Cellular Respiration. What is Cellular Respiration? Step-by-step breakdown of glucose molecules to release energy Produce ATP Takes place day and night

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  • Cellular Respiration

  • What is Cellular Respiration?Step-by-step breakdown of glucose molecules to release energy Produce ATPTakes place day and night in ALL LIVING CELLS

  • Cellular RespirationC6H12O6 + 6O2 6CO2 + 6H2O + EnergyGlucose + Oxygen Carbon Dioxide + Water + Energy

  • Where does it occur?In the CellMitochondria

  • Cellular Respiration3 Stages3 Stages:Stage 1: GlycolysisO2 not required (anaerobic)

    Stage 2: Krebs CycleO2 required (aerobic)

    Stage 3: Electron Transport ChainO2 required (aerobic)

    2 ATPs2 ATPs32 ATPs

  • GLYCOLYSISKREBSCYCLEInsert 1 Glucose2 energytokens(ATP)2 energytokens32 energytokensELECTRONTRANSPORT CHAIN--------reactantsproductsGLYCOLYSISglucoseOxygenWater2 ATP2 NADH2 NADH6 NADH2 FADH22 ATP32 ATPKREBSCYCLEELECTRONTRANSPORTCHAINglucose derivativescarbon dioxidecarbon dioxidecytosolmitochondrion

  • Types of Cellular Respiration1. AerobicOccurs in the presence of oxygenBreaks down glucose completelyReleases large amounts energy36 ATP

  • Types of Cellular Respiration2. AnaerobicOccurs when there is no oxygen availablePartially breaks down glucoseReleases very small amount of energy2 ATP

  • FermentationAnaerobic process that follows Glycolysis when there is NO OXYGEN

    Provides a means to continue producing ATP until Oxygen is available

    Does NOT produce and additional ATP

    JUST keeps GLYCOLYSIS going over & over

  • GLUCOSEGlycolysisAerobic RespirationFermentation(anaerobic)Krebs CycleElectronTransportChain2 ATPATPATP

  • FermentationLactic Acid FermentationOccurs in animal muscle cellsProduces Lactic Acid as wasteOnly oxygen can get rid of lactic acid

  • FermentationAlcoholic FermentationPlants, Yeast & BacteriaEthyl alcohol is produced as waste-productBasis of wine & beer industryBread making (rise)

  • Respiration vs. PhotosynthesisC6H12O6 + 6O2 6CO2 + 6H2O + EnergyC6H12O6 + 6O2 6CO2 + 6H2O + Energy Respiration:Photosynthesis:

  • PHOTOSYNTHESISThe process by which light energy is used to make simple sugars (glucose)

    Producers/Autotrophs the type of organisms that perform photosynthesis

  • Photosynthesis Equation

    Light Energy + 6CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2

    aka

    SUN + Carbon Dioxide + Water Glucose + Oxygen

  • Starting MaterialsCarbon obtained from carbon dioxide taken in from air

    Light from SUN

    Water absorbed through roots

  • PRODUCTSGlucose C6H12O6 used for energy

    Oxygen released into atmosphere as waste

  • TWO STAGESLight Dependent Reactions1. Requires sunlight2. Traps light energy in chlorophyll3. Forms ATP

  • TWO STAGESB. Calvin Cycle1. Does NOT require sunlight

    2. Glucose is made using ATP from 1st stage

  • Plant Cell StructureChloroplast organelle in plant cell, site of photosynthesis

  • Plant Cell StructureChlorophyll- pigment in chloroplast that absorbs ALL but green light

  • Microscopic view of plant cells

  • Cellular Respiration vs. Photosynthesis

    PhotosynthesisCellular Respiration

    Energy from sun stored in glucoseEnergy in glucose releasedCarbon dioxide:Carbon dioxide:Oxygen:Oxygen:Produces:Produces:Requires LightDoes Not require LightOccurs only in:Occurs in:

  • Cellular Respiration vs. Photosynthesis

    PhotosynthesisCellular RespirationFood (glucose) ProducedFood (glucose) broken downEnergy from sun stored in glucoseEnergy in glucose releasedCarbon dioxide:Carbon dioxide:Oxygen:Oxygen:Produces:Produces:Requires LightDoes Not require LightOccurs only in:Occurs in:

  • Cellular Respiration vs. Photosynthesis

    PhotosynthesisCellular RespirationFood (glucose) ProducedFood (glucose) broken downEnergy from sun stored in glucoseEnergy in glucose releasedCarbon dioxide: Taken InCarbon dioxide: Given Off (released)Oxygen:Oxygen:Produces:Produces:Requires LightDoes Not require LightOccurs only in:Occurs in:

  • Cellular Respiration vs. Photosynthesis

    PhotosynthesisCellular RespirationFood (glucose) ProducedFood (glucose) broken downEnergy from sun stored in glucoseEnergy in glucose releasedCarbon dioxide: Taken InCarbon dioxide: Given Off (released)Oxygen: Given Off (released)Oxygen: Taken InProduces:Produces:Requires LightDoes Not require LightOccurs only in:Occurs in:

  • Cellular Respiration vs. Photosynthesis

    PhotosynthesisCellular RespirationFood (glucose) ProducedFood (glucose) broken downEnergy from sun stored in glucoseEnergy in glucose releasedCarbon dioxide: Taken InCarbon dioxide: Given Off (released)Oxygen: Given Off (released)Oxygen: Taken InProduces: Sugar (glucose)Produces: Water & Carbon DioxideRequires LightDoes Not require LightOccurs only in:Occurs in:

  • Cellular Respiration vs. Photosynthesis

    PhotosynthesisCellular RespirationFood (glucose) ProducedFood (glucose) broken downEnergy from sun stored in glucoseEnergy in glucose releasedCarbon dioxide: Taken InCarbon dioxide: Given Off (released)Oxygen: Given Off (released)Oxygen: Taken InProduces: Sugar (glucose)Produces: Water & Carbon DioxideRequires LightDoes Not require LightOccurs only in: organisms that contain chlorophyllOccurs in: ALL living cells

    ******Figure: 07-04a-b

    Title:Overview of energy harvesting.

    Caption:a. In metaphorical terms. Just as the video games in some arcades can use only tokens (rather than money) to make them function, so our bodies can use only ATP (rather than food) as a direct source of energy. The energy contained in food is transferred to ATP in three major steps: glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and the electron transport chain. Though glycolysis and the Krebs cycle contribute only small amounts of ATP directly, they also contribute electrons (on the left of the token machine) that help bring about the large yield of ATP in the electron transport chain. b. In schematic terms. As with the arcade machine, the starting point in this example is a single molecule of glucose, which again yields ATP in three major sets of steps: glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain (ETC). These steps can yield a maximum of 36 molecules of ATP: 2 in gylcolysis, 2 in the Krebs cycle, and 32 in the ETC. As noted, however, glycolysis and the Krebs cycle also yield electrons that move to the ETC, aiding in its ATP production. These electrons get to the ETC via the electron carriers NADH and FADH2, shown on the left. Oxygen is consumed in energy harvesting, while water and carbon dioxide are produced in it. Glycolysis takes place in the cytosol of the cell, but the Krebs cycle and ETC take place in the cellular organelles called mitochondria.

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