Best Practices in Retention in Accelerated Programs February 5, 2008 Council on Postsecondary Education Kentucky Adult Learner Initiative Lexington, Kentucky

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  • Slide 1
  • Best Practices in Retention in Accelerated Programs February 5, 2008 Council on Postsecondary Education Kentucky Adult Learner Initiative Lexington, Kentucky
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  • Presented by: Dr. Jo Ann Rooney President Spalding University
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  • Americas Perfect Storm and Accelerated Programs Storm Forces: Sweeping demographic changes Disparity in literacy and numeracy skills Work place restructuring (Educational Testing Services, 2006. Americas perfect storm: Three forces changing our nations future. Policy Information Report.)
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  • Selected Higher Education Issues Tuition Costs Student Access Student Aid Student Learning Outcomes Accountability to Consumers (Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2007. Ten public policy issues for higher education. Public Policy Paper Series.)
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  • The New Traditional Population The adult student does not fit the characteristics of the traditional 18-22 year old student pursuing a degree on a full-time basis. Thus, best practices in retention for adult programs must be hand-picked to fit the program. What works for Spalding University?
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  • Key definitions and examples Delivery Format Semester - 15-16 weeks 40-45 Contact Hours 2-3 meetings per week Compressed -6 weeks 40-45 Contact Hours 4 meetings per week Accelerated -6 weeks 22 Contact Hours 1 meeting per week
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  • Spaldings Adult Accelerated Program Six-week evening/weekend format focuses on meeting students need for flexibility. Pre-assignments require preparation for maximum learning; last-minute enrollment is not permitted. First class mandatory attendance avoids potential for passive failure.
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  • The Top 10 Truths and Falsehoods About Accelerated Learning and Courses: 1. It is merely a new fadFALSE 2.It is a watered down version of a semester long courseFALSE 3. Faculty should expect less from students FALSE 4. This type of format is suitable for all studentsFALSE 5. Accelerated Learning and Courses are still sources of some controversy and debate within the academyTRUE
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  • 6. There are fewer classroom hours than a semester or compressed course TRUE 7. There is significantly more independent student learning and preparation that must occur outside the classroomTRUE 8. It requires strong organization, preparation and classroom management skills by the faculty memberTRUE 9. It requires a commitment to customer service and student focus by the institutionTRUE 10.Is very effective when taught with creativity and variety, creating an active learning environment incorporating student experiences and in-depth discussion and utilizing assessment measures that focus on competencies and outcomesTRUE The Top 10 Truths and Falsehoods (CONT.)
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  • Tintos Retention Model Incorporation into the society of the college focuses on student retention by providing: accessible, accurate, and consistent information academic, social, and personal support services contact opportunities with faculty, staff, and students learning opportunities within and outside of the classroom (Tinto, V. (1993) 2 nd edition. Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition. The University of Chicago Press.)
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  • Best Practices Applied Student Orientation every 6 weeks provides overview of available services Survival Guide for reference hands-on technology training interaction with faculty and campus personnel
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  • Best Practices Applied US 100 Successful Student Strategies: The purpose of this course is to discuss strategies helpful to students facing the academic and time demands of college. The course structure and process encourages students to take an active role in the construction of their own learning. Students are expected to read, think, discuss, question, and write about strategies and apply them in their academic role.
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  • Best Practices Applied Technology provides flexibility and accessibility University Webpage Student Email Blackboard WebAdvisor Library Computers Library Webpage
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  • Campus Resources Academic Resource Center (ARC) Academic Advising Academic Coaching Success Series Workshops Math Lab Student Counseling Center Writing Center Educational Enrichment Services Student Development & Campus Life
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  • Progressive Change New University Studies Math Requirement Math Placement Policy Quality Enhancement Plan
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  • Math Progression EESM-090 EESM-090, Educational Enrichment Services Math, is a free class offered by Jefferson County Public Schools. Students enroll in EES just like any other Spalding class. EES classes provide the books at no charge. Students who pass EESM-090 may proceed to Math 104, Intermediate Concepts in Algebra. Students who need more time may receive an incomplete and continue working for up to 90 days to complete the requirements of the class.
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  • Quality Enhancement Plan: Increasing Student Ability to Use Mathematical Skills to Solve Problems The purpose of the QEP is to prepare students to be successful in College Algebra, Math 113, the University Studies requirement.
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  • Course Design New Course: Math 104, 3 credits Student Target Group Course Description Student/Faculty Ratio 6 learning modules, 6 weeks 480 minutes a week (meets twice per week) Pass/Fail Carnegie Math System One course per session
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  • Math 104 Intermediate Concepts in Algebra Credit: 3 semester hours This competency-based course examines the use of tables, graphs, and equations, solving equations, linear functions and inequalities, systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations and functions, properties of exponents, and polynominal and rational expressions.
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  • Math 104 Intermediate Concepts in Algebra, continued Specific attention is directed towards ensuring student competence in the utilization of basic algebraic principles. Added emphasis is placed upon mathematical problem- solving strategies with application to everyday situations. The class utilizes experimental learning activities including hands-on application and use of computers. The grade for this course is either Pass or Fail. Students cannot enroll in any other course in the session in which they are enrolled in MATH 104.
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  • Course Essentials The course is structured upon a competency- based approach as evidenced by the students demonstration of knowledge/proficiency in all modules that are assessed daily. The instructors role may be described as learning facilitator with an emphasis upon fostering an individualized instructional approach for each student.
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  • Course Essentials, continued The students role includes acceptance of his/her responsibility for competency attainment, including compliance with course design features such as group support, tutoring, self-assessment completion of learning activities, and consistent course attendance/participation.
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  • Student Learning Outcomes Tied to University Studies Students will: Evidence the ability to use mathematical skills to solve problems Evidence the ability to think critically Increase confidence when dealing with quantitative literacy tasks
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  • Course Benefits Application to other courses Application to everyday life Replication of instructional methods Higher retention Higher graduation rates Share the experience
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  • EXPECTATIONS BY THE FACULTY: BEST PRACTICES in Retention For Accelerated Learning Programs Manage Expectations ! - Learning Outcomes (BUILD INTO COURSE!!) * Analytical Reasoning * Critical Thinking * Oral and Written Communication * Specific Course Competencies -Student Preparation and Effort -A Variety of Assessment Tools
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  • EXPECTATIONS BY THE STUDENTS: - Clear Understanding of Learning Outcomes - Clear Understanding of Assignments, Grading Criteria and Expectations of the Instructor - Relevance and Applicability - Be Challenged Stretch current skills and knowledge base - Receive Timely Feedback from Faculty - Good Classroom Interaction and Student Input - Numerous opportunities for Active Learning - Technology Integrated into Coursework - Good Course Organization - Enthusiastic, Knowledgeable Faculty who focuses on the Students - Course Evaluations and Assessments must be relevant, meaningful and doable
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  • Need further information? Please contact: Dr. Jo Ann Rooney President, Spalding University jrooney@spalding.edu