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Ordinary Meeting of Council Council Chambers, Service Centre 275 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe 2 December 2013 commencing at 7.45pm Following the public forum commencing at approximately 7.30pm and may be extended to 8pm if necessary. AGENDA The Mayor’s Acknowledgement of the Wurundjeri People “Our Meeting is being held on the traditional lands (country) of the Wurundjeri people and I wish to acknowledge them as the traditional owners and pay my respects to their Elders.” Apologies and Leave of Absence Confirmation of Minutes Ordinary Meeting of Council held 18 November 2013 Disclosure of Interests Presentation A presentation will be made to Council by Womens Health in the North for participation in the Northern Region Preventing Violence against Women Strategy “Building a Respectful Community – Preventing Violence against Women”. 1. Petitions 1.1 Vesting of Reserve - 4A Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe ................................................ 3 REPORTS: 2. People Community Strengthening and Support 2.1 Alma Road, Bundoora - Investigation of Parking and Traffic Congestion ............................................................................................................. 5 2.2 Banyule Graffiti Summitt ....................................................................................... 14 3. Planet Environmental Sustainability 3.1 Energy Saving Plan .............................................................................................. 17 3.2 Funding of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program ................................................................................................................ 23

Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

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Text of Banyule Council Ordinary Meeting 2 December 2013

  • Ordinary Meeting of Council

    Council Chambers, Service Centre

    275 Upper Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe

    2 December 2013 commencing at 7.45pm

    Following the public forum commencing at approximately 7.30pm and may be extended to 8pm if necessary.

    AGENDA

    The Mayors Acknowledgement of the Wurundjeri People Our Meeting is being held on the traditional lands (country) of the Wurundjeri people and I wish to acknowledge them as the traditional owners and pay my respects to their Elders.

    Apologies and Leave of Absence Confirmation of Minutes Ordinary Meeting of Council held 18 November 2013 Disclosure of Interests Presentation A presentation will be made to Council by Womens Health in the North for participation in the Northern Region Preventing Violence against Women Strategy Building a Respectful Community Preventing Violence against Women.

    1. Petitions

    1.1 Vesting of Reserve - 4A Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe ................................................ 3

    REPORTS:

    2. People Community Strengthening and Support

    2.1 Alma Road, Bundoora - Investigation of Parking and Traffic Congestion ............................................................................................................. 5

    2.2 Banyule Graffiti Summitt ....................................................................................... 14

    3. Planet Environmental Sustainability

    3.1 Energy Saving Plan .............................................................................................. 17

    3.2 Funding of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program ................................................................................................................ 23

  • AGENDA (Contd)

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 2

    4. Place Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

    4.1 Metropolitan Planning Strategy ............................................................................. 29

    4.2 East West Link - Comprehensive Impact Statement ............................................. 34

    4.3 Options Available to Council to Address Development Sites with Issues ................................................................................................................... 45

    4.4 Balaka Place Bundoora Streetscape Improvements ............................................. 56

    4.5 Proposed sale of discontinued road (Rose Street) adjacent to 1065 Heidelberg Road Ivanhoe ............................................................................ 59

    4.6 Northern Infrastructure Report .............................................................................. 64

    5. Participation Community Involvement in Community Life

    Nil

    6. Performance - Use Our Resources Wisely

    6.1 Audit Committee Charter ...................................................................................... 69

    6.2 Review of Councillor Discretionary Funds ............................................................. 71

    6.3 Assembly of Councillors ........................................................................................ 75

    7. Sealing of Documents

    7.1 Sealing of Documents .......................................................................................... 79

    8. Notices of Motion

    8.1 Bully Free Australia ............................................................................................... 81

    8.2 National Container Deposit Scheme ..................................................................... 82

    8.3 School Crossing Supervision ................................................................................ 83

    8.4 Deferment of Interest Charges on Second Instalment Rates and Charges ................................................................................................................ 84

    9. General Business

    10. Urgent Business

    Closure of Meeting to the Public That in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989, Council close the Meeting to members of the public and adjourn for five minutes to allow the public to leave the Chamber prior to considering the following confidential matters.

    11. Confidential Matters

    11.1 contractual matters

    11.2 contractual matters

    Matters Discussed in Camera That all confidential matters and reports related to the above items remain confidential unless otherwise specified.

    Closure of Meeting

  • 1.1

    Petitions

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 3

    1.1 VESTING OF RESERVE - 4A ABERCORN AVENUE IVANHOE

    Author: Renee Kueffer - Subdivisions Officer, City Development

    Ward: Olympia

    File: P845/2013

    A petition with 25 signatures has been received from residents of Abercorn Avenue Ivanhoe. The petition prayer is as follows: We the undersigned, hereby notify Banyule Council that we object to the transferring of land, that is 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe, otherwise known as Vesting in to Councils name. An outline of the reasons for the objections include but are not limited to the following:

    1. The owners of 4, 6-8 Abercorn Avenue, believed that the ownership of 4A as shown in the accompanying map was on their respective titles and factored into their purchase price when they acquired the respective properties;

    2. The lengthy objection written by land owner in Abercorn Avenue [name removed for privacy reasons], submitted to Councils officers, was not actually submitted to Council itself despite being told that this would happened and that further opportunities for consultation would arise from this;

    3. The home at number 2 is unoccupied and there is no evidence to show that new owners were notified;

    4. The owner of number 4, was not notified by Council; 5. The land in question has been in continuous use by the owners of 2, 4, 6-8.

    The previous owner of 6-8 cultivated and maintained the land as is the current owner;

    6. No opportunity has been afforded to the residents of the above mentioned properties for consultation about purchasing the easement from the original owner or, if he is deceased, then from his beneficiaries;

    7. Once this area of land is transferred onto Councils title, the owners of the aforementioned properties will lose the enjoyment of the land that is at the rear of their property;

    8. Once the area of land is transferred into Councils name, its use may well be irrevocably changed;

    9. Paucity of time to respond.

    OFFICER COMMENT

    Planning Permit application P845/2013 relates to a number of parcels of land across Banyule with the application seeking to vest the parcels in Councils name. The petition relates to one property only which is known as 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe. The Certificate of Title indicates that the subject land was created as a Drainage and Sewerage Reserve as part of the original subdivision in 1921.

  • 1.1

    Petitions

    VESTING OF RESERVE - 4A ABERCORN AVENUE IVANHOE contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 4

    The Vesting of Reserves into Councils name is an administrative process being undertaken for a number of reserves across the municipality and it is not expected that any change in use of the land will occur as a result of the change of ownership. Public Notification of Planning Permit Application P845/2013 was undertaken to all abutting property owners and occupiers, and the required time to object given, in accordance with the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. The objection lodged by the head petitioner was received by Council Officers and was considered in the assessment of Planning Permit Application P845/2013, and a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit was issued under delegation on 30 October 2013. Advice from the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) on 25 November 2013 confirmed that an appeal has been lodged against Councils Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit. Council, as the applicant for the planning application could consider formally amending the application to remove 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe from the application. This would enable the issues raised in the petition to be considered further and for Council to then decide the next steps in relation to this property separately. On this basis it would also be anticipated that following confirmation from VCAT, the appeal against Councils Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit would be withdrawn by the objector.

    RECOMMENDATION

    That Council:

    1. Receives and notes the petition.

    2. Formally amends Planning Application P845/2013 to remove 4A Abercorn Avenue, Ivanhoe from the application and advises the relevant objector once this has occurred.

    3. Advises the primary petitioner accordingly.

    ATTACHMENTS

    No. Title Page

    1 Petition First Page 86

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 5

    2.1 ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION

    Author: Sanjev Sivananthanayagam - Transport Engineer, City Development

    Ward: Grimshaw

    File: ST220

    SUMMARY

    A Notice of Motion brought to Council in December 2012 moved that an investigation be undertaken into possible parking and congestion issues in Alma Road, Bundoora. Alma Road is situated just north of Grimshaw Street and east of Plenty Road and close to a number of traffic and parking generators Aldi Supermarket, Yulong Reserve, St Peters Anglican Church and various local businesses. During the site observations it was observed that vehicles were parked on both sides of Alma Road. Following the investigation, it is considered that the most appropriate parking restrictions for Alma Road is the conversion of the existing No Stopping, 9am 4pm, Sat parking restrictions on the east side of the street to No Stopping, 8.30am 6pm, for all seven (7) days. Also, the extension of the No Stopping parking restrictions 20m further south than the existing is considered appropriate, to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park. As an overwhelming majority of the residents supported this proposal, it is considered appropriate to proceed with the installation of the parking restrictions. This will alleviate concerns with traffic congestion in the street. No other major traffic safety or congestion issues were identified in the street. Councils Local Laws department will be advised to enforce the parking restrictions in the street more frequently, including on weekends.

    OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

    Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

    CITY PLAN

    This report is in line with Councils City Plan key direction to develop and promote safety and resilience in our community.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 6

    BACKGROUND Concerns were raised by residents of Alma Road in relation to parking and traffic congestion in the street with their local ward councillor. At its meeting of 17 December 2012 Council considered a Notice of Motion regarding Alma Road, Bundoora. At the meeting, Council resolved:

    That Council officers provide a report on the traffic and car parking issues that residents on Alma Road in Bundoora may be experiencing. The report should present options for how traffic congestion may be mitigated and how on-street car parking be better reserved for use by local residents. In preparing the report officers are encouraged to write to residents on Alma Road to seek their input and feedback.

    This report responds to the Council resolution. EXISTING CONDITIONS Alma Road is classified under Councils road hierarchy as a Local Road (residential street) with a default speed limit of 50km/h. A locality plan of Alma Road is shown in Figure 1.

    Figure 1 Locality Plan Alma Road is approximately 220m long and 7.2m wide measured between the face of kerbs. It is aligned in the north - south direction, and connects into Grimshaw Street at the southern end and Bent Street on the northern end.

    Subject

    Location

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 7

    Aldi Supermarket and Jetts Gymnasium are located at the intersection of Alma Road and Grimshaw Street, on the western side of Alma Road. St Peters Anglican Church is located at the intersection of Alma Road and Grimshaw Street, on the eastern side of Alma Road. A major bus stop is located on the north side of Grimshaw Street, west of Alma Road, acting as an interchange between tram and bus services. Yulong Reserve which includes numerous sports facilities is located at the intersection of Alma Road and Bent Street, on the north side of Bent Street. There are a number of businesses located on the west side of Grimshaw Street and the east side of Plenty Road, including Ray White Real Estate and an Ambulance Depot. Twelve indented 90 degree angled parking spaces are located in front of St Peters Anglican Church, on the east side of Alma Road. Two of the spaces are signed as disabled parking only and the remaining spaces are unrestricted. One indented parallel parking space is located in front of the Aldi Supermarket, on the west side of Alma Road. A Council car park (27 parking spaces) is located in Alma Road just north of the Aldi Supermarket. Currently there are No Stopping parking restrictions installed for Saturdays between 9am 4pm on the east side of Alma Road, between Bent Street and the Council car park. INVESTIGATION

    An investigation has been undertaken in Alma Road in relation to road safety and parking in the street. The investigation included several site observations, parking surveys and two community consultation surveys. Parking Survey Results Parking surveys were undertaken in the street to determine the level of usage (i.e. percentage of occupancy) and duration surveys to determine the period of time these vehicles were parked in the street. Parking observation surveys were undertaken over a number of weekdays and weekends. The results of the weekday surveys are listed in table 1 below.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 8

    Table 1: Parking Observation Survey Results

    Location

    Su

    pp

    ly

    18/0

    6/2

    013

    10:3

    0:0

    0 A

    M

    18/0

    6/2

    013

    12:0

    0:0

    0 P

    M

    24/0

    6/2

    013

    3:0

    0 P

    M

    25/0

    6/2

    013

    2:0

    0 P

    M

    27/0

    6/2

    013

    4:0

    0 P

    M

    23/0

    6/2

    013

    10:0

    0 A

    M

    20/0

    7/2

    013

    12:0

    0 P

    M

    Avera

    ge O

    ccu

    pie

    d

    Avera

    ge

    Occu

    pan

    cy (

    %)

    Tue Tue Mon Tue Thu Sun Sat

    Alma Road

    East Side 20 0 0 0 1 0 2 4 1 5%

    West Side 16 2 5 5 5 4 2 2 4 25%

    Indented bays

    In front of Church 12 10 12 9 8 10 12 12 10 83%

    In front of Aldi 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 100%

    Off Street Car Parks

    Council Car Park 27 19 19 18 16 20 27 23 20 74%

    Aldi Car Park 113 33 32 27 31 29 35 34 32 28%

    Parking duration surveys were also undertaken in Alma Road during the weekdays. The duration survey highlighted five vehicles parking for longer periods during the day. Three of these vehicles were observed using the indented angled parking spaces in front of the Church, and two vehicles were parked on the west side of Alma Road. Site Observations Several site inspections were undertaken on different days and times. In relation to parking it was observed that:

    Indented angled parking spaces at the southern end of Alma Road are heavily utilised and are operating as short term parking spaces with a high frequency of turnover.

    Aldi Supermarket customers are often utilising the indented angled parking spaces.

    Motorists were observed parking at the northern end of Alma Road and walking towards Plenty Road via Bent Street.

    In relation to the congestion it was observed that:

    Alma Road is not wide enough to accommodate two way traffic movements when vehicles are parked on both sides.

    Vehicles turning out of the indented angled parking spaces generally held up vehicles turning out of Aldi Supermarket car park and the Council car park.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 9

    Vehicles turning right out of Alma Road into Grimshaw Street generally had to wait a short period to undertake the right turn movement, resulting in delay to vehicles wanting to turn left into Grimshaw Street.

    The majority of the observed minor traffic delay issues were caused by Aldi Supermarket customers.

    Vehicle speed was not observed to be a concern. Community Consultation Survey The first community consultation survey was undertaken with Alma Road residents in July 2013 to solicit their views on parking in the street and the type of parking restrictions they believed would alleviate the current traffic congestion and parking issues. Nine responses were received from a possible seventeen properties.

    All nine respondents indicated that they have concerns with parking in the street.

    Eight respondents indicated a need for further parking restrictions in the streets, also stating other traffic concerns which they had.

    Residents listed the following as parking generators in the street.

    Aldi Supermarket

    Yulong Reserve

    St Peters Anglican Church

    Ray White Real Estate in Plenty Road

    Jetts Gymnasium

    Tram Stop in Plenty Road

    Bus Stop in Grimshaw Street

    Ambulance Depot in Plenty Road

    Various local restaurants Plenty Road and Grimshaw Street The following were listed by residents as possible parking restrictions or solutions which could be considered:

    No Stopping parking restrictions, 8.30am - 6pm (all days) on the east side of Alma Road.

    1/2P parking restrictions for the angle parking spaces. Resident Parking Only.

    Provision of additional indented parking along the street. The following were listed by residents as other traffic concerns in the street.

    Aldi supermarket trucks restricted access due to parked vehicles.

    Congestion due to vehicles reversing out of angle parking spaces.

    Congestion due to vehicles parking on both sides of the street.

    Rat running to avoid the traffic signals and the speed in the street.

    Signs in the street not adequate.

    Turning traffic into Alma Road.

    Lack of enforcement in the street on Saturdays.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 10

    DISCUSSION The following discusses the characteristics of the subject site in relation to parking and traffic congestion, from the knowledge and data obtained from the investigation. Off-Street Parking Spaces and Angled Parking Spaces The Council car park, during weekdays and on Saturdays, was observed to be moderately used, with at least 11 of the 27 parking spaces available at all times. During the Sunday parking survey it was observed to be fully occupied. The Aldi Supermarket car park has a total of 113 parking spaces of which a maximum of 32 on weekdays and 35 on weekend were observed to be occupied. Though there are numerous parking spaces available within their car park, the customers were observed using the angle parking spaces outside St Peters Church, probably out of convenience. In the angled parking section, for all parking surveys, at least eight of the 12 indented angled parking spaces were occupied. It should be noted that two spaces out of the 12 are disabled parking spaces, of which only on two occasions during the parking surveys were both of these spaces occupied. During the weekend parking surveys, all the angled parking spaces were occupied. As noted previously, the indented angled parking spaces are generally operating as short term parking spaces with a high frequency of turnover, and as such numerous vehicle changeovers were observed. The car parking duration survey indicated only three vehicles were parked for longer periods in the angled parking spaces. Given the above, installation of short term parking restrictions is not considered necessary; as the current operation caters for both short and long term parking needs. On Street Parking At all times of the parking surveys and site inspections, including the weekends, there were numerous parking spaces available in the street and a maximum of only six (6) parking spaces out of the possible 36 potential parking spaces in the street (excluding the indented parking spaces) were occupied. On street parking on the northern end of Alma Road, particularly on the western side was mostly always occupied. On occasion, it was observed that vehicles were parked on both sides of the street at the northern end, allowing just one vehicle to pass along the street. As noted there is already No Stopping parking restrictions installed in the east side of the street on Saturdays between 9am 4pm. Residents were supportive in their opinion that the parking restrictions should be extended to include weekdays, so one side of the street is free of parking, allowing for passing vehicles. Though the parking surveys did not indicate a major issue with parking in Alma Road, it is considered that allowing parking only on one side of the street will improve the minor traffic delay issues, including access to property driveways and safety of the street.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 11

    Given the above and previous resident feedback, it is was considered appropriate to consult the residents further on the extension of the No Stopping parking restrictions to include all days, on the east side of the street. Weekend Parking St Peters Anglican Church was operating during the Sunday parking survey (during school holidays). Church patrons were using the Council car park and the angled parking spaces in front of the Church, both of which were fully occupied during the Sunday parking survey. A further Sunday parking observation outside of the school holiday period indicated that vehicles were also parked on both sides of Alma Road, probably due to the Sunday School operating. Given the above, it is also considered appropriate to include Sundays in the No Stopping parking restrictions. Residential responses indicate parking is an issue in the street during Church events. Due to inclement weather, sporting events were cancelled on the day of the Saturday parking survey. Notwithstanding, it was observed that illegal parking is occurring on the east side of the street where there are existing No Stopping restrictions for Saturdays. Councils Local Laws department will be requested to monitor the street and enforce the parking restrictions. Traffic Concerns and Congestion There were concerns raised by the residents in regard to traffic congestion when vehicles are parked on both sides of the street. The installation of No Stopping parking restrictions on one side of the street will improve access along with the safety of the street, including access improvement to property driveways. The possible minor traffic delays caused with vehicles reversing out of the angled parking spaces and with vehicles exiting the Aldi Supermarket and the Council car park at the same time is unavoidable. It is expected there will be some delays in vehicles being able to access Alma Road at times. However, it is considered appropriate to extend the length of the existing No Stopping parking restriction 20m further south to improve vehicle movement in and out of the Council car park. Given the above, it is also deemed appropriate for the above suggested parking change to be included in the further residential consultation. As indicated previously, vehicles turning right out of Alma Road into Grimshaw Street generally had to wait a short period to undertake the right turn movement, as there is a high volume of traffic on Grimshaw Street. Given the above, vehicles turning right held up vehicles wanting to turn left into Grimshaw Street. Observations showed that delays were minimal. Installation of a No Right Turn ban at this intersection is not considered warranted at this time. Rat running to avoid traffic signals was raised by a resident in the street. This was not identified during the site inspections. Additionally, vehicle speed was not observed to be a concern. No other traffic safety or congestion issues were identified in Alma Road.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 12

    PROPOSED PARKING CHANGES Following consultation and investigation, it is considered that the most appropriate changes to parking restrictions for Alma Road are:

    The conversion of the existing No Stopping, 9am 4pm, Sat parking restrictions on the east side of the street to No Stopping, 8.30am 6pm, for all seven days; and

    The extension of the No Stopping parking restrictions 20m further south than the existing. This considered appropriate, to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park.

    Given the above, a further community consultation was undertaken in Alma Road with the above proposal, in October 2013. The results of the survey are as follows. Eleven responses were received;

    Nine respondents (82%) supported the proposed parking restriction changes.

    Two respondents (18%) wanted to retain the existing parking arrangement. As the majority of the residents supported the proposal, it is considered appropriate to proceed with the installation of the parking restrictions. CONCLUSION

    Following a Council Notice of Motion, an investigation has been undertaken to consider the possible parking and congestion issues in Alma Road. During the site observations it was observed that vehicles were parked on both sides of Alma Road. Considering the proximity to many local businesses and traffic generators such as Yulong Reserve, Public Transport and the Church, it is noted that there will be instances where parking is occurring on both sides of the road, causing access and safety concerns when parked directly opposite one another. Following the initial consultation and the investigations, it is considered that the most appropriate changes to parking restrictions for Alma Road are:

    The conversion of the existing No Stopping, 9am 4pm, Sat parking restrictions on the east side of the street to No Stopping, 8.30am 6pm, for all seven days.

    The extension of the No Stopping parking restrictions 20m further south than the existing. This is considered appropriate, to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park.

    As the majority of the residents supported this proposal, it is considered appropriate to proceed with the installation of the parking restrictions as this should help to improve access along the street. No other major traffic safety or congestion issues were identified in the street. Councils Local Laws department will be asked to consider additional enforcement of the parking restrictions in the street, including on weekends.

  • 2.1

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    ALMA ROAD, BUNDOORA - INVESTIGATION OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 13

    RECOMMENDATION

    That:

    1. No Stopping parking restrictions for all seven days between 8.30am 6pm, be installed on the east side of Alma Road replacing the existing parking restrictions.

    2. Existing No Stopping parking restrictions be extended a further 20m south to allow for movements in and out of the Council car park.

    3. Councils Local Laws department consider additional regular enforcement of Alma Road, including weekends, as required.

    ATTACHMENTS

    Nil

  • 2.2

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 14

    2.2 BANYULE GRAFFITI SUMMITT Author: Frances Gianinotti - Youth & Community Services Co-Ordinator,

    Community Programs

    File: 2013/831

    SUMMARY

    To report to Council on the outcomes of the Banyule Graffiti Summit Getting a Grip on Graffiti held on the 15th October, 2013.

    OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

    Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

    CITY PLAN

    This report is in line with Councils City Plan key direction of develop and promote safety and resilience in our community.

    BACKGROUND

    The Banyule Graffiti Summit Getting a Grip on Graffiti was held on 15th October 2013 in response to Council and community interest in seeking solutions to the graffiti issues prevailing across the municipality. It was an opportunity to bring together over 60 key stakeholders from the community, government departments, organisations and Council to hear about the culture of graffiti, its impact in Banyule and collaborate to identify solutions for future consideration. In addition, the summit was a vehicle for meaningful community engagement and consultation, to inform the draft Banyule Graffiti Management Strategy (GMS).

    HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

    In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues.

    OVERVIEW OF KEY THEMES

    The Graffiti Summit presented key information by a leading academic on the culture of graffiti and representatives of the Department of Justice and Victoria Police. Council officers presented an overview of the various graffiti strategies and activities currently implemented across Council.

  • 2.2

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    BANYULE GRAFFITI SUMMITT contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 15

    6 key themes were identified and included broad actions for future consideration as follows: Holistic Approach

    Adopt a multi Council approach through the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) to tackle a common community issue with Council to take the lead advocacy role;

    In hot spot areas, coordinate multiple approaches to reduce opportunities and eradicate graffiti activity;

    Youth engagement

    Adopt earlier intervention and proactive approaches to divert young people from illegal graffiti activities e.g. target primary school aged children;

    Strengthen Councils street art program which is working with highly marginalised young people often engaged in the illegal activity;

    Understand the underlying causes of why young people engage in graffiti activity and creating diversionary activities;

    Investigate opportunities to establish a mentoring program for young people engaged in graffiti activity;

    Communication

    Develop a comprehensive communication strategy which includes consistent processes, a coordinated website and empowers the community to take ownership of their local spaces;

    Establish a one stop reporting system within the municipality / region with easy access;

    Cost and Resources

    Invest in appropriately designed infrastructure to reduce opportunities for graffiti activity;

    Maintain a register of tags;

    Engaging Stakeholders

    Engage other stakeholders to take responsibility for graffiti removal on other public owned assets e.g. Vic Roads/ Telcos / Electricity Co, etc.

    Perception of Community Safety

    Ensure effective information to residents on reporting and removal options;

    Encourage increased police presence in hot spot areas;

    UPDATE ON GRAFFITI INITIATIVES

    The issue of graffiti is widespread across the community, not just in Banyule. This is evident in the range of funding initiatives on offer from both State and Federal government departments to address graffiti in local communities. Council has recently secured funding for two projects under the Graffiti Prevention and Removal Grants initiative by the Victorian Department of Justice as follows:

    Graffiti: Everyones Business - $21,941 to undertake a 6 month demonstration project in Watsonia;

    Beating Graffiti in the Village - $21,260 to undertake a major blitz campaign in Olympic Village shopping precinct.

  • 2.2

    People Community Strengthening and Support

    BANYULE GRAFFITI SUMMITT contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 16

    Both projects will be completed this financial year. In addition, Council has secured 5 Portable Graffiti Removal Kits from the Department of Justice. The kits include high pressure cleaning equipment and will be located in key shopping and other hot spot precincts across the municipality for community use. It is expected that they will be in place before the end of 2013.

    TIMELINES

    The Graffiti Summit produced a range of potential actions for consideration by Council as part of the finalisation of the Graffiti Management Strategy (GMS). It is anticipated that the draft GMS will be updated by the end of 2013 and distributed for public comment. The final version will be submitted to Council for approval in early 2014. COUNCIL OFFICER COMMENTS At the Graffiti Summit, Council was recognised as being a lead advocate of graffiti prevention to other Councils and government tiers. The proposal was actively supported by key stakeholders on the day. As a result, Council could consider writing to the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) as soon as possible seeking support to tackle graffiti in a strategic and collaborative approach across regional and statewide boundaries. This would include the sharing of best practice and the development of potential partnerships.

    CONCLUSION

    The Banyule Graffiti Summit actively engaged a range of key stakeholders in discussions to provide Council clarity and purpose going into the future. It was a successful consultation mechanism to inform and validate Councils role. Once completed and endorsed, the Banyule Graffiti Management Strategy will formally account to the community on Councils commitment and direction in addressing Graffiti.

    RECOMMENDATION

    That Council:

    1. Note the six key themes arising from the Graffiti Summit being: Holistic Approach; Youth Engagement; Communication; Cost and Resources; Engaging Stakeholders; and Perception of Community Safety which will inform the finalisation of the Graffiti Management Strategy to be submitted to Council for approval in early 2014.

    2. Write to the Municipal Association of Victoria outlining the outcomes of the

    Banyule Graffiti Summit and seeking its support for a strategic and collaborative approach to tackling graffiti in local communities.

    ATTACHMENTS

    Nil

  • 3.1

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 17

    3.1 ENERGY SAVING PLAN Author: Clayton Simpson - Resource Conservation Officer, City Development

    File: BS24/055/004

    SUMMARY

    To consider the adoption of an Energy Saving Plan to help reduce Councils energy use and costs. OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

    Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

    CITY PLAN

    This report is in line with Councils City Plan key direction to deliver appropriate action on climate change. Under this key direction, the City Plan has a goal of eventual carbon neutrality.

    BACKGROUND

    Following the direction of Councils City Plan 2013-2017 and the Planet Policy and Strategy, the Energy Saving Plan is one of the five plans already adopted or being developed, including:

    Water Sustainability Plan

    Biodiversity Plan

    Waste Plan

    Environmental Stewardship Plan

    Energy Saving Plan In the Greenhouse Action Strategy 2002 (GAS), Council committed to an emissions reduction target for its own operations of 30% below the 1996/97 baseline level by 2010. The 1996/97 baseline level was 16,087 tonnes of emissions and they have increased by about 2% to about 16,500 tonnes now. A 30% reduction would take emissions down to 11,261 tonnes. This reduction target has not been achieved. Council energy use and emissions will continue to increase if Council operations continue in a business as usual fashion. Significant energy saving and emission reduction measures are needed if the City Plan goal is to be achieved.

  • 3.1

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    ENERGY SAVING PLAN contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 18

    HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

    In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues. ENERGY USE INTO THE FUTURE WaterMarc is a large expansion of Council services that has significant energy demands and even with its energy saving measures, it has increased Council emissions. Cogeneration (cogen) is currently being installed at WaterMarc, costing about $700,000. Cogen is more energy, emissions and cost efficient than conventional grid electricity and water boilers. With cogen, WaterMarcs operation is estimated to increase Council annual emissions by about 3,400 tonnes or 21%. Without cogen, the increase in Councils annual emissions is estimated to be about 6,200 tonnes or 38%. If business as usual continues into the future, energy use and emissions increases are likely to continue. Councils energy bill is growing. From 2006/07 to 2012/13, the actual and estimated annual combined buildings, public lighting and fuel energy bill has increased by about $1.6 million to a total of about $4 million, a rise of about 65%. This rise is mostly due to the increase in energy use which the energy plan aims to constrain. ENERGY SAVING PLAN The energy saving plan incorporates key opportunities to achieve carbon neutrality by 2019/20 and constrain Councils growing energy bill. Conceptually, the key energy saving and emissions reduction steps are:

    Reduce energy use and improve efficiency of use

    Substitute emissions-intense energy sources with ones that are less emissions-intense

    Offset all emissions that remain after the previous steps It is estimated that the key energy saving and emissions reduction opportunities would require an investment of about $15 million by 2019/20 to achieve carbon neutrality. These investments would cut Councils energy costs by about $16.7 million cumulatively to 2029/30 with ongoing savings thereafter. TOWARDS THE 30% REDUCTION TARGET Council did not achieve the emissions reduction target of 30% below the 1996/97 baseline level by the set date of 2010. As further detailed in Table 1, the proposed next steps in 2013/14 and 2014/15 towards the 30% target are:

  • 3.1

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    ENERGY SAVING PLAN contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 19

    install solar hot water (SHW) panels on three large energy using buildings

    implement energy efficient public lighting

    consider installing the first tranche of solar photo-voltaic panels on large electricity using buildings

    consider dedicated budget allocations for environmental measures in future building projects

    Table 1: Next Step Towards the 30% Reduction Target

    Emission changes and reduction actions

    Emissions (tonnes/

    year)

    % of Council's

    total

    Emissions reduction

    cost

    Already occurred or underway:

    Increase from 1996/97 baseline + 413 + 2%

    Increase from WaterMarc + 6,200 + 38%

    WaterMarc cogen - 2,800 - 17% $700,000

    For 2013/14 and 2014/15

    Solar hot water (SHW) panels - 100 - 0.6% $118,000

    Energy efficient public lighting - 3,100 - 19% $4,700,000

    Solar photo-voltaic (PV) panels (1st tranche) - 122 - 0.7% $350,000

    Totals + 419 + 3% $5,868,000

    To reduce the above 3% emissions increase to a nil increase, Council could consider a limited purchase of carbon offsets as per the following:

    Carbon offsets (ongoing annual cost) - 419 - 3% $11,000

    Totals including offsets + 0 + 0% $5,879,000

    To achieve the 30% reduction target, about $9 million would need to be spent on Solar PV panels, building improvements, fuel efficient fleet and GreenPower as detailed in Table 2. As $9 million by 2014/15 is a significant investment, it is not considered immediately affordable for Council. Instead, a first tranche of $350,000 of solar PV panels and $11,000 of offsets is proposed for 2014/15. This provides a reasonable mix between energy and cost saving improvement to Council facilities and more affordable emissions reduction through offsets. The 30% reduction target will not be achieved in 2014/15 with these measures, but a good next step towards the target will be taken. The 30% reduction target is only likely to be achieved in 2019/20 with the measures detailed in the achieving carbon neutrality section and Table 2 below. Another measure proposed for 2014/15 and beyond, but not costed or detailed in table 1 above, is for Council to consider budget allocations dedicated to environmental measures in future building projects.

  • 3.1

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    ENERGY SAVING PLAN contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 20

    These building projects could include Council offices above WaterMarc, refurbishment of the basketball stadium of the former Banksia College, Ivanhoe Community Learning Hub, future stages of the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre refurbishment and the Watsonia Hub. In principle, Council could consider a 5% to 10% budget allocation for energy saving and other environmental measures for each of these projects. As an example, if one of these building projects were to cost $15 million, Council could consider an extra $750,000 to $1.5 million for environmental measures. A 5% or more environmental (or ESD environmentally sustainable design) measures budget is becoming common in the building industry because, typically, energy saving returns on investment are attractive. ACHIEVING CARBON NEUTRALITY The next stage of the energy saving program would be to achieve carbon neutrality by 2019/20. This would be achieved by implementing a mix of Reduce, Substitute, Offset steps as outlined in Table 2.

    Table 2: Achieving Carbon Neutrality

    Emission Reduction Actions

    Emissions (tonnes/

    year)

    % of Council's

    Total (16,087 tonnes)

    Emissions Reduction

    Cost to 2019/20

    Cost Effectiveness

    ($ cost to 2019/20 per

    tonne saved)

    Savings to

    2029/30

    Already underway:

    Increase (1996/97) + 413 + 2%

    Increase (WaterMarc_ + 6,200 + 38%

    WaterMarc cogen - 2,800 - 17% $700,000 $250 $2,450,00

    0

    For 2013/14 to 2019/20:

    SHW panels - 100 - 1% $118,000 $1,180 $270,000

    Efficient public lighting - 3,100 - 19% $4,700,000

    $1,516 $6,100,000

    Solar PV panels - 1,000 - 6% $2,930,000

    $2,930 $2,150,000

    Efficient buildings - 680 - 4% $720,000

    $1,059 $1,590,000

    Ivanhoe Aquatic cogen - 500 - 3% $400,000 $800 $420,000

    Fuel efficient fleet - 400 - 3% $4,390,000

    $10,975 $3,670,000

    MRET* - 1,500 - 9% Nil n/a nil

    GreenPower & offsets - 12,620 - 78% $930,000 $74 nil

    Totals - 16,087

    - 100% $14,888,000

    $925 $16,650,000

    *Federal Government Mandatory Renewable Energy Target (MRET)

  • 3.1

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    ENERGY SAVING PLAN contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 21

    CONSULTATION The Banyule Environment Advisory Committee (BEAC) has expressed concern at the limited effectiveness of Council emissions reduction efforts such that the 30% reduction target has not yet been achieved. BEAC has written to applaud Council on the decision to fund streetlights energy efficiency as a first step in a strategy to urgently reduce emissions towards carbon neutrality. The proposed energy saving plan partly satisfies BEACs recommendations on reducing emissions. Solar PV panels are a good next step towards the 30% target for a number of reasons, including:

    Growing enthusiasm for solar PV from BEAC and the community

    Community solar has been discussed by BEAC and encouraged by some members. On occasion, lessees of small Council buildings enquire about installing solar panels. Installing solar PV on large electricity using Council buildings would likely have more direct and significant outcomes. It would be likely that this form of solar PV would be encouraged by the community and BEAC. Solar PV on large electricity using Council buildings would have good demonstration value to the community as the panels tend to be more visible to the public than other energy efficiency measures.

    Growing momentum for Solar PV bulk purchasing

    The Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action, a partnership Banyule has with nine other Councils and the Moreland Energy Foundation, is developing a Solar PV Scale Up project which may consider joint procurement of solar PV installations to try to improve prices. Already, over recent years, the price of solar PV has reduced noticeably.

    Council capacity is more amenable to solutions like solar PV

    Council personnel are focussed on implementation of energy efficient streetlights, SHW panels, the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre refurbishment and other priority projects. While capacity might be stretched in any case, at this stage, an additional bolt on or add on building project is preferable to energy efficiency measures that more fundamentally change buildings and facilities.

    COST IMPLICATIONS Plan implementation will involve the consideration of allocating budget to implement energy saving initiatives for the 2014/15 budget and the ten year capital works plan. For 2014/15, this includes $350,000 for solar PV. As proposed in this report, it also includes an additional $11,000 for offsets in 2014/15 and annually thereafter. Beyond 2014/15, plan implementation will involve future consideration of further allocations towards more solar PV, energy efficient buildings, Ivanhoe Aquatic cogen, fuel efficient fleet, GreenPower and offsets as shown in Table 2 above. Full plan implementation would cost about $15 million by 2019/20, but there would also be savings over time. By 2029/30, accumulated energy savings would total about $16.6 million or greater depending on energy price increases.

  • 3.1

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    ENERGY SAVING PLAN contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 22

    The environmental benefits from these types of initiatives come with financial benefits also. For example, energy savings will be complemented by water savings from the stormwater harvesting project and implementation of the recently adopted Water Sustainability Plan. By 2029/30, accumulated water savings will add at least $6 million to $16.6 million of energy savings for a total of at least $22.6 million which will grow further in the years thereafter.

    CONCLUSION

    To reduce Council energy use, $700,000 has already been committed to WaterMarc cogen, as has $118,000 to solar hot water panels and $4.7 million to energy efficient public lighting. To take the next step towards the 30% target, $350,000 for a first tranche of solar photovoltaic panels and $11,000 for carbon offsets is proposed for 2014/15. A total investment of about $15 million by 2019/20 could achieve carbon neutrality. This investment could constrain Councils energy costs by $16.6 million or more cumulatively to 2029/30 with ongoing savings thereafter. RECOMMENDATION

    That Council:

    1. Adopt the Energy Saving Plan to achieve the City Plan goal of carbon neutrality by 2019/20 and prepare an appropriate document to communicate the plan.

    2. Consider the allocation of $350,000 for solar photo-voltaic panels on Council buildings in the 2014/15 budget

    3. Consider the allocation of $11,000 for carbon offsets in the budget for 2014/15 and annually thereafter

    4. Consider further budget allocations in the ten year capital works plan towards further solar photovoltaic panels, energy efficient building measures, Ivanhoe Aquatic cogen, fuel efficient fleet measures and purchasing GreenPower and further carbon offsets

    5. Consider 5% to 10% budget allocations for energy saving and other environmental (or ESD environmentally sustainable design) measures for the Council offices above WaterMarc, refurbishment of the basketball stadium of the former Banksia College, Ivanhoe Community Learning Hub, future stages of the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre refurbishment and the Watsonia Hub

    ATTACHMENTS

    Nil

  • 3.2

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 23

    3.2 FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM

    Author: John Milkins - Enviromental Sustainability Co-ordinator, City Development

    File: BS24/055/005

    SUMMARY

    To allow Council to consider options with regard to the future of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program, hosted by Banyule City Council on behalf of Melbourne Water.

    OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

    Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

    HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

    In developing this report to Council, the subject matter has been considered to determine if it raises any human rights issues. In particular, whether the scope of any human right established by the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities is in any way limited, restricted or interfered with by the recommendations contained in this report. It is considered that the subject matter does not raise any human rights issues.

    CITY PLAN

    This report is in line with Councils City Plan key direction to conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact. BACKGROUND Since 2000 Banyule City Council has hosted the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program on behalf of Melbourne Water and four other Councils: Darebin, Whittlesea, Yarra and Nillumbik. The Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program is branded as a Melbourne Water initiative with support from local governments. In 2012/13 Melbourne Water contributed $44,000 to the program. The program is now under threat as Melbourne Water decided not to contribute to the 2013/14 operation of the Waterwatch program in the north east region. Council needs to consider Banyules support for the program which has a $172,979 budget in 2013/14. The Waterwatch program was initiated in 1993 to enable communities to become involved in the monitoring and management of waterways in their catchment. Waterwatch aims to raise knowledge in communities about water issues and to encourage water quality monitoring groups to undertake constructive action.

  • 3.2

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 24

    Waterwatch grew from a local to state to national program with a diverse funding basis involving local governments, businesses and catchment management authorities, depending on the program location.

    At the State level, Waterwatch is supported by the Victorian State government through the Department of Environment and Primary Industries http://www.vic.waterwatch.org.au/. In the metropolitan area Melbourne Water is the agency responsible for the program, and it is now branded as a Melbourne Water initiative called Healthy Waterways Waterwatch http://www.waterwatchmelbourne.org.au/.

    Across five of its seven regions Melbourne Water delivers the Healthy Waterways Waterwatch program in-house. However, since the year 2000 in two regions - north and northeast metropolitan Melbourne Waterwatch has been hosted and delivered by Merri Creek Management Committee and Banyule City Council.

    The North East program has a permanent full time Band 6 Waterwatch Coordinator role employed by Banyule in the Environmental Planning team. Funding contributions from Melbourne Water and the five Councils support this role. The role is currently vacant, and it has not been able to be advertised until partner funding contributions are finalised and committed.

    Councils have contributed to the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program on a schedule of costs set by Melbourne Water across the seven regions. For the last several years MOUs have been developed to guide the funding allocations and deliverables across the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. For many years the funding model consisted of Melbourne Water paying around one-sixth of the program cost (17%), and the local governments contributing the remaining five-sixths (83%). However, Melbourne Water also received Federal funding under the National Heritage Trust which boosted program funding. In 2010/11, noting Melbourne Waters branding of the program, and its primary responsibility for waterway health, the North East local governments sought and gained agreement for a funding increase from around $13,000 to $44,000 per annum. This reflected an increase in the contribution from Melbourne Water from 17% to 45% to better represent state and local government sharing of costs. Melbourne Water has gone through a major four year review of its core service delivery, much like the Banyule City Plan process, which resulted in a realignment of the Melbourne Water business and a focus on regions and priority projects. Internal Melbourne Water Waterwatch staff are now part of the Communications department in Melbourne Water, and have been assigned to regions to support identified priority projects where Waterwatch has been deemed relevant. On the basis of its new structure Melbourne Water wrote to Council in November 2012 advising that it would be discontinuing its existing funding arrangements in favour of a new regional approach. The new approach required Banyule as the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program host to apply for a Melbourne Water contribution which was assessed against the other external bid from Merri Creek Management Committee and the five other internally delivered Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Programs.

  • 3.2

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 25

    In the five Melbourne Water delivered Waterwatch programs, no Council financial contributions are sought by Melbourne Water, as some Councils had reviewed their own commitments and the value to their Council of the Melbourne Water Waterwatch program. In the two external programs North and North East Councils were still expected to contribute financially. Over the next several months Banyule sought advice from Melbourne Water on their priority projects in the North East region. Melbourne Water advised that they could not provide these as that work was incomplete. Nonetheless, Banyule submitted an application to host the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program on 4 June 2013, noting concern regarding its ability to provide a fully scoped application without identified Melbourne Water priority projects. As the new financial year commenced without a Melbourne Water funding decision, Banyule City Council continued to resource the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. Currently, five months into the financial year, $23,046 of Councils contribution of $49,878 toward the total 2013/14 Waterwatch program has been expended (46% of Banyules contribution). This scaled back expenditure is being undertaken by Banyule to avoid community volunteer distress in the 19 groups active across the region, reputational damage, and the possible withdrawal of local government partners in the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. However, without a Melbourne Water contribution, it is unlikely that local government partners will continue to support their program in the region. In order to progress the funding issue Banyule and Melbourne Water managers met in late July 2013. Melbourne Water requested that Banyule submit an amended application that sought Melbourne Water funding for a Banyule City Council Melbourne Water Healthy Waterways program excluding the other Council partners, or a Healthy Waterways program delivered across the region with all North East Councils. These applications were submitted on 19 August. Costs were revised (upwards) to reflect a rate that Melbourne Water had accepted for Merri Creek Management Committee to deliver the Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program in the Northern region for 2013-14. Banyule sought urgent feedback on these revised proposals and at a Management level meeting on 15 October was verbally informed that both Banyule applications were unsuccessful. Melbourne Water advised that their total budget for the Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program across the seven regions is $100,000. In 2012-13 year the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program operational budget alone was approximately $120,000 with Melbourne Water contributing $44,000. Banyule has requested formal notification of the Melbourne Water funding decision but it has not been forthcoming. Additionally, Melbourne Water has invited volunteers to a 20 year celebration of the Waterwatch Program at Darebin Parklands and has not indicated how it will acknowledge the significant contribution of the member Councils over this time, despite a request for this advice from Banyule on behalf of local government partners.

  • 3.2

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 26

    Options The following options regarding the future of the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program are suggested for Councils consideration.

    1. Banyule City Council Fund North East Region Program Banyule City Council makes up the funding shortfall ($44,000) resulting from the withdrawal of Melbourne Water funding. This would add to Banyules existing $49,878 contribution to the program.

    This option is not recommended as Banyule already supports the Melbourne Water branded program to a considerable extent.

    2. Seek Additional Funds From North East Region Program Councils

    Banyule City Council seeks increased funding amongst the other local government partners to make up the Melbourne Water shortfall.

    This option is not recommended as local government partners have already expressed dissatisfaction with previous levels of Melbourne Water funding, and local governments in the Melbourne Water run regions do not make any financial contribution to the Waterwatch program there.

    3. Fund Banyule Specific Program Banyule City Council advises Melbourne Water and local government partners and volunteers that, due to a lack of funding from Melbourne Water, Banyule City Council is unable to continue hosting the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program. By maintaining the Banyule funded component of the permanent Waterwatch role, and its operating costs, Banyule City Council can continue to support the State based Waterwatch program and thus the current Banyule Waterwatch volunteers who contribute to this important program. This also allows Banyule to focus exclusively on Councils own significant commitment to waterway health and the local community benefits such as the stormwater harvesting project, Sustainable Homes Program water workshops, Friends groups planting along local creeks.

    This option is recommended as it allows the continuation of the Waterwatch program in Banyule, which has been running for 20 years. Supporting the Waterwatch program also assists in meeting Banyules City Plan City Plan key directions 2.1 Protect and enhance our environment, 2.2 Conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact and 2.5 Act as environmental stewards. The revised Banyule program can be monitored over a 12 month period. At the conclusion of this time the program can be reviewed to assess any adjustments required, and a determination can be made about whether to continue the program.

  • 3.2

    Planet Environmental Sustainability

    FUNDING OF THE NORTH EAST HEALTHY WATERWAYS WATERWATCH PROGRAM contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 27

    CONCLUSION

    Following a lack of funding support for the Melbourne Water North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program, Banyule City Council should consider its ability to continue to host the Program for Melbourne Water and the four (4) other local government partners. An opportunity exists to maintain Banyules commitment to the Waterwatch program at the State level. This meets relevant City Plan key directions and would focus more strongly on Banyules achievements in protecting waterway environments with its local community.

    RECOMMENDATION

    That Council: 1. Advise Melbourne Water, local government partners and volunteers that, due to

    a lack of funding from Melbourne Water, Banyule City Council is unable to continue hosting the North East Healthy Waterways Waterwatch Program for Melbourne Water.

    2. Continues to support the State level Waterwatch program and the 12

    monitoring groups within Banyule in 2013/14.

    3. Reviews the local Waterwatch program outcomes and considers its ongoing support in the 2014/15 budget.

    ATTACHMENTS

    Nil

  • 4.1

    Place Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 29

    4.1 METROPOLITAN PLANNING STRATEGY Author: David Cox - Strategic Planning Co-ordinator, City Development

    File: MBS16/040/013 and PS11/13

    SUMMARY

    The Victorian Government has released the draft Metropolitan Planning Strategy (Plan Melbourne) and has requested response submissions. This gives a further opportunity to influence the shaping of the final Strategy before it is released.

    OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

    Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

    CITY PLAN

    This report is in-line with Councils City Plan key directions to:

    Maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live

    Strengthen local activity and employment areas

    Supporting thriving commercial and retail activity

    Enhance Banyules public and open spaces Support sustainable transport.

    BACKGROUND

    Overarching strategic planning for metropolitan Melbourne is set by the Victorian Governments Metropolitan Planning Strategy (Strategy). This Strategy informs the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) and priorities for future State investment. The SPPF is part of the Banyule Planning Scheme and sits above Councils Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS). The MSS gives Councils local strategic direction for future land use and development in the municipality. Any changes to the SPPF, such as for a new Metropolitan Planning Strategy, will affect all planning schemes across metropolitan Melbourne. The current Strategy for Melbourne is known as Melbourne 2030 and its 2008 update, Melbourne @ 5 Five Million. In 2012 the Victorian Government made progress towards a new Strategy, when a Discussion Paper was released for public comment. After its meeting on 4 March 2013 an approved Council submission was sent and work progressed with other Councils on matters of shared interest. Councils submission raised various matters, these included:

    Advocating for the Victorian Government to do effective public consultation

    Supporting the polycentric city concept and seeking clarity for activity centres Supporting the 20 minute city concept for jobs, shops, recreation and facilities

    to be with sustainable transport

  • 4.1

    Place Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

    METROPOLITAN PLANNING STRATEGY contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 30

    Seeking a focus on public places and spaces, like shopping streets, parks and facilities

    Seeking greater recognition for trees and landscaping for Melbournes identity Seeking adequate funding, mechanisms and land for public places and spaces,

    including better developer contributions, parks and cemetery needs. Council shared a submission with the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils (Boroondara, Greater Dandenong, Knox, Manningham, Maroondah, Monash, Nillumbik, Whitehorse, Yarra Ranges and Banyule), which also made reference to these matters. A further submission was shared with Austin Health, Darebin Council and LaTrobe University for a national employment cluster to be included for northern Melbourne - in Banyule and Darebin. Council also gave input to other submissions prepared by the Northern Region Group of Councils and the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV). On 9 October 2013 the Victorian Government released their draft Strategy, Plan Melbourne. This draft has a 2050 vision for Melbourne as a global city of opportunity and choice to build the confidence, investment and employment vital for Victorias long-term future. Key themes and outcomes in the draft Strategy are:

    An integrated approach across land-use, transport and community and social

    infrastructure

    Collaboration across government tiers, the private sector and the community

    will be required to deliver the strategy

    Job creation and security will be at the forefront of planning decisions

    Increase certainty in the planning system by protecting suburbs and delivering

    intensified development in certain areas

    Setting aspirations for large scale infrastructure development to support city

    growth, sustainability and productivity

    Identifying an emerging LaTrobe Cluster for northern Melbourne.

    CONSULTATION

    The draft Strategy has been released for public comment, with a deadline for written submissions on Friday 6 December 2013. The Plan Melbourne website (www.planmelbourne.vic.gov.au) provides the draft and supporting information. Submissions can be given to the Victorian Government online, via email or by post. Interested people can also be part of online discussions, through dedicated channels on YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. Council has helped raise local awareness with notices in local newspapers, posters at service centres, information on its website and through its Facebook page.

    DISCUSSION

    Metropolitan planning takes a metropolitan perspective to giving policy direction and

    informing investment priorities for the benefit of the metropolitan community and

    Victoria. The Victorian Governments progress towards a new Strategy is already

    associated with various, known priorities. These include:

    Urban renewal of 250ha at Fishermans Bend

    Major transport infrastructure with a new East-West road link

  • 4.1

    Place Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

    METROPOLITAN PLANNING STRATEGY contd

    Ordinary Meeting of Council - 2 December 2013 Page 31

    Expanded central Melbourne for growth and development

    Revised commercial, industrial and rural zones now in planning schemes

    New residential zones, for planning schemes by July 2014.

    Reviewing planning scheme controls for the middle Yarra River.

    The Government has also said that the new Metropolitan Planning Authority (MPA)

    will play a key role to implement the final Strategy. Council is continuing to work with

    the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils and for the emerging La Trobe

    Employment Cluster.

    The draft Strategy has responded positively to various matters raised in Councils

    earlier submission. In summary, the draft is:

    Looking to resolve planning issues for cemeteries

    Establishing an Employment Cluster for northern Melbourne

    Committing to future planning for public open space, boulevards and urban greening

    Supporting councils to promote sustainable development

    Looking to limit residential development in sensitive environments, like waterway corridors

    Identifying future funding opportunities for local councils.

    COUNCIL SUBMISSION

    After reviewing the draft Strategy, a further Council submission can ask for some

    refinements to be made before the Victorian Government releases the final Strategy.

    These refinements can ask for further benefits, by:

    Ensuring the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster is linked with initiatives and investment for continued urban renewal across Heidelberg West, Heidelberg Heights, Bellfield and also benefiting the Heidelberg Activity Centre.

    Recognising the potential for the Bell Street Mall as an Activity Centre, Watsonia as an emerging Activity Centre, and the emerging future potential for Heidelberg as a Metropolitan Activity Centre.

    Identifying regionally important development opportunities at Greensborough Station, Watsonia Station and Heidelberg Station

    Recognising the increasing subregional importance of Heidelberg Station and its key role to support the emerging La Trobe Employment Cluster

    Recognising the importance of achieving integrated public transport and land use solutions for the La Trobe Employment Cluster

    Revising the approach for investigating the future North-East link to prioritise metropolitan, circumferential freight movement to Eastlink, with a revised alignment and southern connection at Ringwood

    Investigating for track duplication of the Hurstbridge rail line, between Heidelberg and Rosanna

    Giving parameters to support removal of Neighbourhood Centre status for Eaglemont

    Giving priority to completing Melbournes Off-Road Trail Network and also for cycling links into Clusters, Activity Centres, other key destinations and into neighbourhoods to support the 20-Minute Neighbourhoods concept

    Giving priority to greening of neighbourhoods and treed-boulevards

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    DTPLIs ongoing leadership for the regional, middle Yarra River project, so Council and community can give feedback on draft Municipal Toolkits before the project is completed.

    A draft Council submission accompanies this report in Attachment 1. This draft includes specific recommendations for the final Strategy, to address the matters outlined above.

    OTHER SUBMISSIONS

    Council is continuing work with the other organisations, described in this report, for shared submissions. These are:

    Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils: A draft submission is attached in Attachment 2. A final submission is currently being prepared. Key matters relevant to Banyule include suggestions for: urban renewal; guiding jobs growth; additional mechanisms for housing affordability; regional transport plans; proactive financial and economic incentives for investment; active progress by MPA; Identifying infrastructure gaps in Activity Centres and coupling the final Strategy with an infrastructure plan.

    La Trobe Employment Cluster: The previous Austin Health, La Trobe University, Darebin and Banyule Councils submission has been supported because the draft Strategy includes the emerging Cluster. A further submission, from these organisations, can now acknowledge this support and ask the Victorian Government to put some priority for investment in the Cluster.

    Northern Region Group of Councils: The northern region group of metropolitan Councils have prepared a report known as the Northern Infrastructure Report Card. This report is being considered as a separate item to this agenda paper and although will not be lodged as a direct submission to Plan Melbourne it will help inform future infrastructure projects to assist in implementation of the Plan. It is expected that this document will be officially launched in February.

    Councils final submission can also be given to the MAV, to help inform any submission it prepares on behalf of the local government sector.

    WHERE TO NEXT

    Submissions to the draft Strategy are due by 6 December 2013. The State has not given a release date for the final Strategy. In addition to giving its own submission and being part of shared submissions, Council can also write to the Ministers for Planning and Transport on some key priorities. These would include: Planning 1. Strategic redevelopment at Greensborough, Heidelberg and Watsonia Stations 2. Revised designation for various centres, including the Bell Street Mall, Watsonia

    and in the future Heidelberg. 3. Neighbourhood Centre designation removed for Eaglemont 4. La Trobe Employment Cluster linked with State investment 5. Middle Yarra River consultation, for reviewed planning controls.

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    Transport 6. Future investment for Hurstbridge line track duplication, between Heidelberg and

    Rosanna 7. Revised investigations for a realigned North-East link.

    CONCLUSION

    The draft Strategy has addressed various matters that Council raised in its earlier submission. Council can now consider a further submission, for refinements to be made in the final Strategy. Council can also support ongoing progress for shared submissions with the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils, La Trobe Employment Cluster, Northern Region Group of Councils and giving information to the MAV.

    RECOMMENDATION

    That Council:

    1. Approves the Banyule submission to the draft new metropolitan planning strategy that is an attachment to this report, and for it to be sent to the Victorian Government.

    2. Supports ongoing work being done for shared submissions with the Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils and the La Trobe Cluster, and for them to be sent to the Victorian Government.

    3. Writes and pursues further discussion with the Minister for Planning and Minister for Transport on the key priorities described in the report.

    4. Receives a future Council report, after the Victorian Government has announced a final new metropolitan planning strategy.

    ATTACHMENTS

    No. Title Page

    1 Draft Council Submission 87

    2 Draft Eastern Metropolitan Group of Councils Submission 121

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    4.2 EAST WEST LINK - COMPREHENSIVE IMPACT STATEMENT

    Author: Cameron Baird - Engineering Services Co Ordinator, City Development

    File: BS20/045/006

    SUMMARY

    The State Government and the Linking Melbourne Authority have recently released the comprehensive impact statement for the eastern section of the proposed East West Link. The East West Link is intended to provide a freeway standard connection from the Eastern Freeway through to CityLink running through the north of Melbourne. The link will provide an alternate east west freeway connection to the busy M1 connection running south of the city. The Impact Statement includes the consideration of Traffic and Transport impacts from the proposal. Modelling of the future traffic network has been conducted to determine the future impacts both with and without the East West Link. Comparison of the two models has enabled an assessment of the projects potential future benefits. The modelling has highlighted that in general there are net traffic volume and travel time improvements evident throughout the study area that offer overall greater benefit to the metropolitan road network. The study also noted some general minor benefits to traffic in the southern Banyule area. Further advice highlighted around 5% improvements on anticipated 2031 traffic volumes on key arterial routes through Banyule through the provision of the project. There are some concerns with the possible detrimental impact the large cost of the East West Link project will have on the provision and timelines of other competing and highly beneficial transport projects around Melbourne. There are also concerns that the East West link has been considered in isolation and has not had its benefits compared with other projects so as to maximise tax payer and transport benefits for Melbourne. A submission highlighting these concerns and requesting commitment and timing from the Government on these other projects is proposed.

    OFFICER DECLARATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

    Section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 requires members of Council staff, and persons engaged under contract to provide advice to Council, to disclose any direct or indirect interest in a matter to which the advice relates. Council officers involved in the preparation of this report have no conflict of interest in this matter.

    CITY PLAN

    This report is in line with Councils City Plan key direction to support sustainable transport.

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    BACKGROUND

    Council at its meeting of 23 September 2013 in considering transport project advocacy resolved in part that:

    A5. East West Link Council has not formed a view on this project given a lack of information regarding the project impacts, including impacts on Banyule. Council seeks further information on this project so that an informed position can be taken.

    The Linking Melbourne Authority has been charged with the delivery of the East West Link project. Following the September resolution Council made a request to the Authority for a briefing on the project and its potential impacts to Banyule. On 31 October 2013 the Linking Melbourne Authority and the State Government released the Comprehensive Impact Statement for this project. This statement is on display for comment until the 12 December 2013. Following this release on the 18 November 2013 the Authority provided a briefing to Council on this matter in line with Council earlier request.

    COMPREHENSIVE IMPACT STATEMENT

    The Comprehensive Impact Statement for the proposed East West Link is a large document that considers multiple facets of the proposal and its potential impacts. This report focuses on the Traffic and Transport components and in particular what traffic and transport impacts from the project may influence Banyule into the future. The Linking Melbourne Authority has invited feedback or submissions on this project. The feedback period closes on 12 December 2013.

    PROJECT DETAILS

    The East West Link in its entirety features two (2) separate components, these being an eastern and a western section. This Comprehensive Impact Statement solely considers the impacts of the eastern section of the proposal. The Eastern Section of the East West Link runs from the western end of the Eastern Freeway in Clifton Hill to join up with CityLink in Parkville, and then extending to the Port of Melbourne precinct where it may ultimately connect with the Western Section of the East West Link. The eastern section comprises a total of 4.4km of tunnel connection from the end of the Eastern Freeway through to Royal Park. This section of the project is estimated to cost between $6 8 billion. Figure 1 details the extents of the proposed East West Link and highlights the local study region (in blue). PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The Impact Statement raises many potential transport opportunities from the project these including:

    East West Link Eastern Section would provide an alternative to the M1 corridor and consequently reduce the reliance on the M1 corridor

    Additional capacity would be provided for east-west movements, which would relieve pressure from existing east-west arterial routes

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    The new link would help alleviate congestion where the Eastern Freeway terminates at Hoddle Street by providing an additional route for this traffic to travel along.

    A reduction of use of local streets by freight traffic

    Improved reliability of north-south tram routes

    Better access to and from the Port of Melbourne and Melbourne Airport to the eastern suburbs

    East West Link Eastern Section allows for a more efficient use of the Eastern Freeway, particularly during non-peak periods

    The new link provides opportunities for faster and more frequent bus services between Doncaster and CBD.

    Figure 1. East West Link Locality Plan TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORT IMPACT STATEMENT A traffic and transport impact statement has been prepared as part of the comprehensive impact statement for the project. This study considers the traffic and transport impacts of the proposal both locally and regionally. Figure 2 highlights the extent of the regional traffic study, which includes large sections of Banyule out to the

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    end of the M80 ring road and along the Greensborough Highway/Rosanna Road connection.

    Figure 2 Regional Study Area Traffic Model

    Traffic modelling has been conducted throughout these areas, with more detailed assessments conducted through the local areas identified in the blue area of Figure 1. The Traffic Modelling for the new link has all been assessed based on future year traffic impacts, in particular the year 2031 has been considered as the assessment year for the study. The model was calibrated to 2011 data and then extrapolated to 2031 utilising population forecasts and employment growth estimations. Two 2013 models were created, one with the East West Link and one without. The data was then compared to determine the relevant difference in impacts between the two scenarios.

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    EAST WEST LINK FORECAST TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORT IMPACTS Traffic Impacts The strategic traffic modelling conducted, generally supports a reduction in adjacent arterial road traffic volumes and general network travel time improvements post East West Link implementation. In particular the report notes:

    The 2031 with East West Link Eastern Section modelling results indicate that the East West Link Eastern Section would improve travel times, with vehicle hours travelled per day reducing by 0.11 per cent (which equates to 4,300 hours per day). In addition, the number of vehicle kilometres travelled within the network would increase by 0.4 per cent (800,000 kilometres). The combination of these two factors would result in an overall greater benefit to the metropolitan road network, as a greater number of kilometres would be travelled within the network for less hours compared to the network in 2031 without the East West Link indicating reduced levels of congestion.

    Further micro-simulation modelling has also been conducted on the key interchanges featured as part of the eastern section of the East West Link. This modelling has recommended certain changes to the original layout and configuration of these interchanges which is being adopted in the final design. The proposed changes demonstrate a suitable level of service is achieved in these areas and that integration with CityLink traffic should not develop undue congestion or capacity concerns. Public Transport Impacts The Traffic and Transport Impact Statement notes that:

    Within the local study area, public transport is not anticipated to be significantly impacted by East West Link Eastern Section. No public transport routes are proposed to be altered due to the project. Additionally, the project is anticipated to provide benefits to north-south tram routes crossing Alexandra Parade.

    In particular the report notes that:

    No adverse impacts are expected to any bus routes operating in the area.

    Bus services on Johnston Street should improve given anticipated traffic reductions

    North South tram routes should improve given anticipated traffic reductions. Cyclin