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CSUSM Department of Social Work Fall Semester 2017 Presenter: Jeannine E. Guarino, LCSW # 24584 Director of Field Education, Department of Social Work, CSUSM

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  • CSUSM Department of Social Work

    Fall Semester 2017Presenter:

    Jeannine E. Guarino, LCSW # 24584Director of Field Education, Department of Social Work, CSUSM

  • Overview of Presentation Meet & Greet and Introduction Ice Breaker Field Education Manual Overview

    Important Field Dates Field Education Requirements Field Documents Introduction to IPT

    Nine Core Competencies and corresponding foundation and advanced Practice Behaviors

    MSW Program Integrated Curriculum Micro Mezzo Macro Practice Learning Experiences in field that correlate to practice behaviors Field Instructors Role in Student Learning:

    Development of the Learning Plan Supporting students linkage of classroom learning to field practicum Evaluation of Student Learning Comprehensive Skills Evaluation

    Process of developing mastery (competence) Information on additional online trainings

  • CSUSM MSW Field Education Overview contd

    Important Field Education Dates for the academic year Field Education Requirements:

    Total required field hours (Foundation & Concentration Years) Field supervision requirements Agency site visits

    Field Instructor Documents: Learning Plan Comprehensive Skills Evaluation

  • MSW Program at CSUM 60 Units 2 year or 3 year option Year 1 is Foundation Year Generalist Year 2 is Advanced Generalist Concentration Year

    Concentrated Fields of Practice and Special Programs: Behavioral Health Children, Youth, and Families IV-E Child Welfare Training Program Integrated Behavioral Health Training Program

  • Field Practicum Hours Foundation Year (1st year): 16 hours per week/2 days;

    Fall semester 216 hours Spring semester 288 hours TOTAL HOURS YEAR 01: 504

    Concentration Year (2nd year): 20 hours per week/2.5 days; Fall semester 312 hours Spring semester 356 hours TOTAL HOURS YEAR 02: 668

    TOTAL FIELD HOURS BOTH YEARS: 1172

    Typical days in field are M/W/F, 8:00 5:00 pm

  • Field Education Office at CSUSM Develops Agency internships Monitors Agency internship sites Oversees placement procedures Conducts Trainings for Field Instructors Addresses major issues of concern as they relate to

    field education Ensures that CSWE competencies are integrated into

    field education

  • The intern Placement Tracking (IPT) system is a web-based system designed to keep track of students placed in internship programs with various agencies.

    Field Instructors will use IPT database to develop the students Learning Agreement and to complete the students skills evaluation at the end of each semester.

    Intern Placement Tracking

  • Intern Placement Tracking

    The IPT system allows both CSUSM and field agencies to communicate with students while in practicum. Because of this, it is essential for students & Field Instructors to keep all information current.

    What follows is a brief introduction to IPT, with instructions on how to access the database using a secure login and password assigned to you by CSUSM.

  • IPT GETTING STARTED

    IPT website is located at www.runipt.com (you can bookmark on your favorites for easy access)

    The IPT database will be on the CSUSM Department of Social Work Website for easy access at IPT LOG IN

    There are three fields required for IPT login: organization ID user name password IMPORTANT NOTE: All information entered in these fields is case sensitive.

  • IPT continuedThe Organization ID for anyone using the CSUSM IPT system is:

    csusm(this is case sensitive)

    By now all Field Instructors should have been emailed a unique default

    user name & password. Please raise your hand if you have

    not received an email

  • Forms on IPT The forms function is one

    of the most important aspects of the IPT system, and it is imperative that CSUSM students and Field Instructors understand how to access and use these forms.

    Forms are online documents that allow students, Field Instructors, and the Field Liaisons to complete fieldwork materials electronically rather than in hardcopy form. There are a few required forms generated through IPT, and it is each users responsibility to complete their portion of a form.

  • Forms on IPT continued Currently, the two forms generated via the IPT system are

    the Learning Plan and Comprehensive Skills Evaluation these are actually two forms integrated into one document.

    Notifications of when forms are generated are sent via email so it is a very important that you keep your email address up to date.

    It is the student and Field Instructors responsibility to complete all forms by the scheduled deadlines. In addition, to the email notification, the CSUSM Department of Social work will let all of our students know when a Form is generated and ask them to pass the information on to each Field Instructor.

  • IPT Demonstration Brief visual demonstration of IPT

    IPT is very user friendly

    Tip keep the IPT URL Link on your favorites toolbar you will use it throughout the year!

  • The Field Faculty Liaison Is an academic faculty member assigned to consult

    with the field instructor about the student in placement,

    Assists in the development of the student's educational plan,

    Leads an integrative field seminar as part of the core curriculum,

    Participates in the evaluation of the student's performance and assignment of a grade, and

    Conducts a site visit and acts as a liaison to the agency.

  • The Field Supervisor is a Professional With a minimum of 2 years post MSW graduate experience

    OR a similar degree and years of experience Who provides a minimum of 1 hour per week onsite direct

    supervision and other educational opportunities for the student.

    Who guides the development of the student's learning agreement, and evaluates the student's performance.

    Who is in a key position to provide the student with reality-based education in the field that cannot be provided in the classroom and which is the cornerstone of quality social work education.

  • Critical Aspects to Field Instruction Protect the client(s) Monitor adherence to NASW Code of Ethics and agency

    policies Provide opportunities for students to master social work

    competencies Model appropriate social work knowledge, skills, and

    values Promote self-reflection and course correction Continually assess students readiness for practice

    Typical experience consists of shadowing, observation, and supervised experience in 1st semester. Increased autonomy & initiative in 2nd semester.

  • Ethical Considerations in Field Instruction NASW Code of Ethics

    3.02 Education & Training

    Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should:

    (a) provide instruction only within their areas of knowledge and competence and should provide instruction based on the most current information and knowledge available in the profession.

  • NASW Code of Ethics3.02 Education & Training

    Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should:

    (b) take reasonable steps to ensure that clients are routinely informed when services are being provided by students One of the first items on your

    orientation list should be to teach the student about

    informed consent.

    Have them practice on you!!

  • NASW Code of Ethics3.02 Education & Training

    Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should:

    (c) not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with students in which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the student. Social work educators and field instructors are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries. It is the policy of the

    Department of Social Work that field instructors do not friend students on social

    networking sites.

  • NASW Code of Ethics3.02 Education & Training

    Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should:

    (d) evaluate students performance in a manner that is fair and respectful.

  • CSUSM MSW Program Integrated Curriculum The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) is the accrediting body that

    governs all social work programs in the United States. CSWE is responsible for developing accreditation standards that define the competencies that MSW students need to master in order to become effective social workers.

    CSWE has defined Field Education is the signature pedagogy of an MSW program curriculum (CSWE, 2015).

    The curriculum takes an integrated approach whereby all classes reinforce the linkage of theories and concepts to the field setting by linking assignments to the field practicum.

    The 4 core content areas of focus in the academic curriculum include: Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE) Policy Practice Research

  • 9 Core Competencies CSWE has moved from focus on content to

    competency-based education, an outcome performance approach to curriculum design1 The goal of the outcome approach is to demonstrate

    the integration and application of the competencies in practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

    Competencies = measurable practice behaviors comprised of knowledge, values, and skills. Additional competencies may be added to the 10

    1CSWE Educational Policy 2.1

  • Why Change? Bring us back to social works core values

    Social and economic justice Social and economic well-being

    Support NASW Code of Ethics principles & standards Get us to think about research-informed practice & practice-informed

    research Respond to new environmental trends and growing knowledge in the

    social and life sciences The move from content to competence shifts focus to results of the

    educational process

  • 9 Core Competencies & Foundation Year Practice Behaviors

    Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its

    ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social Workers:

    make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;

    use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations;

    demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication;

    use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.Practice

    behaviors

  • Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

    Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social Workers: apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference

    in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels; present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of

    their own experiences; apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases

    and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

  • Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice.

    Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social Workers: apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental

    justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels;

    engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

  • Competency 4 Engage In Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

    Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social Workers: use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and

    research; apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative

    research methods and research findings; use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy,

    and service delivery.

  • Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well

    as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social Workers:

    identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services;

    assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services;

    apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

  • Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities

    Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social Workers: apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-

    in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies;

    use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

  • Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

    Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. 23) utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation; and, 24) critique and apply knowledge to understand person and environment. Social Workers:

    collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies;

    apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies;

    develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies;

    select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

  • Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities.

    Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers:

    critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies;

    apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies;

    use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes;

    negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies;

    facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

  • Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social Workers:

    select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes; apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-

    environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes;

    critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes;

    apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

    Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

  • What Does This Mean for Field? Each competency has practice behaviors which operationalize the

    competency and are measurable In the student Learning Plan & Evaluations : practice behaviors

    become learning objectives. An Example:

    Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities CSWE practice behavior:

    Social workers apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies;

    CSUSM Learning Plan learning objective: While student engages with clients, he/she will consider clients environment,

    social networks, community resources available to clients, and clients strengths, when planning treatment and delivery.

  • Micro Mezzo Macro Practice in Social Work

    Micro: Direct practice, usually with individuals, to foster changes within personal functioning. Miley, Karla Krogsrud, OMelia, M.& DuBois, B. (2011) Generalist social work

    practice, An empowering approach. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Mezzo: Practice with families & small groups who share similar interests or common

    problems Barker, R.L. (2003). The social work dictionary (5th ed). Washington, DC: NASW

    Press. Macro: Indirect practice with goal of benefiting large groups of clients or general

    society, presenting opportunities to induce large-scale positive change in the lives of many clients through systemic solutions. Birkenmaier, Julie and Berg-Weger, Marla (2007). The practicum companion for

    social work: integrating class and field work. (2nd ed.) Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    Goal: MSW students will have micro-mezzo-macro social work experiences assigned over the course of the year

  • Micro Social Work PracticeMicro-Practice - Individuals:

    Assignment to three to four individual client cases (not in same family or household).

    Completion of comprehensive bio-psycho-social-spiritual assignments for each assigned client.

    Assignment of at least two on-going, long-term cases. Participation in a minimum of two case conferences, including at least

    one case presentation. Involvement in collaborative experiences with other members of an

    inter/multidisciplinary team in the agency.

  • Mezzo Social Work PracticeMezzo-Practice Families and Groups:

    Assignment to at least one family case (if available). Participation in one group experience: Examples:

    educationally focused groups (e.g. parenting class); therapeutically focused groups; socialization groups; or discussion groups.

  • Macro Social Work PracticeMacro-Practice Organizations and Communities:

    Attendance at a minimum of three agency or collaborative agency meetings or briefings. These may include macro-practice activities (e.g., program needs assessment, policy meeting, Board of Supervisors meeting, training, community organization/collaborative work, agency briefings, public relations and marketing meetings, program evaluation meetings; advocacy related to policy making could be at local, state, and/or federal levels).

    FOUNDATION YEAR STUDENTS: Participation in a macro project at the field site such as grant writing, curriculum or program development/evaluation needs assessment, etc.

  • Core Competencies & Micro-Mezzo-Macro Practice

    Group Activity: Select a competency Look at practice behaviors associated with it

    List learning experiences that can help your intern meet objectives Micro Mezzo Macro

    PresenterPresentation NotesIndividually:Select one (or more) competencies and look at learning objectives associated with itList learning experiences at micro mezzo macro level (as appropriate) that could help your student achieve competenceHow will you know when your intern has achieved competence?In your groupShare selected competence and learning experience(s)

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.1)

    2.1.1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior: Keep a reflective journal log of professional development and challenges; submit to field

    instructor weekly for discussion in supervision. Summarize learning from Ethics training and classes; relate to current agency policies

    and client/system issues in weekly supervision or written reports. Attend multidisciplinary staff meetings and discuss social work perspective and roles

    regarding projects and/or cases; observe and analyze different disciplines roles and viewpoints with field instructor.

    Present cases/issues according to professional presentation guidelines in team meetings and supervision. Review and discuss social work theories and principles that apply to student agency work.

    Create a weekly agenda for supervision that includes reports on clients/projects, integration of classroom learning, and personal reflections regarding professional development.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.2)

    2.1.2 Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice:

    Student will be assigned a diverse caseload and work with a task field instructor of differing ethnicity and/or gender; discuss with field instructor the perspectives and issues that arise in working across difference.

    Maintain a caseload of non-majority clients; attend relevant trainings to learn about generational trauma, language, cultural practice; apply knowledge in work with clients, documentation of case notes, team meetings; discuss insights with field instructor.

    Keep a reflective journal log in which to record observations of practice, culturalconsiderations, personal reactions, and ideas for using strengths-based and

    empowerment perspectives. Discuss experiences with field instructor in supervision.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.3)

    2.1.3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice: Familiarize him/herself with current political events and their effects on

    clients. Discuss with field instructor. Reflect on their (students) own experiences of oppression and discrimination

    and discuss with field instructor. Contact legislators about a current advocacy need and assist clients to do the

    same. Discuss process with field instructor. Attend Lobby Day and write in journal about key learning experiences; share

    with field instructor.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.4)

    2.1.4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice: Research effective engagement interventions with non-majority (ie.,

    Latino, Vietnamese, Filipino) individuals and families and present to field instructor and staff.

    Apply evidence-based interventions with clients of non-majority status.

    Discuss various evidence-based interventions with Field Supervisor, apply theories and interventions learned in the classroom with clients in field setting.

    Attend trainings that teach evidence-based practices and interventions with specialized populations.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.5)

    2.1.5: Engage in Policy Practice: Observe and analyze effectiveness of organization/department policies and

    procedures in serving target population. Discuss in supervision. Analyze gaps in services related to current budget projections; make written

    recommendations for meeting client needs, submit to field instructor. Participate in community/field of practice coalition meetings to analyze trends

    and needs, develop coordinated approaches to advocating for improved laws or standards, and assist in writing reports or articles to communicate plans and results to larger community.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.6)

    2.1.6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities: Introduce self and role to clients in informal settings such as common room, front lobby,

    meal service; get to know clients as people without focus on problems; during supervision identify areas of comfort and discomfort in client engagement

    Contact constituents by telephone and in focus groups to learn about community needs and questions, introduce agency and student role, and explore possibilities for greater involvement, focusing on listening, reflective paraphrasing, and clear communications..

    Interview constituents, clients, and/or colleagues in the agency setting to identify factors important to others in your working relationships; discuss in supervision.

    Seek feedback from field instructor, clients, and colleagues about ways to build rapport and trust in interpersonal interactions, and methods of setting goals that are mutually agreeable.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.7)

    2.1.7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Review examples of community/client assessments through agency documents;

    compare to assessment formats in the literature, and discuss in supervision. Shadow field instructor or colleague to observe assessment implementation, noting

    formal/informal style, areas of priority, cultural factors, analysis of meaning re agency mission and scope of practice; write up a shadow assessment, compare with staff assessment; debrief with field instructor.

    Role play an assessment with client/constituent/community with field instructor or colleague, and report on areas of confidence and discomfort, strengths-based perspectives, and goal-planning options.

    Conduct at least three client/program/community assessments with a client; review with Field Supervisor areas of strength and difficulty, documentation accuracy, priorities and implications for intervention/next steps. progress in supervision.

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.8)

    2.1.8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities: Build a caseload of up to 5 clients to monitor progress towards goals, provide agency

    recommended models of intervention, and review contacts and documentation with field instructor. In supervision, compare and contrast agency methodologies with models of intervention found in the literature from research or classroom learning.

    Review client/group/community services to analyze possibilities for intervention services that might enhance treatment-oriented approaches or address community needs (e.g., anti-bullying education in schools, domestic violence education, culturally sensitive models of independent living supports, gathering information to counter proposed budget cuts).

  • Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.9)

    2.1.9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities: Review each client contact and file for progress toward mutually-agreed upon goals;

    discuss with client and field instructor ways to maximize supportive counseling/services for goal attainment.

    Identify and utilize pre-post assessment/evaluation or data collection tools recommended by agency for use with clients/programs/community initiatives; discuss themes with field instructor.

    Review agency program evaluations via annual reports, quality assurance committee targets for improvement, social work database information, etc. to analyze service effectiveness; present themes and learnings to field instructor and in staff meetings.

    Develop and implement evaluation questions and format for clients/constituents/groups, program, or community assessment, identifying issues and needs with field instructor and participants; analyze results with field instructor, write a summary report.

  • What is a Learning Agreement?

    An educational contract made between the student and the field instructor (that) provides a road map for the field instruction experience. Wilson, Field instruction: Techniques for supervisors, 1981.

    It defines what (student) needs to learn and identifies the activities (student) will undertake in order to learn. Horejsi and Garthwait, The social work practicum: A guide and

    workbook for students, 2002.

  • The Learning Agreement9 Core Competencies

    in the Learning Plan & Comprehensive Skills Evaluation

  • Learning Agreement (Field Manual, Appendices II-V)

    I. COMPETENCY 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior:

    Foundation Year Practice Behaviors Field Assignments that correlate with practice behavior

    Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations

    Student will share issues of counter transference during supervision hour; student will develop process recordings and share with field instructor during supervision hour.

    Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication

    Student will demonstrate adherence to agency policies regarding work attire, appropriate communication with clients and other staff (oral, written and electronic).

    Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes

    Student will demonstrate adherence to all agency policies regarding use of technology in the work place and will use technology in the field internship responsibly; no use of cell phones or other technology for anything other than work-related tasks.

    Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior

    Student will attend weekly supervision prepared to discuss cases; will demonstrate professionalism by being punctual for supervision, have a list of questions to discuss, and be open to feedback about his/her practice.

    From Foundation Year MSW students Learning Agreement/Skills Evaluation (Appendix II):

  • Process of Developing MasteryWe think of mastery as being gained in four steps:

    Unconscious Incompetence

    Conscious Incompetence

    Conscious CompetenceUnconscious Competence

    Step 1: Unconscious Incompetence: At this first stage a learner neither knows how to perform a skill nor appreciates that s/he cannot do so.

    Step 2: Conscious Incompetence: As the learning process proceeds through its early stages, a learner has become highly aware of his/her lack of knowledge and appreciates the importance of mastering the skill. However, the learner is not yet fully able to perform the skill.

    Step 3: Conscious Competence: By the third step, the learner is beginning to competently perform the skill, but still has to think about it. The performance of the skill is therefore slowed or inhibited some by that consciousness. As in the early stages of mastering bicycle riding, one is up and riding, but thinking about every move.

    Step 4: Unconscious Competence: At this last step, the learner is competently performing the skill but no longer has to think much about it. Again, like riding a bicycle, full mastery of a skill becomes "unconscious" or effortless.

  • Role of the Field Seminar Students participate in a Field Education seminar that runs concurrently with

    their field practicum (SW 540 & 541 in Year 01; SW 642 &, 643 in Year 02). Field seminar is the bridge that reinforces what is learned in the classroom

    setting and prepares students to practice the application of this knowledge in the field practicum setting.

    In field seminar students participate in various experiential and role-play exercises that: promote self-reflection and critical thinking; facilitate understanding of how to select and apply evidence-informed practice interventions for use with clients; teach students how to present client case formulations in a professional setting; and, offers opportunities to address professional, ethical, policy, and practice issues that students encounter in the field practicum.

    Through the various modalities practiced in field seminar students gain confidence in the application of this knowledge to the field practicum setting.

  • Seminar Assignments Related to Field Placement

    Students complete several assignments in field seminar that require them to link theories learned in the classroom to their field placement. For Foundation Year Students, assignments include: 1) Field Practicum Learning Goals and Objectives Agreement 2) Process recordings, 3) Field Practicum journaling, 4) Organization and community (macro) project. For Advanced Year students, assignments include all of those listed above, and the following assignments: 1) Agency Presentation & Analysis; 2) Ethics Reflection Paper; and 3) Clinical Case Presentation.

  • Process Recordings & Journal Logs Process recordings require students to identify values, theories, and practice

    behaviors they are using in their field practicum in a structured format that links core curriculum (HBSE, policy, research, and practice) content to their social practice. The process recording also requires students to reflect on and evaluate the extent to which they are mastering practice behaviors in their field practicum. Process recordings are designed to stimulate self-reflection, critical thinking, and to practice communication skills, as these recordings are shared with the agency field instructor who gives feedback and guidance on how the student can improve his/her social work practice.

    Field practicum journal logs are designed to facilitate students critical thinking and to draw linkages between social work literature and theory and their field experiences.

    A sample process recording and Field Work Journal Log entry can be found in the Field Manual Appendix.

  • Field Instructors Role in Student Learning Completion of all Field instructor trainings. Facilitating students ability to link theories and concepts

    learned in the classroom to the field setting. Using the Learning Agreement to reinforce the

    competencies and practice behaviors; accomplished through purposeful work assignments that offer students concrete opportunities to practice the behaviors.

    Reviewing and giving feedback to students on process recordings, journal logs, and other classroom assignments.

  • Field Supervision Requirements Supervision

    Minimum of 1 hour weekly one-on-one supervision with student. Group supervision is recommended, if possible, in addition to 1:1 supervision (2 hours/week), if there are other interns at site.

    Students should bring process recordings and journal logs to weekly supervision so that students can receive feedback and support.

  • MSW Intern Caseload Expectations 1st Year Foundation Students:

    Fall Semester: 3-5 individual cases. Spring Semester: 5-6 individual cases and co-facilitate

    a group. Macro Project

    2nd Year Concentration Students: Fall Semester: 7-8 individual cases & facilitate a group Spring Semester: 9-10 individual cases, facilitate a group,

    organizational/community project

  • Field Evaluation Process Learning Plan & Evaluations directly linked to the 9

    EPAS competencies and corresponding practice behaviors

    How is the student performing at the present time? Level of competence compared to other students

    Ongoing process Important to provide regular feedback Use the Learning Plan as a tool to help gauge progress

    Two formal student evaluations Early Assessment (midterm) and Final Evaluation

  • Field Evaluation Process (contd)Early Assessment

    = Mid-term evaluation Expectation: student performing at least at the

    beginning competency level (level # 2) = emerging level of competence in meeting this objective

    Scores of 1? Contact Field Liaison

    Final Evaluation Student must be performing at level 3 or better in in at

    least 75% of practice behaviors in order to pass the field internship

  • Field EvaluationCOMPETENCE 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

    Learning Objectives (= practice behaviors) 1st sem 2nd sem Make Ethical Decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics,

    relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context.

    Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations.

    Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and oral, written, and electronic communication.

    Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.

    Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgement and behavior.

    Evaluations assess the practice behaviors that operationalize the competencies.

    Level 1 = Intern does not yet demonstrate basic skill in this areaLevel 2 = Intern is beginning to demonstrate basic skill in this areaLevel 3 = Intern often demonstrates basic skill in this area, however interns performance is unevenLevel 4 = Intern consistently demonstrates skill in this areaLevel 5 = Intern demonstrates a high level of skill in this area

  • CSWUM Department of Social Work Web

    Resources

    CSUSM Field Documents

    All Field Documents can be found on CSUSM Department of Social Work Field Education Page. These include:

    Field Manual All Field Forms Field Education Course Syllabi Online Field Instructor Workshops Link to IPT

    CSUSM FIELD EDUCATION HOMEPAGE

  • Online Field Instructor TrainingsAll new field instructors must complete the following online trainings, no later than April 1. For each training series, 3 CEUs are given after completing a brief test at the end of each module.

    Online Training II: The Supervision and Evaluation Process:Module 4: The ITP Loop Model of Field Instruction (Bogo & Vayda, 1998).Module 5: Providing Effective Supervision (Dettlaff, 2003)Module 6: Integrating Theory and Practice (Dettlaff,2002) Module 7: Feedback and Evaluation (Bogo & Vayda, 1997)

    Online Training III: Cultural Competence and Evidence-Informed Practice in Social WorkModule 8: Educating for Cultural Competence: Tools for Training field Instructors (Peterson, et al, 2006); Module 9: Evidence-Informed Practices in Field (Tuchman & Lalane, 2011)

    Online Training IV: Ethics, Organizations, Communities, and Macro Practice in Social WorkModule 9: Ethics in Practicum (Gambrill, 2007; NASW Trust, 2000; Reamer, 2005)Module 10: Organizations and Community Social Work Experiences in Field

    Online Training V: FOR NON-MSW FIELD INSTRUCTORS ONLYModule 11: NASW Code of Ethics MODULE 12: The Social Work Perspective THE EMPOWERMENT

    PERSPECTIVE

  • Jeannine E. Guarino, MSW, LCSW # 24584Director of Field Education

    Department of Social WorkCalifornia State University San Marcos

    333 South Twin Oaks Valley RoadSan Marcos CA 92096

    760-750-7378 Office 760-840-9433 [email protected]

    Field Administrative Assistants:

    Lisa Carmosino760-750-8562 Office

    [email protected]

    Jessica Wilson760-750-7373 [email protected]

    Field Instructor Training Module IOrientation to CSUSM Field Education Program, CSWE Core Competencies,Micro/Mezzo/Macro Practice, Learning Agreement & Skills Evaluation Overview of PresentationCSUSM MSW Field Education Overview contdMSW Program at CSUMField Practicum HoursField Education Office at CSUSMIntern Placement TrackingIntern Placement TrackingIPT GETTING STARTEDIPT continuedForms on IPTForms on IPT continuedIPT DemonstrationThe Field Faculty LiaisonThe Field Supervisor is a ProfessionalCritical Aspects to Field InstructionEthical Considerations in Field InstructionNASW Code of Ethics3.02 Education & TrainingNASW Code of Ethics3.02 Education & TrainingNASW Code of Ethics3.02 Education & TrainingCSUSM MSW Program Integrated Curriculum9 Core CompetenciesWhy Change?9 Core Competencies & Foundation Year Practice BehaviorsCompetency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice.Slide Number 27Slide Number 28Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, and CommunitiesSlide Number 30Slide Number 31Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and CommunitiesWhat Does This Mean for Field?Micro Mezzo Macro Practice in Social WorkMicro Social Work PracticeMezzo Social Work PracticeMacro Social Work PracticeCore Competencies & Micro-Mezzo-Macro PracticeCompetency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.1)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.2)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.3)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.4)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.5)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.6)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.7)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.8)Competency Practice Behaviors & Learning Experiences for Interns (EPAS 2.1.9)What is a Learning Agreement? The Learning AgreementLearning Agreement (Field Manual, Appendices II-V)Process of Developing MasteryRole of the Field Seminar Seminar Assignments Related to Field PlacementProcess Recordings & Journal LogsField Instructors Role in Student Learning Field Supervision RequirementsMSW Intern Caseload ExpectationsField Evaluation ProcessField Evaluation Process (contd)Field EvaluationCSWUM Department of Social Work Web Resources Online Field Instructor TrainingsField Education Program Contact Information: