Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Electrical

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  • Mail Stop: 63 SCI9001 Stockdale HighwayBakersfield, California 93311-1022

    (661) 654-3082(661) 654-6960 FAXhttp://www.cs.csubak.edu

    Department of Computer and ElectricalEngineering and Computer Science

    Computer Science,Computer Engineering, and Electrical Engineering

    ABET Planning Document: Fall 2012

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. ABET Criterion 3: Program/Student Outcomes 12. Course Matrices 33. ACM/IEEE Core Topics (Body of Knowledge) Linkage 44. ABET Criterion 2: Program Educational Objectives 65. Assessment Diagram 116. Performance Indicators 117. Assessment Plan Timetables 148. ABET Science and Mathematics: Area A. & B. Requirements 18

    References 21Appendix I - Original Assessment Plan: Spring 2010 Through Winter 2012 22

    Table I - Computer Science Course Matrix (CAC/ABET) 3Table II - Computer Engineering Course Matrix (EAC/ABET) 4Table III - Electrical Engineering Course Matrix (EAC/ABET) 4Table IV - Computer Science Topics Linkage (280 lecture hours) 5Table V - Computer Engineering Topics Linkage (486 lecture hours) 6Table VI - Computer Science PEO Mapping 8Table VII - Computer Engineering PEO Mapping 9Table VIII - Electrical Engineering PEO Mapping 10Listing IX - Computer Science Performance Indicators 11Listing X - Computer and Electrical Engineering Performance Indicators 12Table XI - Assessment Plan Timetables (All Programs/Courses) 14Table XII - ABET Science and Mathematics Requirement Tables 20Table A1 - Original Assessment Plan Results 22

    1. ABET Criterion 3: Program/Student Outcomes

    Program/Student Outcomes are skills and abilities which students should meet on or before gradua-tion. The Program/Student Outcomes should be compatible with and support the long-term Crite-rion 2. Program Educational Objectives.

    For the purpose of verifiable assessment, faculty members were assigned to required core courses whichthey were familiar with. This was done in such a way that each required core ended up with a teamof at least assigned two faculty members.

    Marc Thomas: ECE 304, CMPS 312, CMPS 321, ECE 332, CMPS 360, CMPS 376Huaqing Wang: CMPS 222, CMPS 223, CMPS 335, CMPS 342, CMPS 350Arif Wani: CMPS 222, CMPS 223, CMPS 335, CMPS 356, CMPS 371

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    Wei Li: CMPS 224, ECE 320, CMPS 321, ECE 322, ECE 330, ECE 420Melissa Danforth: CMPS 222, CMPS 223, CMPS 321, CMPS 356, CMPS 376Shahrzad Mazlouman: ECE 307, ECE 320, ECE 322, ECE 420Hani Mehrpouyan: ECE 330, ECE 332, ECE 423, ECE 337Saeed Zadeh ECE 304, ECE 307, ECE 337, ECE 423Donna Meyers: CMPS 224, CMPS 295, CMPS 312, CMPS 350, CMPS 360

    Programs are strongly urged to use the ABET Criterion 3 Program/Student Outcomes, possiblywith modifications (but this was viewed as a bit dangerous at the ABET workshop).

    ABET Program/Student Outcomes for Computer Science

    3a. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.3b. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements and

    specifications appropriate to its solution.3c. An ability to design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component,

    or program to meet desired needs.3d. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.3e. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities.3f. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.3g. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations,

    and society.3h. Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development.3i. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.3j. An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science

    theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstratescomprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices.

    3k. An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systemsof varying complexity.

    There are some differences between the Program/Student Outcomes for Computer Science and thosefor Computer/Electrical Engineering:

    ABET Program/Student Outcomes for Computer and Electrical Engineering

    3a. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.3b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.3c. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realis-

    tic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,manufacturability, and sustainability.

    3d. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.3e. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.3f. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.3g. An ability to communicate effectively.3h. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global

    economic, environmental, and societal context.3i. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning.3j. A knowledge of contemporary issues.3k. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering

    practice.

    ABET recommends both direct and indirect assessment methods [5, page 38]; direct methods will bethe primary source of information but indirect methods can supplement this in a productive way.These are listed below.

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    I. Direct Assessment Methodsproject: performance tasks, including both individual and team projectspresent: student presentationsexam: locally developed exams with embedded questionsnormed: national normed exams (e.g. the Major Field Test)portfolio: student portfolios

    II. Indirect Assessment Methodssurvey: surveys and questionnairesfocus: focus groupsadvisory: advisory board meetingsinteview: exit interviews

    In this document we restrict our attention to the direct methods.

    2. Course Matrices

    For ABET assessment, a Course Matrix links each Program/Student Outcome to a weighting factorfor each required core course. We used weighting factors 05 for all Computer Science, ComputerEngineering, and Electrical Engineering Course Matrices. Note that a level of 0 means that thegiven outcome is not being formally assessed in that particular course; it does not mean that theoutcome has no connection with the course. For example, Outcome 3a. is a factor in mostof our courses. However, we formally assess it only in those courses which require extensive use ofmathematics and the physical sciences.

    Here are the Course Matrices which we worked up for Computer Science, Computer Engineering, andElectrical Engineering. The Computer Science Course Matrix also incorporates the three major areasof the Major Field Exam in Computer Science (which we give to our graduating seniors):

    Table I - Computer Science Course Matrix (CAC/ABET)

    Out-come CMPS 224 295 312 320 321 335 342 350 356 360 376 4903a. math, physical sciences 2 5 3 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5 03b. problem analysis 3 3 5 5 0 0 3 2 5 3 0 33c. design to desired needs 0 0 0 0 3 5 3 0 3 0 0 33d. effective teamwork 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 33e.* prof., ethical, security 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 03f.* effective communication 0 0 0 3 0 3 3 0 3 0 0 03g. computing in global con. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 33h.* professional development 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 33i. current techniques, tools 0 0 0 4 3 0 0 2 0 0 3 0

    3j. design tradeoffs 0 0 4 0 5 0 0 3 0 3 0 03k. software system/life cycle 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0

    Core Areas onMajor Field Exam

    Prog. Fundamentals 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0Disc. Struct & Algorithms 0 5 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0Sys: Arch/OS/Net/Dbase 0 0 0 3 5 0 5 0 0 5 5 0

    *PHIL 316 (Professional Ethics) will support these outcomes as well.

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    Table II - Computer Engineering Course Matrix (EAC/ABET)

    Out-come CMPS/ECE 160 207 224 295 304 307 320 321 322 360 420 4903a. math, physical sciences 0 0 2 5 5 0 0 5 0 0 0 03b. design/conduct experiment 0 3 0 0 0 5 5 0 5 0 5 03c. design within constraints 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 5 0 03d. multidisciplinary teamwork 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53e. solve engineering problems 0 0 3 0 5 4 0 0 4 0 0 03f.* professional responsiblity 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53g.* effective communication 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 53h. engineering in global con. 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 03i.* life-long learning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 5

    3j. contemporary issues 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 3 0 0 0 53k. modern engineering tools 0 0 0 0 3 4 4 3 5 0 5 0

    Add New Course: ECE 160 Introduction to Engineering (3)*PHIL 316 (Professional Ethics) will support these outcomes as well.

    Table III - Electrical Engineering Course Matrix (EAC/ABET)

    Out-come ECE 160 207 224 304 307 320 330 332 337 423 4903a. math, physical sciences 0 0 2 5 0 0 5 5 0 0 03b. design/conduct experiment 0 3 0 0 5 5 0 3 0 5 03c. design under constraint 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 03d. multidisciplinary teamwork 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53e. solve engineering problems 0 0 3 5 4 0 5 5 0 0 03f.* professional responsiblity 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53g.* effective communication 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 5 0 53h. engineering in global con. 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 03i.* life-long learning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

    3j. contemporary issues 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 4 0 53k. modern engineering tools 0 0 0 3 4 4 2 0 0 5 0

    Add New Course: ECE 160 Introduction to Engineering (3)Add New Course: ECE 337 Fundamentals of Power Systems (5)*PHIL 316 (Professional Ethics) will support these outcomes as well.

    3. ACM/IEEE Core Topics (Body of Knowledge) Linkage

    In the case of Computer Science and Computer Engineering, ACM and IEEE collaborate on producinga set of Core Topics (also called the Body of Knowledge). Each of these topics requires a minimumnumbe

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