Boeing - 100th Anniversary Boeing

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  • THE BOEING CENTURY

    July 1916 July 2016 Celebrating the the Boeing Co.s 100th anniversary

  • Proudly sponsored by the City of Renton, Renton Chamber of Commerce, Renton School District, Renton Technical College, Renton Visitors Connection and UW Medicine | Valley Medical Center

    It takes a strong partnership to

    build the most popular airplane

    in commercial aviation history and

    its happening here in Renton.

    We call that The Spirit of Renton.

    Spirit of Renton

    Congratulations, Boeing on your 100th Anniversary!

    Heres to our next century together!

    Over 9,000 737s call Renton home

    Over 184 million miles flown

    Over 2,000 airborne simultaneously

    Flown by 342 airlines in 111 countries

    Takeoff / landing every 2 seconds

    1608183

    G2 July 2016 Sound Publishing

  • 1616614

    www.economicalliancesc.org

    ADVOCATE DEVELOP CONNECT

    What would Snohomish County look like without

    its anchor tenant?

    Thank You to The BOEING Company

    for its

    50 yearsin Snohomish County.

    1616

    627

    THE BOEING CENTURY Sound Publishing July 2016 G3

    A note from Sound

    Inside

    Credits

    On the cover

    SECTION GA history of accomplishment ............................................................................ 4-6Competitors and mergers ...................................................................................... 7Beyond Everett ....................................................................................................... 8Near misses .......................................................................................................... 10Going to war ................................................................................................ 14-16The Teague connection ............................... 18-19Taxes ..........................................................19Record deliveries ........................... 21To the moon ........................ 22

    SECTION HHeadlines ..................... 3Family connections ....... 4-6Everett connection ............... 8-10A Boeing timeline ........................12-13In uence around the globe ...................................... 14The Oso crash ....................................................................................................... 15The Labor connection ..................................................................................... 16-17The Renton plant .................................................................................................. 18A course for the future .................................................................................. 21-22

    Lead reporter: Dan CatchpolePhoto editor: Andy BronsonEditors: Scott North, Eric StevickSpecial thanks to: Boeing archivists Michael Lombardi and Thomas LubbesmeyerPhotos are courtesy of: The Boeing Co., unless otherwise credited Sound Publishing thanks Robert Frank, Steve Powell, Mark Klaas and Dennis Box for their contributions to this special section.

    You can nd these stories and more images about The Boeing Century online at heraldnet.com.>>

    See anyone you recognize? ese 100 Boeing Co. employee faces were chosen at random (mostly) from various years between 1916 and 2016. A few of those you might know (numbered left to right, top to bottom) are:

    1. William Bill Boeing, founder.2. Wong Tsu, Boeings rst aeronautical engineer, designed the Model C.9. George Conrad Westervelt, Bill Boeings lifelong friend and rst collaborator.14. Joe Sutter, father of the 747.19. Clairmont Claire Egtvedt, engineer, president and chariman, 1917-1966.24. Jack Waddell, 747 test pilot.28. Alvin Tex Johnston, 707 test pilot.35. Dorothy Kuljis, lead receptionist at Plant 2.38. William A. Allen, president, 1945-1968; chairman,1968-1972.47. Carolyn Corvi, vice president and general manager, 2000-2008.68. Kavya Manyapu, engineer.74. A.C. Darby Jr., 787 quality technician.85. Bratt Sutton, 777 wing structures.90. Rose Loper, test pilot.91. Susan Darcy, test pilot.96. Michael Lombardi, Boeing archivist.100. Molly McLaughlin, 777 engineer.

    ............................... 18-19 ..........................................................19

    ........................... 21 ........................ 22

    4-6 ............... 8-10

    ........................12-13In uence around the globe 14

    Happy anniversary and con-gratulations to the Boeing Co.! Sound Publishing, Inc., with its 49 community newspapers and websites, joins with many Washington state businesses to recognize and cele-brate the Boeing Co.s 100th anniversary.

    It is impossible to contemplate Boe-ing without thinking about the companys Paci c Northwest roots. Founder Bill Boe-ing, who was drawn to Washington states timber industry, rode in his rst airplane in 1915 over Lake Washington and had an early oat-plane hangar on Seattles Lake Union.

    It is equally impossible to look around the Puget Sound region without seeing the many ways Boeing has fueled and shaped the places we call home. Today, more than 130,000 highly skilled workers are employed by 1,300 aerospace-related rms throughout the state, producing some of the worlds best-known and well-respected products and services.

    As the company and the region have grown together, Boeings impact has stretched far beyond the economic and employment statistics. e company made its rst donation to the Univer-sity of Washington in 1917, helping start an aeronautical engineering program, and throughout its existence, has been a generous source of gifts and investments

    in our regions educational, cultural and charitable institutions.

    During its rst 100 years, the Boeing Co. encountered its share of bumpy air. Fluctuations in the national economy, competition in the aeronautics indus-try, and inconstant political and military policies all challenged the companys resilience. It certainly hasnt always been easy for the behemoth company, yet Boe-ing has seemingly met each challenge with as much knowledge, experience and grace as possible.

    Looking toward its next century, the company continues to trust its future to innovation. is has always been the Boeing way, from the rst factory in a Duwamish River shipyard to the recently opened composite-wing assembly center in Everett. e ripple e ect of Boeing innovation has brought hundreds of high-tech air-and-space companies to the Paci c Northwest.

    Businesses and institutions in Wash-ington state have been fortunate to have the Boeing Co. as a community partner. Sound Publishing knows the cities and communities it serves are strong, smart and prosperous places thanks to the con-tributions Boeing has made for 100 years.

    For that, we say ank You!

    Gloria Fletcher, President and CEO, Sound Publishing

  • G4 July 2016 Sound Publishing THE BOEING CENTURY

    Scrappy start forged a company built to last

    By Dan CatchpoleHerald Writer

    A steady, chill wind blew across the North Carolina beach as the man climbed into the spruce, linen and wire contraption. The small motor chugged. The mooring line was released, and the craft ran into the wind along a thin wooden track. At 10:35 a.m. on Dec. 17, 1903, it lifted into the air. Orville Wright jerked the planes heavy rudder left and right fighting to stay in the air.

    After 12 seconds and about 120 feet, the Wright Flyer smacked back into the sand. Man had flown.

    Earlier that year, a recent Yale drop-out steamed into Grays Harbor on Washingtons coast. Hed come to turn his inheritance into a fortune in log-ging. Bill Boeing had a sharp mind for mechanics and business. He was an avid hunter and adventurer, as well.

    Boeing quickly joined the clus-ter of millionaires whod wrenched fortunes out of the states lush forests, rich mineral veins and bountiful fish runs. By 1915, hed bought a yacht as well as the shipyard that built it and a mansion in the Highlands, a posh enclave north of Seattle.

    In July of that year, he and a friend, George Conrad Westervelt, paid a wiry barnstormer, Terah Maroney, to take them flying. Lake Washington dropped away below as the plane banked and turned through the air.

    Boeing was hooked by the thrill of flying, and its technical challenge. He said to Westy, as friends called him, that they could probably build a bet-ter plane.

    That year, he bought a rudimentary plane and took flying lessons from Glenn Martins Los Angeles-based company.

    Like other aviation pioneers, Boe-ing and Westervelt were tinkerers, with no formal training in the science of flight.

    The pair learned by trial and error while designing their own plane, the B&W, named for the initials in their last names. Our interest was in prog-ress, Boeing later told an interviewer.

    While flying was still a hobby for Boeing, he hired a crew to help develop the B&W and built a float-plane hangar on Seattles Lake Union. Westervelt moved back east before the B&W flew in June 1916. The plane performed well, as did a second one completed that fall.

    Boeing established the Pacific Aero Products Co. on July 15, 1916. The arti-cles of incorporation listed nearly every flying-related endeavor imaginable, including making airplanes. Pacific Aero Products was renamed the Boe-ing Airplane Co. less than a year later.

    By 1917, the company developed the first all-Boeing airplane, the Model C, a seaplane trainer pitched to the Navy. Workers dismantled the prototype, packed it in crates and loaded it on a train bound for

    Pensacola, Florida, where Navy flyers put it through tests.

    The Navy was so impressed that Boeings representative, C. Berlin, fired off a telegram: Advise you get ready f