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  • PADM 5117 – Fall 2012 Prof. Robert Shepherd

    Page 1 PADM 5117: Public Sector Management (Fall 2012)

    Carleton University

    School of Public Policy and Administration

    PADM 5117 A

    PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT AND THE CANADIAN POLITICAL SYSTEM

    Fall 2012

    Instructor: Robert Shepherd Phone: (613) 520-2600 ext. 2257

    Class Time: Tuesday 14:35 - 17:25 pm Email: [email protected]

    Class Room: 3228 RB Office Hours: Tuesday: 13:00 - 14:30 pm

    Office: 5126RB Wednesday: 15:35 - 17:30 pm

    COURSE OBJECTIVES

    This course is intended to:

    $ Provide an understanding of the theories, values and principles of public sector

    management and a critical assessment of how these are implemented in practice in a

    parliamentary system;

    $ Critically discuss contemporary Canadian and international research on public

    management and administration;

    $ Examine how the philosophies of public sector management have evolved over time and

    assess the impact of institutional and managerial reforms in a Canadian and comparative

    context; and

    $ Create an awareness of current key issues and challenges of public administration, and

    facilitate discussion of how these might be addressed.

    The main focus is on public management in the Canadian context with specific reference to the

    Government of Canada. The course also draws on international research and examples from other

    jurisdictions including provincial and municipal governments.

    READINGS

    Savoie, Donald J., Court Government and the Collapse of Accountability: in Canada and the

    United Kingdom (Toronto: UofT Press, 2008).

    Leone, Roberto and Frank Ohemeng. Approaching Public Administration: Core Debates and

    Emerging Issues (Toronto: Edmond-Montgomery, 2011).

    All other readings will be available on WebCT as available given Copyright restrictions.

    mailto:[email protected]

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    COURSE FORMAT

    The course will run as a structured seminar with a short introductory lecture provided by the

    instructor at the beginning of the class followed by active engagement by students in discussions

    based on the readings and selected public management cases.

    COURSE EVALUATION

    Assignment

    Theory Paper

    Scenario

    Presentation

    MC Case

    MC Case

    Presentation

    Class

    Participation

    Due Date

    November 6

    As Assigned

    December 11

    December 4

    Throughout

    % of Final Grade

    25%

    15%

    30%

    15%

    15%

    Theory Paper

    The purpose of the theory paper is to provide you some experience to think critically and

    analytically about the readings, the concepts and theories, and the practice of public

    administration. The paper should be a critical analysis of a “theory” and its “practice” in public

    management. You are expected to describe the concept and its importance to public management

    from the perspective of our parliamentary system. You may wish to describe this comparatively

    with the republican or other system of government. However, the main purpose of this paper is to

    understand the theory and how it affects the functioning of the parliamentary system. In this

    respect, it may be useful to describe the historical underpinnings of the theory and how it has

    changed over time.

    For example, you may wish to examine an aspect of the Federal Accountability Act and assess its

    short and long-term effects on management of the Public Service, or the overall functioning of the

    parliamentary system, or some impact on a department. You may also wish to compare the

    positions of particular authors and discuss how such positions may or may not be workable either

    from a theoretical or practice perspective. Your paper should be properly researched and all

    sources should be cited using an appropriate citation method. Sources such as Wikipedia are not

    considered to be scholarly sources. Also, papers submitted after the due date will be accepted but

    subject to a 1 percent penalty per day. Your paper should not exceed 20 double-spaced pages.

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    Scenario Presentation

    Pairs of students will be expected to prepare a scenario from current events that corresponds to the

    course readings. Your task is to present the scenario as if you were preparing a memorandum-to-

    cabinet (MC). Pairs will be assigned. That is, you should follow a standard template as follows:

    • Issue Definition (brief description – 1 minute)

    • Background of the Issue (brief – 3 minutes)

    • Recommended Solution (2 minutes)

    • Considerations (for recommended solution – 2 minutes)

    • Implementation (how you would implement the solution – 4 minutes)

    Memorandum-to-Cabinet Group Assignment (MC)

    Throughout the term, you will be expected to work in a group of approximately 3 or 4 people.

    Each group will select an issue or public problem that builds on one or more of the course

    discussions such as risk management, public consultation or public sector renewal. Each group

    will prepare a memorandum-to-cabinet that includes a background document and memorandum-

    of-recommendations using the prescribed Privy Council Office guidelines (provided on WebCT in

    an assigned folder).

    Groups will be assigned sometime in October comprising no more than four persons per group.

    You will be expected to select a public problem on your own, but these topics should be approved

    by the instructor.

    As an exercise, the public problem should be well-defined according to guidelines to be discussed

    in class. Given that this is a course in public management, your emphasis will be to consider how

    your recommended solution would be implemented given the contextual, ideological,

    environmental, regulatory or other factors as pertinent. Your background paper should not exceed

    20-22 double-spaced pages. Your memorandum-of-recommendations should not exceed the page

    limit prescribed by the PCO guidelines.

    MC Case Study Presentation and Participation

    Each case study team will compete in a mini-case study competition at the end of the term. Your

    task will be to present the findings of your case studies and to make a persuasive case for your

    recommendation. Your presentation grade will be based on the extent to which you present your

    argument logically that makes pertinent links to the theories you have learned in class. That is, it is

    not enough that you believe your recommendation is correct or appropriate. You must demonstrate

    that you fully understand the implications of your recommendation on the “logic” of our system

    of government and its management practices.

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    Class Participation

    Students are expected to come to class having read and be prepared to discuss the readings and

    apply them to real world public sector management situations. You will not be required to do a

    formal presentation on the readings, but will be expected to attend classes and actively participate

    in the discussions. You will be expected to bring news items to class to discuss.

    GRADING GUIDELINES

    SPPA has expanded upon the grading system outlined in the Graduate Calendar in order to give

    our students a fuller description of standards. This explanation is intended to provide clarification

    of the Graduate Calendar, and in no way overrides it. Carleton University uses a 12 point grading

    scale from A+ (12) to D- (1) to determine your overall Grade Point Average (GPA). The final

    evaluation you receive in this course will be submitted as a letter grade that corresponds to this

    scale. Note that in a graduate program, grades of C+ or lower normally cannot be given credit

    toward the degree.

    Here is how to interpret grades in terms of our expectations of performance:

    Letter Grade

    CU #s

    Description

    % Ranges

    Explanation

    A+

    12

    Outstanding

    90-100

    For written work, virtually publishable.

    Demonstrates exceptional evaluative judgment,

    outstanding critical thinking, and mastery of

    technical and literary aspects of writing.

    A

    11

    Excellent

    85-89

    Demonstrates superior grasp of material, very

    strong critical thinking, and capacity to

    understand and extend underlying patterns.

    A-

    10

    Very Good

    80-84

    Demonstrates strong grasp of material, its

    component parts, and capacity to analyse their

    relationships to each other.

    B+

    9

    Good

    77-79

    Demonstrates clear understanding of material

    and ability to apply concepts. Written work is

    competent.

    B

    8

    Satisfactory

    73-76

    Satisfactory, but below average. Demonstrates

    comprehension of material, reasonable but not

    strong analytical capacity, with limitations in the

    ability to apply concepts.

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    B-

    7

    Barely Adequate

    70-72

    Clearly below average. Demonstrates

    comprehension and understanding, with limited

    capacity for application. Communications skills

    are problematic.

    C+

    6

    Less than Adequate

    67-69

    Did not demonstrate an adequate understanding

    of the material or the ability to apply the

    concepts. Writing and/or presentations show

    serious problems.

    C to D-

    Failure

    50-66

    Grades in this range indicate work that is

    passable in some respects but does not meet the

    standards of graduate work.

    F

    Failure

    Did not meet minimum requirements.

    UNIVERSITY POLICY ON PLAGIARISM

    Plagiarism is an instructional offence that occurs when a student uses or passes off as one’s own

    idea or product work of another person, without giving credit to the source. The punishments for

    plagiarism at Carleton are significant. You could fail the course, or, under certain circumstances,

    be expelled from the university.

    If you are using someone else’s words—in a quotation—refer to the source in a footnote or

    bracketed reference. If you are paraphrasing someone else’s text (that is, not quoting directly, but

    closely following the line of argument), refer to the source just as you would for a quotation,

    except that quotation marks are not used. If you are using someone else’s ideas, acknowledge this

    in a footnote, or by a clear reference in the text of your essay.

    Material copied from the Internet must be treated like material from a book or any other source. If

    you are quoting a source you found on the Internet, use quotation marks and refer to the location

    of the item (name the website; identify the electronic journal and issue, etc.) just as you would for

    a quotation from printed material. If you are paraphrasing material or borrowing ideas from an

    Internet source, the source must be identified in a footnote, just as a quotation would be. Excellent

    software is available for locating material that might have plagiarized from the Internet, and it will

    be used.

    ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION

    You may need special arrangements to meet your academic obligations during the term. For an

    accommodation request the processes are as follows:

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    Pregnancy obligation: write to me with any requests for academic accommodation during the first

    two weeks of class, or as soon as possible after the need for accommodation is known to exist. For

    more details visit the Equity Services website: http://www2.carleton.ca/equity/

    Religious obligation: write to me with any requests for academic accommodation during the first

    two weeks of class, or as soon as possible after the need for accommodation is known to exist. For

    more details visit the Equity Services website: http://www2.carleton.ca/equity/

    Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: The Paul Menton Centre for

    Students with Disabilities (PMC) provides services to students with Learning Disabilities (LD),

    psychiatric/mental health disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism

    Spectrum Disorders (ASD), chronic medical conditions, and impairments in mobility, hearing, and

    vision. If you have a disability requiring academic accommodations in this course, please contact

    PMC at 613-520-6608 or [email protected] for a formal evaluation. If you are already registered

    with the PMC, contact your PMC coordinator to send me your Letter of Accommodation at the

    beginning of the term, and no later than two weeks before the first in-class scheduled test or exam

    requiring accommodation (if applicable). After requesting accommodation from PMC, meet with

    me to ensure accommodation arrangements are made. Please consult the PMC website for the

    deadline to request accommodations for the formally-scheduled exam (if applicable) at

    http://www2.carleton.ca/pmc/new-and-current-students/dates-and-deadlines/

    You can visit the Equity Services website to view the policies and to obtain more detailed

    information on academic accommodation at http://www2.carleton.ca/equity/

    http://www2.carleton.ca/equity/http://www2.carleton.ca/equity/

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    COURSE OUTLINE

    Week 1 Introduction

    September 11

    • Defining “public administration” and “public management”

    • What are the challenges of governing today?

    • Course overview and expectations

    PART I: PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION THEORY AND INSTITUTIONS

    Week 2 Public Institutions, Organizing Principles and Democratic Control

    September 18

    • Parliament and democracy: the Westminster model

    • Politics/Administration Dichotomy

    • Rule of Law of Public Legitimacy

    Savoie, Introduction and Chapter 2.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 3 (Should the bureaucracy be politically neutral?).

    Gerald Baier, Herman Bakvis and Douglas Brown, “Executive Federalism, the Democratic Deficit

    and Parliamentary Reform,” in G. Bruce Doern (ed.), How Ottawa Spends 2005-2006: Managing

    the Minority. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2005, 163-183.

    Paul Thomas, “Parliament and the Public Service,” in Christopher Dunn (ed.), The Handbook of

    Canadian Public Administration. Don Mills, Oxford University Press, 2002, 341-368.

    Optional Readings:

    Joseph Heath, “The Myth of Shared Values in Canada,” 2003 John L. Manion Lecture, Canada

    School of Public Service. May 2003, 1-35.

    Eugene Forsey, How Canadians Govern Themselves, 7th

    Edition (Ottawa: Supply and Services,

    2005). Available at: http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/idb/forsey/PDFs/How_Canadians_Govern_Themselves-7ed.pdf/

    http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/idb/forsey/PDFs/How_Canadians_Govern_Themselves-7ed.pdf/

  • PADM 5117 – Fall 2012 Prof. Robert Shepherd

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    Week 3 Political and Administrative Responsibilities

    September 25

    • Personality and Values of the Canadian Public Service

    • Government departments and mandates

    • Ministerial Responsibility, role of legislation and limits of authority

    Savoie, chapter 3.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 5 (Is ministerial responsibility a dead concept?).

    Nick d’Ombrain, “Ministerial Responsibility and the Machinery of Government,” Canadian

    Public Administration, 50, 2, Summer 2007, 195-218.

    Gregory Tardi, “Departments and other Institutions of Government,” in Christopher Dunn (ed.),

    The Handbook of Canadian Public Administration. Don Mills, Oxford University Press, 2002,

    281-304.

    John Alford and Janine O’Flynn, “Making Sense of Public Value: Concepts,

    Critiques and Emergent Meanings,” International Journal of Public Administration, 32 (2009), 3,

    171-91.

    Kenneth Kernaghan, “East Block and Westminster: Conventions, Values, and Public Service,” in

    Christopher Dunn (ed.), The Handbook of Canadian Public Administration. Don Mills, Oxford

    University Press, 2002, 104-119.

    Optional Readings:

    Peter Aucoin, Jennifer Smith and Geoff Dinsdale, Responsible Government: Clarify Essentials,

    Dispelling Myths and Exploring Change (Ottawa: Canada School of Public Service, 2004).

    Jonathan Malloy and Scott Millar, “Why Ministerial Responsibility can Still Work,” in G. Bruce

    Doern (ed.), How Ottawa Spends 2007-2008: The Harper Conservatives – Climate of Change

    (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2007), 105-22.

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    PART II: FROM ADMINISTRATION TO MANAGEMENT

    Week 4 Managing Government: The New Public Management

    October 2

    • New Public Management

    • Alternative service delivery - the “rightness” of the private sector?

    Savoie, chapter 4.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 4 (Should the public sector be run like a business?)

    Michael Howlett, Luc Bernier, Keith Brownsey and Christoper Dunn, “Modern Canadian

    Governance: Political-Administrative Styles and Executive Organization in Canada,” in Luc

    Bernier, Keith Brownsey and Michael Howlett (eds.), Executive Styles in Canada: Cabinet

    Structures and Leadership Practices in Canadian Government. Toronto: University of Toronto

    Press, 2005, 3-16.

    Mohamed Charih, Lucie Rouillard, “The New Public Management,” in Mohamed Charih and

    Arthur Daniels (eds.), New Public Management and Public Administration in Canada. Toronto:

    IPAC, 1997, 27-46.

    David Zussman, “Alternative Service Delivery,” in Christopher Dunn (ed.), The Handbook of

    Canadian Public Administration. Don Mills, Oxford University Press, 2002, 53-76.

    Week 5 Managing Government: Shift to Public Governance

    October 9

    • New public management to “public governance”

    • New “styles” of management - Collaboration and networks

    Savoie, chapter 7.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 13 (New Public Governance)

    Tony Bovaird, “Public Governance: Balancing Stakeholder Power in a Network Society,”

    International Review of Administrative Sciences, 71, 2 (2005), 217-228.

    Stephen P. Osborne, “The New Public Governance?,” Public Management Review, 8 (September

    2006), 3, 377-387.

    Terry L. Cooper, Tomas A. Bryer, and Jack W. Meek, “Citizen-Centered Collaborative Public

    Management,” Public Administration Review, December 2006, Special Issue, 76-88.

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    Optional Readings:

    Robert Agranoff, “Inside Collaborative Networks: Ten Lessons for Public Managers,” Public

    Administration Review, Special Edition (December 2006), 56-65.

    Evan Diamond and Ron Cooper, “Citizen Relationship Management,” Optimum Online, 33

    (December 2003), 4. Available at: http://www.optimumonline.ca/article.phtml?id=190”

    Donald J. Savoie, The Federal Government: Revisiting Court Government in Canada,” in Luc

    Bernier, Keith Brownsey and Michael Howlett (eds.), Executive Styles in Canada: Cabinet

    Structures and Leadership Practices in Canadian Government. Toronto: University of Toronto

    Press, 2005, 17-43.

    John J. Kiefer and Robert S. Montjoy, “Incrementalism before the Storm: Network Performance

    for the Evacuation of New Orleans,” Public Administration Review, December 2006, Special

    Issue, 122-130.

    Rachel Laforest and Susan Phillips, “Citizen Engagement: Rewiring the Policy Process,” in

    Michael Orsini and Miriam Smith (eds.), Critical Policy Studies. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2006,

    67-90.

    PART III: MANAGING UNDER CONDITIONS OF GOVERNANCE

    Week 6 Managing Money: Public Budgeting Processes

    October 16

    • Budget setting processes

    • Shifts to performance budgeting

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 9 (Should Canadian governments be required by law to run balanced

    budgets?)

    Miekatrien Sterck and Bram Scheers, “Trends in Performance Budgeting in Seven OECD

    Countries,” Public Performance & Management Review, 30 (Sept 2006), 1, 47-72.

    Miekatrien Sterck, “The impact of performance budgeting on the role of the legislature: a four-

    country study,” International Review of Administrative Sciences, 73 (2007), 189-203.

    Christopher Stoney and G. Bruce Doern, “Harper Budgeting in a New Majority Government:

    Trimming Fat or Slicing Pork?, How Ottawa Spends 2011-2012, 3-38.

    Aaron, Wildavsky, “A Budget for all Seasons? Why the Traditional Budget Lasts,” Public

    Administration Review, November/December 1978, 501-509.

    http://www.optimumonline.ca/article.phtml?id=190%E2%80%9D

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    Week 7 Managing Money: Expenditure Management Processes

    October 23

    • Expenditure Management System (EMS)

    • Controlling expenses and growth in staffing

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 7 (Do institutions responsible for parliamentary oversight offer

    better tools for scrutinizing and improving governance?)

    Office of the Auditor General, “An Overview of the Federal Government’s Expenditure

    Management System,” Report of the Auditor General of Canada 2006. Ottawa: OAG, 2006,

    5-28. Available at: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/domino/reports.nsf/html/20061100ce.html

    Peter Dobell and Martin Ulrich, “Parliament and Financial Accountability,” Gomery Commission,

    Research Studies, Volume 1, 23-62.

    Shepherd, Robert, “Departmental Audit Committees and Governance: Making Management and

    Accountability the Priority from the Top Down,” Canadian Public Administration, 54 (June 2011),

    2, 277-304.

    Reto Flury and Kuno Schedler, “Political Versus Managerial Use of Cost and Performance

    Accounting,” Public Money and Management, 26 (September 2006), 4, 229-34.

    Optional Readings:

    Denis Saint-Martin, “Managerialist Advocate or ‘Control Freak’? The Janus-faced Office of the

    Auditor General,” Canadian Public Administration, 47, 2, 2004, 121-140.

    Barbara Allen, “How Ottawa Buys: Procurement Policy and Politics beyond Gomery,” in G.

    Bruce Doern (ed.), How Ottawa Spends 2006-2007: In from the Cold, The Tory Rise and the

    Liberal Demise. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2006, 95-115.

    Week 8 Managing for Accountability: Who is Responsible?

    October 30

    • The Friedrich-Finer Debate renewed: values versus rules

    • Revisiting Ministerial Responsibility

    • Accountability Act and Accounting Officer model

    Savoie, chapter 11.

    http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/domino/reports.nsf/html/20061100ce.html

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    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 16 (Federal accountability regimes and First Nations’ Governance)

    David E. Smith, “Clarifying the Doctrine of Ministerial Responsibility as it Applies to the

    Government and Parliament of Canada,” Commission, Research Studies, Volume 1, 101-

    144.

    James Ross Hurley, “Responsibility, Accountability and the Role of Deputy Ministers in the

    Government of Canada,” in Commission of Inquiry into the Sponsorship Program and Advertising

    Activities, Restoring Accountability: Research Studies Volume 3. Ottawa: PWGSC, 2006, 115-

    156.

    Lorne Sossin, “Defining Boundaries: The Constitutional Argument for Bureaucratic Independence

    and its Implications for the Accountability of the Public Service,” Commission, Research Studies,

    Volume 2, 1-64.

    Optional Readings:

    Peter Aucoin, “Improving Government Accountability, Canadian Parliamentary Review, 29 (Fall

    2006), 3, 20-26.

    Peter Aucoin, “After the Federal Accountability Act: Is the Accountability Problem in the

    Government of Canada Fixed?,” FMI Journal, 18 (2007), 2, 12-15.

    C.E.S. (Ned) Franks, “The Respective Responsibilities and Accountabilities of Ministers and

    Public Servants: A Study of the British Accounting Officer System and its Relevance for

    Canada,” Commission, Research Studies, Volume 3, 157-230.

    Donald J. Savoie, “The Canadian Public Service has a Personality,” Canadian Public

    Administration, 49, 3, Fall 2006, 261-281.

    Week 9 Managing Partnerships: Multiple Party Arrangements

    November 6

    • 3 Ps, Partnerships, MOUs

    • Finding new ways of cooperating across jurisdictions

    Savoie, chapter 5.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 10 (Should governments use the private sector to deliver public

    services?)

    Joan Price Boase, “Beyond Government?: The appeal of public-private partnerships,” Canadian

    Public Administration, 43 (Spring 2000), 1, 75-91.

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    Tony Bovaird, “Public-Private Partnerships: from contested concepts to prevalent practice,”

    International Review of Administrative Sciences, 70 (2004), 2, 199-215.

    Ali Sedjari, “Public-Private Partnerships as a tool for modernizing public services,” International

    Review of Administrative Sciences, 70 (2004), 2, 291-306.

    Susan Phillips and Karine Levasseur, “The Snakes and Ladders of Accountability: Contradictions

    between Contracting and Collaboration for Canada’s Voluntary Sector,” Canadian Public

    Administration, 47 (2004), 4, 451-74.

    Optional Readings:

    Archon Fung, “Varieties of Participation in Complex Governance,” Public Administration Review,

    December 2006, Special Issue, 66-76.

    Patrick Dunleavy, Helen Margetts, Simon Bastow and Jane Tinkler, “New Public Management is

    Dead-Long Live Digital-Era Governance,” Journal of Public Administration Research and

    Theory,” 16, 2005, 467-494.

    Laura Edgar, “Building Policy Partnerships: Making Network Governance Work,” Institute on

    Governance, February 2002. Available at: http://www.iog.ca/publications/effective_network.pdf

    Week 10 Managing People: Performance, Recruitment, Renewal

    November 13

    • Merit and a neutral public service

    • Collective bargaining, motivation and job satisfaction

    • HR Renewal

    Savoie, chapter 8.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 11 (Is employment equity fair and necessary?)

    Mary Ann Feldheim, “Public Sector Downsizing and Employee Trust,” International Journal of

    Public Administration, 30 (2007), 3, 249-70.

    James L. Perry, Debra Mesch and Laurie E. Paarlberg, “Motivating Employees in a New

    Governance Era: The Performance Paradigm Revisited,” Public Administration Review,

    July/August, 2006, 505-534.

    http://www.iog.ca/publications/effective_network.pdf

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    Jonathan Malloy, “The Next Generation? Recruitment and Renewal in the Federal Public

    Service,” in G. Bruce Doern (ed.), How Ottawa Spends 2004-2005: Mandate Change in the Paul

    Martin Era. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2004, 277-295.

    Optional Readings:

    Edward C. Page, Christopher Hood and Martin Lodge, “Conclusion: Is Competency Management

    a Passing Fad?,” Public Administration, 83, 4, 2005, 853-860.

    David Zussman, “How to Retain Talent,” The Ottawa Citizen, October 16, 2006.

    Morley Gunderson, “Collective Bargaining and Dispute Resolution in the Public Service,” in

    Christopher Dunn (ed.), The Handbook of Canadian Public Administration. Don Mills: Oxford

    University Press, 2002, 517-532.

    Peter Aucoin, “The New Public Governance and the Public Service Commission,” Optimum

    Online, 36, 1 March 2006. http://www.optimumonline.ca/article.phtml?id=252

    Week 11 Managing Leaders: Ethics in Governing

    November 20

    • Ethics and public leadership

    • Whistleblowing and disclosure of wrongdoing

    • Transparency in government

    Savoie, chapter 12.

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 8 (Should whistleblowing be encouraged in the public sector?)

    Sandford Borins, “Loose Cannons and Rule Breakers or Enterprising Leaders?: Some Evidence

    about Innovative Public Managers,” Public Administration Review, 60 (Nov/Dec 2006), 6, 498-

    507.

    John Langford and Allan Tupper, “How Ottawa Does Business: Ethics as a Government

    Program,” in G. Bruce Doern (ed.), How Ottawa Spends 2006-2007: In from the Cold, The Tory

    Rise and the Liberal Demise. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2006,

    116-137.

    Kenneth Kernaghan, “Encouraging ‘Rightdoing’ and Discouraging Wrongdoing: A Public Service

    Charter and Disclosure Legislation,” Commission, Research Studies, Volume 2, 71-114.

    http://www.optimumonline.ca/article.phtml?id=252

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    Optional Readings:

    Demetrios Argyrides, “Good Governance, Professionalism, Ethics and Responsibility,”

    International Review of Administrative Sciences, 72, 2 (June 2006), 155-70.

    Herman Bakvis and Luc Juillet, The Horizontal Challenge: Line Departments, Central Agencies

    and Leadership. Canada School of Public Service, 2004. http://www.myschool-

    monecole.gc.ca/Research/publications/pdfs/hc_e.pdf

    Jacques Bourgault, “Corporate Management at the Top Level of Governments: the Canadian

    Case,” International Review of Administrative Sciences, 73, 2, June 2007, 257-274.

    Week 12 Managing Risk: The “New” Way Forward in Managing?

    November 27

    • Evaluation and results-based management

    • Rise of “risk-based” management - risk or results?

    Leone and Ohemeng, chapter 6 (Do performance management systems lead to better

    accountability and governance?)

    Savoie, chapter 13.

    Malcolm K. Sparrow, The Regulatory Craft: Controlling Risks, Solving Problems and Managing

    Compliance (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2000), Chapters 8 and 19, 109-122

    and 281-292.

    Barbara Wake Carroll and David I. Dewar, “Performance Management: Panacea or Fools’ Gold?”

    in Christopher Dunn (ed.), The Handbook of Canadian Public Administration. Don Mills: Oxford

    University Press, 2002, 413-429.

    Gwyn Bevan and Christopher Hood, “What’s measured is what matters: targets and gaming in

    healthcare in England,” Public Administration, 84 (2006), 3, 517-38.

    Matthias Beck, Darinka Asenova and Gordon Dickson, “Public Administration, Science, and Risk

    Assessment: A Case Study of the U.K. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Crisis,” Public

    Administration Review, 65, 4 (July/August), 2005, 296-308.

    Optional Readings:

    Tony Bovaird, “Developing New Forms of Partnership with the ‘Market’ in the Procurement of

    Public Services,” Public Administration, 84,1, 2006, 81-102.

  • PADM 5117 – Fall 2012 Prof. Robert Shepherd

    Page 16 PADM 5117: Public Sector Management (Fall 2012)

    Treasury Board Secretariat, “Review of Canadian Best Practices in Risk Management,” 1999.

    Available at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/dcgpubs/RiskManagement/rm-rcbp_e.asp

    Treasury Board Secretariat, “Risk, Innovation and Values-Examining the Tensions,” 1999.

    Available at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/dcgpubs/RiskManagement/rm-riv_e.asp

    CCAF, “How to Strengthen Risk Management in Government,” (June 2008). Available at:

    http://www.ccaf-fcvi.com/English/updates/RiskManagement06-06-08.html

    Week 13 MC Group Case Study Presentations

    December 4

    http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/dcgpubs/RiskManagement/rm-rcbp_e.asphttp://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/dcgpubs/RiskManagement/rm-riv_e.asphttp://www.ccaf-fcvi.com/English/updates/RiskManagement06-06-08.html