Brief Introduction to Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Anne Todd, Steve Newton, & Rob Horner, University of Oregon Kate Algozzine & Bob Algozzine,

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  • Slide 1
  • Brief Introduction to Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Anne Todd, Steve Newton, & Rob Horner, University of Oregon Kate Algozzine & Bob Algozzine, University of North Carolina at Charlotte APA Citation: Todd, A. W., Newton, J. S., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2013). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS II) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon. www.uoecs.orgwww.uoecs.org.
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  • Goals Foundations of an effective meeting Identifying problems effectively Building useful solutions Implementation, follow-up and adaptation of solutions.
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  • TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 3 People arent tired from solving problems they are tired from solving the same problem over and over.
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  • Implement Solution with High Integrity Identify Goal for Change Identify Problem with Precision Monitor Impact of Solution and Compare Against Goal Make Summative Evaluation Decision Meeting Foundations Team-Initiated Problem Solving II (TIPS II) Model Identify Solution and Create Implementation Plan with Contextual Fit Collect and Use Data TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 4
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  • Action Planning Action Planning Improving Decision-Making Problem Solution Problem From To Problem Solving Information Solution
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  • DORA Foundations Score Newton et al., 2012: Effects of TIPS Training on Team Meeting Foundations Pre TIPS Training Post-TIPS Training TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 6 TIPS I Study
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  • DORA Thoroughness of Decision Making Score (Simple) Newton et al., 2012: Effects of TIPS Training on Team Decision-making Pre TIPS Training Post-TIPS Training TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 7
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  • Meeting Foundations Clear Purpose/ Authority How will we know if the meeting is effective? What is the impact we are to have on students/ families/ School? Roles and responsibilities Facilitator Minute Taker Data Analyst Member Agreement about process Start time/stop time Schedule Respect and commitment Electronic Meeting Minutes/Agenda
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  • Define roles for effective meetings Core roles Facilitator Minute taker Data analyst Active team member Administrator Backup for each role TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 9 Can one person serve multiple roles? Are there other roles needed? Typically NOT the administrator
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  • ActionPerson Responsible Reserve RoomFacilitator Recruit items for AgendaFacilitator Review data prior to the meetingData Analyst Reserve projector and computer for meeting Minute Taker Keep discussion focusedFacilitator Record Topics and Decisions on agenda/minutes Minute taker Ensure that problems are defined with precision Facilitator Ensure that solutions have action plans Facilitator Provide drill down data during discussion Data Analyst End on timeFacilitator Prepare minutes and send to all members Minute taker Who is Responsible? 10
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  • Your Turn Define who will be: Facilitator Minute Taker Data Analyst Backup
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  • Organizing for an effective problem solving conversation TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 12 Problem Solution Out of Time Use Data A key to collective problem solving is to provide a visual context that allows everyone to follow and contribute
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  • Using Meeting Minutes Documentation Logistics of meeting Agenda items for todays meeting ( and next meeting) Discussion items, decisions made, tasks and timelines assigned Problem statements, solutions/decisions/tasks Reviewing Meeting minutes Snapshot of what happened at the previous meeting and what needs to be reviewed during the current meeting Visual tracking of focus topics Prevents side conversations Prevents repetition Encourages completion of tasks TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 13
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  • 14 Agenda for Next Meeting
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  • Where in the Form would you place: 1.Schedule for hallway monitoring for next month 2. Too many students in the intensive support for literacy 3. Status of fights on playground in last month. 4. Next meeting date/time. 5. Todays agenda 6. Solutions for a new problem Where in the Form would you place: 1.Schedule for hallway monitoring for next month 2. Too many students in the intensive support for literacy 3. Status of fights on playground in last month. 4. Next meeting date/time. 5. Todays agenda 6. Solutions for a new problem TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 15
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  • Where in the Form would you place: 1.Staff will complete weekly fidelity checks 2. Three students are not meeting daily CICO goal 3. Parents are not signing CICO home report 4.ORF scores are too low for third graders 5. Plan for school board report Where in the Form would you place: 1.Staff will complete weekly fidelity checks 2. Three students are not meeting daily CICO goal 3. Parents are not signing CICO home report 4.ORF scores are too low for third graders 5. Plan for school board report TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 16
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  • Evaluation of Team Meeting (Mark your ratings with an X) Our Rating YesNoSo-So 1. Was todays meeting a good use of our time? 2. In general, did we do a good job of tracking whether were completing the tasks we agreed on at previous meetings? 3. In general, have we done a good job of actually completing the tasks we agreed on at previous meetings? 4. In general, are the completed tasks having the desired effects on student behavior? At end of each meeting, conduct a BRIEF assessment of the meeting by asking 4 questions TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org 17
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  • Defining problems The first step to effective problem solving A Problem Any significant difference between what is expected/desired and what is actually observed (academic, behavior). Define Problems is Precision What is the behavior (and discrepancy)? Where is it most likely? When does it occur? Who performs the behavior? Why does the behavior keep happening in this situation?
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  • Using Data to Refine Problem Statement The statement of a problem is important for team-based problem solving. Everyone must be working on the same problem with the same assumptions. Problems often are framed in a Primary form, that creates concern, but that is not useful for problem-solving. Frame primary problems based on initial review of data Use more detailed review of data to build Solvable Problem Statements.
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  • Precise Problem Statements (What are the data we need for a decision?) Precise problem statements include information about the following questions: What is the problem behavior? How often is the problem happening? Where is the problem happening? Who is engaged in the behavior? When is the problem most likely to occur? Why is the problem sustaining?
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  • What When Where Who Why Designing Effective Behavior Support
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  • Primary versus Precision Statements Primary Statements Too many referrals September has more suspensions than last year Gang behavior is increasing The cafeteria is out of control Student disrespect is out of control Precision Statements There are more ODRs for aggression on the playground than last year. These are most likely to occur during first recess, with a large number of students, and the aggression is related to getting access to the new playground equipment.
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  • Primary versus Precision Statements Primary Statements Too many referrals September has more suspensions than last year Gang behavior is increasing The cafeteria is out of control Student disrespect is out of control Precision Statements There are more ODRs for aggression on the playground than last year. These are most likely to occur during first recess, with a large number of students, and the aggression is related to getting access to the new playground equipment.
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  • Precise or Primary Statement? Children are using inappropriate language with a high frequency in the presence of both adults and other children. This is creating a sense of disrespect and incivility in the school. ODRs during December are higher than in any other month.
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  • Precise or Primary Statement? James D. is hitting others in the cafeteria during lunch, and his hitting is maintained by peer attention. Boys are engaging in sexual harassment. Three 5 th grade boys are name calling and touching girls inappropriately during recess in an apparent attempt to obtain attention.
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  • Precise or Primary Statement? Minor disrespect and disruption are increasing over time, and are most likely during the last 15 minutes of our block periods when students are engaged in independent seat work. This pattern is most common in 7 th and 8 th grades, involves many students, and appears to be maintained by escape from work.
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  • Examples: Primary to Precise Gang-like behavior is increasing Texting during school is becoming more negative Bullying (verbal and physical aggression) on the playground is increasing during first recess, is being done mostly by four 4 th grade boys, and seems to be maintained by social praise from the bystander peer group. A large number of students in each grade level (6, 7, 8) are using texting to spread rumors, and harass peers. Texting occurs both during the school day, and after school, and appears to be maintained by attention from others.
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  • Your Turn Define a primary problem you have encountered. Transform that primary problem statement into a precise problem statement.
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  • Using Data to Build Precise Problem Statements STEP ONE Do we have a problem? (compare observed with expected) What and How Often STEP TWO Define the problem with precision (which behaviors?) Where When Who Why
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  • Total Office Discipline Referrals Total Office Discipline Referrals as of January 10
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  • Transforming Data into Information Look first at your patterns (tell the story) Level, Trend Peaks Match data to current perceptions Compare your data With national median With last year With what your staff/students/ families want
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  • SWIS summary 2011-12 (Majors Only) 5194 schools; 2,663,221 students; 2,033,426 ODRs Grade Range Number of Schools Mean Enrollment per school Mean ODRs per 100 stud/ school day Median ODRs per 100 per stud/ school day 25 th Percentile ODR/100/ school day 75 th Percentile ODR/100/ school day K-63310446.34 (.41).22.11.42 6-9972614.61 (.65).44.25.76 9-12477853.78 (.86).53.30.94 PreK-8285336.51 (.57).36.18.64 PreK-12714311.07 (1.19).44.21.88
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  • Elementary School with 150 Students Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual. Questions to Ask What is happening? What is typical? What is possible? What is needed?
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  • Elementary School
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  • Middle School 765 students
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  • Describe the narrative for this elementary school
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  • Describe the narrative for this Middle school
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  • Describe the narrative for this High school Year One Year Two Median Line based on 2010-11 Data
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  • What are the SWIS reports you need to move from a Primary to a Precise statement? What problem behaviors are most common? ODR per Problem Behavior Where are problem behaviors most likely? ODR per Location When are problem behaviors most likely? ODR per time of day Who is engaged in problem behavior? ODR per student Why are problem behaviors sustaining? Custom graph
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  • Data lead to asking the right questions If many referrals in classroom Which classes? Which students? What problem behaviors? When? If many referrals in cafeteria Which students? What times? (beginning or end of lunch period?) What problem behaviors?
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  • Questions to ask about Referrals by Problem Behavior Is there one major problem behavior or multiple problem behaviors? Do they appear to be student-student problem behaviors or student- adult? Are there similarities in the types of behaviors? Are they major or minor problem behaviors?
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  • Questions to ask about Referrals by Location Where are the problems occurring? Are there problems in many locations, clusters of locations, or one location?
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  • Questions to ask about Referrals by Time When are the problem behaviors most likely? How do those times match with the daily activities? How does this information match up to Referrals by Location?
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  • WHO: Questions to ask about Referrals by Student Who is engaging in problem behavior? What proportion of students has 0-1 ODR? What proportion of students has 2-5 ODRs? What proportion of students has 6+ ODRs?
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  • Why? The hardest question Given a specific behavior in a specific context: What consequence is perceived as maintaining the problem behavior? Always assess motivation AFTER you have defined who, what, where? You always ask WHY the students misbehave in a specific context Look for the primary motivation if there are multiple possibilities.
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  • Motivation for Many students engaging in Disruption in the Cafeteria This Year
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  • Motivation for many students engaging in Disruption in the Classroom: Elementary This Year
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  • Motivation for Non-compliance and Insubordination in the Classroom: All students/ Middle School This Year
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  • Motivation for Brians Disrespectful Behavior in the Classroom This Year
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  • Meeting Video #1 Check if you identified the ____ minute taker ____ facilitator ____ data analyst ____ school administrator What was one problem (old or new) addressed by the team? Was it defined with precision?
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  • Building Goals Define the problem with precision Define the measure of the problem...