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Clarinet I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 Technique No. 3 Technique NO. 4 Articulation No. 1 Articulation No. 2 Articulation No. 3 Amazing Grace (Phantom Regiment 1992) Canon (Phantom Regiment 2003) Adagio for Strings (Santa Clara Vanguard 2013)

Clarinet I - I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

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Page 1: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet I Technique Packet

Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic

Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones

Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 Technique No. 3 Technique NO. 4

Articulation No. 1 Articulation No. 2 Articulation No. 3

Amazing Grace (Phantom Regiment 1992) Canon (Phantom Regiment 2003)

Adagio for Strings (Santa Clara Vanguard 2013)

Page 2: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet Techniques

by Sergeant Major Wendell Voss

Master Sergeant James HeffernanMaster Sergeant Cathy Ogram

Sergeant First Class Shari Smith

The Musical Ambassadors of the ArmyWashington, DCWashington, DCW

The United StatesArmy Field Band

The United States Army Field Band4214 Field Band Drive • Fort Meade, Maryland 20755-5330

Phone: (301) 677-6586 • Fax: (301) 677-6533E-mail: fl [email protected] • Website: www.army.mil/fi eldband

Page 3: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20
Page 4: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Clarinet Techniques

3–1

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Clarinet Techniquesby

Sergeant Major Wendell VossSergeant First Class James Heffernan

Sergeant First Class Cathy OgramStaff Sergeant Shari Smith

the back in the arched, or “ee” position. Fluctua-tions in the soft under-chin area when removingthe tongue indicate that the entire tongue, notjust the tip, is moving.

Usually it takes several tries and some en-couragement to move only the tip of the tongue.The next step is to finger an open G and, withthe tongue on the reed, begin to blow. Release thetongue to play the G on signal, then try to stopthe tone with the tongue on signal (see Example2). Although the tone will stop, the air pressureshould remain full. To see if the air pressure isbeing maintained, leak a little air from the cor-ner of the embouchure while blowing. Thoughplaying with an air leak is not recommended, thiswill verify if the air pressure is constant or chokedoff when the tongue returns to the reed.

Example 2

Once this can be accomplished moving onlythe tip of the tongue while maintaining air pres-sure, shorten the rhythmic values (see Examples 3and 4).

Example 3 q = 60

Most players accomplish this lesson in twentyminutes, although it helps to continue to review har-monic exercises for proper tongue position. Use thephrase “breathe-blow-release” to encourage blow-ing a full amount of air before the attack. Articula-tion occurs as the tongue moves away from the reed,

TONE AND ARTICULATIONFor clear staccato playing and tone production,

clarinet students need to have the proper tongueposition, visualizing the oral cavity’s shape whensaying “ee” or “hee.” Blowing air through a strawwith the tongue in this position is a good beginningexercise for proper air stream. Studying clarinetharmonics (the sounds produced when overblowinga note) further develops this shape and tongue po-sition. The following exercise will help achieve this.

First, hold an open G at a comfortable volume;then overblow the G, producing a D6. Reach D6 byarching the tongue slightly higher in the back ofthe mouth while keeping the throat open and re-laxed. Sometimes it helps to play D6 with the properfingering for four counts to hear the pitch. Afterhearing the pitch and feeling the proper tongueposition, once again overblow G to play D6 andoverblow D6 to play Bb6. Then descend chromati-cally from G to E3, one tone after the next, holdingthe fundamental and the two overblown harmon-ics for four counts each (see Example 1). Studentsshould have a good feel for the proper oral cavityshape after learning the pitches in this exercise;they can only be played if the air stream is full andthe oral cavity is shaped correctly.

Example 1

Begin staccato studies by placing the tip of thetongue on the reed tip, maintaining proper posi-tion and shape of the oral cavity—especially atthe back of the tongue. Finger an open G. Whilethe tongue depresses the tip of the reed againstthe mouthpiece, blow the air and remove thetongue on signal. Prior to removing the tongue,the student will be blowing, but no sound shouldcome from the clarinet since the tongue is on thereed. Remove only the tip of the tongue, keeping

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Example 4 q = 60

Page 5: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

3–2

Clarinet Techniques

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not as it moves toward the reed. Release the tip ofthe tongue from the reed with the syllable “tee.”

Beginning with Example 5 from the Rose 32Studies, breathe, blow, and release the first A, play-ing the note as short as possible at a comfortablevolume. With the tongue on the reed, change to thefollowing C# on signal. Release the C# and play thegrace notes, quickly stopping the tone with thetongue after the second C#. Move to the E, releaseit, and play it as short as possible. Complete theexercise at a comfortable tempo, then play the en-tire etude at e = 44, quickly moving the fingers tothe next note. There should be no tongue sounds,grunts, or subtones as notes are released.

Example 5 q = 60

Keep the air pressure steady when the tongueis on the reed, moving only the tip of the tongue.Keep the back of the tongue arched and stable, fin-gering notes just ahead of the tongue. Play eachstaccato note with perfect clarity. This is achievedonly when the tongue, air speed, and tongue pres-sure are correct.

Example 6 from the Rose 40 Studies combinesslurred and staccato notes. Practice by releasingthe D, maintaining the air pressure and moving thefingers ahead to the A. Then release it and slur downto the F; clip the F short and move the fingers im-mediately ahead to the D during the silence betweenthe notes. All of the notes preceding the staccatonotes should be clipped so the fingers move aheadto the next notes.

Example 6

If some upper articulations do not sound im-mediately, review the harmonic study based on thefundamental of the note causing the problem. Forexample, if B5 does not sound, review the harmonicfor E4 (E4, B5, G6) and try the measure again.

Begin practicing Example 6 by playing each trip-let eighth-note at 60 beats per minute, gradually in-creasing to 92. Speed is not as important as properlyvoicing each note and using a steady air stream. Byusing correct tonguing, players will learn to articu-late as fast as the tempo requires with a good tone.

Proceed to Example 7 from the 40 Studies,playing slowly to carefully evaluate the releases.Playing the thirty-second-note as short as possibleand immediately going to the next sixteenth helpsthe tongue stay close to the reed and move only ashort distance. A good starting tempo is e=46.

Example 7

Example 8 uses groupings of two notes slurred,one after the other.

Example 8

Very slowly

Clip slurs only if they are followed by a stac-cato note. When groups of notes are slurred one af-ter the other, the articulated first note should betongued “tee,” without holding the reed down tocreate space. Play Rose etudes 10, 11, 16, 17, 19,and 20 in the same way, beginning each one slowlyand gradually increasing the tempo.

This approach to staccato playing uses thestudy of harmonics to place the tongue correctly andimprove tone. Practicing slowly and producing beau-tiful staccato notes will help to develop an all-around tone, but the trick is to keep air pressurefull and constant, moving only the tip of the tongueto the tip of the reed. Remember, it is the back ofthe tongue that keeps the tone voiced properly.

CLARINET TECHNIQUEThe development of good technique is one of

the most important issues in learning to play theclarinet. Many students, both young and not so

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Page 6: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Clarinet Techniques

3–3

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young, take the approach of learning to play fastnotes without taking the time to slowly develop goodhabits. This almost always results in the cultivationof bad habits that eventually hinder the student.

The three most important goals in the pursuit oftechnical improvement are correct hand position, cor-rect finger motion, and relaxation. Gradual technicalimprovement should take place when the student takestime each day to practice these aspects. Effort shouldbe made to always practice in front of a mirror, con-stantly checking for mistakes. And, of course, it is bet-ter to practice too slowly than to practice too fast.

CORRECT HAND POSITIONThe hands should be in a natural position

when placed on the clarinet. To accomplish this,start by letting the hands dangle naturally at theside. Gradually bring them up as if to play the clari-net. The hands should be relaxed and slightlycupped, with the thumbnails facing upward. Thearms are fairly close to the body and the wristsshould break inward slightly (toward the back ofthe clarinet). It is important to note that if tensionor discomfort results, the wrist angle is probablyexaggerated. If an imaginary line were drawnthrough the back of the clarinet (left to right), itwould run through the knuckles.

The right thumb should be at an angle, approxi-mately 35–45˚ from the imaginary line. There aremany commercial thumb rests available to help withthumb position, but the most economical is a one-inch piece of black surgical tubing, which can bepurchased at most medical supply stores. It shouldbe stretched over the existing thumb rest and pointedto the left. The fingers should form a continuouscurve (each joint should be slightly bent) and thepads of the fingers should be over the tone holes.The Bb/Eb key (lowest right-hand side key) shouldbe just above the second joint of the index finger.

Example 9

The left hand is similar in position to the righthand. The fingers should form a continuous curve,with the pads closing over the holes. The thumb shouldbe angled up to the right at approximately 45˚.

CORRECT FINGER MOTIONThe fingers should remain curved at all times.

When a finger must be moved, it moves only fromthe back knuckle, leaving the other two knucklesin a nice, relaxed curve. The fingers should neverstraighten. They should clear the tone holes whenlifted, but should still be kept as close as possibleto the clarinet.

RELAXATIONThe hands and fingers should always be re-

laxed. If tension builds up, unevenness develops andthe fingers slow down. One of the most commonsources of tension occurs when straightening out afinger as it leaves the tone hole. To correct this, letthe hand fall relaxed to the side. Lift it, palm up-ward, noticing that the hand is in a relaxed cup-shape. If one of these fingers is straightened, a slighttension can be felt throughout the palm of the hand.This is an example of the tension that builds whenpracticing technique incorrectly. The weight of theinstrument on the right thumb is also a majorsource of stress. Frequently drop the hands to theside and shake the tension out to maintain a senseof relaxation.

DAILY TECHINICAL WARM-UPEach day the student should spend time

warming up, making sure that the hand positionis correct, the fingers are moving correctly, andtension is eliminated. The following warm-up rou-tine should be performed in front of a mirror,watching to make sure that the fingers maintaintheir natural curve (see Example 9).

Page 7: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

3–4

Clarinet Techniques

Begin slowly, at q = 60 or slower. Stop frequentlyto check hand position and to shake out the tension.

Repeat each measure as many times as pos-sible, checking in a mirror, stopping frequently tocheck hand position, finger motion, and tension.

Continue the rhythmic patterns from Example9 with the notes in Example 10, continuing to checkfor correct hand position, finger motion, and tension.

Increase the tempo slightly each day. If anyunevenness or tension develops, decrease the tempo.

By performing the preceding exercises daily,clarinetists will have the chance to slowly train eachfinger to behave correctly. Eventually the fingerswill respond with more accuracy when learning newmusic.

REEDSIn order to play well, clarinetists must learn

to properly choose and adjust reeds to suit theirpersonal needs. Many volumes have been writtenabout working on reeds. The following is an over-view of the important concepts to master on thissubject.

Good reeds share many common traits. The tipmust be the same shape as the tip of the mouthpiece(see Examples 11 and 12). The cut of the reed needsto be even (regular and uniform on both sides). Thetip must not be chipped, nicked, or split. The table of

the reed must be flat to match up with the table ofthe mouthpiece.

REED SELECTIONAfter wetting a reed thoroughly with water,

press the tip against the table of the mouthpiece toensure that the tip of the reed is flat. Put the reedon the mouthpiece (making sure it is not off to oneside, or above or below the rails). Hold the reed inplace with the right thumb and blow an open G.

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Example 11

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Page 8: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Clarinet Techniques

3–5

If the reed feels comfortable and sounds good,put the ligature on and play for a short time (nomore than ten minutes for a new reed).

ADJUSTING REEDSIf the reed is difficult to play, attempt to find

out if it is warped or unbalanced (one side harderthan the other). To determine if the reed is unbal-

anced, do the “tilt test.”Place the mouthpiece inthe mouth tilting it sothat one side of the reedis firmly pressed on thelower lip. Play an openG holding the barrelwith the left hand. Theside which is up andfree of the lower lip isthe side being heard.Do this to each side. Ifone side feels more un-responsive or is harderto blow than the otherside, lightly sand theharder side with reedrush or #400 or #600wet-or-dry sandpaper.When sanding thereed, keep the shape ofthe resisting part(heart) intact and workon the vibrating por-tion of the reed (see Ex-ample 13). Only when

a reed blows extremely hard should the player thindown the resisting part of the reed.

Keep in mind that the tip of the reed must bethin, gradually increasing in thickness toward theresisting part (heart). The sides or edges of the reedshould also taper up from side to center.

The register in which a reed is hard to blowwill also give clues as to where to work on a reed.The lower third of the vamp corresponds to the lowerregister; the middle of the vamp corresponds to themiddle register; and the top third of the vamp tothe upper register (see Example 14).

The table of the reed must be smooth and flat,since it must align with the table of the mouthpiece.In order to carry the vibrations into and throughthe instrument, no air can leak between the reedand mouthpiece.

To check if the reed is warped, lay the reed on aflat surface (preferably glass) and alternately presswith the fingertips on each side of the reed. If thereed rocks back and forth, it is warped on the bottom.

Probably the easiest way to fix the warped bottomof a reed is to place the reed on #600 wet-or-dry sandpa-per. Gently sand the back of the reed a few strokes;

then try playing itagain. When satis-fied with the results,polish the back ofthe reed on thesmooth side of thesandpaper or on theglass itself. This willgive the reed asmooth, polished fin-ish that is less likelyto be affected bymoisture again.

After adjustingreeds to , store themon a flat surface tominimize warpingand protect the tipfrom chips andsplits. Many com-

mercial reed holders and reed cases are designed tomeet these needs, including products from La Voz,Vandoren, and Harrison.

Chamber

Rail

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Example 12

VibratingParts

ResistingParts

VibratingParts

ResistingParts

Example 13

Example 14

High Register

Middle Register

Low Register

Page 9: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

3–6

Clarinet Techniques

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES

Method Books

40 Studies, Books 1 and II ............................................. Rose (Carl Fischer)

32 Studies ........................................................................Rose (Carl Fischer)

20 Grand Studies from the Works of Rose ..................... Rose (Carl Fischer)

40 Studies for Clarinet ...................................................Blancou (Cundy-Bettoney)

Celebrated Method for the Clarinet ...............................H. E. Klose (Carl Fischer)

Thirty Caprices ............................................................... E. Cavallini (Carl Fischer)

Method for Clarinet, Book III ........................................ Carl Baermann (Carl Fischer)

Le Vade-Mecum du Clarinettiste .................................... Paul JeanJean (Alphonse Leduc)

Melodious and Progressive Studies (3 Volumes) ...........David Hite (Southern)

Clarinetists Compendium ..............................................Daniel Bonade (Leblanc)

Clarinet Articulation ...................................................... Allen Sigel (Roncorp)

Advanced Studies for the Clarinet .................................V. Polatschek (G. Schirmer)

Progressive Studies for Clarinet, Books I and II ..........Chris Allen (Presser)

Method for Clarinet (3 volumes) .................................... H. Lazarus /Bellison (Carl Fischer)

Gammes et Exercises (2 volumes) .................................. G. Hamelin (Alphonse Leduc)

Recordings

Weber, C. M. von, Concertos #1 and #2 ......................... Sabine Meyer, soloist(EMI #CDC 7 47351 2)

Debussy, Premiere Rhapsodie for Clarinet ................... Gervase de Peyer, soloist(CBS #D3M 3 2988)

Debussy, Premiere Rhapsodie for Clarinet .................. Reginald Kell, soloist(Decca #DL 9744)

Clarinet Connection (The Great Concertos) .................. Sabine Meyer, soloist(EMI Classics #CDC 5 55155 2)

Mozart, Clarinet Concerto in A ...................................... Harold Wright, soloist(CBS #MP 38786)

Mozart, Clarinet Quintet, K. 581 ................................... Karl Leister, soloist(Teldec #2292 46429 2ZK)

Page 10: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Clarinet Techniques

3–7

Brahms, Sonata in Eb Major .........................................Jonathan Cohler, soloist(Ongaku Records #024-102)

Schumann, Fantasiestucke, Op. 73 ............................... Paul Meyer, soloist(Denon #75960)

Brahms, Sonatas in Eb and F minor, Op. 120 .............. Harold Wright, soloist(Boston Records #BR1005CD)

Brahms, Sonatas in Eb and F minor, Op. 120 .............. David Shifrin, soloist(Delos #D/CD 3025)

Mozart, Clarinet Concerto, K 622 .................................. David Shifrin, soloist(Delos #3020)

Brahms, Sonata No. 1 in F minor ................................. Karl Leister, soloist(Orfeo Records #C086 841 A)

Weber, Clarinet Concerto No. 1, Op. 73.........................Karl Leister, soloist(Deutsche Grammophone #136 550)

Mozart, Clarinet Concerto, K. 622 ................................. Karl Leister, soloist(Philips #422 390-2)

Solos de Concours - Music from the Premier Prix ........Victoria Soames, soloist(Clarinet Classics #CC0011)

Miscellaneous

Solos for Unaccompanied Clarinet ................................James E. Gillespie(Information Coordinators)

The Clarinetists’ Discography (I and II) ....................... Richard Gilbert(Grenadilla Society)

The Index of Clarinet Music........................................... Wayne Wilkins, editor(The Music Register)

Online Resources

http://www.sneezy.org/clarinet/ ...................................... The Clarinet Page

http://www.sneezy.org/OCR/ ........................................... The Online Clarinet Resource

http://copper.ucs.indiana.edu/~rspece/clarinet.html .... Richard’s Clarinet Page

http://www.clarinet.org................................................... International Clarinet Association

Page 11: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20
Page 12: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Scale Supplement

S–1

Scale SupplementThe fifteen major and minor scales make up our musical “ABCs.” Just as a person wishing to read

learns the alphabet first, a musician cannot expect to master an instrument without first learning thebasic set of scales. By diligently practicing the major scales and all three forms of the minor scales, theywill become automatic, just like reading the alphabet. This will make playing, especially sight reading,much easier so that the musician can concentrate towards the ultimate goal—making music!

Each scale below should be played slowly at first, ensuring that each note is played correctly. Gradu-ally work for speed, but do not rush. Use a metronome whenever possible to guarantee evenness and asteady tempo. The player should practice difficult scales twice as often as easy ones to develop competencein all keys. As skills increase, change rhythmic patterns and increase tempos. Advanced players can stilluse scales to work on intonation, technique, range, and dynamics.

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A melodic minor

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Use the following patterns one at a time or in combination to get even morebenefit from scale practice:

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Page 13: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

S–2

Scale Supplement

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Page 14: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Scale Supplement

S–3

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Page 15: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

S–4

Scale Supplement

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Page 16: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Scale Supplement

S–5

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Page 17: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

S–6

Scale Supplement

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Page 18: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

The U.S. Army Field Band Scale Supplement

S–7

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Page 19: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

S–8

Scale Supplement

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Page 20: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

5/2/12 5:27 PMReed Clinic

Page 1 of 2http://bands.army.mil/masterclass/tusab/mar2003/reed_clinic/reed_clinic.htm

Summer, Spring or FallHow to Love Your Reeds Despite It All

A concise reed clinic by SFC Robert Beeson

Does this sound familiar? You have just opened a box of reeds, selected the best ones for anupcoming concert, and set them aside. The next day, you play on them again andHORRORS! they're now virtually unplayable. The concert is that night and that was yourlast box of reeds. The purpose of this clinic is to help the single reed player becomeproactive in avoiding this situation and also to offer recommendations as to how to rectifythis situation once it has already occurred.

First, we need to begin with a little informal botany for the single reed player. Reeds wereonce living organisms. As such, they had a need for items of basic sustenance such as air,food, and water. It is this last requirement that causes single reed players the mostdifficulty. The cane plant has an extensive network of tubules beneath the surface of thebark. These tubules are responsible for taking nutrients from the soil at the root and sendingthem up to the leaves via capillary action. Unfortunately, these tubules still function in theinert wood of the reed, drawing moisture under the bark portion of the reed, and leaving thetip dry--particularly in the dry winter months or in climates with low humidity. Todramatize this natural phenomenon, take a new reed out of the box and wet it. Now placethe bottom end in your mouth and blow air into the tubules found in the back end of thereed. If you do this right, you should see bubbles on the vamp (cut top portion) of the reed.This is what is responsible for pulling moisture from the vamp of the reed under the barkand causing the bottom or table of the reed to bulge and no longer remain flat against themouthpiece. When this occurs, the reed becomes unresponsive and very hard to play. Youcan check to see if this is the case by placing the reed on a flat surface and alternatingpressure side to side with your fingertips. If it rocks, the reed is warped. To remedy thissituation, you need to restore some of the flatness to the table of the reed. This can beaccomplished by first running the reed under very hot water for a minute and then verycarefully bending the side rails down until the reed lays flat, and/or secondly, sanding thetable of the reed with 400 grit wet-dry sandpaper until some semblance of flatness isrestored. You must be careful to not over-sand the reed as it may be easily renderedunplayable.

How do we prevent this situation? We must stop the vamp from drying out too soon andseal the tubules to prevent the table from becoming water- logged. To do this, we must firstassemble these easily found supplies: 400 and 600 grit wet and dry sandpaper, waxedpaper, plastic Ziploc bags, and a commercial reed holder-- or one constructed out of a piece

Page 21: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

5/2/12 5:27 PMReed Clinic

Page 2 of 2http://bands.army.mil/masterclass/tusab/mar2003/reed_clinic/reed_clinic.htm

of 6" by 6" Plexiglas and 3-4 heavy rubber bands to hold the reeds flat. (If you make yourown reed holder, or if you have a problem with your reeds getting moldy, put a little rocksalt and aquarium charcoal in a mesh bag, or portion of pantyhose, and place it inside yourplastic bag.)

Now that you have assembled these items, get a new box of reeds and soak them in waterfor 5 minutes. Play, test and set aside the best ones. Now take one these good reeds andvigorously sand the butt end of the reed with the 400 grit sandpaper. Lightly sand the tableand vamp with the 600 grit sandpaper. To finish, lightly burnish the vamp, tip and butt withwax paper until a slight sheen appears. Now your reed is sealed and the tubules are closed.This should minimize any warping of the table.

The next crucial element is to place the sealed reeds flat on a reed holder of some sort, andkeep them in a consistent humid environment. This will retard the rate at which the reedsdry out. This is very important in the dry months here in the mid-Atlantic region. If you areusing the no-frills Plexiglass/rubber band method, you can place them in a plastic bag withthe rock salt/charcoal combo, or I have seen some reed players use a small Tupperwarecontainer to create a low budget reed humidor. Small commercial reed holders can bestored this way, or many of the deluxe reed storage systems have methods in place toregulate humidity. If you have a problem with mold growing on your reeds during thehumid months, don't worry, it's harmless. To rectify this situation, simply add the rocksalt/charcoal combo or leave the reeds out of the bag.

Now you have significantly stacked the odds in your favor and you should enjoy warp-freereeds in spite of the changing.

This article provided courtesy of The United States Army Band, "Pershing's Own,"Washington, DC

Page 22: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

CLARINETS

BASIC FINGERING CHART

www.conn-selmer.com

Page 23: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20
Page 24: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 25: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

1st Clarinet in Bb

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Page 26: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 27: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 28: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

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Page 29: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

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Page 30: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 31: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 32: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 33: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

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Page 34: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

1st Clarinet in Bb

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Page 35: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb

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Page 36: Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 · 2017-10-20

Clarinet in Bb I

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