Building the 21st Century National Aerospace Workforce

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“Right Skills, Right Place, Right Time”. Building the 21st Century National Aerospace Workforce. Aerospace Industries Association Special Session on “Revitalization of the Workforce” March 27, 2003 Presentation by: Steve Sleigh, IAM Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, MIT. Mission and Vision. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Building the 21st Century National Aerospace Workforce

  • Building the 21st Century National Aerospace WorkforceAerospace Industries Association Special Session on Revitalization of the Workforce March 27, 2003

    Presentation by:Steve Sleigh, IAMJoel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, MITRight Skills, Right Place, Right Time

  • Mission and VisionOverall Mission for the Aerospace Industry:Enabling the global movement of people and goods; Enabling the global acquisition and dissemination of information and data;Advancing national security interests; andProviding a source of inspiration by pushing the boundaries of exploration and innovation Source: Lean Enterprise Value: Insights from MITs Lean Aerospace Initiative (Palgrave/MacMillan, 2002)

    21st Century Workforce Vision:Attract and retain a 21st Century aerospace workforce with the skills, capabilities and commitment to enable transformation and success in the aerospace industry

  • Strategic ChallengesKnowledge and CapabilityDemographic cliffGaps in pipelines skilled apprenticeships and aerospace engineering programsChanging skill mix requirements and new technologies Fundamental changes in the nature of work and operations

    Competitive ChallengesGlobal competition and organizational instabilityInstitutional barriers, monuments and gaps in the social infrastructureDivisive dynamics around job security, benefits and flexibilityReduced attractiveness of careers in aerospace

  • Institutional OpportunitiesAerospace Inter-Agency Task ForceSpanning the Department of Defense, NASA, FAA, Departments of Labor, Education, Commerce and Homeland Security to coordinate government aerospace workforce initiatives

    Aerospace Capability Network Public/private partnerships spanning all key stakeholdersbusiness, labor, government, universities and community groupsDevelopment of aerospace skill standards and certification programs Dissemination of information on occupations, job availability, high performance partnerships, and new work systemsGrants for demonstration projects at local and regional levels

    Industry Promotion and DevelopmentBest practices in career development, employment relations, and life-long learning across the industryNational campaign on aerospace opportunities primary schools, secondary schools, community colleges and universities

  • Aerospace Workforce Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs): A Conceptual MapSource: MITs Labor Aerospace Research Agenda

  • Potential Topics for DialogueDialogue on Challenges:Skills and capabilityCompetitive challenges

    Dialogue on Opportunities:Priorities from industry and labor for proposed Inter-Agency Task Force on the Aerospace WorkforceElements of success for potential Aerospace Capability NetworkOpportunities for Aerospace Industry Promotion and DevelopmentFor more information on aerospace workforce research at MIT, see the publications presented by MITs Labor Aerospace Research Agenda http://mit.edu/ctpid/lara and MITs Lean Aerospace Initiative http://web.mit.edu/lean. For more information on the IAM and High Performance Work Organizations, see http://www.goiam.org under visit IAM Headquarters.

  • Concluding CommentAll of the above options require substantial contributions from public and private sectors not just contributions of funds, but of leadership time and attention We call for a deep commitment to fundamental cultural change in this industry valuing human capital as the key to future success.

  • AppendixApprenticeship dataGlobal footprint dataNational employment and sales data

  • US DoL and Other Apprenticeship Programs: 2002 SurveyThe vast majority (85%) of aerospace facilities do not have apprenticeship programs and of those that do, approximately 2/3 have had no graduates over the past three years and have no one in the programs.

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    Europe

    Japan, China, Korea

    Canada/Mexico

    South America

    Russia & CIS

    Other

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    0.840.070.040.030.010.01

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    No Apprenticeship Program

    None over past 3 years

    1 to 5 people

    6 to 10 people

    11 to 20 people

    Over 20 people

    Chart4

    0.030.490.48

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    Strongly Disagree (1 or 2 on 7 Point Scale)

    Neither Strong Agreement Nor Strong Disagreement (3, 4 or 5 on 7 Point Scale)

    Strongly Agree (6 or on 7 Point Scale)

    Chart5

    0.420.40.18

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    Strongly Disagree (1 or 2 on 7 Point Scale)

    Neither Strong Agreement Nor Strong Disagreement (3, 4 or 5 on 7 Point Scale)

    Strongly Agree (6 or on 7 Point Scale)

    Chart3

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    % of Facility Reporting Use of Knowledge Management Tools and Techniques

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    Extremely Important (5) & Very Important (4)

    Important (3) & Somewhat Important (2)

    Not Important (1)

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    Lean Enterprise (only on 2002 Survey)0.301

    1999 Survey

    2002 Survey

    Chart8

    0.45578231290.24

    0.13605442180.19

    0.40816326530.56

    1999 Survey

    2002 Survey

    Chart10

    0.430.47Notice of Future Skill Requirements0.480.45Notice of Future Skill Requirements0.090.09

    0.120.09Increased Employee Control Over Daily Responsibilities0.620.6Increased Employee Control Over Daily Responsibilities0.270.31

    0.220.21Employee Involvement in Work Redesign0.570.59Employee Involvement in Work Redesign0.220.2

    Never Use -- 2002

    Never Use -- 1999

    Limited Use -- 2002

    Limited Use -- 1999

    Extensive Use -- 2002

    Limited Use -- 1999

    Chart11

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    26% to 30%0.02

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    35% to 40%0.01

    Over 40%0.01

    Approximate Percentage of Workforce Retired Over Past Three Years

    Approximate Percentage of Workforce Eligible to Retire Over Next Three Years

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    Percent of the Workforce Who Retired Over the Past Three Years

    Percent of the Workforce Eligible to Retire Over the Next Three Years

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    Under 10%

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    Under 10%

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    Percent of the Workforce Who RetiredOver the PAST Three Years

    Chart14

    0.6910.2670.044

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    Under 10%

    10-20%

    Over 20%

    Percentage of the Workforce Eligable to Retire Over the NEXT Three Years

    Chart15

    0.8510.0910.0340.0190

    0.8510.1020.03100.003

    0.8510.0750.0340.020.009

    0.8510.0910.040.0060.006

    No Apprenticeship Program

    None over past 3 years

    Under 5 people

    5 to 10 people

    Over 10 people

    Sheet1

    G1 Global Interdependency

    USEuropeJapan, China, KoreaCanada/MexicoSouth AmericaRussia & CISOther

    Suppliers95%35%22%23%3%4%3%

    Customers98%75%50%56%29%5%18%

    Joint Ventures40%18%11%7%1%1%3%

    Strategic Partners50%22%11%10%1%2%4%

    Current Competitors92%66%31%25%5%6%5%

    Future Competitors73%58%68%33%13%20%10%

    US DOL Apprenticeships

    No Apprenticeship ProgramNone over past 3 years1 to 5 people6 to 10 people11 to 20 peopleOver 20 people

    Graduates of US DOL Apprenticeship Programs Over Past Three Years (max = 10)84%11%3%2%0%0%

    Currently in US DOL Apprenticeshp Programs (max = 20)84%11%3%0%1%0%

    Graduates of Other Apprenticeship Programs Over Past Three Years (max = 150)84%7%4%3%1%1%

    Currently in Other Apprenticeship Programs (max = 50)84%9%5%0%1%1%

    Overall Capacity of All Apprenticeship Programs (max = 300)84%1%6%4%2%3%

    Strongly Disagree (1 or 2 on 7 Point Scale)Neither Strong Agreement Nor Strong Disagreement (3, 4 or 5 on 7 Point Scale)Strongly Agree (6 or on 7 Point Scale)

    a. Employees have the opportunity to learn new skills3%49%48%

    b. Employees encourages to use different approaches to problem-solving3%45%52%

    c. Employees rewarded for using what they have learned5%64%31%

    d. Work is rescheduled so people can attend training8%52%40%

    e. Employees open to new ideas and suggestions7%50%43%

    f. Training encouraged to build skills for advancement8%51%41%

    Strongly Disagree (1 or 2 on 7 Point Scale)Neither Strong Agreement Nor Strong Disagreement (3, 4 or 5 on 7 Point Scale)Strongly Agree (6 or on 7 Point Scale)

    g. Training capacity reduced compared to two years ago42%40%18%

    h. No problems recruiting people with skills that we need35%51%14%

    i. Building interpersonal skills is equal or greater importance than technical skills12%65%23%

    j. People working h