 4 following highlight the forecast regional impacts of the East West Link in comparison to the 2031 base case condition with no East West Link. In general the forecast highlights minor reductions in both local and arterial road traffic in the southern Banyule area.

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Figure 3. Regional Area Impacts - Percentage traffic volume change, 2031 base case Vs 2031 East West Link (eastern section) Several local and arterial roads within Banyule highlight more significant impacts in comparison to the 2031 base case scenario, these being mostly situated around the Heidelberg West Industrial Precinct. The roads include:

Southern Road , Heidelberg West around 10 – 20% reduction.

Dougharty Road, Heidelberg West – around 10% reduction.

Altona Street, Heidelberg West around 10 – 20% reduction.

Liberty Parade (North), Heidelberg West – around 10% reduction.

Kenilworth Parade and Wallace Street, Ivanhoe around 10 – 20% reduction.

Ramu Parade, Heidelberg West around 10 – 20% reduction.

Outhwaite Road, Heidelberg West around 10 – 20% reduction.

Alamein Road, West Heidelberg around 10 – 20% increase.

Maltravers Road, Eaglemont around 10 – 20% increase. Figure 4 is an enlarged extract of the forecast impacts in the southern Banyule area, and is the only detailed data available for the impacts on local Banyule roads included in the traffic and transport report.

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No further data is available in the report or appendices on further impacts in Banyule to the northern areas; in particular no information appears to be available on any possible impacts to the Greensborough Highway and Rosanna Road corridor. This traffic corridor is an important route within the road network and is of ongoing concern to Council given its high traffic volumes and freight numbers.

Figure 4. Percentage traffic volume change, 2031 base case Vs 2031 East West Link (eastern section) – Banyule Enlargement Linking Melbourne Authority Council Briefing On 18 November 2013, representatives from Linking Melbourne Authority provided a briefing on the East West Link to Council. The briefing enabled Councillors and senior staff an opportunity to ask questions and seek further information on the project. In particular queries in regard to potential impacts on the Greensborough Highway and Rosanna Road corridor were able to be addressed. Advice was provided from the Authority that for Lower Plenty Road, Rosanna Road, Lower Heidelberg Road and Heidelberg Road that reductions in traffic volume of around 5% are evident in modelling of the 2031 traffic conditions with the provision of the East West Link.

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MODEL ACCURACY AND ROBUSTNESS Strategic modelling of such a large area is based on current government and local area policy, census statistics and general trends in order to attempt to forecast future traffic volumes and changes. The model utilised in the study has undergone calibration, sensitivity testing, base case validation, peer review and VicRoads review and sign off. Short of further independent expert evidence and review of the data all the proper modelling protocols and testing procedures appear to have been carried out in the development of this forecasting model. Having noted this, the local road impacts assessed as part of the modelling should not be considered highly robust. These offer more an indication of future traffic volume changes and potential future impacts. As modelling in these local areas assumes a fairly course representation of the environment and generally does not account for local traffic management and other local factors which might limit utilisation of some of these streets. STATE TRANSPORT PROJECT FUNDING IMPACTS AND DISCUSSION Funding Implications The East West Link eastern section is estimated to cost between $6 – 8 billion, with a total cost of the complete East West Link connecting through to the M80 ring road being estimated at around $15 – 17 billion. These are significant investments for the state and there is concern as to how these may be funded and what impacts this might have on other significant transport improvement projects and their potential delivery timeframes. The concern is that the project will exhaust government spending potential on these other significant projects for some considerable time and delay the delivery of these projects. Some of the most important projects to Banyule include: The Melbourne Metro project; Doncaster Rail project and The North East Link project (linking the M80 direct through to Ringwood rather than through Banyule) and ongoing incremental improvements to the Hurstbridge Rail Line. These projects might have potential delivery times significantly impacted due to the cost of this project. Cost Benefit Analysis Comparisons Whilst the generally positive transport impacts of the East West Link project on Melbourne, particularly for the north, northeast and northwest appear to be sound, there is concern that this project has not been considered in comparison to other significant transport projects offering benefit to Melbourne. No consideration of the net benefit of this project appears to have been directly compared to other important projects for Melbourne. The potential and long term benefits of the Melbourne Metro project have been well presented and documented. With benefits from this project anticipated to impact most of Melbourne, given the significant potential for metropolitan train network capacity improvements on most Metro lines. As an example it is unknown how these benefits might stack up against the potential East West Link benefits in a direct comparison.

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EAST WEST LINK – BANYULE SUBMISSION Submissions for comment on the Comprehensive Impact Statement for the East West Link close on 12 December 2013. It is proposed that Council provide a short submission on this statement. Proposed Submission Banyule Council acknowledges that the East West Link project has some traffic and transport merit given the traffic modelling provided. In future years this project could provide some minimal improvements to traffic congestion in Banyule. However Council has some concerns with the mechanisms for funding this project and the possible detrimental impacts this may have on the timing and provision of other important transport projects for Melbourne given finite funding resources. In particular the timing and provision of such projects as the Melbourne Metro project, the Doncaster Rail project and the provision of an ultimate solution to the missing North East Link; providing a ring road around metropolitan Melbourne, from the M80 ring road direct through to EastLink in Ringwood and incremental improvements to the Hurstbridge Rail Line. Council has further concerns that the State Government has not considered the benefits of this project in comparison to these other projects. There is concern that this project may not represent the current best use of tax payer money, as no direct cost benefit analysis of the competing projects appears to have been provided or considered for comparison. Given the current governments commitment to delivering the East West Link as a priority, Council would like to see a dedicated commitment, timeline and funding model provided from the State Government for the delivery of:

a. The Melbourne Metro project; b. The Doncaster Rail project; c. The North East Link project – with direct connection from the M80 to

EastLink in Ringwood; and d. Hurstbridge Rail Line improvements.

CONCLUSION

The State Government and the Linking Melbourne Authority have recently released the comprehensive impact statement for the eastern section of the proposed East West Link. The East West Link is intended to provide a freeway standard connection from the Eastern Freeway through to CityLink running through the north of Melbourne. The link will provide an alternate east west freeway connection to the busy M1 connection running south of the city. The Impact Statement includes the consideration of Traffic and Transport impacts from the proposal. Modelling of the future traffic network has been conducted to determine the future impacts both with and without the East West Link. Comparison of the two models has enabled an assessment of the projects potential future benefits.

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The modelling has highlighted that in general there are net traffic volume and travel time improvements evident throughout the study area that offer overall greater benefit to the metropolitan road network. The study also noted some general minor benefits to traffic in the southern Banyule area. Further advice highlighted around 5% improvements on anticipated 2031 traffic volumes on key arterial routes through Banyule through the provision of the project. There are concerns with the possible detrimental impact the large cost of the East West Link project will have on the provision and timelines of other competing and highly beneficial transport projects around Melbourne. There are also concerns that the East West link has been considered in isolation and has not had its benefits compared with other projects so as to maximise tax payer and transport benefits for Melbourne. It is proposed to provide a submission highlighting these concerns and requesting commitment and timing on these other projects from the Government.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council provide a submission to the Linking Melbourne Authority on the East West Link Project, acknowledging that the project will have minimal impacts to traffic congestion in Banyule but raising the following concerns:

i. The project may have detrimental funding implications on other important state transport projects, such as:

a. The Melbourne Metro project; b. The Doncaster Rail project; c. The North East Link project – with direct connection from the M80 to

EastLink in Ringwood; and d. Incremental improvements to the Hurstbridge Rail Line.

ii. This project has not been considered in comparison with these other projects

and may not represent the best benefit for all of Melbourne.

iii. The State Government should provide a commitment, timeline and funding model for the delivery of these other projects.

ATTACHMENTS

No. Title Page

1 East West Link - Traffic and Transport Impact Statement (Under Separate Cover)

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4.3 OPTIONS AVAILABLE TO COUNCIL TO ADDRESS DEVELOPMENT SITES WITH ISSUES

Author: Scott Walker - Director City Development, City Development

File: BS16/040/010, BS30/025/010

SUMMARY

Investigation into the options that are available to Council to ensure that development sites are developed in accordance with relevant approvals and in a timely manner, that appropriate development around Activity Centres and Public Transport is promoted and that property owners and landlords provide upkeep and maintenance of their properties to minimum standards.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live”. BACKGROUND Council plays an important role in setting the strategic direction and guidelines for development, approving developments and then monitoring construction activities and the subsequent development outcomes. However, the development process does not always run smoothly. Construction activities often impact on the amenity of an area and there are times when development sites become unsightly or in a state of disrepair. When a development has been completed landowners also at times do not maintain their sites properly which can also impact on the appearance of an area. Properties can be damaged due to various factors such as storms, fire or lack of maintenance. Concerns about the poor appearance of private property and unsightly or derelict development sites are regularly raised by the community. In response to community concern there has been a number of Council Notices of Motion requesting that the issues are investigated and considered further. Some of the issues raised in the NOM’s are site specific, but generally raise the overall concern with development sites or maintenance of sites by private landowners. In particular the following NOM’s have recently been raised: 1. Preserving Neighbourhood Character in Banyule - Resolution C2013/81

“That Council officers provide a report to Council on options to promote greater accountability among landlords for the upkeep and maintenance of

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their properties to minimum standards. The report should consider options to positively encourage better behaviour as well as options to penalise non-compliance with minimum standards. The report should also consider how the local community and other stakeholders, such as local real estate agents, which manage properties on behalf of landlords, might be engaged in this process.”

2. Development of the Site in and Around the former Watsonia Post Office - Resolution C2013/277

“That Council officers investigate the levers available to Council to:

1. promote appropriate development in and around the former Watsonia Post Office site on the corner of Devonshire Road and Lambourn Road in line with community expectations; and

2. encourage the neat and clean upkeep of the site ahead of development.

This information will better position Council to positively engage with the current owner of the site to try to source a positive outcome for the community.”

3. Plenty Road Precinct - Resolution C2013/376

“That Council:

1. Investigates greater density development outcomes for residential properties abutting and in the vicinity of Plenty Road in Bundoora between Grimshaw Street and to the edge of the City of Banyule close to LaTrobe University.

2. Organises a meeting with the Ward Councillor the Mayor, officers and residents and property owners of this locality to discuss ways of ensuring better development outcomes for the area.”

In particular Council has requested an examination of the levers available to ensure that sites are developed in accordance with relevant approvals and are developed in a timely manner, that appropriate development around Activity Centres and Public Transport occurs and that landlords and property owners provide the upkeep and maintenance of their properties to minimum standards. The issues associated with derelict or unsightly development properties are not unique to Banyule. It is an issue common to all municipalities, but the issue has varying degrees of detrimental impact on a community depending on the location and surrounding character of an area. The residents of Ivanhoe are well aware of the issue. A high profile site at 270 Lower Heidelberg Road, East Ivanhoe adjoining the roundabout within the East Ivanhoe shopping strip remained partly completed for many years following a legal dispute over the development approval to allow three dwellings which ultimately meant that the development was unable to be completed. More than 10 years later the site still remains in poor condition despite one of the dwellings having been completed. Melbourne City Council is not immune to the issue. In fact, Lord Mayor Robert Doyle has pursued a campaign in recent years to encourage the redevelopment of sites within the City that he considers a blight on Melbourne. With very little leverage to require a landowner to develop their properties, Melbourne City Council used a

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variety of techniques to encourage development including offering streamlined approvals, financial incentives and as a last resort endeavouring to embarrass land owners in the metropolitan newspapers. Following a sustained campaign in the Age and Herald Sun newspapers in regard to the Savoy Hotel site on the corner of Spencer Street and Bourke Street, the landowner ultimately agreed earlier this year to pursue a modest refurbishment of the partly burnt out and derelict hotel on the site as an interim measure until the site is redeveloped fully in the future. Whilst the owner has agreed to pursue the redevelopment and obtain the relevant approvals it remains to be seen whether the project is actually undertaken or the commitments made by the landowner were simply ‘lip service’ to placate the Council. Ultimately, the power of the Council to oblige the landowner to undertake the stated development is very limited. However, it is not only the high profile commercial sites that are an issue. Residential properties in local streets of Banyule have also been identified, sometimes as a result of lack of upkeep by landlords where there are a high number of rental properties including properties owned and managed by the Department of Housing. Parts of the Heidelberg Heights and Heidelberg West area have been identified in the past, partly due to the high number of rental properties and also the Plenty Road precinct which is discussed as a case study later in this report. In these situations the impact can flow on to the public realm as landlords also neglect the mowing and tidying of naturestrips on Council land in front of their properties and the dumping of rubbish and hard waste in public areas including reserves and naturestrips is often higher as a consequence. DISCUSSION Council Departments Dealing with Development Sites There are a number of Council Departments or service units that have a role in the development and land use management process, some more directly than others. The State Government and its associated agencies such as the Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure (DTPLI) and the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) also play an important role. In summary, Council Service units have the following key roles:

Strategic Planning Setting the broad land use direction and planning framework including Local Planning Policy Framework (LPPF) and local policies, rules and guidelines for the municipality in accordance with the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) and Planning and Environment Act 1987.

Economic Development

Encouraging positive development, employment and investment within the municipality which is consistent with the City Plan and local planning policy direction.

Development Planning

Managing the overall development and land use approvals and subsequent enforcement in accordance with the LPPF and local rules prepared by Strategic Planning and the SPPF and P&E Act established by the State Government.

Building (Banyule BPI)

Managing building approvals, if appointed as the relevant building surveyor, and enforcement of building approvals

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issued in the municipality primarily in relation to structural integrity and safety of buildings and subsequent to relevant planning approvals.

Engineering Services

Providing technical advice on the appropriate standards and approval of design in relation to car parking, roads and drains to support the approval processes of Development Planning and Building.

Local Laws Ensuring that construction and building activity is well managed in accordance with Council’s Local Law and associated Building Site Code of Practice to minimise the impact on the amenity of the surrounding area. A secondary role also relates to the ongoing maintenance of sites such as long grass which may be deemed a fire hazard and overhanging branches again in accordance with the Local Law.

Environmental Health

To respond to and manage health related issues from sustained land use activities such as domestic noise, offensive odours, asbestos management, vermin or other health issues in accordance with State legislation.

The role of some of the key Departments and service areas of Council is discussed in more detail below. Strategic Planning and Economic Development The Strategic Planning Section of Council, whilst a small team, plays a very important role in setting the broad land use direction and planning framework for the municipality. They are responsible for maintaining the Banyule Planning Scheme which can be altered from time to time through the Planning Scheme Amendment Process in accordance with the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and in line with State Policy. The Banyule Planning Scheme contains the Local Planning Policy Framework (LPPF) including the Municipal Strategic Statement as well as the zones and overlays that apply in Banyule. It also contains the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) which establishes the primary planning direction for the State and sets the guidance for all subsequent policies and guidelines at the local level. Collectively, these set the broad rules for land use and development decisions. Activity Centres Strategic Planning plays an important role in guiding the future direction of activity centres in Banyule. There a number of areas within the municipality that have been identified as Activity Centres, these areas allow for growth and activity. Each Major Activity Centre has a Structure Plan which provides a long-term plan to guide future land use and development. Structure Plans typically consider options to broaden the mix of uses to include shops, housing, offices and community facilities to better meet community needs now and in the future. The aim is to produce guidelines that are realistic and consistent

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with State planning policy around activity centres, and also to reduce development pressure in residential areas.

The Economic Development Team in Banyule is also very small but plays an important role in supporting activity centre traders associations and supporting employment generating opportunities and investment in the municipality primarily around retail centres. However, their capacity to directly support and guide development on specific sites is very limited and not backed up by any legislative framework beyond the Planning Scheme.

Development Planning & Engineering The Development Planning team is responsible for managing the overall development and land use approvals process and subsequent enforcement in accordance with the LPPF and local rules prepared by Strategic Planning and the SPPF and P&E Act established by the State Government. Given the complexities of the planning process, public involvement and detailed rules embodied in the Banyule Planning Scheme the team involved in the approvals component of the process is quite large with individual expertise including arborists and a subdivision officer. The enforcement component, however, is limited to a ‘reactive’ service which primarily responds to complaints. Technical input to the assessment and approvals process is provided by the Engineering Services Team, primarily in regard to appropriate standards and approval of designs in relation to car parking, roads and drains. The issuing of planning permits has historically focused on the development outcome to be achieved with appropriate permit conditions relating to the development once complete rather than the construction phase. Construction activities have then been managed through other State and local legislation such as the Local Law and EPA in relation to pollution and noise. This continues to be the accepted approach, although conditions relating to construction activity which may impact on the ultimate planning outcome are now commonly accepted. For example, a requirement to protect a specific tree which is to be retained as part of a development is essential as a planning permit condition as it is important that the tree is protected to achieve the overall planning outcome sought. General conditions relating to construction activity are not appropriate in a planning permit although the use of construction management plans for some large development sites have been accepted in recent years. There are planning provisions that cover sites that are affected by a Planning Permit including timelines as to when a development must be commenced and completed. All planning permits issued contain a standard condition that most commonly states:

“In accordance with section 68 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, this permit will expire if one of the following circumstances applies:

The development is not commenced within two years of the date of this permit; or

The development is not completed within four years of the date of this permit.”

However, it is difficult for Council to force an owner or developer to commence works on site within the timeframe specified in the condition. There may be mitigating circumstances as to why a development has not commenced which can include

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personal or financial reasons. The applicant also has the opportunity in accordance with section 69 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, to apply to the Responsible Authority for an extension to periods referred to in the planning permit before the permit expires, or within three months afterwards. The principles established for approving extensions of time suggest that extensions should be granted unless the planning circumstances have changed significantly or a land owner is deemed to be ‘warehousing’ the permit (i.e. holding the permit indefinitely with no genuine intent to develop the site in accordance with the permit). Moreover, refusing to grant an extension to a permit is not likely to lead to a swifter development of the site as the owner then needs to obtain fresh permits which can take considerable time to be issued. Issues can also arise when developments have commenced and for various reasons the developer ceases work. This also could be attributed to justifiable circumstances such as financial hardship. Again it is difficult for Council to oblige the owner or developer to continue with the development and in fact poses an even greater dilemma. The more pressure that Council puts on the owner and the more barriers put in place such as refusing to extend permits the more difficult the situation becomes for the owner and consequently the less likely that the owner will readily recommence the development. Sometimes this can lead to a property changing hands and the new owner recommencing the project or developing the site in a different way but at other times it can lead to a site being abandoned for a considerable time. Council also has the ability, once a planning permit has commenced, to enforce the conditions of the planning permit through section 114 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. This allows Council to apply to the Tribunal for an enforcement order against the owner, occupier or developer of the site if a permit condition has been contravened. However, this is really only effective where a development is current and the permit has not lapsed. Enforcement orders can require someone to rectify a wrong, but if a lawfully established development is stalled and not complete an enforcement order cannot oblige someone to complete a development. Nonetheless, one of the key causes of a development becoming abandoned is where a developer has not complied with the approvals issued and suffered a financial penalty in endeavouring to rectify problems which often are crippling. A diligent enforcement regime assists in minimising this occurrence. Unfortunately, the current planning enforcement system is largely reactionary to complaints and generally only addresses issues after they have occurred and often too late to keep a project tightly within the approval parameters. Building (Banyule BPI) Banyule BPI is responsible for managing building approvals in the municipality, but since the deregulation of the industry over 15 years ago only if appointed as the relevant building surveyor. However, Private Building Surveyors can be appointed to issue permits and monitor building approvals on sites within Banyule, the enforcement of building approvals issued in the municipality, primarily in relation to structural integrity and safety of buildings and in accordance with relevant planning approvals is also another key function of the team. Banyule has been much more active in the enforcement of building regulations since the appointment of a Building Enforcement Officer two years ago which has reduced the incidence of building activity in breach of the regulations. The Building Act 1993 & Building Regulations 2006 allow Council, through its Municipal Building Surveyor, to enforce safety issues, such as pool fencing,

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dangerous buildings and illegal building work. This makes building enforcement limited for maintenance and amenity issues unless they affect safety. Local Laws and Construction (Asset Protection) Council’s Local Laws Section has wide ranging responsibilities for enforcing Councils Local Laws. One of their key functions is to ensure that construction and building activity is well managed in accordance with Council’s Local Law and associated ‘Building Site Code of Practice’ to minimise the impact of construction activity on the amenity of the surrounding area. The Building Site Code of Practice is designed to ensure that building sites are appropriately managed and that there is no detriment to neighbouring properties, existing vegetation and council assets or waterways as a result of building activity. It is expected that all builders, developers and tradesman operating within Banyule will comply with the Code. Breaches of the Code of Practice may be enforced under the relevant Legislation. A copy of the Code is included as an attachment. For significant off-site issues the EPA, Melbourne Water of other Authorities may also be involved. Similarly, building and construction activities which impact on Council assets are governed by Local Laws. Where Building Works are undertaken the owner or the person responsible for the Building Works must ensure that:

a) “adequate provision is made for the protection of any proximate

Road and Vehicle Crossing from damage caused as a result if the Building Works and from deliveries and movement of materials to or from the Land.

b) provision is made within the Land on which the Building Works are

undertaken to contain all mud, dust, rubbish and litter that may result from the Building Works being undertaken

c) no building materials, dirt, rubbish or litter leaving the Land is

deposited on or finishes up on a Road or in Council’s stormwater or other drainage system

d) no building or materials are left or stored on a Road”.

Rather than a direct role for the general Local Laws Team, Councils ‘Asset Protection’ unit is responsible for monitoring development impacts on Council assets but with the legislative power provided by the Local Law. The Asset Protection Team is notified about development commencement and subsequently inspects the assets nearby and seeks a bond to be returned once the development is complete and the assets are protected or reinstated. A further objective of Council’s Local Law is to protect the amenity of an area by placing prohibitions and obligations on owners and occupiers. The relevant Local Law states the following:

“An owner or occupier of any Land must not cause allow or suffer –

a) his or her Land to be kept in a manner which is unsightly or detrimental to the amenity of the neighbourhood, whether due to excessive vegetation growth, rubbish, unused or waste

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materials, unused machinery or vehicles, disused excavations or otherwise;

b) his or her Land to be kept in a manner which harbours or is likely

to harbour rats, mice, vermin, pests or insects (including flies, European wasps or termites) or any other similar animal or insect which may cause detriment to the area or which may cause or is likely to constitute a health hazard.”

The Banyule General Local Law No. 1 2005 is due to sunset in early 2015 and will be replaced with a new Local Law which is currently being developed. The new Local Law will be completed by the end of 2014 for adoption by Council. This will provide an opportunity for Council to review some of the provisions relating to unsightly properties and building works and to perhaps tighten the provisions. However, the ability of local laws to provide for controls and enforcement in this area is limited. The Local Government Act sets out a number of limiting conditions in relation to what Councils can and can’t consider or include in their local laws. Also the maximum penalties that councils can set for breaches of local laws are relatively low, and in many cases the penalties that apply through a local law do not act as a deterrent. Further, the Local Government Act prohibits councils from creating local laws that attempt to deal with issues that embody principles of major substance or controversy or contain any matter which principles or matter should properly be dealt with by an Act and not by subordinate legislation. Where an issue such as this one affects all councils and is a problem to all councils, it may be more appropriate to advocate for the State Government to legislate in this area. State legislation would have the ability to apply consistent requirements across the board and could set much higher penalties for breaches or failing to act. Whilst the Local Laws are quite wide ranging and presents the best opportunity to address unsightly properties it needs to be used fairly and is not able to be used to pursue vacant and abandoned sites if they are reasonably neat. Environmental Health To respond to and manage amenity and health issues from sustained land use activities such as noise, smells, vermin or other health and safety issues in accordance with State legislation and Council’s Local Law. CASE STUDY 1: Plenty Road Bundoora (between Grimshaw Street and LaTrobe University in the City of Banyule) As previously reported to Council an initial examination of the Plenty Road area suggests that a number of properties appear to be poorly maintained, with a decline in the quality of both buildings and gardens in some parts of Bundoora in particular. Further observations suggest that rental properties, in particular, may be causing local amenity issues because of the state of some buildings and gardens, and rubbish both within the properties and on adjoining nature strips. Historically, the area was populated with owner-occupiers residing in most of the properties, however in recent years the area has experienced an increase in the number of properties that are tenanted. Many of these tenants are students that attend the tertiary education facilities close by and as such only require short term

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accommodation. Long-term residents in the area are concerned that these properties are not being adequately maintained and this is reducing the amenity of the local area. When considering Council’s policy directions in the City Plan, the Housing Strategy, the Banyule Planning Scheme and the Student Accommodation Guidelines, this may be a location where it is worth considering ways of encouraging better development outcomes in Bundoora. Such an application may then start to address the long-term housing needs of the area and look at changes to the housing mix to better service local students and improve the quality of buildings and local amenity. In light of that policy context a locality well placed to focus on housing development for students in particular would be areas either adjacent to or close to the Principal Public Transport Network, such as Plenty Road, Bundoora. Such an area, say from Grimshaw Street to near LaTrobe University, would be worth focusing on as it is supported as an area for growth in both the Banyule Planning Scheme and the Student Accommodation Guidelines. Council could consider investigating ways in which it could better manage the land use of that area to improve amenity and address some existing concerns. This would then build on Council’s existing policy commitment to promoting this Plenty Road area as an accessible location for more diverse housing forms including student housing. While regular inspections of the area may be able to address some illegally dumped rubbish issues, the enforcement of this matter is complex, costly and time consuming. This may be especially intense for rental properties where the tenants may have moved on and owners are difficult to contact or communicate with. The initial recognition of this area for development purposes will occur through the new residential zones project.

CASE STUDY 2: 77 Devonshire Road Watsonia (former Watsonia Post Office)

A Planning Permit for the site was issued for a Multi Dwelling Development comprising 11 Dwellings. However, the site is vacant and fenced although is not a positive contribution to the visual amenity of the area it is not ‘unsightly’ in terms of the Local Law. The site is at an important and prominent gateway to the Watsonia Activity Centre. The development of this site will have a positive impact on the identity of the Activity Centre and the desired future character of the surrounding commercial and residential neighbourhood. The Planning Permit was issued on 28 August 2012 subject to conditions which required the lodgement of plans for endorsement. A condition within the permit required that:

“In accordance with section 68 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, this permit will expire if one of the following circumstances applies:

The development is not commenced within two years of the date of this permit; or

The development is not completed within four years of the date of this permit.”

Whilst it is acknowledged that the planning permit is still current, correspondence was sent to the owner of the property on 27 August 2013, requesting that they

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confirm whether it is their intention to develop the site in accordance with the planning permit and if so when it is likely to commence. The letter also outlined that if the current approved development is not the preferred option for the site that Council may be able to assist with alternative proposals and emphasised the expectation that the site is fully maintained and secured to ensure that it does not become unsightly.

To date no response has been received in relation to this correspondence however it is noted that Condition 1 Plans have since been lodged with the Planning Department in the last few weeks. The lodgement of these plans indicates that the development will proceed in accordance with the planning permit. There has also been no action to tidy up the site to improve its appearance despite the letter of request from Council.

OPTIONS

Council has a direct role in managing development outcomes and construction activity through its various Departments and Service units to ensure that compliance with the approvals issued is achieved. However, when a land owner or developer becomes disengaged with their property, issues can arise which have an amenity impact on the surrounding area and are not as easily resolved by Council actions, particularly where there is a timing delay to a project rather than non-compliance with approvals that have been issued. Nonetheless, there are certainly options available to Council to manage sites better and reduce the number and severity of unsightly and abandoned properties. These could include:

a) Reviewing the Local Law and associated Building Site Code of Practice;

b) Educating the community through publicity and an information booklet and pamphlets;

c) Increased enforcement of the Local Law, Planning and Building Approvals;

d) Encouragement of redevelopment of key sites and strategic redevelopment areas with an appropriate planning framework;

e) Development support through an enhanced Economic Development and project support service;

f) Approval facilitation with a streamlined Planning Approvals process:

g) Direct incentives for investment and development.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1. Pursues opportunities to better manage building sites and unsightly properties as part of the Local Law Review currently underway and a review and updating of the associated Building Site Code of Practice.

2. Identify and pursue opportunities to educate the community on the issues associated with development sites and the role of Council and other agencies through the media and Banyule Banner, direct mail to real estate agents and managing agents and the preparation of an information booklet and pamphlet to be made available on Council’s website and customer service centres.

3. Focused enforcement of the Local Law on key building site issues with the

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resources available within the Local Law Team and particularly following the review of the Local Law and Building Site Code of Practice and increased education.

4. Request the Municipal Association of Victoria through the State Council meeting to advocate for State wide legislation to better manage and control the amenity of development sites.

5. Preparation and implementation of Planning and Building Enforcement Policy and further consideration of options to improve Statutory Planning enforcement

6. Continued Building enforcement in line with recent service improvements to enforce Building Requirements.

7. Ongoing updates of the Local Planning Policy Framework and planning requirements to support and encourage the redevelopment of parts of the municipality in line with the Strategic Direction being pursued and identified in the Housing Strategy/framework and Activity Centre Plans. This will include the use of the new residential zones.

8. Consideration of options for direct development support through an enhanced Economic Development and project support service which may include additional resources to be considered as part of future budgets.

9. Further refinement and streamlining of the development planning approvals process to facilitate timely redevelopment outcomes in line with Council’s Strategies identified in the Local Planning Policy Framework.

ATTACHMENTS

No. Title Page

1 Building Site Code of Practice 137

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4.4 BALAKA PLACE BUNDOORA STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS

Author: Ben Smith - Economic Development CoOrdinator, City Development

Ward: Grimshaw

File: BS2013/11/02

SUMMARY

The opportunity to improve the streetscape at Balaka Place Bundoora has been investigated and works have been identified that will benefit the local shopping environment. Consideration of the funding of the works is recommended for the 2014/15 budget process.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “support thriving commercial and retail activity”.

BACKGROUND

Balaka Place, Bundoora is the location of a small shopping strip containing six shops and a small commercial office development. It forms a T-intersection on the south side of Grimshaw Street. Figure 1 shows the location of the street. All of the shops are located on the western side of the road, with a series of indented car parking bays in-between. The northern end of the footpath has a larger area for pedestrians, which occasionally is used by traders to provide temporary seating for customers. The streetscape area has not been subject to any significant investment in recent times.

CURRENT SITUATION

Currently the site does not offer a particularly pleasant environment for traders, shoppers and residents as:

Footpaths are uneven in places

Kerbs are disintegrating and not level with the footpath

The larger footpath section is underutilised

The public realm is only hard surfaces with no planting.

Figure 2 shows the existing streetscape and condition of infrastructure.

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Figure 1: Location of Balaka Place Bundoora

(North up the page)

Figure 2: Existing Conditions of Balaka Place Bundoora

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

In recognition of the potential of the northern part of Balaka Place, particularly during the summer months, the area could be made a more welcoming place. A new planter box could be installed creating a sheltered area for customers and an inviting gateway to Balaka Place from Grimshaw Street. The planter box could incorporate a permanent seat that could complement any temporary seating provided by traders. The area could be resurfaced in a hard-wearing material to cope with use by people eating and drinking. Plants could be installed in the planter box, but to a height that does not interfere with traffic sightlines or obstruct views to the shops from Grimshaw Street. A tree could be

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planted at the upper end of Balaka Place on the grass reserve and kerbs could be replaced along the car parking bays.

FUNDING IMPLICATIONS

The proposed works have been scoped and are estimated to cost $12,000. New planting introduced in the proposed planting box could be maintained by local traders; ‘in principle’ commitment has been made to this effect

CONSULTATION

All traders and property owners on the Balaka Place shopping strip were asked for their views on the proposed scheme and the response was unequivocally in support of the improvements. Traders have been involved in choosing some of the finer details of the scheme including colours of surfaces and finishes.

CONCLUSION

Streetscape improvement works at Balaka Place, Bundoora are required to enhance the public realm and introduce a more pleasant trading environment that will serve traders, shoppers and local residents. The proposed improvements include:

Planter box with seat and new surfacing on the lower part of Balaka Place

New kerbs along the car parking bays The cost of the improvements is $12,000.

RECOMMENDATION

That the proposed streetscape works for Balaka Place at a cost of $12,000 be considered for funding in Council’s 2014/15 capital works budget.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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4.5 PROPOSED SALE OF DISCONTINUED ROAD (ROSE STREET) ADJACENT TO 1065 HEIDELBERG ROAD IVANHOE

Author: Lorraine James - Property Officer, City Development

Ward: Griffin

File: F2013/856 ST6450 BP3375/1065

Previous Items Council on 7 October 2013 (Item 4.3 - Proposed Discontinuance of Road

(Section of Rose Street) Adjacent to 1065 Heidelberg Road Ivanhoe)

SUMMARY

To consider whether the section of ‘road’ (Rose Street), adjacent to 1065 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe, being an area of approximately 50m2 on the northern boundary, should be discontinued and sold to the adjoining owner.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live”.

BACKGROUND

A recent feature survey of privately owned land at 1065 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe (the site), has revealed a discrepancy between title measurements and the extent of the fenced boundary. Part of the fenced area, on the northern boundary of the site, includes a section of road. A car yard operated from the site for many years prior to its sale, as shown on aerial photo of the site in Figure 1. The new owner of the site seeks to acquire both the occupied land and the garden bed located on the north-eastern corner of the site (the land). For all intents and purposes the section of unconstructed ‘road’ has been occupied by the current owner of 1065 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe (and predecessor in title) for some time. Discussions have taken place with owners of 1065 Heidelberg Road regarding the acquisition of the land. A Planning Permit application (P1014/13) has been referred to VCAT (Ref. 1195/2013) for hearing on 9 December 2013. However, this application does not include the section of unconstructed ‘road’.

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Figure 1: Aerial Photo of Site A title search at the Land Registry confirms that the land is a ‘road’ on title, forming part of the land remaining un-transferred in certificate of title volume 1525 Folio 895. The total area of the land (the ‘road’ being considered for discontinuance) is estimated to be approximately 50m2 and is shown as Lot “1” on the Plan in Figure 2 below.

Figure 2: Land Proposed for Sale Adjacent Rose Street

HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report.

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Section 20 of the Charter provides that “A person must not be deprived of his or her property other than in accordance with law”. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues because the power to discontinue a ‘road’ and sell the resultant land is conferred on Council pursuant to section 206 and Clause 3 of Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act). Section 207A of the Act provides that a person may make a submission under section 223 of the Act with respect to a proposal to discontinue a ‘road’. In this instance no submissions were received in relation to the proposal to discontinue the section of ‘road’.

CURRENT SITUATION

At its meeting of 7 October 2013 Council resolved, amongst other things (CO2013/344) to:

1. “Authorise the commencement of the statutory procedures pursuant to sections 207A and 223 of the Local Government Act 1989 by giving public notice, in the “Heidelberg Leader”, of Council’s intention to discontinue the section of unconstructed ‘road’ (Rose Street) and sell the land currently and the garden bed located on the north eastern corner of 1065 Heidelberg Road Ivanhoe, to the adjoining owner.

2. Consider a further report and hear any submissions received following the

closing of the public notice submission period in order to determine whether the section of unconstructed ‘road’ (Rose Street) adjacent to the northern boundary of 1065 Heidelberg Road Ivanhoe, currently landscaped and fenced, should be discontinued and sold, and to confirm the price for the sale of the land.”

LEGAL CONSIDERATION

The power to discontinue a ‘road’ is conferred on Council pursuant to section 206 and Clause 3 of Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act). Prior to discontinuing a ‘road’ and selling the land, Section 207A of the Act provides that Council must give public notice of its intention to do so. Section 223(1)(b) of the Act provides that a person may, within 28 days of the date of publication of the public notice, lodge a written submission regarding the proposal to discontinue a ‘road’.

Public notice of Council’s intention to discontinue the section of unconstructed ‘road’ and sell the land was given in the “Heidelberg Leader” on 15 October 2013, with submissions on the proposal invited in accordance with section 223 of the Act.

The submission period closed on 12 November 2013. No submissions were received. VALUATION

The Act also provides that a valuation must be obtained no more than six (6) months prior to the sale of any land. The section of ‘road’ proposed to be discontinued and sold has an approximate area of 50m2. The City Valuer has indicated that the unencumbered value of the land is in the vicinity of $1250/m2. The ‘road’ contains underground fibre optic telecommunications cables and a series of footway access chambers. All rights in relation to Telecommunication assets are

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protected under the Telecommunications Act 1997. Consequently the market value of the section of ‘road’ would be significantly diminished.

FUNDING IMPLICATIONS

The Local Government Act 1989 does not obligate Council to offer land for sale or to sell land at its market value. Nevertheless, Council has a fiscal and ethical responsibility to the community to ensure any decisions made are soundly based, transparent and compliant with the law.

POLICY IMPLICATIONS

The proposal has been considered, having regard to the Rights of Way (Roads) Discontinuance Policy (Policy). The proposal generally meets the aims and objectives of the Policy insofar as:

The ‘road’ does not portray the physical characteristics of a road.

The proposal will not impact on the movement of pedestrians or vehicles within vicinity of the road.

The proposal does not involve the destruction or removal of native vegetation. The Policy also provides that the land from any discontinued ‘road’ should be allocated for sale at current market value, unless otherwise determined by Council. In addition the purchaser should reimburse Council for expenses incurred including advertising, statutory and government charges

CONCLUSION

The discontinuance or removal of ‘road’ status requires Council to form the view that the section of unconstructed ‘road’ is no longer reasonable required as a ‘road’ for public use. In forming that view Council must, in accordance with section 223(1)(d)(i) of the Act, consider all submissions received. In this instance no submissions were received in response to the public notice. The section of unconstructed ‘road’ is not currently used by the public as a means of vehicular or pedestrian access. It has been either landscaped and/or is currently maintained as part of the property at 1065 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe. In light of the above, there appears to be no impediment to Council forming the view that the ‘road’ is no longer reasonably required for public use. Accordingly the proposal to discontinue the section of ‘road’ should be supported. Council has the power to accept an offer for the sale of land for an amount being more or less than the market value. In this instance there are no other buyers for the land. The land can only effectively be sold to the abutting owners. Council should now direct by resolution that the section of ‘road’ shown on the locality plan in this report be discontinued and, upon publication of the resolution in the Victoria Government Gazette, the section of ‘road’ will be discontinued and vest in the municipality until such time as the land is sold to the owners of 1065 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe.

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RECOMMENDATION

That Council: 1. Having complied with the provisions of section 223 of the Local Government

Act 1989, by giving public notice, forms the view that the section of ‘road’, adjacent to 1065 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe, being 50m2 on the northern boundary, is no longer reasonably required as a ‘road’ for public use for the following reasons: (i) the section of unconstructed ‘road’ is not currently used by the public as a

means of vehicular or pedestrian access; and (ii) the section of unconstructed ‘road’ has been landscaped and/or is

currently maintained as part of the property at 1065 Heidelberg Road;

and resolves to discontinue the section of ‘road’ and directs that notice of Council’s resolution be published in the Victoria Government Gazette.

2. Acknowledges that upon publication of the resolution in the Victoria

Government Gazette the section of ‘road’ (Rose Street) is discontinued and the land thereafter vests in Council until sold to the abutting owner.

3. Consider a report in relation to confirming the final negotiated price for the sale

of the section of discontinued road.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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4.6 NORTHERN INFRASTRUCTURE REPORT Author: Ben Smith - Economic Development CoOrdinator, City Development

File: BS2013/11/03

SUMMARY

The Northern Horizons – 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Melbourne’s North report provides a long term plan for investment in the region’s infrastructure, supporting Council’s advocacy to State and Federal Governments.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live”.

HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues.

BACKGROUND

The Northern Region of Melbourne comprises the local government areas of Banyule, Darebin, Hume, Moreland, Nillumbik, Whittlesea and Yarra. The seven councils, NORTH Link, La Trobe University, Northern Melbourne Regional Development Australia and the Shire of Mitchell have partnered to produce a report (“the report”) about infrastructure in Melbourne’s North. Northern Horizons – 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Melbourne’s North assesses the infrastructure gaps in Melbourne’s North and defines a long term plan (0 to 50 years) that identifies the major infrastructure projects of national, state or regional significance, critical to ensuring the long term sustainability and liveability of the Region. The attached Summary Report provides a distillation of the main themes and recommendations of the full report. The regional approach provides a more powerful voice as the eight councils in the North of Melbourne are home to over one million people and generate 16.3% of Melbourne’s and 13% of Victoria’s economic production (State Domestic Product).

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The report represents a comprehensive evidence based investigation consisting of two parts:

A Report Card that defines the current level of infrastructure provision in Melbourne’s North; and

Future Directions for the short, medium and long term priorities for infrastructure in the region.

The challenges of meeting infrastructure needs in the region are well known and include:

The lag between needs identification and actual infrastructure provision.

Pressures on outer suburban infrastructure from sustained population growth, and its further impact on inner and middle ring suburbs.

The lack of employment hubs in outer suburban Melbourne.

The need to find alternative funding sources to finance the construction and maintenance of infrastructure.

CURRENT STATE OF INFRASTRUCTURE The report analyses the current condition of infrastructure provision in the region across transport, social, utilities, environment, and economic facilities, summarised below. Transport Infrastructure Compared to the other Melbourne regions, the North is well served within the inner municipalities by rail, tram, bus and cycling infrastructure and has excellent airport access. The Report Card highlights the unmistakable divide between good public transport access in the inner North and poor access and services in the outer North. Road congestion is relatively severe, Northern roads have the slowest travel speeds in the morning and evening peak periods compared to other Melbourne regions, as well as the longest delays in travel time. Investing in public transport as well as road ‘pinch points’ is necessary to alleviate road congestion and improve the social, economic and environmental outcomes related to accessibility.

Social Infrastructure Social infrastructure includes schools, hospitals sports facilities, libraries, community centres and cemeteries. The principal challenges for the region are in providing social infrastructure at the two ends of the age spectrum, for children and older people. There is a significant shortfall in the provision of aged care places. Utilities Infrastructure Gas infrastructure is the most pressing utility issue in the north, but other areas are also considered to be unsatisfactory including broadband internet, solid inert waste landfill capacity, renewable energy and recycled water.

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Environment Infrastructure The region is generally well served by open space, park lands and protected areas, and the report recognises that Nillumbik and Banyule are particularly well served. Economic Infrastructure New housing construction is strong in some parts of the region. In others, such as Banyule, housing supply is significantly more limited and affordability is poor. The report also notes that there is a particular lack of economically productive land in Banyule. 50 YEAR PLAN FOR MELBOURNE’S NORTH The report identifies the priority projects and programs to address current and future infrastructure gaps to ensure the North’s long term liveability and productivity and build on the region’s competitive strengths. The process of prioritising future infrastructure projects and programs for Melbourne’s North involved the identification, through consultation and document review, of over 300 potential transport, social, utility, environmental and economic projects and programs. These were independently prioritised on the basis of the current and future need the project or program will address and the associated triple bottom line benefits. The key projects for Banyule are highlighted in the sections below, based on their level of priority. Immediate Priorities Coordinated bus network – The reports suggests minimum bus frequencies for the north and the introduction of Bus Rapid Transit corridors for:

SmartBus Route 901.

Heidelberg (Austin Hospital) – La Trobe University – Bundoora RMIT – Mernda Bus Rapid Transit.

Coburg Station – Reservoir Station – La Trobe University – Macleod Station Bus Rapid Transit.

Dedicated SmartBus lanes and priority on Bell Street. Accelerated National Broadband Network rollout – The report recognises that the region lags behind the South and West in terms of the rate of NBN rollout. La Trobe Employment Cluster – The employment significance and potential for growth of the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster, as recognised in the draft Metropolitan Planning Strategy, will be further supported by:

Joint funding of research and sharing of resources to identify barriers to investment.

Identifying priority uses of land to attract investment in knowledge industries.

Coordinating appropriate planning scheme amendments.

Enhancing accessibility and transport connectivity between institutions. Public Transport Victoria Network Development Plan – Metropolitan Rail Stage 2 – An immediate priority is the Clifton Hill Group Upgrade, which will enable increased

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service frequencies on the South Morang and Hurstbridge Lines (from 8 to 11 and 9 to 11 trains per hour respectively). Increasing car parking at selected stations – Sufficient and designated car parking at train stations can assist in alleviating north-south car journeys during peak hours. The report recognises potential for increased parking at selected stations along the Hurstbridge line. Medium Term Priorities Public Transport Victoria Network Development Plan – Metropolitan Rail Stage 3 – Increasing capacity on the Hurstbridge Line by potentially tunnelling between Clifton Hill and the CBD. Extending the tram network – Extending route 72 to Ivanhoe Station, along Burke Road and Lower Heidelberg Road. Improving local arterial road network in the inner North – Upgrading Bell Street in a series of road widening projects, including from Waterdale Road to Burgundy Street (widening to eight lanes). New North East Link – Greensborough to Eastern Freeway – The report proposes a North East Link that will provide a connection between the M80 Ring Road at Greensborough and the Eastern Freeway. The proposed route would require a tunnel to minimise environmental impacts on the Banyule Flats, Yarra River and other places of significance such as the Heidelberg Museum of Modern Art.

DISCUSSION

The range of initiatives to improve infrastructure in a range of areas including transport, utilities, environment, social and economic facilities should be supported. The northern region is provided with a strong case for investment based on compelling evidence and analysis of need. When Council advocates for Federal and State investment in infrastructure, either individually or with others, the report will prove a useful and compelling case for attracting further resources. The report adds particular strength to the case being made for investment in the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster. The cluster has been recognised in the State Government’s draft Metropolitan Planning Strategy. A submission to the Strategy is being considered in a separate report as part of this agenda. One significant qualification to the report is the detail provided for the proposed North East Link. Council’s position varies from that put forward in the report. Council supports a ring road solution that provides direct, circumferential freight and traffic movement from the M80 to the eastern side of the Mullum Mullum tunnel and East Link. Such an approach will improve long term ring road capacity and remove unnecessary traffic from the Eastern Freeway, providing a better freight and outer ring road solution. This would also contribute to avoiding long term capacity constraints at the Mullum Mullum tunnel. While supportive of a ring road solution to ease freight movements in particular, Council’s position supports the redefinition of the purpose of the North-East Link to secure a clearer focus on regional, circumferential freight movement via a changed alignment and link towards the Eastern suburbs.

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Consideration should also be given to the impact of any proposed North-East Link on any sensitive environment, heritage and landscape areas at the Yarra River corridor. This includes, but is not limited to, Banyule Flats and Warringal Parklands.

TIMELINES

The report is in its draft stage. Once finalised it will be launched early 2014 and used for advocacy in furthering the region’s infrastructure agenda.

CONCLUSION

The report provides a strong case for the breadth of infrastructure requirements for Melbourne’s North now and over the next fifty years. It will prove a useful tool in Council’s advocacy for investment, and demonstrates consensus across core priorities among Councils in the region representing over 1 million people. This joint work will add substantial weight to advocating for investment in Council’s infrastructure priorities. The overall broad support for the report is qualified by Council’s position on the North East Link. The report should provide greater recognition of the need to review the purpose of the North East Link and its potential alignment.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1. Supports the Northern Horizons – 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for

Melbourne’s North report with the qualification that references to the North East Link are amended as detailed in point 2 below.

2. Advocates that references to the North East Link in the Northern Horizons – 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Melbourne’s North report are amended to recognise Council’s position. Council supports a metropolitan ring road solution that provides a freight and traffic direct connection from the M80 to the eastern side of the Mullum Mullum tunnel and East Link.

3. Advocates for priority projects in the Northern Horizons – 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Melbourne’s North report to State and Federal governments.

ATTACHMENTS

No. Title Page

1 Northern Horizons - 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Melbourne's North: Summary Report

143

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Performance - Use Our Resources Wisely

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6.1 AUDIT COMMITTEE CHARTER Author: Keith Yeo - Director Corporate Services, Corporate Services

File: BS04/025/002

SUMMARY

To review the appointment term for Hugh Parkes, Independent Representative and Chairperson, on Council’s Audit Committee.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction of “enable good governance and accountability with minimal risk”.

BACKGROUND

In accordance with the Audit Committee Charter, the role of the Audit Committee is to assist Council in fulfilling its governance responsibilities by overseeing compliance with laws and regulations, accountability requirements, ensuring sound ethical standards are practised and the necessary systems controls are in place to manage risks and prevent fraud and corruption. The Charter also includes details on the appointment of Independent Representatives and the Chairperson. Council’s attention is directed to Section 9 of the Charter relation to the Duration of Committee Members’ Appointment.

“The Council will review its two Councillor representatives on an annual basis and its two Independent Representatives at the expiration of their appointed term, which will not exceed a maximum of two-years. The reappointment of Independent Representatives to serve an additional term will be at Council’s discretion. The expiry time for Independent Representatives should preferably occur in a different period to each other and that of the externally contracted Internal Auditors to ensure, as far as possible, continuity of knowledge residing in the Committee”.

Further, Section 2B of the Charter states “the Chair of the Audit Committee must be appointed by Council and be an Independent Representative”.

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AUDIT COMMITTEE CHARTER cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 70

The Independent Representative and Chairperson of the Audit Committee, Hugh Parkes, current term is due to conclude as at 31 December 2013. Therefore, in accordance with the Charter, Council needs to select an Independent Representative and a Chairperson for the Audit Committee. The Chairperson is pivotal to the overall effectiveness of the Committee and must be capable of providing effective leadership and be efficient at planning and conducting meetings. Council appreciates that Independent Representatives needs to be highly skilful professionals with considerable commercial and Local Government knowledge and expertise. It is recommended that Hugh Parkes be reappointed as an Independent Representative for a further two-year period from 1 January 2014 and continue as Chairperson of the Committee given his qualifications, experience, sound judgement and excellent leadership.

CONCLUSION

The reappointment of Hugh Parkes, as an Independent Representative and Chairperson on Council’s Audit Committee, ensures compliance with the Audit Committee Charter and Best Practice Standards. Hugh Parkes has extensive qualifications and experience to fulfil this important advisory position.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council reappoint Hugh Parkes as an Independent Representative and Chairperson on Council’s Audit Committee for a two-year period effective from the 1 January 2014.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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6.2 REVIEW OF COUNCILLOR DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

Author: Gina Burden - Manager Governance, Information & Laws, City

Development

File: F2013/926

SUMMARY

To advise Council of the Victorian Local Government Investigations and Compliance Inspectorate’s report on the Review of Councillor Discretionary Funds (attached). Following a long investigation into the practices of Victorian Councils relating to Councillor Discretionary Funds, the Inspectorate recently released its report which analyses the findings from its investigation and puts forward recommendations to the Minister for Local Government regarding the future operation of CDFs.

OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

CITY PLAN

This report is in line with Council’s City Plan key direction to “enable good governance and accountability with minimal risk”.

BACKGROUND

The Local Government Investigations and Compliance Inspectorate (Inspectorate) has completed a review of practices related to Councillor Discretionary Funds (CDFs) in Victorian Councils. The review was initiated to ensure that any discretionary spending by councillors was accountable, transparent and complied with the Local Government Act 1989 (Act). In November 2012, Inspectorate staff commenced an audit to identify:

the prevalence of CDFs within councils

whether practices related to CDFs complied with the Act

what controls were in place to protect against fraud and corruption; and

alternative funding arrangements.

Banyule Council, being one of the councils with a CDF program, which operates under the Banyule Council Ward Funds Policy, was one of the councils reviewed as part of the Inspectorate’s investigation. The Inspectorate wrote to all councils with CDF programs earlier in 2013, to share its preliminary observations and provide an opportunity for comment. Feedback from

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councillors and Council Audit Committees was also considered. In particular, councils were asked to explain how their CDF processes were open and auditable, and whether a CDF program was necessary given the alternative funding programs that exist. Following receipt of the Inspectorate’s letter to Banyule in June 2013, Council responded that it would be reviewing its policy in line with the feedback provided. Accordingly, on 12 August 2013, Council adopted an amended version of its Wards Fund Policy in line with some of the suggestions made by the Inspectorate, including that the criteria for awarding funds be strengthened and that there be limits set on the individual amounts awarded per application. HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues.

DISCUSSION

Councillor Discretionary Funds in Victoria The Inspectorate’s audit has produced a comprehensive picture of CDFs in Victoria as at 1 January 2013:

32 of Victoria’s 79 councils reported some form of CDF program in place (40.5 per cent).

Of the 47 councils who have not reported that they have CDFs, only Towong Shire Council is without an alternative funding arrangement.

27 councils reported that they had fixed annual CDF budgets, worth a combined total of more than $2 million each year.

Five other councils advised that CDF amounts varied annually and were determined in their annual budget processes.

Grants offered through CDFs ranged from $3,000 to $500,000. The median amount of funding dispensed by councils under their CDF schemes annually is $62,500.

In 22 councils, individual councillors take the initiative to recommend how CDF grants will be allocated, and one additional council also receives applications from prospective funding recipients.

12 councils reported that councillors authorise CDF payments at their own discretion.

Characteristics and examples of CDFs As part of the Inspectorate’s review, councils were requested to justify their need for a CDF program. Their responses often reflected a desire to align the CDF program

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with the council’s corporate plan, particularly objectives aimed at engaging the community and contributing to the wellbeing of constituents. Councils are required to operate in an open and transparent manner, and to the highest standard of integrity, to ensure public faith in a council’s effectiveness, value and accountability to the community. The Inspectorate examined both what makes an accountable CDF program, and what constitutes a poor or risky CDF program? Criteria of a good CDF program:

Application process

Criteria for Eligibility

Transparent assessment of applications

Information regarding CDF recipients

Acquittals process

Protection against conflicts of interest Criteria for a poor CDF Program:

No applications

No assessment criteria

No policy

No conflict of interest controls

No publicly available information

No acquittal process

The report cites examples of Councils with good and also poor or risky CDF programs. Banyule has been referred to in the report as a Council that is currently reviewing its CDF Policy. However, it should be noted that after having reviewed its policy in August 2013, Banyule has many of the criteria indicated in the good category of CDF programs. Inspectorate view of CDF programs and recommendations The following are some of the conclusions and observations made by the Inspectorate in relation to CDF programs:

In general, the practices of Councillor Discretionary Funds sit uncomfortably with the Inspectorate particularly where public funds are considered a resource for personal distribution in what can only be regarded a mechanism to generate popular support.

Many councils did have processes in place that require formal approval via council resolution, however many processes lacked a suitable level of accountability, particularly where Councillors are approving applications without considering the merits of individual applications or taking advice from Council officer reports. Allegations of “rubber stamp” approvals for CDF payments in council meetings were common in the course of the Inspectorate’s review.

This review has allowed for councils to be aware of the risks they face should they continue to operate such funding programs, however, despite efforts by councils to tighten their individual processes, a gap remains between the accountable and transparent processes the community expects and Councillor Discretionary Funding schemes.

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In all cases, community grants programs were found to be a good alternative to CDF programs. This includes the four councils considered to be examples of CDF best practice. In the majority of cases, the objectives of the community grants programs were similar to those of the CDF programs. The main difference was that the community grants programs had more stringent, transparent and accountable processes. One could therefore question the value of a CDF program at all, when the only difference between the stated objectives of each program is whether or not an individual councillor, or group of councillors, is publicly seen to be giving money to certain persons or groups.

This can create public perceptions or expectations of councillors who have discretionary money at their disposal. This in turn creates opportunities for councils to be exposed to financial and reputational risks, and creates integrity risks for both the role of the individual councillor and the council itself.

Based on the information contained within this report, the Minister may consider: (a) allowing CDF practices by Victorian Councils to continue as they are;

(b) issuing guidelines to Councils promoting “best practice‟ principles; or

(c) commencing legislative reform, to either abolish CDFs or mandate their requirements.

CONCLUSION

The Inspectorate’s almost year-long investigation on the conduct of CDF programs in Victorian Councils has now concluded, and has resulted in a report and recommendations from the Inspectorate on the future of such programs. Councils with such programs will now need to await the Minister’s response to the report, which if based on the Inspectorate’s recommendations, will likely involve either the issuing of Ministerial Guidelines for the operation of CDFs, or legislating on the banning of CDFs.

RECOMMENDATION

That Council note the Local Government Investigations and Compliance Inspectorate’s report on the Review of Councillor Discretionary Funds.

ATTACHMENTS

No. Title Page

1 Review of Councillor Discretionary Funds - October 2013

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6.3

Performance - Use Our Resources Wisely

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 75

6.3 ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS Author: Emily Outlaw - Governance Officer, City Development

File: BS02/015/002

SUMMARY

Under the Local Government Act 1989 an Assembly of Councillors is defined as: A meeting of an advisory committee of the Council, if at least one Councillor is present or; A planned or scheduled meeting of at least half of the Councillors and one member of Council staff which considers matters that are intended or likely to be- a) the subject of a decision of the Council or; b) subject to the exercise of a function, duty or power of the Council that has been delegated to a person or committee. In accordance with Section 80A of the Local Government Act 1989 Council is required to report as soon as possible to an Ordinary Meeting of Council a record of any assemblies of Councillors held. Below is the latest listing of notified assemblies of Councillors held at Banyule City Council. RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES

1 Date of Assembly: 18 November 2013

Type of Meeting: Strategic Property Group

Matters Considered: Confidential Matters – Property and Proposed Developments

Councillors Present: Steven Briffa Mark Di Pasquale Craig Langdon Tom Melican

Staff Present: Allison Beckwith, Director – Community Programs Scott Walker, Director – City Development Daniel Kollmorgen, Acting Manager – Strategic & Economic Development Michael Hutchison, Projects Co-Ordinator – City Development Ben McManus – Acting Co-Ordinator – Leisure & Culture Services

Others Present: Nil

Conflict of Interest: Nil

2 Date of Assembly: 18 November 2013

Type of Meeting: Councillor Briefing

Matters Considered: East West Link Road Project

Councillors Present: Steven Briffa Mark Di Pasquale Craig Langdon Tom Melican Jenny Mulholland

Staff Present: Simon McMillan, Chief Executive Officer

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ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 76

Allison Beckwith, Director – Community Programs Scott Walker, Director – City Development Geoff Glynn, Director – Assets & City Services Daniel Kollmorgen, Acting Manager – Strategic & Economic Development Joel Elbourne, Acting Manager – Development Services Cameron Baird, Co-Ordinator – Engineering Services

Others Present: Matt Phelan Shaun Smedley Both from Linking Melbourne Authority

Conflict of Interest: Nil

3 Date of Assembly: 18 November 2013

Type of Meeting: Councillor Briefing

Matters Considered: Items on the Council Agenda for the Ordinary Meeting of 18 November 2013 (excluding confidential items) 1.1 195 Para Road Greensborough - Noise Complaint

1.2 Redevelopment of the Former Haig Street Primary School Site in the Olympia Ward

1.3 45-47 Warwick Road Greensborough - Construction of 13 Dwellings

2.1 Notification of the submission for the Inquiry into the supply and use of methamphetamines in particular 'ice'.

3.1 MAV Submission to the Office of Living Victoria's Melbourne's Water Future

4.1 Drainage Improvement Works - 121 Maltravers Road Ivanhoe

4.2 School Crossing Update

4.3 New Residential Zones

4.4 Draft Banyule Rights of Way Policy and Strategy 2013-2023

4.5 Chelsworth Park and Proposed Leases with Ivanhoe Grammar School

4.6 Extension of Time to Planning Permit P760/2006 - 40 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe

4.7 Proposed Medical Centre - 25 Banksia Street Eaglemon

4.8 Drainage Investigation Cressy Street and Orr Lane Montmorency

5.1 Proposed Sale of Rosanna Service Centre Office Site

5.2 Yarra Plenty Regional Library Meeting Procedures Local Law 2013

5.3 Ward Fund Allocations

6.1 Assembly of Councillors

8.1 Walter Burley Griffin - Proposal - An Honorary Australian Citizen

8.2 Request for Changes to the Zone Ticketing System – MYKI General Business Queen Scouts Award Bell Street Mall

Councillors Present: Steven Briffa Mark Di Pasquale Craig Langdon Tom Melican Jenny Mulholland Wayne Phillips

Staff Present: Simon McMillan, Chief Executive Officer Allison Beckwith, Director – Community Programs Scott Walker, Director – City Development Geoff Glynn, Director – Assets & City Services Keith Yeo, Director – Corporate Services

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ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS cont’d

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 77

Gina Burden, Manager – Governance, Information and Laws Daniel Kollmorgen, Acting Manager – Strategic & Economic Development Joel Elbourne, Acting Manager - Development Services Emily Outlaw – Senior Governance Officer Cameron Baird, Co-Ordinator – Engineering Services Shaun Barber, Manager – School Sites Redevelopment

Others Present: Nil

Conflict of Interest: Cr Jenny Mulholland declared a conflict of interest in item 4.6 Left the room at 7.09pm Returned 7.14pm after discussion regarding the item concluded.

RECOMMENDATION

That the Assembly of Councillors report be received.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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7.1

Sealing of Documents

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 79

7.1 SEALING OF DOCUMENTS Author: Andrea Turville - Property Officer, City Development

Ward: Griffin

File: BS28/015/017 x BP7545/226/3

The following documents require the affixing of the Common Seal of Council: 1

.

PARTY\PARTIES: Banyule City Council and Ivanhoe Endoscopy Centre Pty Ltd

OFFICER: Andrea Turville FILE NUMBER: BS28/015/017 x BP7545/226/3 DOCUMENT: Lease ADDRESS: 3/226 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe WARD: Griffin BRIEF EXPLANATION: Council is the owner of a commercial building situated

at 226 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe. Tenancy 3,

226 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe was recently

vacated by Clark and Marron Pty Ltd on 16 August,

2013. Ivanhoe Endoscopy Centre Pty Ltd is the

current tenant of Tenancy 2, 226 Upper Heidelberg

Road and expressed interest in taking over Tenancy

3. A lease has been negotiated for Tenancy 3 on

terms acceptable to Council for a rent of $12,500 pa

commencing 9 December, 2013 and ending 8 June,

2014 to coincide with the expiry of its 3 lease at 2/226

Upper Heidelberg Road. The Tenancy 3 lease

provides for two further options of three (3) years

bringing it into line with the lease for Tenancy 2.

Public notice of Council’s intention to lease is not

required as the rent is under $50,000 pa and the

lease is for a lesser term than 10 years. Council

should support entering into and formally ratifying the

Lease by resolving to affix its Common Seal to the

Lease.

RECOMMENDATION

That the Common Seal of the Banyule City Council be affixed to the following documents: 1. Lease between Banyule City Council and Ivanhoe Endoscopy Centre Pty Ltd

for the premises located at 3/226 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe for a period

commencing 9 December, 2013 and expiring 8 June 2014.

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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8.1

Notice of Motion

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 81

8.1 BULLY FREE AUSTRALIA Author: Cr Steven Briffa

Ward: Hawdon

File: F2013/947

TAKE NOTICE that it is my intention to move:

“That Council:

1. Write to all primary and secondary schools in Banyule as follows:

(a) to encourage their ongoing commitment to making schools bully free and to thank them for their efforts to date in tackling this important social issue;

(b) schools can contact the relevant Council business units to seek advice on links into support services and to seek advice as required.

2. Hold a forum in 2014 on the issue of bullying, the forum will invite a range of key stakeholders to discuss a range of strategies that will encourage a bully free Banyule community.”

Explanation The Foundation is headed up by The Honourable Craig Ondarchie MP as Chairperson and supported by a range of expert board members. The vision of the Bully Zero Australia Foundation is: to protect and empower Australian children and adolescents to live a fulfilling life free from all forms of bullying. The mission of the Bully Zero Australia Foundation is to provide genuine and enduring care for bullying victims and their families. We exist to identify and empower bullying victims, to support and stand side by side with them, their families and friends in taking action and creating permanent positive change. We are dedicated and committed to raising awareness of bullying and its devastating consequences through schools, workplaces and the broader Community. We aim to provide young people with education to prevent bullying and work with bullies and their families to help create positive behavioural changes. We are passionate about establishing a no-tolerance culture of bullying in Australia and will work tirelessly to ensure that anti-bullying laws are implemented and enforced Nationally. We stand united in our quest to create a tomorrow where our children and adolescents live a fulfilling life free from bullying.

CR STEVEN BRIFFA Hawdon Ward

ATTACHMENTS

Nil

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8.2

Notice of Motion

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 82

8.2 NATIONAL CONTAINER DEPOSIT SCHEME Author: Cr Craig Langdon

Ward: Olympia

File: F2013/947

TAKE NOTICE that it is my intention to move:

“That Council Officers provide a briefing to Council on the implications of a national container deposit system in order for Council to consider its position on potential systems.”

Explanation Over the last few years there have been many discussions at State and Federal Government level in relation to implementing a National Container Deposit Scheme. The information provided as part of these discussions has come from many stakeholders and has focussed on the impacts on beverage container littering behaviour and recycling recovery rates in other State and International jurisdictions. However, Council needs to be informed of all potential impacts of a container deposit scheme including those at the Victorian and local (Banyule) level.

CR CRAIG LANGDON Olympia Ward

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Notice of Motion

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8.3 SCHOOL CROSSING SUPERVISION Author: Cr Rick Garotti

Ward: Grimshaw

File: F2013/947

TAKE NOTICE that it is my intention to move:

“That:

1. Council conduct a recount of the warrants for ongoing crossing supervision at the following school crossing sites:

Greenwood Drive, Bundoora; the Grimshaw Street and Plenty Road Intersection, Bundoora; and at Dundee Street, Watsonia North.

2. Council should consult with the respective Primary and Secondary Schools associated with each school crossing to ensure that the recount of the warrants occurs during the times of peak pedestrian and vehicle usage.

3. Upon the recount information being received, Council organise consultation meetings involving the Mayor and Ward Councillor with the schools associated with the crossings that have failed to meet the warrants to discuss potential funding options.”

Explanation

At its meeting on 18 November, Council resolved that in line with Council policy unless alternate non Council funding of up to 50 per cent of the cost of crossing supervision is secured prior to the start of the 2014/15 financial year or until the appropriate warrants are met, then the school crossing supervisors provided at the following crossings be removed from 1 July 2014 in line with current VicRoads subsidy conclusion:

Greenwood Drive, Bundoora; the Grimshaw Street and Plenty Road Intersection, Bundoora; and at Dundee Street, Watsonia North.

Council resolved to approach the respective Primary and Secondary Schools associated with each crossing to advise them of this position and seek agreement for an annual funding contribution of $6,500 (the approximate 50 per cent cost for the annual provision of the school crossing supervisor).

Given the potential adverse impacts on pedestrian safety associated with the removal of a school crossing supervisor, it is considered prudent that Council conduct a recount of the warrants to ensure that the traffic information on which any Council decision is to be based is reliable and accurate. This will also provide a sound basis for any consultation meetings with schools that are to take place.

CR RICK GAROTTI Grimshaw Ward

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Page 84: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

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Notice of Motion

Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 84

8.4 DEFERMENT OF INTEREST CHARGES ON SECOND INSTALMENT RATES AND CHARGES

Author: Cr Rick Garotti

File: CO2013/357

TAKE NOTICE that it is my intention to move:

“That: 1. Interest charges on the 2013/14 financial year second instalment due on 30

November 2013 be deferred until Friday, 20 December 2013. 2. A reminder letter be sent to all ratepayers regarding outstanding second

instalment payments and advise that payment needs to be made by 20 December 2013 to avoid penalty interest.

3. On or after 21 December 2013 penalty interest be charged on outstanding accounts from the 30 November 2013.”

Explanation Council resolved for the 2013/14 financial year to move to payment of rates and charges by 4 instalments only, being:

30 September 2013 30 November 2013 28 February 2014 31 May 2014

The intention of this charge was to financially assist ratepayers given the transfer of the Fire Services Property Levy to Local Government Councils to collect from 1 July 2013 onwards. The deferral of interest charges on the second instalment is to assist ratepayer understanding of the charges as part of this transition period.

CR RICK GAROTTI Grimshaw Ward

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Page 85: Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

ATTACHMENTS

ORDINARY MEETING OF COUNCIL ON 2 DECEMBER 2013 Page 85

1.1 Vesting of Reserve - 4A Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe

Attachment 1 Petition First Page ........................................................................... 86

4.1 Metropolitan Planning Strategy

Attachment 1 Draft Council Submission ................................................................ 87

Attachment 2 Draft Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils Submission ............ 121

4.3 Options Available to Council to Address Development Sites with Issues

Attachment 1 Building Site Code of Practice ....................................................... 137

4.6 Northern Infrastructure Report

Attachment 1 Northern Horizons - 50 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Melbourne's North: Summary Report ............................................. 143

6.2 Review of Councillor Discretionary Funds

Attachment 1 Review of Councillor Discretionary - October 2013 ........................ 166

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RESPONSE TO

DRAFT METROPOLITAN PLANNING

STRATEGY – PLAN MELOURNE

Submission by Banyule City Council

2 December 2013

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Banyule:

1) Acknowledges release of a draft Strategy that has considered many of the issues

raised in Council’s previous submission, including:

Looking to resolve planning issues for cemeteries

Establishing a Cluster for northern Melbourne

Committing to future planning for public open space, boulevards and urban

greening

Supporting councils to promote sustainable development

Looking to limit residential development in sensitive environments, like

waterway corridors

Identifying future funding opportunities for local councils.

2) Consider that a final Strategy can be improved by:

Ensuring the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster is linked with initiatives and

investment for continued urban renewal across Heidelberg West, Heidelberg

Heights, Bellfield and also benefiting the Heidelberg Activity Centre.

Recognising the potential for the Bell Street Mall as an Activity Centre, Watsonia

as an emerging Activity Centre, and the emerging future potential for Heidelberg

as a Metropolitan Activity Centre.

Identifying regionally important development opportunities at Greensborough

Station, Watsonia Station and Heidelberg Station

Recognising the increasing subregional importance of Heidelberg Station and its

key role to support the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster

Recognising the importance of achieving integrated public transport and land use

solutions for the La Trobe Employment Cluster

Revising the approach for investigating the future North-East link to prioritise

metropolitan, circumferential freight movement to Eastlink, with a revised

alignment and southern connection at Ringwood

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Investigating for track duplication of the Hurstbridge rail line, between Heidelberg

and Rosanna

Giving parameters to support removal of Neighbourhood Centre status for

Eaglemont

Giving priority to completing Melbourne’s Off-Road Trail Network and also for

cycling links into Clusters, Activity Centres, other key destinations and into

neighbourhoods to support the 20-Minute Neighbourhoods concept

Giving priority to greening of neighbourhoods and treed-boulevards

DTPLI’s ongoing leadership for the regional, middle Yarra River project, so Council and community can give feedback on draft Municipal Toolkits before the project is completed.

Banyule looks forward to working with government departments and the Metropolitan

Planning Authority, so initiatives and investment can be achieved for the municipality, to

benefit the northern region and metropolitan Melbourne.

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INTRODUCTION

Banyule Council appreciates this opportunity to give comment on the draft Metropolitan

Planning Strategy (the draft). The draft has responded positively to various issues raised

in Council’s earlier submission to the Discussion Paper. This includes reference to: a

national employment cluster for northern Melbourne; urban renewal around the train

network; seeking housing affordability; pursuing public transport solutions; respecting

heritage when land is developed; and more clearly integrating environmental

sustainability into decision making. On top of these Council appreciates the draft’s

reference to future funding opportunities that local councils may access, to help

implement the final Strategy.

Whilst there are many positives, Council encourages a better balance to transport

priorities which are too heavily weighted to expensive road solutions for local

communities to move around our City. This seems to be at the expense of public

transport solutions for investing in trains, trams and buses.

The following feedback uses the draft’s structure to give recommendations for the final

Strategy. Collectively these recommendations ask the Victorian Government to put

greater priority on emerging opportunities for Melbourne’s north, so this region can make

a greater contribution to driving economic productivity and supporting investment

opportunities.

Melbourne’s north in Banyule offers a unique setting for metropolitan living and

investment. It makes a special contribution to our City. Banyule is a place where the

draft’s vision for ‘opportunity and choice’ is aligned with Council’s vision for ‘a green,

liveable and prosperous city, sustaining a healthy and engaged community’.

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CHAPTER 1: Delivering Jobs and Investment

Emerging La Trobe Cluster and emerging Heidelberg Metropolitan Activity Centre

Banyule supports the introduction of an emerging national employment cluster for

Melbourne’s north. The La Trobe Cluster has much potential to attract and grow more

regional and metropolitan investment and job opportunities. A final Strategy can now

more clearly describe and support the emerging cluster so it can become a more

significant engine for short-term economic growth and job opportunities for our

polycentric city.

The emerging Cluster is in northern Melbourne’s established area and its medical and

allied industries are already servicing catchments beyond this region. The Cluster

includes Heidelberg, where recent and past investment in health and allied services has

resulted in the highest ‘Effective Jobs Density’ in north-eastern Melbourne. The

Heidelberg hospitals, particularly those managed by Austin Health, are also attracting

investment from the private sector. Doctors and other professionals continue to develop

and setup their businesses in Heidelberg, close to the hospitals. This investment is

showing that the forces of agglomeration are active in Heidelberg. Because of this, there

is potential for the Strategy to give clearer recognition to changing Heidelberg, as a

priority location for the emerging cluster and metropolitan Melbourne.

Council’s completed structure planning for Heidelberg has already delivered a changed

policy context for Heidelberg. It includes priorities for further medical and allied industry

agglomeration, by identifying:

A growing medical precinct close to the hospitals, around Burgundy Street

Expansion for the medical precinct along Bell Street, between Upper Heidelberg

Road and Waterdale Road

A well-located strategic site for integrated, mixed-use and transit orientated

development at Heidelberg train station, next to the Austin/Mercy Hospitals

Complex.

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Since completing the structure plan several years ago, Heidelberg has attracted more

investment. For Austin Health, this includes:

$18.9M for Olivia Newton-John Cancer and Wellness Centre in 2012

$13.5M for Trauma Related Mental Health Facility in 2011

$11.5M for Austin BioResources Facility in 2009

$14.5M for Community recovery Program in 2013

$45M for Melbourne Brain Centre in 2012

$3M for Emergency Department and ICU in 2011.

The Warringal Private Hospital on Burgundy Street is also implementing a $54M

expansion. Bolden Street, in the medical precinct, is being transformed for private sector

investment whilst Bell Street (near the medical precinct) is also changing.

Separately from the rapidly expanding and agglomerating medical and allied industries,

there is also a pipeline of separate development approvals in place for Heidelberg. In

recent years this pipeline has started to reshape the centre. This will continue.

Heidelberg will continue to play an important role, which benefits the La Trobe Cluster

and the northern region, to expand opportunities for economic growth and job creation

within metropolitan Melbourne’s already established area.

Council has also adopted an Urban Design Framework for the Bell Street Mall (the Mall).

This framework has linked the Mall with the agglomerating medical and allied industries

in Heidelberg. The Mall is now a changing centre, with growing significance for the

emerging Cluster and Heidelberg’s expansion along Bell Street. Approvals for higher-

density mixed-use development are happening at the Mall.

The Mall’s future is now positioned for it to also support suburban renewal for Heidelberg

West. Further investigations and investment is now needed at the Mall, to develop

market-ready solutions for continued centre and suburban renewal.

Several changes can be made, so the final Strategy can more effectively describe the

La Trobe Employment Cluster. These changes can reflect the outcomes of completed

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strategic planning done for Heidelberg and the Mall. Doing this will help the final Strategy

give a more effective distinction between this ‘emerging’ cluster and ‘existing’ clusters.

Because of the work already done to identify priority locations for investment in the

Heidelberg Activity Centre and for the Mall, the final Strategy can also prompt the

Metropolitan Planning Authority to play an active role to investigate and involve others for

producing market-ready solutions at critical locations.

At this stage, Banyule recommends that any coordination for the emerging La Trobe

Cluster should continue to be done by the four key stakeholders: Austin Health, La Trobe

University, Darebin and Banyule Councils. Not with standing this, there would still be an

opportunity for the DTPLI and the MPA to give support to emerging priorities within the

cluster. Emerging priorities could include: further neighbourhood planning for Heidelberg

West and giving impetus to strategic redevelopment at Heidelberg Station.

Activity Centres

The previous categories of Activity Centres in Melbourne 2030 were helpful to

understand the course relationship between different sized places and their offerings.

However this classification was also ambiguous and challenging to convey to local

communities. Sometimes the categories did not give an effective context for activity

centre planning, because it was too course. Whilst a reviewed approach is appreciated,

some further refinement can give a more effective classification for clearer distinction

between different sized centres.

Further refinement can acknowledge that some Neighbourhood Centres will already have

planning frameworks or be experiencing change, for them to be an Activity Centre. In

Banyule:

Bell Street Mall was previously recognized as a Neighbourhood Activity Centre.

Council’s forward planning has repositioned this place to become a larger centre

that includes nearby, existing higher density housing and the abutting ALDI

development and expanded NMIT campus. This centre would be better recognised

as an Activity Centre.

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Watsonia was previously recognized as a Neighbourhood Activity Centre.

Council’s forward planning, the available floor space, public transport and proximity

to a large strategic redevelopment site for transit-oriented development, means this

centre is better categorized as an emerging Activity Centre.

There are also other (former) Neighbourhood Activity Centres, which are small and

coupled with a planning framework that protects their current identity. These are the

smaller shopping streets with known heritage, landscape or environmental significance

within or surrounding them. In these settings a precautionary approach is needed to

define their role. This will help protect and conserve their valued attributes that are highly

regarded by the local community and recognised in Council’s planning framework. In

Banyule, one example of this is at Eaglemont.

A finer-grained distinction between different types of centres can be progressed by

considered the following structure.

Emerging Metropolitan Activity Centre

For a changing place, that is well-connected to public transport, where a planning framework for much growth exists or notable growth gives the place emerging metropolitan importance – at a preferred location within the metropolitan structure of existing MACs. This includes changing centres within established parts of metropolitan Melbourne that are important for achieving a polycentric city. Any growth framework and evidence of growth should illustrate that a well, located multi-functioned centre is maturing at a preferred location within metropolitan Melbourne. In Banyule this could include Heidelberg in the future, where there is a planning framework for substantial growth beyond its existing Specialised and Major Activity Centre status. This place is also experiencing growth and investment, has a pipeline of development approvals and is well located on the Hurstbridge rail line with orbital buses and Bell Street. It is also part of the emerging La Trobe Cluster, which is a strategic location within northern Melbourne.

Activity Centre For a former Principal, Major or Specialised Activity Centre. In Banyule this includes Greensborough, Ivanhoe and at this stage Heidelberg. There is an opportunity to revisit this category to help inform the structure of centres in Melbourne’s regions. A revised category might introduce a ‘Regional Activity Centre’ category for those large, existing centres with larger catchments and expanding services. In Banyule, Greensborough would be suited to this definition.

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For former Neighbourhood Activity Centres, either growing or coupled with a planning framework for notable growth. These centres may be coupled with residential growth opportunities in surrounding streets. In Banyule this should include the Bell Street Mall.

Emerging Activity Centre

This category can include those previous Neighbourhood Activity Centres that have experienced growth, or are well-suited to further growth at a preferred location on a railway line and with strategic redevelopment opportunities. In Banyule this should include Watsonia.

Neighbourhood Centre

For former Neighbourhood Activity Centres that are not already emerging or preferred as Emerging Activity Centres. These centres would have been large or modestly sized Neighbourhood Activity Centres with a clear opportunity for some growth. In Banyule this should include Rosanna and Bundoora.

Restricted Neighbourhood Centre

For those smaller retail settings, some may have been small Neighbourhood Activity Centres, where there may be some nominal but restricted growth potential. These restrictions may relate to environmental, precinct heritage or landscape significance. The potential for growth may also be restricted for surrounding residential development where significance landscapes, heritage and environments exist or there is no anticipated renewal for the surrounding housing stock. A restricted setting may also be due to public transport limitations or because there are other preferred centres for growth that can be accessed by local residents. In Banyule this should include East Ivanhoe, Montmorency, Lower Plenty, St Helena, MacLeod and Diamond Village.

Convenience Centre

For smaller retail settings (some may have been small Neighbourhood Activity Centres under Melbourne 2030), where there is a clear planning framework for very restricted change. The mix of retailing in these settings would be limited and geared only to surrounding properties, with no wider catchment. In this category a precautionary approach applies to give weighting to known heritage, landscape or environmental significance that exists in the retail setting and the surrounding residential streets. This may be best reflected by known heritage precincts. In Banyule this should include Eaglemont.

This suggested structure for centres is also relevant to Chapter 4 in the draft Strategy

and the mapping of Melbourne’s regions in Chapter 7.

Urban Renewal Sites for Transit-Oriented Development

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The draft Strategy is missing an opportunity for the Hurstbridge rail line, to recognize

strategic locations for transit-oriented development. Banyule has completed structure

plans and identified key renewal sites, at strategic locations on the Hurstbridge rail line.

These key sites are currently underused and warrant further investigation to develop

market-ready solutions for transit-oriented development. These sites are at:

Heidelberg Station and car park is important for the emerging La Trobe Cluster.

Structure planning has been done and a planning framework now exists for future

development to integrate hospitals with the train stations, transport interchange and

the renewing Mount Street. Key landholdings are controlled by VicTrack and some

early development feasibility has been done, but more is needed to explore design-

solutions and packaging for investment and staging.

Greensborough Station and car park is another important location for the northern

region. A pipeline of planning approvals is in place for the Greensborough Activity

Centre and Council is actively seeking interest from the private sector to develop

land at the Main Street retail core. Council’s structure planning for the

Greensborough Activity Centre has uncovered development potential at

Greensborough Station. Further investigation is now needed to more clearly

prepare Greensborough Station for staged transit-oriented development, potentially

as part of a transport interchange required at this location.

Watsonia Station and car park is a large landholding with notable development

potential near Greensborough and the La Trobe Cluster. Its proximity on

Greensborough Road, near the M80 Ring Road, the future North-East Link, in the

emerging Watsonia Activity Centre makes this a valuable investment and

employment opportunity for northern Melbourne. The land is controlled by VicTrack

and VicRoads. There is an opportunity for the MPA or Places Victoria to work with

Council to fully identify and unlock this site’s opportunity. Urban design and market

investigation is needed to unpack this potential and consider solutions that may be

staged.

Chapter 1 Recommendations

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Initiative 1.5.1, for national employment clusters:

1. Revise the description of the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster on page 47 to

indicate:

The “advanced concentration” of employment opportunities already happening

in Heidelberg.

The “potential for future consideration of Heidelberg as an emerging

Metropolitan Activity Centre.”

That completed structure planning for Heidelberg has “uncovered opportunities

for well-located urban renewal for mixed, higher-density, transit-orientated

development at Heidelberg train station”.

The “Bell Street Mall Activity Centre has substantial growth potential to support

Heidelberg West’s neighbourhood renewal”.

2. Update Map 18 to include symbols and changes to the index for:

Heidelberg as an “emerging future Metropolitan Activity Centre”.

More clearly depicting the “emerging centre growth” extent for Heidelberg, by

shading an area that is bound by: Dora/Jika Street to the east, Darebin Street to

the North, Upper Heidelberg Road to the west and Bell Street to the south.

Showing an “expanding Health Precinct” around Health Node 2, by shading an

area that is bounded by: the railway line to the east, Darebin Street to the north,

Powlett Street to the west and Burgundy Street to the south.

Also showing an “expanding Health Precinct” along Bell Street, by shading an

area that follows this street, between Upper Heidelberg Road and Waterdale

Road.

“Transit Orientated Development Priority” at Heidelberg Station.

“Activity Centre” at the Bell Street Mall, located to the immediate west of NMIT

Heidelberg.

3. Include another short term initiative to “investigate for an ‘emerging clusters fund’

for priority initiatives within emerging clusters.”

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4. In addition to this submission please consider the separate, joint submission being

made on behalf of La Trobe University, Austin Health, Darebin and Banyule

Councils for the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster. This separate

submission suggests other opportunities to refine the draft.

Initiative 1.5.3, for planning of other activity centres:

5. Revise the text for activity centres on page 38 to include “Our City has many

shopping streets and small retail settings that support liveable neighbourhoods.

Some of these are growing and already identified for change. Others are smaller

and may have important heritage, landscape and environmental significance.

These attributes warrant a precautionary approach to defining their role and

protecting existing liveability. Some further refinement to the elements in Table 1

is anticipated for a reviewed structure. “

6. Introduce a further short term initiative for DTPLI to “refine the elements in Table 1

before updating the SPPF. Refined elements may include Emerging Activity

Centres, Restricted Neighbourhood Centres and Convenience Centres.”

7. Also consider recommendations 5 and 6 above, to help refine Initiative 4.1.1.

8. Revise Map 8 to show: the Bell Street Mall as an Activity Centre; Watsonia as an

emerging Activity Centre and Heidelberg as a future emerging Metropolitan

Activity Centre.

Initiative 1.6.1, for Urban Renewal Sites around existing train stations for transit oriented

development:

9. Revise the existing medium term initiative, to incorporate new commercial and

housing activities at identified locations, to include the “Heidelberg Station” and

‘Greensborough Station”

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10. Revise Map 11 on page 40 to show the “Heidelberg Station” as an additional

urban renewal opportunity. Also separately show the “Greensborough Station” as

another renewal site.

11. Consider removing and replacing the quotes on page 41 (La Trobe University) and

page 59 (City of Darebin), with a quote that can be attributed to the combined

submission of La Trobe University, Austin Health, Darebin and Banyule Councils.

Initiative 1.6.2, for new development and investment on the planned transport network:

12. Revise Map 12 to include “Watsonia” as an Investment & Employment

Opportunity.

13. Revise the medium term initiative for DTPLI to look at investigation areas that

include “the Heidelberg, Watsonia and Greensborough Stations, to create

employment opportunities linked with the emerging La Trobe Cluster, the northern

region or future road initiatives.”

14. Concurrently with the above, make changes to Map 32 for the Northern

Subregion.

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CHAPTER 2: Housing Choice and Affordability

Heidelberg West is an Urban Renewal Precinct for housing close to Jobs and

Transport

Heidelberg West has been previously identified for urban renewal by the Victorian

Government. Much of the housing stock is reaching the end of its life. Council’s housing

strategy in the planning scheme includes all of this suburb, as well as parts of Bellfield

and Heidelberg Heights, for short term urban renewal and with potential to deliver notable

housing growth. Support from others is needed to achieve this.

Heidelberg West is part of the emerging La Trobe Cluster and is traversed by orbital bus

routes. It contains an NMIT campus, is close to Northland, La Trobe University, the

Heidelberg West Industrial Estate and the Heidelberg Activity Centre. Indeed, it is at the

centre of these surrounding locations for employment and education.

Council is actively pursuing renewal for former State school sites in the area. These

brownfield sites are being purchased by Council so community facilities can be improved

and residential development progressed. Heidelberg West’s wider urban regeneration is

also involving the Department of Human Services (DHS). A portfolio of public housing

sites is underpinning the Minister for Housing’s ‘Olympia Initiative’ to incrementally

regenerate this stock.

There is an opportunity for the MPA and Places Victoria to work with Council to do further

planning for Heidelberg West and the Bell Street Mall. Some early work on this has

started, when Places Victoria did some initial analysis and investigation for the suburb’s

renewal, as well as the emerging Bell Street Mall Centre. This work gives a starting point

for more to be done so Heidelberg West can be regenerated in the short term.

Improving Housing Quality

There is an opportunity to reform building codes and design guidelines for more

accessible housing. A revised approach, that more clearly benefits aging communities

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and those with disabilities, is needed. This can be incorporated into any review of

residential design guidelines, by taking an expanded approach for improving the quality

and amenity of residential development - whether it be single dwellings, multi-unit or

higher-density apartments.

Achieving Social Housing

Banyule has some experience with supporting innovative social housing. This

experience came with support to the Common Equity Housing Ltd project at

Bamfield Road in Heidelberg Heights. This innovative project achieved a benchmark

eco-housing and co-housing outcome. Its success was influenced by two factors. The

first was access to funding sources and the second was the shared interests of an

abutting landowner, who decided to partner into the project. These influences suggest

that further growth for this sector can be achieved through similar avenues.

Design for social housing can also be more clearly supported if residential design

guidelines give more transparency for co-housing design solutions. This might be

achieved by reviewing ResCode or introducing other standards that give clarity for

co-housing design solutions.

Chapter 2 Recommendations

Initiative 2.1.4, for the quality and amenity of residential apartments:

15. Revise the heading of Initiative 2.1.4 to “improve the quality and amenity of

residential development.”

16. Revise the introductory text for initiative 2.1.4 to include “In addition to looking at

design and measures for higher-density development, reviewing building codes

and residential design guidelines for more accessible homes will be explored.

These are homes that are more able to suit the needs or modified for people with

disabilities. Local councils, such as Banyule City Council, have created and been

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trialling such guidelines. There is now an opportunity to expand upon these efforts

for wider application.”

17. Introduce another short term initiative to “Explore residential design guidelines and

review building codes for design that is more accessible and adaptable for people

with disabilities.”

Initiative 2.2.2, for unlocking the capacity of urban renewal precincts:

18. Revise the introductory text to include reference to likely urban renewal precincts,

such as “Heidelberg West”.

19. Introduce a further short term initiative for DTPLI to “Support those local councils

that are leading renewal of key brownfield sites in potential urban renewal

precincts. Examples include the former government-owned land in Heidelberg

Heights and Bellfield.”

Initiative 2.3.1, for facilitating growth in the social housing sector:

20. Recognise that a range of measures could be considered to support growth in the

social housing sector, including:

a. Reviewing the ResCode and residential design guidelines to more clearly

support co-housing design solutions.

b. Collating information on landowners and investors who may choose to

invest in social housing.

c. Seeking federal funding opportunities and incentives to explicitly support

the social housing sector.

d. Explore financial incentives and programs to support private investment in

social housing.

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CHAPTER 3: A More Connected Melbourne

Transport and economic growth

Plan Melbourne’s recognition of the critical dependency between land use planning and

transport presents a significant opportunity to boost the achievement of the strategy’s

Directions. A highly functioning transport system brings people closer to jobs and

provides greater business reach to markets at a local, regional and international level.

Transport is a key challenge for the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster. Significant

potential is offered by the existing transport infrastructure, and particularly the ‘spines’ of

the two rail corridors to the east and west – the Hurstbridge and South Morang lines

respectively. However, east west public transport links continue to present a challenge

particularly to offer fast and direct links across the sub-region.

Establishing a trial, and ultimately rolling out, high capacity signalling across the network

will assist in addressing capacity constraints. The Hurstbridge line should be considered

for high capacity signalling because of the vital role it performs in serving the sub-region.

The line will also provide a key connection to the growing needs of the emerging

La Trobe employment cluster. Further key capacity constraints are the single track

sections of the Hurstbridge line between Heidelberg and Rosanna and between

Greensborough and Eltham respectively.

Population growth

Over the next 40 years Banyule (relative to other areas) will experience a major impact

on local transport infrastructure, as journeys through the municipality increase. Likewise,

as key employment areas, such as Heidelberg and Greensborough, grow and attract

more investment and workers, the demands on existing transport infrastructure will

increase and the need for further investment will intensify.

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Key connectivity factors continue to be pressing issues in Banyule, particularly in

circumferential movements where intermodal change is required between train and bus

services.

Council supports the development of an integrated transport system that benefits people

travelling to work and serves businesses trading goods with the market. Banyule

Council’s view on the principal projects of relevance to the locality is:

North-East Link – Council supports an outer ring road solution that provides direct,

circumferential freight and traffic movement from the M80 to the eastern side of the

Mullum Mullum tunnel and East Link. Such an approach will improve long term ring road

capacity and remove unnecessary traffic from the Eastern Freeway, providing a better

freight and outer ring road solution. This would also contribute to avoiding long term

capacity constraints at the Mullum Mullum tunnel. While supportive of an outer ring road

solution to ease freight movements in particular, Council asks the State Government to

redefine the purpose of the North-East Link to secure a clearer focus on regional,

circumferential freight movement via a changed alignment and link towards the Eastern

suburbs. As part of its investigations, the government should also consider the impact of

any proposed North-East Link on any sensitive environment, heritage and landscape

areas at the Yarra River corridor. This includes, but is not limited to, Banyule Flats and

Warringal Parklands.

Melbourne Metro – Council supports the Melbourne Metro as a vital transport project,

noting its importance in providing additional capacity to facilitate Doncaster Rail and other

important network improvements.

Doncaster Rail – Council supports an Eastern Freeway solution for this project,

including a full extension to Doncaster Hill, incorporating a station at Burke Road North

and extension of the route 72 tram through to Ivanhoe.

East West Link – Council has not formed a view on this project given a lack of

information regarding the project impacts, including impacts on Banyule. Council seeks

further information on this project so that an informed position can be taken.

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Consideration should also be given to the DTPLI providing leadership on the business

case and exploring initial functional design elements for the Hurstbridge line upgrade

within the next five years.

Chapter 3 Recommendations

Initiative 3.1.2, for a metro-style rail system: 21. Revise the supporting text for Initiative 3.1.2 to include specific reference to the

transport needs of emerging employment clusters, including the La Trobe

Employment Cluster.

22. Insert a new action that seeks to provide a maximum 10 minute frequency on all

Hurstbridge line rail services.

Initiative 3.2.1, for the North-East Link options:

23. Amend the introductory text to Initiative 3.2.1 to include “reviewing the purpose of

the North-East Link for circumferential, freight priorities”.

24. Revise the mapped alignment of the North-East Link on Map 23 to make it clearer

that a final alignment may be different. This can be done by showing an

alternative, more circumferential alignment that connects with Eastlink at

Ringwood, on the eastern side of the Mullum Mullum tunnel.

Initiative 3.2.2, for harmonisation of public transport services across trains, trams and

buses to provide access to job-rich areas in the suburbs:

25. Include reference to “Heidelberg and Greensborough Stations” in the list of short

term upgrades.

26. Amend the text for medium term initiatives to upgrade major multi-modal

interchanges serving “existing and emerging” National Employment Clusters.

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27. Insert a new short term initiative for DTPLI to “Investigate integrated public

transport and land use opportunities, within and for the benefit of the La Trobe

Employment Cluster.”

Initiative 3.3.2, for improving outer-suburban rail and bus networks:

28. Add to the introductory text for Initiative 3.3.2, to highlight that “expansion of park

and ride facilities can be achieved alongside the development of Urban Renewal

Sites around existing train stations.” (as referred to in Initiative 1.6.1)

29. Include reference to “Heidelberg, Greensborough and Watsonia Stations” in the

short term action to expand Park+Ride and bike cages at outer suburban railway

stations

Initiative 3.4.1, for pedestrian friendly neighbourhoods:

30. Insert a new initiative to “support Councils to introduce pedestrian priority

precincts, including reduction of traffic speeds and improvements to pedestrian

crossings and facilities.”

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CHAPTER 4: Liveable Communities and Neighbourhoods

20-Minute Neighbourhoods

The 20-Minute Neighbourhoods concept is critical to delivering many of the Strategy’s

aspirations across suburban Melbourne. Because of this it will be important to clarify this

concept in the final Strategy, any review of the SPPF and for the preparation of practice

notes. Improved clarity may be given by making it clearer that:

There are clear preferences for walking, cycling and accessing public transport – as

preferred sustainable modes of movement.

Investing in cycling links, through infrastructure investment, can deliver affordable

infrastructure improvements for improved 20 minute access for neighbourhoods.

The 20-Minute concept also has an important contribution to make for delivering new

housing close to jobs and transport and for suburban renewal. Because of this any

funding opportunities for neighbourhoods might be prioritized towards those that also

offer access to local employment and neighbourhood renewal, as well as those that

benefit emerging clusters. This includes infrastructure investment for improved 20

minute movement.

It is unclear whether the 20-Minute concept also applies to accessing “green” public open

space. A more ambitious target would be aiming to have everyone within five to ten

minutes walking time of a local park. Melbourne will struggle to retain its status as one of

the most liveable cities in the world unless high levels of access to public open space are

maintained. International research has shown that regular contact with “green” spaces,

particularly public parks, significantly improves the mental and physical wellbeing of

people who live in urban areas.

The comment “to encourage more open space, including new parks, in urban renewal

precincts and established areas” (p.99) is supported. However local councils will struggle

to provide this new open space in established areas, without considerable support from

the government and other sources. The cost of acquiring land in established areas,

where development has occurred, is often very high.

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While Council supports the principles outlined in initiative 4.1.2, a further initiative could

give momentum to supporting local government to gain easier access to government and

authorities land for public open space.

Protection from Inappropriate Development

In areas earmarked for greater urban density, provision of and access to, “green” public

open space should be treated as a high priority. This will help ensure Melbourne’s high

liveability standards are maintained. (Direction 4.2 Protect Melbourne and its Suburbs

from Inappropriate Development)

Council also supports the initiative to protect unique city precincts and waterways from

inappropriate development. Banyule is currently involved in a project with DTPLI for the

middle Yarra River corridor and looks forward to this project reviewing planning scheme

controls for limiting development and sensitive design in the corridor. Council’s past

strategic planning for the river has achieved an integrated approach that includes other

waterways in Banyule. These include Darebin Creek and the Plenty River. Any

outcomes for the planning scheme that come from the DTPLI review for the middle Yarra

River corridor should look to:

Retain an integrated approach for the Banyule Planning Scheme that considers

Darebin Creek and the Plenty River as well.

Ensure an opportunity for public comment on draft tool kits that are prepared, to

help improve planning schemes. This opportunity would enable local communities

and councils to give comment to DTPLI on drafted planning scheme changes,

before any planning scheme amendment process is done.

Integrate consideration of new residential zones, in a manner that is consistent with

local adopted strategies for activity centres and neighbourhoods.

Do mapping and analysis for a reviewed boundary of the river corridor, to ensure

any reviewed planning scheme controls are coupled with reviewed mapping of the

corridor.

Creating Neighbourhoods and Communities for Healthy Lifestyles

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Council supports concepts for healthy living. For many neighbourhoods that is about

their access to footpaths and bicycle paths within neighbourhoods and for movement

towards key destinations. These destinations include Activity Centres, train stations and

other local destinations. Importantly, this also includes Melbourne’s Off-Road Trails

Network.

Banyule supports developing a stronger nexus between Municipal Health and Wellbeing

Plans and Municipal Strategic Statements, however the final Strategy could go further by

bolstering this relationship with Municipal Public Open Space Strategies as well.

Future Social Infrastructure

Banyule has identified a medical and allied industries precinct in the Heidelberg Structure

Plan. This precinct includes the Austin/Mercy Hospitals Complex, Warringal Hospital and

other land near Heidelberg Station. The work done has also identified Bell Street as a

preferred location to expand this precinct in the future, linking it westerly to the

Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital. Council has also done community facility planning for

Heidelberg West, where there is potential for suburban renewal to be supported by health

facilitates and allied services. This completed work supports the emergence of a

Metropolitan Activity Centre for Heidelberg in the future that also has a regional Health

Precinct.

Banyule supports the recognition of regional Health Precincts and suggests that this is

appropriate for the work done for Heidelberg. From this experience, the definition and

urban design parameters for such precincts needs to be carefully considered. During

structure planning for Heidelberg, which has a suburban neighbourhood context, a good

outcome was achieved by achieving a precinct with tailored design guidelines for building

heights, setbacks, finishing of facades, car-parking and streetscape outcomes.

Design for Health Precincts and social infrastructure needs to consider various principles

for good urban design. This includes principles for active design and integration with

surrounding built-environments for permeability and public transport integration. This

also calls for an outward looking approach to facility planning. Because of this, it is

suggested that DTPLI and the MPA take a cautious approach to amending structure plan

guidelines, updating the SPPF and preparing planning provisions. A final approach

needs to ensure that local issues and opportunities are integrated within future planning

for individual precincts. Doing this, in a manner that involves local communities, also

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enhances the opportunity for health and allied industry providers to have an effective

relationship with local councils and local communities.

There is also an opportunity for DTPLI and the MPA to work with the Department of

Health to do research and analysis for projected growth in public and private medical and

allied industry floor space growth across Melbourne, with a focus on identified health

precincts

Making our City Greener

The development of a new Metropolitan Open Space Strategy is supported. It is

recommended that a new strategy should address the need for more open space in

established areas, where population density is increasing. Before making progress on a

new Strategy it is suggested that the MPA should facilitate ‘scoping’ discussion with local

councils, authorities and key stakeholders to develop a shared understanding on issues

and opportunities for a new Strategy. Initiating such discussion gives an opportunity to

see how interested parties are prepared to contribute to the creation of a new Strategy as

well as reveal key aspects that may influence project planning for the Strategy’s creation.

Council also supports the provision of new neighbourhood parks and open spaces. This

should give direction to the creation of ‘pocket parks’ in Melbourne’s established areas

that are reasonably sizes so they can effectively service community needs. It is

suggested that a 0.75 hectares minimum size should be adopted.

In Banyule there are other places where landscapes, vegetation and environments

contribute neighbourhoods and the public domain. This includes vegetation and

landscaping within road and rail reservations. It is suggested that the draft could make

reference to future initiatives that look to give better recognition and protection for these

places.

Creating More Great Public Places

Council supports reference to ‘grand boulevards’ for defined inner city locations and

believes this concept can be investing for places in Banyule. The final Strategy’s

reference to boulevards, through the use of cross sections and supporting text can also

flag the potential to have reduced (sign posted) traffic speeds and recognition that

greater spaces may be needed for cyclists and pedestrians.

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There is also an opportunity to improve the Strategy to reference an ‘urban forest’ for our

City. Whilst this concept has been explored by the City of Melbourne for public domains,

it has potential to inform priority locations where public and private domains contribute to

our City’s ‘urban forest’. For example, much of Banyule sits at the foothills of the Great

Dividing Range and with a regional waterway corridor. In such locations, public and

private land contributes to the green, treed identify of our City – as it blends into

surrounding landscapes and environments. In these locations DTPLI could prepare

some template cross sections that may be more appropriate for boulevard roads in

suburban Melbourne.

Achieve and Promote Design Excellence

Melbourne’s reputation for quality design can be carried forward into the concepts and

initiatives being introduced by the Strategy. This includes achieving good design for

health precincts, within clusters, urban renewal precincts, activity centres as well as for

strategic redevelopment sites. Often the challenge for achieving good design outcomes,

depends on an ‘outward looking’ approach for creating integrated built and landscape

environments.

To imbed design excellence for outcomes that emerge from the Strategy, it is suggested

that the Victorian Design Review Panel and the State Architect are resources that should

be accessed by local councils and others who are helping to shape our City.

Chapter 4 Recommendations

Direction 4.1, for 20-Minute Neighbourhoods:

31. Consider including more text to clarify the 20-Minute Neighbourhood concept. Do

this by making reference to “preferred modes of movement and access to public

open space in neighbourhoods.”

Initiative 4.1.1, for supporting a network of vibrant neighbourhood centres:

32. Consider recommendations 5 and 6 in this submission to help refine the structure

of centres.

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Initiative 4.1.2, for supporting local governments to plan and manage neighbourhoods:

33. Revise the introductory text to make it clearer that planning and management of

neighbourhoods includes other initiatives described in the strategy. In particular

initiative 2.2.2 for urban renewal precincts.

34. Revise the listed principles for:

“Increasing the usability of and access to, existing and planned green open

space in neighbourhoods.

Applying a hierarchy of travel modes to give priority on walk, cycling and public

transport as preferred modes of movement within neighbourhoods and at

centres.

Improving local economic opportunities, including those that have links with

emerging clusters.

Maintaining green open space within rail and road corridors that contribute to

green backdrops, skylines or vistas within and across neighbourhoods.

Improving housing choice and diversity, including implications for urban

renewal for the neighbourhood.”

35. Include another short term initiative for DTPLI to “Investigate funding options and

incentives for local councils to create and improve green public open space in

neighbourhoods, centres and infrastructure for walking and cycling.”

36. Include another short term initiative for DTPLI to “Invest in Melbourne’s Off-Road

Trail Network and also cycling links into emerging Clusters, Activity Centres, other

key destinations and into neighbourhoods.”

Initiative 4.2.3, for protecting unique city precincts and waterways:

37. Revise the introductory text to integrate reference to “waterway corridors”.

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38. Revise the existing short term initiative for DTPLI to work in partnership with local

governments and “communities” for Melbourne’s waterways for protection of

“waterway corridors, beyond the immediate river banks”.

39. Introduce another short term initiative for DTPLI to “Ensure local government and

community feedback on draft development control tool kits for the middle Yarra

River, before any final controls are prepared.”

Initiative 4.3.1, for creating neighbourhoods and communities for healthy lifestyles:

40. Revise the introductory text to more reference walking “and cycling”, as well as

indicating that these modes of movement provide physical activity for “traveling

outside neighbourhoods, to other destination, such as train station, regional trail

networks and towards central Melbourne.”

41. Revise the existing short term priority for the MPA to examine how the benefits of

walking and cycling connectivity for new links and across natural and “other”

barriers.

42. Introduce another short term initiative for the MPA to “Establish priorities and

investigate funding opportunities for completing Melbourne’s Off-Road Trail

Network.”

Initiative 4.3.2, for municipal health and wellbeing plans:

43. Revise the introductory text to indicate that “local governments also prepare local

open space strategies that promote health and wellbeing.”

44. Introduce another short term initiative for DTPLI to “investigate how ministerial

direction can also be given for municipal strategic statements to be informed by

municipal open space strategies.”

Initiative 4.4.1, for creating health precincts:

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45. Revise the introductory text to more clearly indicate that future definition and

design for regional Health Precincts shall look to “achieve effective relationships

with local communities and development outcomes that are sensitive to the

surrounding context.”

46. Revise the short term initiative for DTPLI to prepare and implement planning

provisions, in a manner that promotes “integrated urban design principles” and

“effective relationships with local communities.”

47. Introduce another short term initiative for DTPLI “in partnership with DoH to

capture information and do analysis for projected private and public medical and

allied industry floor space growth for Melbourne, it’s regions and for regional

health precincts.”

48. Introduce another short term initiative for DTPLI to “develop urban design

guidelines for health precincts, which promote an integrated and outward looking

approach for definition and development of precincts with transport systems, other

infrastructure and mindful of local area planning for surrounding neighbourhoods

and centres.”

Initiative 4.5.2, for new neighbourhood parks and open space:

49. Revise the introductory text to indicate that “local open space needs to be

adequately sized to service changing community profiles and population densities.

In established parts of Melbourne, this calls for innovative solutions and funding

support for local councils, communities and authorities to reimagine the use of

roads and other public places as well as considering funding support and

incentives for better parks and open spaces.”

50. Introduce another short term initiative for DTPLI to “provide ministerial and

practice note guidance, so local councils have potential to more effectively access

State approval processes for achieving interim and final planning scheme changes

for introducing and refining developer contributions.”

Initiative 4.5.3, for landscape and vegetation cover for metropolitan Melbourne:

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51. Include another short term initiative for DTPLI to “Investigate how green open

space within rail and road reserves can be recognized for their contribution to

neighbourhoods and work with Infrastructure Authorities for this contribution to be

maintained and improved in their strategies, plans and practices.”

Initiative 4.6.1, for a distinctive Melbourne policy:

52. Revise the introductory text to indicate that “Our City blends with waterway

corridors, coastlines and with the Great Dividing Range, where landscape and

environmental attributes blend across public and private places for an Urban

Forest.”

53. Revise the introductory text, for the cross section on page 110, to include “In

addition to identifying preferred cross sections, creation of boulevards includes

other aspects for achieving reduced traffic spends and achieving good spaces for

cyclists and pedestrians.”

Initiative 4.6.2, for developing Melbourne’s network of Boulevards:

54. Revise the introductory text to indicate that “boulevards that blend with waterway

corridors, activity centres, along ridgelines and in treed, hilly parts of our City can

help our urban fabric blend with natural features and achieve corridors for

environmental benefit.”

55. Revise the short term initiative for DTPLI to investigate boulevard treatments for

“Plenty Road in Bundoora”.

56. Introduce a short term initiative for DTPLI to “prepare alternate boulevard design

concepts, as templates that may be further explored for establishing a pipeline of

future boulevards across Melbourne.”

57. Revise the medium term priority to indicate a pipeline of future boulevards “with a

focus on major roads at ridgelines, across waterway corridor and the hillier, treed

parts of Melbourne.”

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Initiative 4.8, for achieving design excellence:

58. Revise the introductory text to indicate that “achievement of a polycentric city calls

for achieving urban design excellence for many key places across Melbourne.

This includes clusters, activity centres, health precincts, urban renewal precincts

and for key sites.”

59. Revise the short term initiative to expand the Victorian Design Review Panel

process, so it can be accessed for “Significant Authority and Local Council

projects for health precincts, clusters, urban renewal and strategic sites in activity

centres.”

60. Introduce another short term initiative for the government to “investigate an

expanded role for the State Architect to provide support for those Authorities and

Local Council’s doing key projects for health precincts, clusters, urban renewal

and strategic sites in activity centres.”

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CHAPTER 5: Environment and Water

City Structure to drive sustainable outcomes in managing growth

The reformed residential zones, once applied across Melbourne, will impact on the

pattern of residential redevelopment. This includes places where the Neighbourhood

Residential Zone (NRZ) is applied. In addition to looking at residential growth and urban

renewal areas, it will be valuable for the Urban Development Program to also report on

other aspects that are aligned with a new Strategy. This includes reporting for clusters,

health precincts as well as locations where urban redevelopment is being guided by the

NRZ.

Reduce energy consumption and transition to clean energy

Banyule Council, along with others, is innovative in promoting and encouraging a more

sustainable built environment. Along with Moreland, Port Phillip, Stonnington,

Whitehorse and Yarra Councils, local planning reform is being promoted through the use

of a local planning policy. These Councils have completed public exhibition for planning

scheme changes that leverages off work previously done by the City of Melbourne.

These Councils have concurrent proposals that are currently being considered by a

Planning Panel. These proposals have also prompted DTPLI to enable progress, so the

Planning Panel also provides a Ministerial Advisory Committee function to consider wider

planning system reform opportunities.

Chapter 5 Recommendations

Initiative 5.1.1, for City Structure to drive sustainable outcomes in managing growth:

61. Revise the short term initiative for DTPLI to reform and expand the Urban

Development Program in a manner that looks to “also restructure reporting so

information is collated for clusters, health precincts, activity centres,

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neighbourhood centres and on areas affected by the neighbourhood residential

zone.”

Initiative 5.7.1, for supporting local governments and the private sector in their efforts to

promote energy efficiency:

62. Introduce a short term initiative for the State Government to “actively consider any

recommendations that emerge from the ministerial advisory committee for

environmental sustainable development.”

63. Introduce a short term initiative for DTPLI to “give support to local councils to use

and refine local planning policies to promote and encourage environmental

sustainable development.”

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Chapter 7: Implementation: Delivering Better Governance

Establish a Metropolitan Planning Authority

Creating a MPA gives a further opportunity to review and streamline processes for

changing planning schemes for metropolitan Councils. In the past, Council has done

extensive consultation with local communities to develop activity centre structure plans

and design guidelines for neighbourhoods and other places. This is often an interactive

process on refining and creating final planning scheme changes. In instances where

Councils do this, there should be an opportunity for Councils to fast-track changes to

their planning schemes – particularly where much community consultation has been

done.

Open up new funding opportunities

Council requests setup of an expanded funding stream to help local government

implement the metro strategy. It would have a focus on emerging clusters, 20 minute city

implementation projects, suburban renewal and key strategic sites.

A funding focus on emerging clusters would give momentum to cluster management and

facilitation between key stakeholders who own and manage land in the cluster. This

focus would give impetus to these stakeholders continuing to work together, on further

planning and projects for the emerging cluster.

Council also suggests consideration of the DTPLI or MPA working with other State

Government departments and authorities on key land use aspects to accommodate

changing community profiles. For instance:

• Investment for cemeteries and development of a metropolitan strategy.

• Integrating greater safe design and accessible / liveable housing design parameters

into planning and building systems.

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Initiative 7.1.1, for establishing a MPA:

64. Revise the short term initiative for DTPLI to amend the Planning and Environment

Act 1987 for notice exemptions (such as section 20(4)) for matters “where local

government has completed extensive consultation to create or review a strategy”,

so that delegated decision-making powers can be given to the MPA where there is

evidence that consultation has included proposed planning scheme provisions.

Initiative 7.1.2, for creation of five metropolitan subregions

65. Revise the Map 32 on page 156 to:

a. Show Heidelberg as an emerging Metropolitan Activity Centre.

b. More clearly include Heidelberg within the La Trobe Employment Cluster

symbol by resizing the symbol.

c. Show Watsonia as an Activity Centre. This requires relocation of text for the

‘Potential North-East Link’

d. Show Bell Street Mall as an emerging Activity Centre.

e. Include additional symbols and/or supporting text in the index to identify

Heidelberg, Watsonia and Greensborough Stations as significant urban

renewal sites for transit-oriented development.

f. Consider amending or reformatting the alignment of the ‘Potential North-East

link’ to depict future flexibility for alternate alignments, include the suggestion

given in this submission.

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EASTERN METROPOLITAN GROUP OF COUNCILS

SUBMISSION TO PLAN MELBOURNE

November 2013

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Table of Contents

1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 3

2.0 BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................ 4

3.0 PLAN MELBOURNE – OUTCOMES & OBJECTIVES ...................................................................... 5

3.1 Delivering Jobs & Investment .............................................................................................. 5

3.1.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................... 5

3.1.2 Suggestions ............................................................................................................................ 6

3.2 Housing Choice & Affordability............................................................................................ 7

3.2.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................... 7

3.2.2 Suggestions ............................................................................................................................ 8

3.3 A More Connected Melbourne ............................................................................................ 9

3.3.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................... 9

3.3.2 Suggestions ............................................................................................................................ 9

3.4 Livable Communities & Neighbourhoods ........................................................................... 10

3.4.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................. 10

3.4.2 Suggestions .......................................................................................................................... 10

3.5 Environment & Water ....................................................................................................... 11

3.5.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................. 11

3.5.2 Suggestions .......................................................................................................................... 11

3.6 A State of Cities ................................................................................................................ 12

3.6.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................. 12

3.6.2 Suggestions .......................................................................................................................... 12

3.7 Implementation: Delivering Better Governance ................................................................. 13

3.7.1 Discussion ............................................................................................................................. 13

3.7.2 Suggestions .......................................................................................................................... 14

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1.0 INTRODUCTION

Plan Melbourne provides a comprehensive response to the issues and challenges facing

Melbourne over the next 40 years. As outlined in the Plan, these include congestion,

affordability, accessibility, a changing climate and rural encroachment.

Plan Melbourne’s aim to integrate long-term land-use, infrastructure and transport

planning to meet the needs of the future, and to provide certainty for residents and

business provides an important starting point for a metropolitan strategy.

The Vision for Melbourne as expressed, is that “Melbourne will be a global city of

opportunity and choice”. It is proposed that this will be achieved by:

- Protecting the suburbs

- Developing in defined areas near services and infrastructure

- Creating a clearer and simpler planning system with improved decision making

- Rebalancing growth between Melbourne and regional Victoria, and

- Identifying an investment and infrastructure pipeline.

Plan Melbourne is based on a number of key concepts which underpin its vision.

Together, these concepts provide a sound and strategic framework for the future of

Melbourne and provide a positive response to the issues and challenges facing the City.

The key concepts are:

- Delivering a New Integrated Economic Triangle

- Protecting the Suburbs by Delivering Density in Defined Locations

- A State of Cities

- Delivering a Pipeline of Investment Opportunities

- Better Use of Existing Assets

- 20 Minute Neighbourhoods

- Housing Choice & Affordability

- Transitioning to a more Sustainable City

- Good Governance and Strong Partnerships

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Seven Outcomes and Objectives are included within Plan Melbourne. These are:

Delivering Jobs & Investment

Housing Choice & Affordability

A More Connected Melbourne

Liveable Communities & Neighbourhoods

Environment & Water

A State of Cities

Implementation: Delivering Better Governance

Within each Outcome and Objective, a series of Directions and Initiatives are proposed.

These are the means by which the Plan Melbourne vision and objectives are to be

delivered. These include a broad variety of short, medium and long positive actions such

as preparing new subregional plans, undertaking urban renewal activities, making

changes to the planning and policy framework, committing to collaboration and a

partnership approach with the public and private sector, supporting local government,

investigating new processes and establishing a monitoring framework.

Given the extent of growth that is expected to occur in Melbourne over the next 40

years ,including the Eastern region, the strategy outlined by Plan Melbourne, including

the extensive number of initiatives, is well-considered and provides a comprehensive

response to the issues raised in the EMGC’s submission to “Melbourne, let’s talk about

the future” (March 2013).

Due to the extent of growth and complex issues facing Melbourne, the challenges are

considerable. The success of Plan Melbourne lies in its ability to be implemented.

Forging successful partnerships with both the public and private sector, and delivering

social and physical infrastructure are fundamental to achieving this.

2.0 BACKGROUND

Provide overview of Eastern Region

Provide summary of issues raised in submission to ‘Melbourne, let’s talk about the

future’ (March 2013)

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3.0 PLAN MELBOURNE – OUTCOMES & OBJECTIVES

3.1 Delivering Jobs & Investment

3.1.1 Discussion

The new city structure outlined in Plan Melbourne is a positive response to the key economic

drivers of Melbourne. As a land use and integrated transport strategy that outlines a vision

for Melbourne to 2050, and which is based on infrastructure led growth, it is supported by

the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils (EMGC).

The Integrated Economic Triangle and support for its continued evolution in Plan Melbourne

is a sensible and strategic approach that takes advantage of metropolitan Melbourne’s

spatial economy. Further, Plan Melbourne recognises the changing nature of Melbourne’s

economy, and acknowledges the growth in business and population related services which

now generate a greater share of employment and economic output than previously.

Plan Melbourne provides a clear distinction between the role of National Employment

Cluster, Metropolitan Activity Centres and other Activity Centres. Facilitating the

development of National Employment Clusters and supporting the planning of Activity

Centres to accommodate a skilled job force and value-adding industries is an integral spatial

concept.

The identification of five new subregions, each to be anchored by a National Employment

Cluster, a major economic gateway (airport, port or interstate freight terminal) and

containing Metropolitan Activity Centres, is a practical response to Melbourne’s spatial

economy that exploits the City’s advantages and will be valuable in informing future land use

and infrastructure planning, as well as investment decisions.

The ‘important future initiatives’, the ‘places of state-significance’, the identified activity

centres and the urban renewal locations (as indicated on Map 33; p 159) are logical

opportunities and key elements for the Eastern subregion, which are supported by the

EMGC.

The reclassification of Activity Centres, including the removal of ‘Principal’ (PAC) and ‘Major’

(MAC) designations is considered positive. Such designations were often ambiguous with

regard to the envisaged outcomes between a PAC and a MAC, which did not necessarily

reflect the genuine potential of the centre, its specific opportunities and constraints for

development, or commercial reality.

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The identification of selected Metropolitan Activity Centres based on existing public

transport networks with the aim of attracting investment in education and health, as well as

providing diversity of jobs and increased housing opportunities, will better achieve a growth

hierarchy and clearer focus for infrastructure investment.

Identifying urban renewal sites around the existing transport network to unlock investment

opportunities for the private sector and to maximise the State’s return on infrastructure is

an important first step in the renewal process.

The need for collaboration between State and local government to develop long term plans

for the subregions is fundamental to the success of the Plan and is strongly supported. It is

an important first step that recognises the need for collaboration in a process where a ‘one-

size fits all’ model should not apply.

3.1.2 Suggestions

Further to the vision expressed, Plan Melbourne should expand on its vision for Melbourne,

which is for it to become “a global city of opportunity and choice”. This could include

describing its intended national and international role for the next 40 years, including what

its relationship with other Australian capital cities.

Unlike each of the other identified subregions, Plan Melbourne does not identify a future job

capacity increase for the Eastern subregion. At the same time, the subregion’s population is

expected to increase between 25% to 35% over the life of the plan. There needs to be

explicit recognition and commitment to promote employment growth in the Eastern

subregion, which contains a highly educated and skilled demographic and is well matched to

the needs of the future economy. This will signify that the region is strategically placed to

capitalise on increased employment in Melbourne’s growth industries.

Given the existing and significant forecast population of the Eastern subregion, together

with its relatively skilled and educated workforce, its national employment clusters and

knowledge based industries, it plays a major role in delivering jobs and investment. This fact

should not be overlooked by Plan Melbourne or any of the policy or infrastructure initiatives

that follow from it. Further, as Plan Melbourne suggests that there could be demand for

around 11 million square metres of commercial zoned land (office and retail) across

Melbourne, identifying a potential job capacity for the Eastern subregion would be a

prudent and sensible measure.

Plan Melbourne is very much focussed on employment nodes of national significance,

however it should not fail to acknowledge or make provision for existing or emergent

employment hubs that serve a significant regional catchment. This is particularly the case

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given the creation of the subregions, in which such hubs play an important economic

function and should be factored into future policy, infrastructure and investment decisions.

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3.2 Housing Choice & Affordability

3.2.1 Discussion

Providing a diversity of housing in defined locations that caters for different households

which are close to jobs and services, is central to successfully planning for Melbourne’s

future. As outlined in Plan Melbourne, at least one million additional new dwellings are

required by 2050. Of this, 600,000 (60%) are expected to occur in established areas

including the central city and surrounds, of which 393,000 are expected to occur in

established Melbourne suburbs. While this aim is supported, introducing measures to

deliver a sufficient quantity and type of new housing and which is affordable, presents

numerous challenges. Delivering on this objective is not only essential to achieving

numerous other objectives of Plan Melbourne, but also to ensuring the social and economic

well-being of the city and its residents.

Providing choice in housing is an important initiative that responds not only to the increasing

population, but also continuing change in household size, driven by the ageing population

and a desire to downsize and age in place.

Directions outlined to provide greater housing choice and affordability, including reducing

the cost of living by increasing housing supply near services and public transport; facilitating

the supply of more social housing; and facilitating the supply of more affordable housing, are

considered necessary and important.

It is noted that Plan Melbourne will determine a process to facilitate the development of

targeted urban renewal sites and precincts, including assisting local government in

identifying areas suitable for more residential growth. Supported by the ERGC, the means by

which this is ultimately proposed will have a significant bearing on the ability to deliver the

intended residential development outcomes.

The principle of urban renewal precincts as locations for accommodating new housing is

recognised as an important concept that once delivered, offers significant benefits for

residents and in accommodating growth. A plan that promotes such an outcome is

supported. The identified urban renewal opportunities for the Eastern subregion in Plan

Melbourne - Ringwood Station, Nunawading Station and Glen Waverley Station - are

appropriate.

In the identified Eastern subregion, approximately 115,000 new dwellings will be required

(based on the median forecast population increase). Considering this, together with the

impending application of the new residential zones this raises two key questions:

1) Where will the new dwellings occur?

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2) How will this improve affordability?

Given the likelihood that the areas available for medium density development area are to be

reduced as a result of the application of the Neighbourhood Residential Zone, the ability to

supply new housing, and therefore accommodate the needs of the growing population, may

be limited. It is recommended that this issue is considered when applying the new zones

and that supply, in terms of type, location and price, is monitored closely once implemented.

3.2.2 Suggestions

Initiatives and actions identified to help achieve housing choice and affordability within Plan

Melbourne are largely limited to changing the policy framework, guideline preparation,

application of planning zones and possible streamlining of the approval process. While these

represent an important suite of initiatives, they are generally regulatory changes only

Following genuine urban renewal examples, particularly those with a focus on delivering

new housing, significant opportunity exists to introduce a variety of mechanisms and

initiatives that will assist in bringing forward residential development in defined locations

and in the process helping achieve the necessary supply and in doing so, making it more

affordable. As an example, this could include selected changes to stamp duty, a variety of

fiscal measures, joint venture arrangements, equity sharing and housing gap funding

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3.3 A More Connected Melbourne

3.3.1 Discussion

Plan Melbourne correctly acknowledges that transport underpins the livability, economic

prosperity, efficiency and success of cities. It identifies that large cities with compact and

efficient transport infrastructure are efficient urban settlements.

The EMGC concurs with the aim to consolidate future growth in targeted areas including the

Monash Employment Cluster, Box Hill and Ringwood) and the opportunities for transport

upgrades, including potential road and rail links.

Appropriately, Plan Melbourne recognises that transport presents an important challenge

for National Employment Clusters such as Monash, where rail level crossings and congested

arterial roads inhibit bus and car access. Plans to harmonise public transport services across

trains, trams and buses to provide better connectivity, removing level crossings and

improving suburban rail and bus networks in growth areas and outer suburbs, are all

supported.

The commencement of the first stage of the East-West link in 2014 is a significant initiative

which will improve the efficiency of freight movements into and out of the region. On this

basis, support is also extended for investigations into the North-East Link to connect the

M80 Ring Road, the potential Rowville Rail Link, and the potential Doncaster Rail Link.

Moving towards a metro-style rail system, including the Melbourne Metro is a fundamental

transformation required to accommodate a growing population and achieve a more efficient

movement pattern across Melbourne.

3.3.2 Suggestions

Connectivity to and from the Monash National Employment Cluster and Deakin University

should give support to improved and extended public transport throughout the region.

While the Strategy recognises Rowville Rail as one of the few long term actions, it should

address the Knox tram extension and the need to start planning in the short term.

Commencing the reservation of land for future rail extensions and stations in the urban

growth areas and outer suburbs, including the Rowville rail, should be a short term rather

than a medium term action under Initiative 3.3.2 Improve Outer-suburban rail and bus

networks.

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Regional Development Australia (Melbourne East) and the Eastern Transport Coalition have

undertaken extensive and excellent work in relation to transport provision, including

identifying priority projects in the eastern region. It is suggested that this work is included

within Plan Melbourne, including the proposed reforms to bus services.

There is a need for regional transport plans to interface with each other.

3.4 Livable Communities & Neighbourhoods

3.4.1 Discussion

The intention to create a network of vibrant Neighbourhood Centres that enables people to

access a range of local services within 20 minutes of home is a worthy objective and is an

ideal worth aspiring to. Activity Centres will continue to be important in helping achieve the

’20 minute city’ concept and their expanding role in providing diverse uses, including higher

density residential development

Emphasis on liveability through increased walkability, better public spaces, open space

improvements, planning for social infrastructure is supported. The proposed ’20 Minute

Neighbourhood’ fund will assist in achieving this.

3.4.2 Suggestions

Many of the initiatives proposed relate to policy, zoning controls and providing guidance,

including protection from inappropriate development, e.g. introducing mandatory height

controls, introducing the Neighbourhood Residential Zone across at least 50% of Melbourne

and introducing neighbourhood character controls in Neighbourhood Centres. While

development control is important, the development of vibrant Activity Centres as envisaged

by Plan Melbourne also requires proactive measures, which may include financial and

economic incentives, investment prioritisation and public-private partnership initiatives.

The introduction of increased regulation may well limit the ability for them to develop.

These issues should be understood before more stringent development control is applied.

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3.5 Environment & Water

3.5.1 Discussion

Plan Melbourne states that it will “protect our natural assets and better plan our water,

energy and waste management systems to create a sustainable city”. This is consistent with

the view of the EMGC and is an important platform from which to plan Melbourne over the

next 40 years.

The proposed directions to achieve a sustainable city recognise the variety of environmental

issues that need to be addressed. The various initiatives identified recognise the importance

of managing urban growth, protecting and restoring natural habitat, enhancing food

production capability, improving noise and air quality, reducing energy consumption and

transitioning to clean energy, and planning for better waste management and resource

recovery.

3.5.2 Suggestions

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3.6 A State of Cities

3.6.1 Discussion

It is agreed that regional cities will need to take a greater share of Victoria’s population

growth over the coming years. Directions to achieve this outcome including, delivering a

permanent boundary around Melbourne, integrating metropolitan, peri-urban and regional

planning implementation, and improving connections between cities are supported and

endorsed by the EMGC.

Establishing a permanent boundary around Melbourne to provide long term planning

certainty and to protect the non-urban values of the land surrounding Melbourne is a

positive initiative and the decision to do this with input from local government is supported.

Strengthening the economic, social and amenity roles of regional city CBDs by encouraging

increased business and residential densities is key to making regional cities more attractive

and is an important action in relieving population pressure on Melbourne.

Identifying a pipeline of developments to attract growth out of Melbourne and into the peri-

urban area and regional Victoria will assist in the creation of a State of Cities.

Investment strategies and infrastructure plans developed as part of regional plans should

include timeframes for delivery of key projects. Such initiatives will be integral to attracting

population, particularly those contemplating relocating from metropolitan Melbourne.

3.6.2 Suggestions

Beyond identifying a pipeline of developments in areas outside of Melbourne it will be

important to assist the viability of such projects through various facilitation mechanisms that

will help stimulate private sector interest and address market failure where necessary.

Tailored responses, beyond changes to the planning framework, and which include direct

investment and financial incentives, should be employed to help grow Victoria’s regions.

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3.7 Implementation: Delivering Better Governance

3.7.1 Discussion

Plan Melbourne recognises that successful implementation will require a sustained effort by

all levels of government and the private sector. This is an important acknowledgement of

the challenges and complexities confronting Melbourne over the next 40 years and is one

with which the EMGC concurs.

The Metropolitan Planning Authority’s (MPA) responsibility for implementation is clearly an

important role and is central to Plan Melbourne’s success. Intended to adopt a collaborative

approach, including with the private sector, the traditional centralised planning function of

the State must evolve and adopt a more sophisticated approach to delivering the type of

outcomes envisaged by Plan Melbourne. Directions to drive delivery and facilitate action,

open up new funding sources and better align infrastructure delivery and growth are

supported.

The establishment of five metropolitan subregions to work collaboratively with the State

Government is positive and is an excellent opportunity to plan in response to the specific

challenges, opportunities, strengths and weaknesses that exist within each. The partnership

approach can add significant value, as a well supported plan for the subregion will allow for

a better response to the many challenges that lie ahead and enable strategic planning to be

undertaken at a regional level, as well as provide opportunities for coordinated regional

infrastructure and service delivery.

Urban renewal can have many positive effects and the concept of extending renewal

initiatives into the suburbs is supported. Facilitating growth in major urban renewal

precincts is an important initiative outlined in Plan Melbourne. To achieve this, a variety of

actions that are beyond modifying the regulatory framework are required. Successful urban

renewal is dependent on a tailored response involving both the public and private sectors.

Plans to develop a framework to identify under-utilised government land, including a system

to manage, value-capture and dispose of it, will be pivotal to achieving successful

development outcomes and meeting various objectives of Plan Melbourne.

Monitoring and reporting on the progress of Plan Melbourne’s initiatives across the five

subregion’s is essential and will provide an understanding of the success of the various

initiatives. Publishing indicators is an important initiative by which to achieve transparency,

and ultimately accountability in performance.

A more strategic approach to funding of infrastructure is welcomed including recognition

that funding is not just about the ‘big ticket’ items’ but is also about ‘unlocking the capacity’

of existing infrastructure.

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3.7.2 Suggestions

Traditionally, the key role of public bodies involved in urban renewal is in the creation of a

policy and investment environment that is conducive to the private sector. Added value can

be obtained by cross-sector co-operation which creates the opportunity to bring forward

redevelopment initiatives and the sharing of risk. International examples highlight that

urban renewal agencies should be built on formal partnerships that operate at arm’s length

from political authorities, which enables them to fully engage the private sector.

The development and application of a range of tools and policy initiatives to achieve renewal

are many and could include site assembly, land rehabilitation, establishment of regeneration

zones, infrastructure facilitation, commercial venture partnerships, etc. It is important that

the MPA investigates options beyond the regulatory and traditional policy framework as a

means to achieve its urban renewal objectives.

It is important that the role of the MPA, including its planned short term projects and

stakeholder engagement program, is clarified and announced early. Given its strategic focus,

its role will have a critical impact on Council planning, decision making and resourcing. Early

collaboration will be important, particularly as those programs and initiatives identified to

be undertaken by local government are not addressed. To fulfil its intended role the MPA

needs to be sufficiently well resourced.

Clarification of the role of the Department of Transport, Planning & Local Infrastructure also

needs to be provided.

Clarification on how cross regional issues, as well as those at the boundaries between

regions should be dealt with, needs to be addressed.

Extensive work has been completed for the eastern region through bodies such as the

Eastern Transport Coalition and Regional Development Australia (Melbourne East). This

includes the following projects:

- Melbourne East Regional Plan – “Making A Great Region Even Better” (2012)

- Creating employment within the region (2012)

- Supporting the tertiary education sector in the Melbourne East region(2012)

- Creating innovation & knowledge based business employment in Melbourne's East (2012)

- Audit & Market Assessment of Cultural Facilities in the Melbourne East region (2012)

- Melbourne East RDA submission responding to the federal Major Cities Unit 'Our Cities'

Discussion Paper (2012).

Given the extensive work undertaken and the relevance of this to Plan Melbourne, it is

expected that these projects, should in the very least be used to inform the subregional

planning process to be undertaken by the MPA

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Plan Melbourne should recognise the need to address existing infrastructure gaps in

established Activity Centres where a significant portion of new housing and other forms of

development are planned. The renewal of existing infrastructure is as important as new

infrastructure in meeting the Plan’s objectives. Increasing densities in established areas can

deliver major infrastructure cost savings, however in many instances there is a lack of

information about existing infrastructure capacities to enable immediate identification of

areas where infrastructure is underutilised, or where it may require upgrading to

accommodate an increase in dwellings. This information needs to be obtained prior to

preparing land use plans.

The capacity of existing infrastructure such as roads, sewers and drainage should be

identified and taken into consideration as part of the new Strategy. Infrastructure capacity

should underpin locations identified for increased housing or commercial intensity

particularly in established areas to avoid costly retrofitting and determine where

infrastructure improvements should occur.

An infrastructure plan should be developed as part of the Strategy that will identify

where/what improvements are required in established areas to sustain greater levels of

development. An infrastructure management plan would also provide clear direction for the

preferred location of future housing and key community services. The long term

sustainability of commuting greater distances to work and other services should be factored

into identifying areas for more intense housing and creating employment hubs across

Melbourne.

At the local government level, a review of the Local Government Act may be needed to

determine if it is unnecessarily restricting local government investment in appropriate

development projects. This could be coupled with best practice examples of alternative

funding models to assist future investment and funding decisions.

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Item: 6.2 Attachment 1: Review of Councillor Discretionary - October 2013

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Item: 6.2 Attachment 1: Review of Councillor Discretionary - October 2013

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Item: 6.2 Attachment 1: Review of Councillor Discretionary - October 2013

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