53
Standard Note, 01.01.2007 1 1. Introduction Minerals constitute the backbone of economic growth of any nation and India has been eminently endowed with this gift of nature. A number of minerals of economic and commercial value abound in this country. There are many evidence that exploitation of minerals like coal, iron-ore, copper, lead-zinc has been going on in the country from time immemorial. However, the first recorded history of mining in India dates back to 1774 when English Company was granted permission by the East India Company for mining coal in Raniganj. Coal mining got a boost in 1855 when railway line was laid from Howrah to Raniganj. M/s John Taylor & Sons Ltd. started gold mining in Kolar Gold Fields in the year 1880. The first oil well was drilled in Digboi in the year 1866 - just seven years after the first ever oil well was drilled anywhere in the world viz. in Pennsylvania State, USA in 1859. Mining activities in the country however remained primitive in nature and modest in scale uptill the beginning of the current century. Thereafter, with progressive industrialisation the demand for and hence the production of various minerals gradually went up. After India became independent, the growth of mining under the impact of successive Five Year Plans has been very fast. There are ambitious plans in coal, metalliferous and oil sectors to increase production of minerals during the 10 th Five Year Plan and thereafter. Table-1 shows the increasing trend in output of important minerals, whereas Table-2 shows the growth of mining activities in terms of some important parameters like number of mines, value of minerals mined, aggregate horsepower installed and explosive used. Table-3 shows average daily employment in coal, metal & oil mines. Table-4 shows the trend in average place-wise daily employment of men and women in mines. The table shows that there is a gradual fall in average daily employment of women in mines. Table-5 shows trend in production of coal from belowground and opencast workings. It also shows the trend in average daily employment in belowground, opencast workings and aboveground in the coal mines. It is observed that the production of coal from opencast workings has increased substantially while that from belowground workings has remained almost stagnant. Minerals are depleting assets of a nation. Extraction of the same from below the surface of the earth is fraught with innumerable dangers. Mining has been and continues to be a hazardous profession and has rightly been deemed to be a war with the unpredictable forces of nature. The condition of roof and sides of underground mines can change without any prior indication. Dangers due to sudden inrush of water, release of lethal and inflammable gases or the fall of roof and side are inherent to mining and it is essentially because of such unpredictable dangers that mining is considered the most hazardous of all peace-time occupations. 2. Mine Safety Legislation In earlier years when mining activities were modest in scale, safety problems too were simple. With the progress in exploitation of minerals, safety of persons employed started to become a matter of concern. In 1895, the Government of India initiated steps to frame legislative measures for safety of workmen. In 1897 first major disaster in mining hit the Kolar Goldfields killing 52 persons, to be soon followed by the Khost Coal Mine disaster in Baluchistan (now in Pakistan) killing 47 persons. The disaster hastened the process of formulation of safety laws and the first Mines Act was enacted in 1901. With further experience, this Act was superseded by the Indian Mines Act, 1923, which was again replaced by the present Mines Act, 1952. This Act came into force on the 1st July 1952. Major changes were incorporated in this Act in the years 1959 and 1983. The Mines Act, 1952 applies to mines of all minerals within the country except the State of Sikkim, including the offshore mines within the limits of ter- ritorial water. For administering the provisions of the Indian Mines Act, 1901, the Government of India set up a "Bureau of Mines Inspection" on the 7th January 1902 with headquarters at Calcutta. The name of the organisation was changed to Department of Mines in

Dgms Notes

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

1

1. Introduction Minerals constitute the backbone of economic growth of any nation and India has been eminently endowed with this gift of nature. A number of minerals of economic and commercial value abound in this country. There are many evidence that exploitation of minerals like coal, iron-ore, copper, lead-zinc has been going on in the country from time immemorial. However, the first recorded history of mining in India dates back to 1774 when English Company was granted permission by the East India Company for mining coal in Raniganj. Coal mining got a boost in 1855 when railway line was laid from Howrah to Raniganj. M/s John Taylor & Sons Ltd. started gold mining in Kolar Gold Fields in the year 1880. The first oil well was drilled in Digboi in the year 1866 - just seven years after the first ever oil well was drilled anywhere in the world viz. in Pennsylvania State, USA in 1859. Mining activities in the country however remained primitive in nature and modest in scale uptill the beginning of the current century. Thereafter, with progressive industrialisation the demand for and hence the production of various minerals gradually went up. After India became independent, the growth of mining under the impact of successive Five Year Plans has been very fast. There are ambitious plans in coal, metalliferous and oil sectors to increase production of minerals during the 10th Five Year Plan and thereafter. Table-1 shows the increasing trend in output of important minerals, whereas Table-2 shows the growth of mining activities in terms of some important parameters like number of mines, value of minerals mined, aggregate horsepower installed and explosive used. Table-3 shows average daily employment in coal, metal & oil mines. Table-4 shows the trend in average place-wise daily employment of men and women in mines. The table shows that there is a gradual fall in average daily employment of women in mines. Table-5 shows trend in production of coal from belowground and opencast workings. It also shows the trend in average daily employment in belowground, opencast workings and aboveground in the coal mines. It is observed that the production of coal from opencast workings has increased substantially while that from belowground workings has remained almost stagnant. Minerals are depleting assets of a nation. Extraction of the same from below the surface of the earth is fraught with innumerable dangers. Mining has been and continues to be a hazardous profession and has rightly been deemed to be a war with the unpredictable forces of nature. The condition of roof and sides of underground mines can change without any prior indication. Dangers due to sudden inrush of water, release of lethal and inflammable gases or the fall of roof and side are inherent to mining and it is essentially because of such unpredictable dangers that mining is considered the most hazardous of all peace-time occupations. 2. Mine Safety Legislation In earlier years when mining activities were modest in scale, safety problems too were simple. With the progress in exploitation of minerals, safety of persons employed started to become a matter of concern. In 1895, the Government of India initiated steps to frame legislative measures for safety of workmen. In 1897 first major disaster in mining hit the Kolar Goldfields killing 52 persons, to be soon followed by the Khost Coal Mine disaster in Baluchistan (now in Pakistan) killing 47 persons. The disaster hastened the process of formulation of safety laws and the first Mines Act was enacted in 1901. With further experience, this Act was superseded by the Indian Mines Act, 1923, which was again replaced by the present Mines Act, 1952. This Act came into force on the 1st July 1952. Major changes were incorporated in this Act in the years 1959 and 1983. The Mines Act, 1952 applies to mines of all minerals within the country except the State of Sikkim, including the offshore mines within the limits of ter-ritorial water. For administering the provisions of the Indian Mines Act, 1901, the Government of India set up a "Bureau of Mines Inspection" on the 7th January 1902 with headquarters at Calcutta. The name of the organisation was changed to Department of Mines in

Page 2: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

2

1904 and its headquarters shifted to Dhanbad in 1908. On 1.1.1960, the organisation was renamed as "Office of the Chief Inspector of Mines". Since 1.5.1967, the office has been re-designated as Directorate-General of Mines Safety (DGMS for short). 3. Organisational Set-Up Under the Constitution of India, safety, welfare and health of workers employed in mines are the concern of the Central Government (Entry 55-Union List-Article 246). The objective is regulated by the Mines Act, 1952 and the Rules and Regulations framed thereunder. These are administered by the Directorate-General of Mines Safety (DGMS), under the Union Ministry of Labour & Employment. Apart from administering the Mines Act and the subordinate legislation there under, DGMS also administers a few other allied legislation, including the Indian Electricity Act. A list of the subordinate legislation under the Mines Act and certain allied legislation administered by DGMS is at Annexure-I. Officers appointed to different technical posts in DGMS are selected by U.P.S.C. They are required to have Degree in Mining or Electrical or Mechanical Engineering and several years of experience, varying from seven to ten years of working in responsible capacity in mines or allied industry. Besides, officers of mining cadre posses First Class Mine Manager's Certificate of Competency. The Occupational Health cadre is manned by qualified and experienced medical personnel. Due to the nature of work performed by the officers of DGMS, the Govt. of India declared this organisation as "S&T Institution” on the recommendation of Science and Technology Department of Govt. of India, in November, 1987. The organisation has its headquarters at Dhanbad (Jharkhand) and is headed by the Director-General of Mines Safety. At the headquarter, the Director-General is assisted by specialist staff-officers in mining, electrical & mechanical engineering, occupational health, law, survey, statistics, administration and accounts disciplines. The headquarters has also a technical library and S&T laboratories as a back-up support to the organisation. The field organisation has a two-tier network of field offices. The entire country is divided into six zones, each under the charge of a Deputy Director-General. There are three to four Regional offices under each zonal office. Each Region is under the charge of a Director of Mines Safety. There are in all 21 such Regional Offices. Sub-regional offices have been set up in important areas of concentrated mining activities away from Regional office. There are five such sub-regional offices, each under the charge of a Deputy Director. Each Zone, besides having inspecting officers of mining cadre has officers in electrical & mechanical engineering and occupational health disciplines. Organizational chart of DGMS is at Annexure-II. DGMS has a total sanctioned strength of 978 persons with 741 in position as indicated below: CATEGORY SANCTIONED STRENGTH IN POSITION STRENGTHGROUP-A 177 131 GROUP-B 104 89 GROUP-C 453 352 GROUP-D 244 169 TOTAL 978 741

Page 3: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

3

The table below shows the discipline-wise strength of the inspecting officers of DGMS (as on 1.1.2007)

Discipline Sl.No Designation Mining Electrical Mechanical O.H.

S P S P S P S P1. DIRECTOR-GENERAL 1 - - - - - - -2. DY.DIRECTOR-GENERAL 7 7 1 1 - - - -3. DIRECTOR 29 29 4 4 2 2 - -4. DY.DIRECTOR 82 57 18 14 10 5 1 15. ASSTT.DIRECTOR 1 - - - - - GR.I- 3 2

GR.II-5 3TOTAL 120 93 23 19 12 7 9 6

S - Sanctioned = 164 P - In position = 125 Shortage = 39 The continuing shortage of the front-line inspecting officers has been affecting the inspection work of mines considerably. 3.1 Budget For meeting with the expenditure on salaries, allowances, office expenses etc. in connection with various plan and non-plan activities, the following financial provisions are made:

(Rupees in thousand) Activity Budget

EstimateRevised

EstimateActual

Expend.Budget

Estimate Revised

Estimate Budget

Estimate 2005-06 2005-06 2005-06 2006-07 2006-07 2007-08

A-Non-plan 1. DGMS Non plan 184040 178065 165657 195495 188295 2011412. Examination 5960 5935 4694 7205 6205 7505Total Non plan 190000 184000 170351 202700 194500 208646B. Plan Schemes 1. SOMA 7500 6255 5968 16000 14460 85602. S&T 10500 9107 7375 10000 12400 109553. SSEX 7500 4900 4439 7500 5900 77004. PIF 10000 678 604 500 500 500New Plan Scheme 1. MSC 2000 16002. MID 5000 1400

2990 15000 12823 10000

Total Plan 33500 24000 21376 49000 46083 37715

4. Role and Function of DGMS The mission of DGMS is the reduction in risk of occupational diseases and casualty to persons employed in mines, by drafting appropriate legislation and setting standards, by overseeing compliance thereof and through a variety of promotional initiatives and awareness programmes creating an environment in which safety is given due priority. 4.1 Vision of DGMS The vision of DGMS is “To ensure nationally acceptable and internationally competitive standards of health, safety and welfare for employees of the Indian mines.”

Page 4: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

4

4.2 Current functions of DGMS broadly include: 1. Inspection of mines 2. Investigation into - (a) accidents (b) dangerous occurrences - emergency response (c) complaints & other matters 3. (a) Grant of : (i) statutory permission, exemptions & relaxations - pre-view of project reports & mining plans (ii) approval of mine safety equipment, material & appliances (b) Interactions for development of safety equipment, material and safe

work practices through workshop etc. (c) Development of Safety Legislation & Standards (d) Safety Information Dissemination 4. Conduct of examinations for grant of competency certificates. 5. Safety promotional initiatives including : (a) Organisation of -

Conference on Safety in Mines National Safety Awards Safety Weeks & Campaigns

(b) Promoting - - safety education and awareness programmes - workers’ participation in safety management through -

workmen’s inspector safety committee tripartite reviews

5. Measures to improve safety in mines 5.1 Legislative Measures 5.1.1 Inspection & Enquiries Since mining is beset with many inherent hazards, detailed precautions have been laid down in the Mines Act and the Rules and Regulations framed thereunder to guard against dangers in mines and it is the responsibility of the mine management to comply with the same. While the onus of providing for and ensuring safety in mines rests fundamentally with the mine managements, as clearly laid down under section 18 of the Mines Act, 1952 as “The owner and agent of every mine shall each be responsible for making financial and other provisions and for taking other such steps as may be necessary for compliance with the provisions of this Act and regulations, rules, bye-laws and others made thereunder.” The DGMS has the responsibility to see that the safety statute is kept updated to absorb the technical advancements as well as to make the same comprehensive, practicable and legally sound and also to carry out periodic inspection of mines to oversee compliance of safety laws. The Mines Act and the subordinate legislations framed thereunder is periodically updated for the purpose. Each and every accident involving fatality is enquired into by an officer or a team of officers of DGMS. A few accidents involving serious bodily injury and most of the important dangerous occurrences are also investigated by DGMS Officers. Action taken subsequent to inspections:

Pointing out contraventions Withdrawal of permission Issue of improvement notices Prohibition of employment Informal stoppages Prosecution in the court of law

Page 5: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

5

5.1.2 Enquiry into Accidents, Dangerous Occurrences etc. Statutory Provisions The notifiable dangerous occurrences include:

All fatal and serious accidents & specified dangerous occurrences and occupational diseases are required to be notified to DGMS,

Explosion, ignition, spontaneous heating, out-break of fire, irruption or inrush of water or other liquid matter;

Influx of inflammable or noxious gases; Breakage of rope, chain or other gear by which persons or materials are

lowered or raised in a shaft or an incline; Overwinding of cages or other means of conveyance in any shaft while

persons or materials are being lowered or raised; or Premature collapse of any part of the workings.

All fatal accidents are required to be enquired into by DGMS within 2 months. Apart from the incidents mentioned above the officers also enquire into complaints connected with the safety and welfare of the persons connected with mining which are received from various sources. Being concerned with safety, normally, even anonymous complaints are enquired into. Following actions are taken after an enquiry:

Warning to delinquent Suspension of certificate Modification in the method of working Action by management like stoppage of increment, dismissal from service,

recorded warning, withholding promotion and Prosecution in the court of law

The number of inspections and enquiries conducted by DGMS officers during the year 2006 is shown in appended Table-6

Inspection Enquiries Inspections & Enquiries

Discipline

Coal Metal Oil Total Coal Metal Oil Total Coal Metal Oil TotalElectrical 832 217 91 1140 38 0 0 38 870 217 91 1178Mechanical 284 50 16 350 61 9 2 72 345 59 18 422Mining 2598 2002 79 4679 696 297 19 1012 3294 2299 98 5691O.H. 98 32 0 130 37 9 0 46 135 41 0 176TOTAL 3812 2301 186 6299 832 315 21 1168 4644 2616 207 7467 * Figures are provisional and upto November, 2006 5.1.3 Permission, Exemptions and Relaxations DGMS is keeping a constant vigil on the method of extraction of minerals, supports of the workings, working environment and safe code of practices to ensure that mine workers are not exposed to dangers and dangerous environments while working in belowground, opencast or any surface operations. Permissions, exemptions, relaxations and associated orders are regularly granted by this Directorate to the mine operators under various provisions of the statute. Whenever a new technology is planned to be introduced in the mines, the officers of this Directorate are always approached to analyze and scrutinize the proposal for its safety and affectivity. The technology is either directly permitted to be introduced or modified to suit Indian environment. The workings in the mine are regularly checked by field officers during

Page 6: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

6

the course of their inspection and enquiries. If the conditions of workings and manner of extraction are found unsafe and not carried out as per the permissions granted, the permissions are immediately revoked. During the year 2006, 2532 applications were received for grant of permissions, exemptions and relaxations, out of which 2174 cases were dealt by the officers of DGMS resulting in grant of 1597 permissions, exemptions etc. and 577 cases, were recorded. Action in respect of remaining 358 applications is under process. 5.1.4 Improvement Notices & Prohibitory Orders During inspection of mines, if the workings or the environment are found to be unsafe and dangerous notices or prohibitory orders are immediately issued to the management to take necessary steps for improvement. Unless the conditions improve for re-deployment of persons as recorded through inspections, the orders are not vacated and persons are not allowed to be deployed in such dangerous conditions. Details of the improvement notices and prohibitory orders are given in Table-7 in the annexure. In addition 37 cases statutory permissions were withdrawn for non-compliance of conditions laid down in the permissions. 5.1.5 Approval and Testing What constitutes “mine safety equipment” has not been precisely defined anywhere. Mining is a hazardous occupation and therefore the equipment, machinery, tools and material used in mines required to be safe, robust and reliable capable of working safely under hostile environment. The equipment needs to remain safe under prolonged usage even in adverse condition. Approval Policy and Procedure The objective of granting approval to various equipment for use in mines is to primarily fulfill the statutory obligation enshrined under different provisions of Coal Mines Regulations, 1957, Metalliferous Mines Regulations, 1961, Oil Mines Regulations, 1984, Indian Electricity Rules, 1956 and Mines Rescue Rules, 1985 besides statutory notification under these regulations by the competent authority from time to time. For obtaining approval any mines safety equipment material it is generally required to conform to the Bureau of Indian Standard specification and if there are no such specification then to standard specification of other countries like ISO/EN/DIN etc. Sometime the standard evolved on the basis past practice are also accepted. The equipment/material is tested in any approved test house in India in accordance with the above standard. If the test report is satisfactory it is considered for grant of approval. Approval are granted in two phases a) Approval for field-trials b) Regular approval Based on preliminary examination of the application, which is made in a prescribed format, test report from an approved test house in conformity of applicable standard approval to conduct field trial is granted. Sometimes factories of the manufacturer are also visited to ensure their capability and to check the quality control system adopted in the manufacturing process. The period of field trial approval vary between three months to one year. It is necessary to ensure that the field trials are conducted in mines suitable for the purpose and will offer adequate scope for monitoring the performance by DGMS officials. After successful completion of the field trial and receipt of the satisfactory report the case is again examined and recommendations made to accord regular approval. If shortcomings are observed during the field trials the same is communicated to the manufacturer. The manufacturer may seek extension of the field trial. Regular approval is granted for a particular period initially for one year and is

Page 7: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

7

subsequently extended after obtaining satisfactory performance report from the field. The time period for extension vary between two years to three years. During the year 2006, 329 approvals for use of material, equipment, machinery etc. in mines were granted as detailed below:

Type of approval No. approved Approval for field trial 67Regular approval 262Total 329

5.2 Developmental Measures 5.2.1 Standard Setting Based on the experiences, the developmental initiatives undertaken by DGMS are - (i) amendment of safety laws, (ii) issue of guidelines for safer operations in identified thrust areas through

circulars and (iii) issue of technical instructions to DGMS officers for their guidance. Standard setting is a complex process consisting of translation of the vast experience of DGMS and multilevel interaction. Results of inspections and analysis of accident enquiries, recommendations of courts of enquiries and safety conferences, results of research & development activities, ILO guidelines and international state of the art of technology and its safety ramifications are some of the inputs going into standard setting. Amendment of statutes is an elaborate process wherein all the likely affected parties viz. Labour, management, academicians, research institutes, professional bodies are given adequate opportunities to send their comments, which in turn are considered before finalizing the amendment. During 2006, DGMS issued 8 circulars to the mine management and 3 in-house departmental instructions as indicated below:

Type of Circular No.issueDGMS (Technical) Circulars 07DGMS(Legislation)Circulars 01DGMS (General) Circulars -DGMS (Approval) Circulars -DGMS (Technical) Instructions 02DGMS (General) Instructions 01Total 11

5.3 Conduct of Examinations and Award of Statutory certificates of

Competency Mining is a war against unpredictable forces of nature and since conditions of workings go on changing moment to moment, man at the spot has to take instantaneous decisions. Practical and on the spot decision of the front-line supervisor and managerial executive is of paramount importance to save life. To examine the competency of persons eligible for manning such posts and to grant certificate of competency, two Boards of Mining Examination, one for Coal and the other for Metalliferous mines, function under the Chairmanship of the Director-General of Mines Safety. Competency examinations are different from university examinations. In these Examinations stress is laid on practical aspect of managing/supervising a mine/district apart from his theoretical knowledge. In case of managers, assistant managers, surveyors and overman, the competency examination consists of a written part and an oral part. In manager’s competency examination i.e. first class/second class there are

Page 8: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

8

five subjects in which candidates are examined viz. Legislation, Mine Management & General Safety, Method of work, Ventilation, Mining machinery and Mine Surveying. Depending on the qualification and experience of the candidates, exemptions from appearing in some papers/subjects are granted. Candidates obtaining at least 40% marks in written examination in any subject is then called for the oral examination. Candidates obtaining at least 40% in orals and at least 50% in aggregate i.e. written and oral examinations are declared successful. Before a candidate is allowed to appear in an examination his application is scrutinized for valid first aid certificate, gas-testing certificate, other statutory certificate, practical experience, character certificate, medical certificate and basic qualification certificate. In case of junior examinations i.e. sirdar’s, shotfirer’s mate’s, blaster’s etc. only oral examinations are held. A candidate has to secure at least 50% marks with different examiners to be declared successful. Details of examinations conducted during the year 2006 are given in Annexure-III. Processing of the large nos. of application is a big job and the system requires computerization for which a plan scheme named SSEX has been initiated. 5.4 Promotional initiatives Some of the recent developments in safety movement, besides the legislative measures, include: 5.4.1 Conference on safety in mines. The Conference on Safety in Mines is a tripartite forum at the national level in which the employers' representatives, the trade unions' representatives, the Government represented by Ministry of Labour, DGMS, various administrative ministries/ departments and State Governments and associated institutions, professional bodies, service associations, etc. take part. They review the status of safety in mining and the adequacy of existing measures in a spirit of mutual cooperation. The conference also suggests measures for further improvement in safety, welfare and health of mine workers. The first Conference was held in the year 1958 and the ninth conference was held on 2nd & 3rd February, 2000 at New Delhi. A number of recommendations of these conferences have been given statutory backing and most of the others absorbed in management practices and policies. 5.4.2 National Safety Awards (Mines) Ministry of Labour & Employment, Government of India instituted National Safety Awards (Mines) in 1983 (for the contest year 1982) with a view to promote a competitive spirit amongst mine operators for the betterment of safety standards in mines and to give due recognition to outstanding safety performance at national level. This award is given away by the Hon'ble President of India every year and has generated considerable enthusiasm amongst the Mining community. National Safety Awards (Mines) for the year 2001 was given away on 8th November, 2004. 5.4.3 Vocational Training and Other Training Recognizing the need for safety education to enable the mine workers to prepare them to face the challenges of mining, the Mines Vocational Training Rules were framed in 1966. These rules provide for initial, refresher and specialised training to mine workers. This also provides for construction of mines vocational training centres with training officers and instructors along with proper and adequate equipment and softwares. It also provides for payment to trainees during the training period.

Page 9: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

9

5.4.4 Observance of Safety Week, Safety Campaign etc. During the safety week held every year in different mining fields, efforts are made through various audio-visual means, to inculcate safety consciousness amongst workers, supervisors and others so as to influence their behaviour at work. Further, by holding competition amongst various participating mines an attempt is made to improve the working conditions. In all 37 nos. of safety weeks were observed during the year 2006 in different regions spread over the country covering all types of mines. Based on the accident experience, special safety drives are sometimes launched to focus attention on specific cause-groups. 5.4.5 Holding of First Aid and Rescue Competitions etc. Unfortunately inspite of all-round efforts by every body accidents continue to occur. To mitigate the consequences of such occurrences speedy and timely rescue & rendering of first aid assumes great importance. Recognising the importance of preparedness, speed and efficiency in first aid and rescue, competitions are held to bring improvement in these services. First Aid and Rescue Competitions were held in a number of mining companies. These keep the rescue workers and first-aiders in battle ready conditions. The officers of DGMS actively associated themselves with these competitions. 5.4.6 Promoting Participation of workers in safety management Much greater strides in safety can be achieved by participation of workmen in safety programme, the twin institutions of 'Safety Committee & ‘Workmen’s Inspector’ have been conceived and even given the statutory backing. DGMS is also associated with training of Workmen’s Inspectors to make them effective in discharge of their duties. In coal mines almost all the eligible mines had a Workmen’s Inspector and a Safety Committee. The table below shows the status of appointment of Workmen’s Inspector and Safety Committees during 2006: Type of Mine No. of Safety Committees No. of Workmen’s Inspectors Required Provided Required Provided Coal 527 526 1533 1526 Metal 307 289 374 386 Oil 17 16 36 36 Total 851 831 1943 1948 5.4.7 Promoting Self-regulation by management Most of the mining companies in the organised sector have enunciated company's safety policy and set up Internal Safety Organisation (ISO) for monitoring, advising on and aiding in the implementation of safety measures in mines as per Company’s policies and guidelines in keeping with the statutory provisions. ISOs are headed by a very senior officer of the Director level in the coal companies and are multi-disciplinary in character. 5.4.8 Awareness and information dissemination Officers of DGMS serve as guest faculties at several short-term safety courses organized by the Mine Managements, Institute for Miners & Metal Workers' Education and Scientific and Academic Institutions. The officers also participate in various technical workshops, seminars, symposia and conferences and present technical

Page 10: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

10

papers relevant to their field of work. At all these forums they strive to spread the message of safety in right perspective. Lists of various training courses/seminars/symposium & workshops attended/ participated by DGMS Officers during 2006 are given in Annexures IV & IVA respectively. Besides, lectures were delivered by Officers of DGMS in various forums. They also chaired technical sessions and delivered key-note/valedictory addresses at various seminars/symposia/workshops and conferences etc. Another piece of information which is widely disseminated and extensively made use of relates to accident statistics and analysis thereof. The DGMS also publishes the following:

(a) DGMS Annual Report - annually (b) Statistics of Mines in India Vol.I (Coal) - annually (c) Statistics of Mines in India Vol.II(Non-coal) - annually

(d) Monthly Coal Bulletin - monthly (e) Monthly Review of Accidents - monthly 5.4.9 Technical Measures It is well recognised that reasonable frequency of inspections is important to keep the mine operators alert to their responsibilities. It is also recognised that quality of inspections is equally important. This underscores the need for:

Technical and professional competency of the officers of DGMS to be kept continually updated and upgraded;

The regulatory, enforcement, advisory and promotional roles of DGMS to be backed by strong in-house S&T support; and

Optimize the scarce resources of DGMS through:

Automation of office work so as to free the technical officers from work of routine and repetitive nature; and

Develop and implement comprehensive computer-based Mines Safety Information Monitoring System.

All most all the officers of DGMS are provided with personal computers with necessary accessories to perform their routine work and efforts are being made to implement the e-governance program of Govt. of India.

Page 11: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

11

5.4.10 Interactions & advisory role

One of the measures to promote the cause of safety is inter-action with mine operators, workers’ representatives, teaching and research institutions etc. A list of important organisations/ committees the meeting of which are organised/ par-ticipated by DGMS is indicated below:

1. Standing Committee on Safety in Coal Mines under the Chairmanship of the

Union Minister of Coal. 2. Safety Board of Coal India Ltd. 3. Review Committees of various mining companies on implementation of

recommendations of the Conference on Safety in Mines. 4. Mineral Advisory Council of India. 5. Mining Education Advisory Board, West Bengal. 6. Executive Council, Central Mining Research Institute. 7. Research Council of Central Mining Research Institute. 8. Project Advisory Committee - Central Mining Research Institute. 9. Standing Sub-committee on Production, Productivity & Safety of Central Mining

Research Institute. 10. Task Force Committee of Central Mining Research Institute. 11. Advisory Panel for Mine Environment & Health Discipline - Central Mining

Research Institute. 12. General Council of Indian School of Mines. 13. Executive Board of Indian School of Mines. 14. Establishment & Finance Sub-committee of Indian School of Mines 15. Joint Board on Mining Engineering Education & Training. 16. Advisory Committee for Mining Engineering Department, Indian Institute of

Technology, Kharagpur. 17. Coal Advisory Council of India. 18. The Council of the Mining, Geological & Metallurgical Institute of India. 19. Bihar Mineral Advisory Council. 20. Environmental Appraisal Committee for Mining Projects. 21. SSRC’s Standing Sub-committee on production productivity & safety - CMPDI 22. Advisory Committee for Safety Review of Projects of Indian Rare Earth Ltd. (Organised by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board) 23. Governing Body of National Institute of Rock Mechanics (Kolar). 24. Standing Co-ordination Committee on Mine Safety and Mineral Development. 25. Coal Conservation & Development Advisory Council. 26. Consultative Committee of the Ministry of Labour & Employment. 27. S & T Advisory Committee of the Ministry of Labour & Employment. 28. Standing committee of Parliament of Labour Welfare. 29. Committee of Parliament on Environment & Forest - Sub-committee on Dams &

Mining. 30. Various Technical Committees of Bureau of Indian Standards. Director-General or other Officers of DGMS being the Chairman/Member of these bodies are able to influence the policies and programme with a view to promote safety, welfare and health of workmen employed in mines.

Page 12: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

12

6. Plan Schemes In order to provide in-house technical support to field offices, DGMS is implementing following Plan Schemes namely: Ongoing schemes:

Study of Mine Accidents and Development of Mine Safety Information System (SOMA)

Augmentation of S&T Capabilities, Mines Rescue Services and Human Resource Development (S&T)

Strengthening of Machinery for Conduct of Statutory Examination (SSEX) Improving Efficiency by Providing Infrastructure Facilities in DGMS (PIF)

New scheme:

Modernization of Information Database Relating to Mine Management (MID)(Merged with MSC)

6.1 Study of Mine Accidents and Development of Mine Safety Information System (SOMA)

The scheme has been formulated by merging two on-going plan schemes of DGMS, namely “Development of Mine Safety Information System (DMSIS,1976)” and “Study of Mine Accidents to Plan Preventive Measures (SOMA, 1976)”. These two schemes were functional independently during the 8th plan period and during the first 4 years of the 9th plan. In 2001-2002, i.e. the terminal year of the 9th plan, keeping the objective of integration in view, these schemes were merged into one scheme “Study of Mine Accidents and Development of Mine Safety Information System (SOMA)”. Reports of enquiry into all fatal accidents were scrutinized, causes and circumstances leading to these accidents were finalized and compiled for inclusion in DGMS Annual Report. In the year 2006, work of collection, compilation and analysis on a PC platform in respect of accident due to roof fall, side fall, wheeled trackless transportation machinery and haulage in coal mine was conducted in order to identify critical causation factors of such types of accidents and to find out probable corrective measures for their prevention. The outcome of the studies would be disseminated to the industry through technical circulars. Software packages were developed for entry, processing and tabulation of data on roof & side fall accidents in coal mines involving over twenty-five explanatory variables. Some descriptive results of the analysis are presented. A modified approach for identification of accident prone mines was adopted, data from eleven coal companies regarding all mines were collected and accident prone mines of these eleven coal companies were identified with a view to identify hazard potential of such mines and draw up action programmes for formulation of mitigating measures through collective efforts of Mine Management, Trade Unions and the Government. The major activities taken up during the year included –

Publication of Annual Report, 2004 and compilation of Annual Report for the year 2005.

Compilation and publication of Standard Note on DGMS as on 1.1.2006 Identification of accident-prone mines in respect of coal & lignite mines. Compilation of statistics and preparation of manuscript for –

o Statistics of Mines in India, Vol.I (Coal), 2004 o Statistics of Mines in India, Vol.II(Non-Coal), 2004 o Monthly Review of Accidents and

Page 13: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

13

o Report on Monthly Inspection Analysis Providing EDP Facilities to other field offices of DGMS Processing of applications and preparing a list of winner for National Safety

Awards (Mines) Issued Technical Circulars based on the accident experience.

Several talks were given to disseminate valuable insight into the area of accident analysis and investigation during in-house training programmes as well as to the industry representatives in various fora. 6.2 Augmentation of S&T Capabilities, Mines Rescue Services and Human

Resource Development (S&T) Origin: This Scheme has been formulated by merging the objectives of ongoing schemes namely “Augmentation of Science & Technological support capabilities in DGMS” [S&T] (1981), “Development of Mines Rescue Services“[DMRS] (1981) and “Human Resource Development for improving health and safety standards in mines” [HRD] (1990).

The overall activities are broadly divided into three components: (A) Scientific and Technological Support (S&T)

This scheme aims at providing in-house scientific support to the officers of DGMS in discharge of their enforcemental, regulatory and promotional role. It also provides scientific support to mine operators, workers organisation and other institutions concerned with occupational health and safety matters. The activities of the S&T plan scheme covers a wide cross-section of facets of occupational safety and health including occupational hygiene/health, strata control, mine ventilation, mine gases, fires and explosion, mining techniques, mine mechanization, oil and opencast mines safety, standard setting and policy planning. The support activities are broadly divided into three categories: (i) Planned support:

This plan support is provided to field offices on:

⇒ a current issue which has emerged into an enforcemental problem; ⇒ an enforcemental strategy calling for development of monitoring equipments

or techniques; and ⇒ monitoring of quality assurance of external organisation in sampling, pre-

approval testing and other similar activities.

These activities are selected on merit, including improvement of efficiency and safety and future needs.

(ii) Reactive Support:

Reactive Support is provided in response to demands from field offices in areas where:

⇒ In-house assessment and analysis of a problem leads to better understanding of enforcemental problem and helps in determining enforcemental strategy;

⇒ support is required on a technical problem without referring to external agency.

(iii) Testing Services:

This service is provided to the field offices as a sample check on quality control standards and in emergency response situation. Major Programmes:

Page 14: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

14

The major programmes of the S&T plan scheme includes: (1) Occupational Safety:

(a) Monitoring of implementation of the Technical Standards on Support system in Bord and Pillar workings.

(b) Review of standards on stability of multi-seam workings. (c) Review of standards on detection, control, dealing with and protective

measures against fire and revision of standards/guidelines. (d) Assessment of hazards associated with mine mechanization and

standardization of monitoring techniques and control measures.

(i) Standardization of prototype test(s) houses for testing powered supports and hydraulic/friction props.

(ii) Standardization of Ultrasonic Testing Techniques and formulation of Acceptance & Rejection Norms.

(iii) Testing of fire resistant hydraulic oils. (2) Occupational Hygiene and Health

(a) Standardization of techniques for monitoring and control of occupational hazards from noise, air borne dust, mine gases and poor illumination.

(b) Review and standards of medical examinations. (c) Review and standardization of procedures for surveillance of

occupational disease already established. (B) Development of Mines Rescue Services: This plan scheme aims at promoting proper rescue services in mining industry. The scheme envisages critical appraisal of design characteristics of rescue apparatus and self rescuers, evaluation of field performance of the same, inquiry into accidents in use of rescue apparatus, inspection of rescue stations/rescue rooms organizing rescue competitions, monitoring formulation of emergency plan by the management of all underground mines and to deal with applications for grant of permissions/approval/relaxation under the Mines Rescue Rules, 1984. Major Programme: → Installation of testing facility for SCBA of Resuscitator → Creation of Rescue Data bases

(i) CMR/OMR/MMR/ dBase (ii) RRAE databases

→ Design of rescue systems (i) Inundation RRS (ii) Fire RRS (iii) Explosion RRS

→ Development of disaster control systems → Testing of Self-Rescuers, Testing SCBA → Rescuers Competition → Standard setting, review of emergency plans → Issue of Technical circular’s to the mining industry (C) Human Resource Development: This scheme, which started on a modest scale from 1.4.90. The scheme envisages setting-up of a Mines Safety & Health Academy comprising Institutes at Dhanbad and Nagpur for imparting structured training to the Inspection Officers of DGMS so as to update and upgrade their technical and professional competence and improve their

Page 15: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

15

effectiveness in regulatory, enorcemenral, advisory and promotional roles. The facilities so created would be also utilized for disseminating latest information on mine safety principles and practices amongst the key safety personnel of the mining industry and the Workmen’s Inspectors. Major Programmes:

1. Development of training schedules 2. Conduct of training programmes

(a) Training of DGMS Officers i. New Entrants ii. Existing officers iii. Special Lectures

(b) Training of Key personnel in Mining Industry i. Managerial Personnel ii. Safety Officers iii. Ventilation Officers iv. Engineers v. Industrial Hygienists vi. Executive Trainees vii. VTOs

(c) Training of Workmen’s Inspectors. During the year 2006, the following activities were undertaken by S&T wing:-

Activity Achievement (A) Augmentation of S&T Capabilities: 1. Mine Environment surveys 2. Occupational Health Review, Survey & Medical exam 3. Ground Control. 4. Mine mechanization (Testing of machinery parts) 5. Additional job:-

(a) Gas analysis (b) Mine dust analysis

21 mines 05 mines 08 mines Nil 153 nos. 45 Nos.

(B) Development of Mines Rescue Services: 1. Creation of Rescue databases 2. Review/Design of Rescue systems 3. Testing of self rescuers 4. Rescue competition 5. Standard setting, review of emergency plans 6. Field RS & RR 7. Field visits

Contd. Contd. Contd. 09 07 -- 12

(C) Human Resource Development 1. Development of training scheduled 2. Conduct of training programs:-

(a) DGMS Officers (b) Key personnel from mining industry (c) Workmen Inspectors

01 71 105 12

6.3 Strengthening of Machinery for Conduct of Statutory Examinations

(SSEX)” This scheme was conceived during the 9th plan period and was principally approved by the Ministry of Labour. However, due to various procedural and other problems, the work could not start till the penultimate year of the current plan period. Feasibility study vis-à-vis computerization of the examination system has been done. The main objective of the scheme is to strengthen and improve the efficiency of the statutory examination system by:

Developing a quick and transparent system of examination with the aid of computer and associated information technology.

Page 16: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

16

Review of the examination system in vogue, in order to eliminate redundancy and standardize procedures.

Developing computerized application-processing system, issue of certificate and maintenance of records connected therewith.

6.4 Improving efficiency by providing infrastructure facilities in DGMS (PIF) The purpose of the scheme is to develop infrastructure facility by providing own office and residential complexes to the officers and staff members, providing better communication facilities and office equipment and furnishing of offices. The facility so created would improve the efficiency of officers and staff members of the DGMS. The scheme also envisages improvement of enforcement of safety laws in the mining industry by strengthening the legal set up in DGMS. The scheme proposes creation of adequate no. of posts in the legal set up and also provision of infrastructural facilities to enable the legal officers to play their role in enforcemental activities. The legal set up so created will also be utilized for rendering advice to organisation on legal matters and also providing legal assistance to the Board of Mining Examinations. 6.5 Modernization of Information Database Relating to Mine Management

(MID)(Merged) The purpose of the scheme is to reach beyond current efforts to reinvent DGMS by identifying breakthrough strategies that rethink the core value of key services, improve service delivery, reduce cost and redefine administrative processes. The application of e-Governance to the processes of functioning of DGMS will bring about simple, moral, accountable, responsive and transparent governance. It will help the organization in managing its operations at various phases of governance making the entire process user friendly. The objective of the scheme would be:

(i) Identification of mines safety information need and identify the boundaries of an e-governance system;

(ii) develop a core group within the organization to formulate and use computer based ‘MIS’ vis-à-vis mines safety;

(iii) develop modules of need-based software with the help of experts; (iv) create infrastructure to implement computer based systems including

establishment of LAN/WAN, establish electronic communication channels;

(v) establish a comprehensive protocol for use of such system; (vi) establishment and operation of modern survey system and electronic

storage of mine plans; and (vii) establish a comprehensive training system for officers of DGMS in

use of such new systems.

Page 17: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

17

7. Accident Experience 7.1 During the year 2006, there were 82, 57 and 5 fatal accidents involving 141, 70

and 5 fatalities in coal, non-coal and oil mines respectively, the number of fatal accidents during the previous year 2005 being 99, 55 and 2 for coal, non-coal and oil mines respectively.

7.2 Table 8 indicates the trend in 10-yearly average number of fatal accidents and

that of fatality rates per thousand persons employed from 1901 to 2000 and the 6-yearly average for the period 2001 to 2006, separately for coal and non-coal mines. For coal mines, a consistent decline is observed in the 10-yearly average number of accidents per year since the 1950s and in the 10-yearly average number of fatalities since the 1970s. The same trend continued for the 6-yearly period 2001-2006. For non-coal mines, the average number of accidents and fatalities have remained more or less at the same level during the last three decades ending in 2000 while the 6-yearly averages have fallen during the period 2001-2006.

7.3 Table 9 shows the variation over the last ten years in the number of fatal and

serious accidents separately for coal, metal and oil mines. In all the three sectors, the number of accidents (fatal and serious taken together) has decreased in 2006 compared to 2005 except in oil mines.

7.4 Mineral-wise trends in annual death rates per 1000 persons employed during

the last decade are shown in Table 10 for major minerals while Table 11 shows the mineral-wise break-up of accidents and casualties during the year 2006. It is seen from Table 10 that in the year 2006, among the important non-coal minerals, death rate was the highest for Limestone mines. From Table 11 it is seen that of the 70 deaths reported from metalliferous mines, 22 occurred in Iron-ore mines, 15 in Limestone mines, 4 in Stone quarries, 1 each in Galena & Sphalarite and gold mines and 25 in others. In oil mines 5 fatal accidents occurred during the year 2006.

7.5 Trends in serious injury rates, as well as death rates, appear in Tables 12, 14

& 16 for coal, metal and oil mines respectively. The average annual number of serious injuries in coal mines has increased from 673 during the five year period 1997-2001 to 824 during the five year period 2002-2006. For metalliferous mines, this average has come down from 219 during 1997-2001 to 134 during 2002-2006. For oil mines, the average annual number of serious injuries during 1997-2001 was 23 as compared to 24 during 2002-2006. Place wise trends in death and serious injury rates are shown for coal mines in Table 13 and for metalliferous mines in Table 15.

7.6 Tables 17 to 20 give cause-wise and place-wise figures of fatal and serious

accidents in coal and non-coal mines during the years 2004 to 2006. The tables 17, 18, 19 and 20 show that:

Page 18: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

18

In coal mines:

Number of fatal accidents due to ground movement involving roof fall and side fall accidents are 33, 25 and 17 for the year 2004, 2005 and 2006 respectively. Roof and side fall accidents accounted for about 21% of all fatal accidents during the year 2006.

Roof fall fatal accidents decreased in number from 18 in 2005 to 13 in 2006. About 16% of all fatal accidents in 2006 were due to roof fall alone.

The number of fatal accidents due to dumper has decreased from 16 in 2005 to 12 in 2006 which accounted for about 14.6% of the total accidents. Rope haulage accounted 9.8%, other machineries 19.5% and other causes 20.8% during the year 2006.

Fall of persons, the dominant cause of serious accidents, accounted for about 26%, followed by rope haulage 22% during the year 2006.

Serious accidents due to fall of objects accounted for about 17% of all serious accidents during the year 2006.

Figures 1 and 2 below show cause-wise fatal and serious accidents in coal mines during the year 2006.

Fall of roof15.9%

Truck tanker etc.2.4%

Dumpers14.6%

Rope haulages9.8%

Fall of sides4.9%

Other Machinery19.5%

Explosives1.2%

Fall of person2.4%

Other causes20.8%

Fall of object8.5%

Fig.1 Cause-wise distribution of fatal accidents in coal mines during 2006

Fall of roof3.2%

Truck tanker etc.2.6%

Dumpers2.1%

Rope haulages22.4%

Fall of sides3.1%

Other Machinery12.1%

Fall of person26.4%

Other causes11.3%

Fall of object16.8%

Fig.2 Cause-wise distribution of serious accidents in coal mines during 2006

Page 19: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

19

In non-coal mines:

The number of fatal accidents due to dumper was 10 during the year 2006 and same as 2005 which is about 16% of the all fatal accidents during 2006.

Fall of sides caused 11 fatal accidents in 2006 as compared to 6 in 2005. Proportion of such fatal accidents increased to 18% in 2006 from 11% in 2005.

During 2006, there were 14 fatal accidents due to fall of persons and 3 fatal accidents due to explosives thereby accounting for 23% and 5% of all fatal accidents respectively.

The two main frequent causes of serious accidents in non-coal mines in 2006 were fall of objects and fall of persons, they accounting for about 23% and 27% respectively of all serious accidents in 2006.

Serious accidents arising from dumpers, truck/tanker and other machineries accounted for about 28% of all serious accidents in 2006.

Figures 3 and 4 below show cause-wise fatal and serious accidents in non-coal mines in 2006.

Explosives4.8%

Fall of person22.6%

Truck tanker etc.12.9%

Dumpers16.1%

Fall of sides17.7%

Other Machinery9.7%

Fall of object9.7%

Other causes6.5%

Fig. 3 Cause-wise distribution of fatal accidents in non-coal mines during 2006.

Truck tanker etc.5.6%

Dumpers1.4%

Fall of sides1.4%

Other Machinery21.1%

Fall of object22.5%

Other causes21.2%

Fall of person26.8%

Fig.4 Cause-wise distribution of serious accidents in non-coal mines during 2006.

Page 20: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

20

ANNEXURE-I

SAFETY, HEALTH & WELFARE LEGISLATION FOR

MINES ADMINISTERED BY DGMS

MINES ACT, 1952

Coal Mines Regulations, 1957

Metalliferous Mines Regulations, 1961

Oil Mines Regulations, 1984

Mines Rules, 1955

Mines Vocational Training Rules, 1966

Mines Rescue Rules, 1985

Mines Creche Rules, 1966

Coal Mines Pit Head Bath Rules, 1959

ELECTRICITY ACT, 2003 Indian Electricity Rules, 1956

ALLIED LEGISLATION Factories Act, 1948 : Chapter III & IV Manufacture, Storage & Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989

– under Environmental Protection Act, 1986 Land Acquisition (Mines) Act, 1885 The Coal Mines (Conservation & Development) Act, 1974

Page 21: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

21

Abbreviations: DDG - Deputy Director General Dy.Dir - Deputy Director Elec - Electrical Engineering Mech - Mechanical Engineering DD(OH) – Dy. Director, Occupational Health SO - Staff Officer CMC - Career Management & Co-Ordination PIF – Improving Efficiency by Providing Infrastructure Facilities in DGMS SSEX –Strengthening of Machinery for Conduct of Statutory Examination SOMA – Study of Mine Accidents & Development of Mine Safety Information System MID – Modernization of Information Database relating to mine management of mine plans and automated survey system CMR, MMR - Coal/ Metalliferous Mines Regulations

Organisation Chart:DGMS DIRECTOR GENERAL

BOARD OF MINING EXAMS -UNDER CMR

BOARD OF MINING EXAMS UNDER MMR

DDG (HQ)

ADMINIS- TRATION

EXAMINATION

STORES ACCOUNTS LAW

HINDI

MECHANICAL

MINES SECTIONS

STATISTICAL CMC OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

SURVEY

MINES SAFETY EQUIPMENT

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

SSEX SOMA PIF

PLAN SCHEMES

OTHER SECTIONS

DDG, ZONES ( 6 )

DDG(E)

ELECTRICAL

SOUTH EASTERN ZONE, RANCHI JHARKHAND

RANCHI REGION BHUBANESHWAR REGION CHAIBASA REGION KODARMA REGION

RAMGARH

EASTERN ZONE SITARAMPUR WEST BENGAL

REGION NO. I REGION NO. II REGION NO. III

DIGBOI

NORTHERN ZONE AJMER RAJASTHAN

AJMER REGION UDAIPUR REGION GHAZIABAD REGION

SOUTHERN ZONE HYDERABAD ANDHRA PRADESH

HYDERABAD REG- I HYDERABAD REG-II CHENNAI REGION GOA REGION

NELLORE BELLARY

WESTERN ZONE NAGPUR MAHARASHTRA

NAGPUR REGION-I NAGPUR REGION-II JABALPUR REGION BILASPUR REGION

PARASIA

CENTRAL ZONE DHANBAD JHARKHAND

REGION NO. I REGION NO. II REGION NO. III TECHNICAL SECTIONS

Headquarters Organisation

Zonal Organisation

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF MINES SAFETY

Note: Dy.DGs in-charge of zones & Directors in-charge of regions

Annexure: IIMinistry of Labour & Employment Govt. of India

A-2

SSEX

MID

Page 22: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

22

ANNEXURE: III DETAILS OF EXAMINATIONS CONDUCTED IN THE YEAR 2006 UPTO DECEMBER

Sl. No. Type of Examination No. of Candidates Remarks Appeared Successful

Under Coal Mines Regulations, 1957 First Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in December, 2005

2276 200 Result declared on 15.07.2006

1.

First Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in December, 2006

2504 - Result not yet declared

Second Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in December, 2005

1339 151 Result declared on 15.07.2006

2.

Second Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in December, 2006

1490 - Result not yet declared

Mine Surveyor’s Certificate Examination held in December,2005

245 25 Result declared on 15.07.2006

3.

Mine Surveyor’s Certificate Examination held in December,2006

343 - Result not yet declared

Overman’s Certificate Examination held in December, 2005

955 78 Result declared on 15.07.2006

4.

Overman’s Certificate Examination held in December, 2006

1060 - Result not yet declared

5. Mining Sirdar’s Certificate 677 179 6. Shotfirer’s Certificate Nil Nil 7. Gas-Testing Certificate 1811 657 8. Winding Engine Driver’s Certificate

(a) First Class (b) Second Class

35 26

28 15

9. Medical Examinations (a) 5 yearly under Reg. 27(1)

(i) Overman (ii) Mining Sirdar (iii) Shotfirer (iv) Winding Engine Driver 1st Class (v) Winding Engine Driver 2nd Class

(b) Senior Medical Board under Reg. 28 (i) First Class Manager’s (ii) Second Class manager’s (iii) Surveyor’s

(c) Junior Medical Board under Reg.28 (i) Overman (ii) Mining Sirdar (iii) Shotfirer (iv) Winding Engine Driver 1st Class (v) Winding Engine Driver 2nd Class

688 803 26

150 89

26 19 03

50 67 07 Nil Nil

685 801 26 149 89

25 19 03

46 65 07 Nil Nil

10. Exchange cases Nil Nil Applicatio

n received Certificate/ auth. issued

11 Exemption cases 439 412 Under Metalliferous Mines Regulations, 1961 I. Un-Restricted

First Class manager’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2005

107 31 Result declared on 25-02-2006

1.

First Class manager’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2006

82 - Result not yet declared

Second Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2005

74 6 Result declared on 25-02-2006

2.

Second Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2006

78 - Result not yet declared

3. Surveyor’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2005

08 02 Result declared on 25-02-2006

Page 23: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

23

Sl. No. Type of Examination No. of Candidates Remarks Appeared Successful

Surveyor’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2006

09 - Result not yet declared

Foreman’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2005

44 7 Result declared on 25-02-2006

4.

Foreman’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2006

28 - Result not yet declared

5. Mining Mate’s Certificate 85 17 6. Blaster’s Certificate 25 2 II. Restricted to Opencast Workings only

First Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in September,2005

627 68 Result declared on 25-02-2006

1.

First Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in September,2006

720 - Result not yet declared.

Second Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2005

359 31 Result declared on 25-02-2006

2.

Second Class Manager’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2006

486 - Result not yet declared.

Surveyor’s Certificate Examination held in September,2005

84 14 Result declared on 25-02-2006

3.

Surveyor’s Certificate Examination held in September,2006

60 - Result not yet declared

Foreman’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2005

391 50 Result declared on 25-02-2006

4.

Foreman’s Certificate Examination held in September, 2006

219 -

Result not yet declared

5. Mining Mate’s Certificate 168 33 6. Blaster’s Certificate 87 15 III. Other Certificates 1. Winding Engine Driver’s, 1st Class 2 2 2. Winding Engine Driver’s, 2nd Class 8 8 IV. Medical Examinations (a) 5 yearly under Reg. 30(1)

(i) Foreman, Un-restricted (ii) Foreman, Restricted (iii) Mining Mate, Un-restricted (iv) Mining Mate, Restricted (v) Blaster, Un-restricted (vi) Blaster, Restricted (vii) Winding Engine Driver 1st Class (viii) Winding Engine Driver 2nd Class

(b) Senior Medical Board (i) First Class Manager’s (ii) Second Class manager’s (iii) Surveyor’s

(c) Junior Medical Board (i) Foreman (ii) Mining Mate (iii) Blaster

265 340 275 394 176 197 1 Nil 50 40 9 78 66 30

264 340 274 392 175 197 1 Nil 48 47 9 75 60 25

10. Exchange cases Nil Nil 11. Exemption cases Applicatio

n received Certificate/ authorisation issued

193 173

Page 24: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

24

ANNEXURE-IV

LIST OF VARIOUS SEMINARS, SYMPOSIUMS, CONFERENCE, WORKSHOP ETC. ATTENDED BY DGMS OFFICERS DURING 2006.

S.N Title of Seminar/

Symposium/ Conference &

Workshop

Venue From To No. of officers attende

d 1. First Asian Mining

Congress

Kolkata 16.01.2006

18.01.2006

09

2. International Mining Exhibition

Kolkata 17.01.200

6

- 11

3. Workshop on Future of underground Coal Mining in India Mechanized Bord and Pillar or Longwall

Kolkata 19.01.2006

20.01.2006

05

4. International Seminar on disaster Management & Fire Control Method & Equipment

Ahmedabad

20.01.2006

21.01.2006

02

5. National Seminar on Benchmarking of HSE in Oil Industry

Goa 01.02.2006

03.02.2006

03

6. National Seminar on underground Metal Mining Status and Prospects

ISM, Dhanbad

13.02.2006

14.02.2006

01

7. Seminar on “Advances in Computer and Information Technology”

ISM, Dhanbad

11.03.2006

12.03.2006

04

8. Workshop on “Modern Management of Mine Production, Safety & Environment

Shibpur, Howrah

08.06.2006

09.06.2006

02

9. National Conference on India’s Energy Security: Coal & Alternative Energy Resources

Kolkata 16.05.2006

17.06.2006

03

10. National Seminar on “Mine Subsidence Damages and Mine Subsidence Insurance Scheme”

Dishergarh, ECL

20.09.2006

- 03

11. National Seminar on underground coal mining & EXPO-2006

ISM, Dhanbad

09.11.2006

10.11.2006

04

Page 25: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

25

ANNEXURE-VIA

CARRIER MANAGEMANT AND COORDINATION TRAINING FOR THE YEAR 2006 (IN COUNTRY)

Sl. No.

Title of training Venue From To No. of officers

attended 1. Training Programme on

“Pay fixation under fundamental Rules and under ACP Scheme of Central Government”

Parsam Institute of Statutory Rules, Bangalore

26.07.2006

28.07.2006

1

2. Training Programme on Pension

ISTM, New Delhi

25.09.2006

29.09.2006

1

3. Training Programme on implementation of Reservation Policy for SC/ST/OBC/PH

VV Giri National Institute, Noida

28.09.2006

29.09.2006

2

4. Training programme on “Disciplinary Proceedings Enquiry for major penalty – Statutory Rules and Supreme Court Judgments

Parsam Institute of Statutory Rules, Bangalore

22.11.2006

24.11.2006

1

5. Training programme on Establishment Rules

ISTM, New Delhi

11.12.2006

15.12.2006

1

6.

CARRIER MANAGEMANT AND COORDINATION TRAINING

FOR THE YEAR 2006 (ABROAD) Sl. No.

Title of training Venue From To No. of officers attended

Nil

Page 26: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

26

Table-1 Trend in Output of Important Minerals

Oil & Natural Gas Other Minerals Coal

Oil

Gas

Copper Ore

Lead & Zinc

Gold Ore

Iron Ore

Mang. Ore

Lime stone

Bauxite

Stone

Year Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million Cu. Mtr.

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

Million tonnes

1951 34.98 n.a. n.a. 0.37 0.01 n.a. 3.71 1.18 2.96 0.06 0.72

1961 55.71 n.a. n.a. 0.42 0.15 n.a. 12.27 1.23 14.35 0.48 1.68

1971 75.64 7.19 720 0.68 0.30 0.6 32.97 1.61 25.26 1.45 3.81

1981 127.32 7.92 2220 2.01 0.96 0.50 42.78 1.55 32.56 1.75 4.10

1991 237.76 9.51 3543 5.05 1.82 0.47 60.03 1.68 75.02 3.86 11.64

1992 249.94 10.75 3510 5.20 2.14 0.45 61.24 1.96 77.79 4.36 9.12

1993 260.60 11.81 4912 5.15 2.10 0.40 63.26 1.78 87.72 4.81 10.81

1994 267.52 11.60 4740 4.78 1.90 0.36 64.91 1.69 86.77 4.70 11.12

1995 284.59 11.66 5323 4.77 2.10 0.46 73.00 1.83 93.64 5.09 6.34

1996 304.10 11.24 5451 4.75 2.06 0.47 71.59 2.01 120.87 5.35 4.78

1997 316.68 13.71 7068 4.26 2.01 0.46 78.36 2.29 123.56 5.17 10.43

1998 319.90 18.28 7289 4.38 2.23 0.51 77.34 1.92 116.61 5.91 12.03

1999 315.19 13.68 7548 3.29 3.21 0.64 75.89 1.65 131.70 5.81 10.63

2000 334.32 14.24 7821 3.20 3.32 0.58 84.77 1.99 148.80 6.39 15.62

2001 341.51 14.56 8203 3.53 1.76 0.48 90.47 1.93 147.34 7.02 15.15

2002 363.31 14.56 8024 3.19 3.18 0.62 99.81 1.91 158.59 8.96 14.36

2003 379.19 18.50 8494 2.84 3.53 0.10 118.81 2.41 190.45 10.65 10.45

2004 409.30 16.64 6456 30.09 3.52 0.10 135.75 2.83 256.70 9.29 12.68

2005* 429.00 16.94 6557 3.19 2.35 0.10 97.91 1.91 224.31 8.91 20.63

N.B. Data for the year 2005 are provisional.

Page 27: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

27

TABLE- 2 : Growth of Mining Activities in India

No of reporting Value of minerals Aggregate H.P. Explosives used

Year mines (in Million Rupees) (in 1000s) (in 1000 tonnes)

Coa

l Meta

l Oil Coal Metal Oil

Coal

Metal Oil Coal

Non-coal

1951 893 1810 - 505 235 N.A. 188 83 N.A

. 1.5 1.0

1961 848 2323 - 1141 487 N.A. 438 159 N.A

. 4.5 3.8

1971 781 1995 13 2543 1080 756 732 282 25 12.3 9.4

1981 496 1768 8 18114 3620 2748 1841 925 35 46.3 15.3

1991 561 1787 24 79794 19076 18533 4292 1519 507 124.

2 40.3

1992 567 1810 27 96377 21700 23104 4653 1644 583 140.

0 44.1

1993 570 1845 27 10746

7 23392 31777 3942 1853 541 155.

6 44.1

1994 576 1869 29 12221

6 24648 34302 4690 1891 548 156.

9 43.3

1995 579 1930 32 13331

4 33611 37065 5218 1735 579 189.

6 46.2

1996 576 1872 32 15747

4 36521 37388 5300 1877 523 207.

8 47.2

1997 580 1834 34 19387

7 43758 32608 5314 2016 570 232.

7 43.4

1998 594 1864 37 20530

7 45286 42851 5399 2020 602 247.

0 47.1

1999 598 1957 44 21910

1 46415 72824 5660 2147 769 267.

6 49.8

2000 595 2022 45 23453

1 53111 92954 5561 2371 757 290.

5 57.0

2001 568 1907 43 26108

2 54032 10674

7 5586 2087 712 318.

8 55.8

2002 567 1870 42 28639

0 64964 12332

6 5432 2175 757 315.

3 55.6

2003 562 1716 49 29995

4 77605 13189

7 5527 2129 621 304.

8 63.7

2004 567 1764 47 34889

8 10428

3 16608

3 5409 2336 685 334.

0 70.6 2005

* 565 2110 50 36894

0 10438

8 16808

5 5800 2338 526 350.

3 71.1

N.B. Data for the year 2005 are provisional.

Page 28: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

28

TABLE -3 : Average Daily Employment in Mines ( in '000 )

Year

Coal

Oil

Copper Ore

Gold Ore

Iron Ore

Lime Stone

Mang. Ore

Mica

Stone

Others

Total Metals

1951 351.9 N.A. 3.7 21.7 20.2 16.0 55.5 52.2 5.1 22.7 197.1

1961 411.2 N.A. 4.2 21.7 54.5 54.7 47.0 29.6 8.5 39.5 259.7

1971 382.3 13.6 7.6 12.4 52.8 53.2 30.4 12.2 8.8 57.5 234.9

1981 513.4 14.5 13.4 12.3 44.9 49.8 26.5 6.7 7.7 60.6 221.9

1991 554.1 35.5 12.8 9.3 40.0 43.5 17.9 2.2 11.2 63.3 200.2

1992 552.0 35.7 12.7 9.4 42.0 43.0 18.4 1.6 8.9 67.2 203.2

1993 546.3 33.5 12.2 7.9 39.8 41.6 18.5 1.5 9.2 68.9 199.6

1994 523.7 34.3 11.2 7.4 38.5 39.8 18.2 1.7 9.4 65.2 191.4

1995 513.3 34.0 10.5 7.1 39.6 39.8 18.1 1.8 7.5 64.4 188.8

1996 506.4 33.4 9.9 6.9 39.2 35.7 18.1 1.2 5.2 60.1 176.3

1997 503.4 28.6 10.3 6.8 38.6 33.0 16.0 1.2 4.9 61.6 172.4

1998 491.3 29.5 8.7 6.1 37.3 31.2 15.9 1.1 5.3 59.3 164.9

1999 475.8 25.5 7.7 5.9 36.2 29.8 16.5 1.0 5.2 55.3 157.6

2000 458.4 23.4 6.9 5.3 35.3 31.1 16.1 1.0 6.4 54.8 156.9

2001 438.2 24.4 3.9 3.6 32.3 24.2 17.8 1.0 6.3 36.1 161.1

2002 422.6 22.3 3.3 3.3 33.6 25.1 13.7 1.0 7.8 49.8 159.2

2003 416.7 18.6 2.5 2.7 35.8 24.2 13.2 0.6 8.0 49.7 155.6

2004 405.2 19.1 21.1 2.7 38.6 24.8 14.6 0.6 7.9 52.3 162.7

2005* 398.0 19.2 3.5 3.3 33.4 25.0 13.3 0.6 7.7 50.5 156.5

N.B. Data for the year 2005 are provisional.

Page 29: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

29

TABLE- 4 Average Daily Employment in All Mines by Place of Work

Opencast Aboveground Total Year

Belowground Men Women Men Women

1951 220312 89467 54107 129662 55500 549048

1961 261703 157033 67927 145944 38380 670987

1971 255297 142911 52916 157295 22316 630735

1981 331613 144729 45883 198580 28998 749803

1991 339781 154422 29225 240621 25831 789880

1992 334805 158717 28302 244902 24245 79071

1993 330697 159905 26069 205460 23829 745960

1994 313923 155413 24793 231058 24303 749490

1995 307356 154611 23358 193457 23323 702105

1996 300196 148676 20609 224192 22510 716183

1997 298329 144590 19533 220144 21941 704537

1998 288075 144807 17273 213822 21696 685673

1999 273966 144457 16145 204584 19749 658901

2000 263217 144701 15593 197300 17930 638741

2001 250416 137661 12032 183758 15436 599303

2002 234954 139506 12349 179897 15174 581880

2003 223377 141746 11643 179952 15608 572327

2004 219023 147162 12275 174545 14906 567911

2005* 213874 138611 13200 173657 15240 554582

N.B. Data for the year 2005 are provisional.

Page 30: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

30

Table-5 - Place-wise Distribution of Average Daily Employment and Production in Coal Mines

Belowground Opencast Above ground Total

Year

Output (in ‘000 tonnes)

Employment (in ‘000 number)

Output (in ‘000 tonnes)

Employment (in ‘000 number)

Employment (in ‘000 number)

Output (in ‘000 tonnes)

Employment (in ‘000 number)

1951 30199 178 4784 36 138 34983 352

1961 44887 230 10822 60 121 55709 411

1971 58552 228 17090 43 111 75642 382

1981 76205 302 51120 55 156 127325 513

1991 70731 316 167026 67 171 237757 554

1992 71062 311 178879 67 174 249941 552

1993 73672 308 186935 68 170 260607 546

1994 70644 293 196878 67 164 267522 524

1995 68512 287 216074 68 158 284586 513

1996 70128 281 233969 68 157 304097 506

1997 69062 279 247619 69 156 316681 504

1998 68571 270 251324 69 152 319895 491

1999 68101 258 247088 71 147 315189 476

2000 66225 249 268092 69 140 334317 458

2001 64134 239 277379 69 130 341513 438

2002 56330 225 297982 69 129 363312 423

2003 63632 216 315556 69 132 379188 417

2004 61932 211 347347 70 122 409268 405

2005* 60060 204 368940 68 126 429000 398 N.B. Data for the year 2005 are provisional

Page 31: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

31

TABLE-6 Number of Inspections and Enquiries

No. of inspections No. of Enquiries Gran

d Year Coal Metal Oil Total Coal Metal Oil Total Total

1991 5838 3846 258 9942 1063 521

102

1686

11628

1992 5598 4063 313 9974 1233 533 59

1825

11799

1993 5766 3953 262 9981 1227 463 57

1747

11728

1994 5625 3345 213 9183 1346 539 25

1910

11093

1995 5461 3206 181 8848 1102 396 21

1519

10367

1996 5525 2491 226 8242 1105 330 50

1485 9727

1997 4563 2404 189 7156 1157 406 34

1597 8753

1998 4752 2539 166 7457 1127 398 29

1554 9011

1999 6106 3061 198 9365 1319 483 26

1828

11193

2000 5642 3614 245 9501 1163 325 26

1514

11015

2001 5410 2908 229 8547 1148 418 51

1617

10164

2002 5667 2856 269 8792 1022 402 30

1454

10246

2003 5574 3247 246 9067 966 427 13 140

6 1047

3

2004 5214 2983 228 8425 834 436 8 127

8 9703

2005 5247 3107 295 8649 933 372 30 133

5 9984

2006* 3812 2301 186 6299 832 315 21 116

8 7467 *Figures of 2006 are provisional and upto November'2006

Page 32: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

32

Table-7

IMPROVEMENT NOTICES AND PROHIBITORY ORDERS (Under Section 22 of Mines Act and under Reg. 103/108

of Coal/Metalliferous Mines Regulations) Coal Mines Non Coal Mines

Notices issued

Orders issued

Notices issued

Orders issued

Section Reg. Section Reg. Section Reg. 22(1A) 103 22(1A) 108 22(1A) 108

Section 22(1) or 22A(1)

Reg. 103

or 22(3)

or 22(3)

or 22(3)

1991 7 Nil 13 Nil 1 17 50 9

1992 3 Nil 5 Nil Nil 19 37 7

1993 7 1 38 Nil 9 11 79 11

1994 26 9 19 4 4 4 29 5

1995 35 1 19 1 Nil 14 41 14

1996 39 6 32 3 12 9 99 6

1997 28 1 21 Nil 27 12 37 2

1998 38 1 16 Nil 6 1 26 1

1999 31 Nil 19 Nil 13 7 71 4

2000 74 2 37 1 32 6 186 10

2001 126 18 69 Nil 44 5 63 6

2002 36 Nil 30 Nil 32 2 80 3

2003 127 Nil 65 Nil 38 2 185 2

2004 147 Nil 62 Nil 56 Nil 251 1

2005 124 Nil 36 Nil 130 1 136 Nil

2006* 103 Nil 72 Nil 18 1 59 1

Page 33: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

33

TABLE-8 - Trend in fatal accidents and fatality rates per 1000 persons employed ( Ten yearly average )

COAL MINES NON-COAL MINES

Av. No. Acc. Av. No. of

Fatality Av. No. Acc. Av. No. of Fatality

of Acc. rate Fatalities rate of Acc. rate Fatalities rate

1901-10 74 0.76 92 0.93 16 0.47 23 0.67

1911-20 139 0.94 176 1.29 29 0.57 37 0.73

1921-30 174 0.99 219 1.24 43 0.54 50 0.66

1931-40 172 0.98 228 1.33 35 0.41 43 0.51

1941-50 226 0.87 273 1.01 26 0.24 31 0.29

1951-60 223 0.61 295 0.82 64 0.27 81 0.34

1961-70 202 0.49 259 0.62 72 0.28 85 0.33

1971-80 187 0.40 264 0.55 66 0.27 74 0.30

1981-90 162 0.30 185 0.34 65 0.27 73 0.31

1991-00 140 0.27 170 0.33 65 0.31 77 0.36

2001-06 90 0.21 118 0.29 59 0.36 68 0.42

* PROVISIONAL.

Table-9 – Trend in Incidence of Accidents in Mines

Coal Metal Oil

Number of accidents Number of accidents Number of accidents

Year

Fatal Serious Total Fatal Serious Total Fatal Serious Total

1997 143 678 821 68 246 314 2 19 21

1998 128 523 651 50 234 284 6 20 26

1999 127 595 722 59 207 266 2 23 25

2000 117 661 778 50 160 210 1 27 28

2001 105 667 772 62 178 240 9 21 30

2002 81 629 710 50 174 224 2 31 33

2003 83 563 646 51 147 198 1 21 22

2004 87 962 1049 55 150 205 2 38 40

2005 99 1093 1192 55 93 148 2 15 17

2006 82 719 801 57 59 116 5 12 17

N.B. Figures of 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 34: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

34

Table – 10 : Trend in death rate per thousand persons employed

Year Coal Oil CopperOre

Gold Ore

Iron Ore

Lime Stone

Mang. Ore

Galena& Sphl.

Total Metals

All Mineral

1997 0.33 0.07 0.10 0.29 0.49 0.30 0.31 0.56 0.43 0.34

1998 0.30 0.24 0.11 0.33 0.40 0.42 0.19 0.36 0.35 0.31

1999 0.29 0.08 0.00 0.68 0.22 0.44 0.24 0.18 0.44 0.32

2000 0.31 0.04 0.15 0.00 0.28 0.29 0.31 0.00 0.34 0.31

2001 0.32 0.37 0.25 0.28 0.37 0.45 0.07 0.00 0.53 0.37

2002 0.23 0.09 0.30 0.00 0.30 0.52 0.29 0.22 0.45 0.28

2003 0.27 0.05 0.00 0.00 0.39 0.33 0.08 0.00 0.45 0.31

2004 0.24 0.10 0.00 0.00 0.34 0.56 0.21 0.79 0.43 0.28

2005 0.30 0.10 0.00 0.00 0.44 0.40 0.00 0.26 0.41 0.32

2006 0.35 0.26 0.00 0.37 0.57 0.61 0.14 0.26 0.49 0.38

N.B. Figures of 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as 31.12.2006.

TABLE- 11 Accidents and Causalities in 2006 by Major Minerals Number of Accidents Number of persons Mineral

Fatal Serious Killed Seriously injured Coal 82 719 141 745 Oil 5 12 5 12 Copper 0 0 0 0 Galena & Sphalerite 1 12 1 12 Gold 1 9 1 10 Iron Ore 16 21 22 22 Lime Stone 12 4 15 4 Manganese 2 5 2 9 Stone 4 0 4 1 Others 21 8 25 10 Total Metalliferous 57 59 70 68

All Minerals 144 790 216 825

Page 35: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

35

Table-12 : Trend in Fatal and Serious Accidents and Death Rates & Serious Injury Rates in Coal Mines

Number of accidents Number of persons

Rate per 1000 persons

Employed

Year

Fatal Serious

Total

Accident frequency Rate/Lak

h Manshifts

Killed S/Injured Death Rate

S/Inj. Rate

Death Rate per Million Tonnes

1997 143 678 821 0.52 165 726 0.33 1.44 0.52 1998 128 523 651 0.43 146 560 0.30 1.14 0.46 1999 127 595 722 0.48 138 650 0.29 1.37 0.44 2000 117 661 778 0.54 144 707 0.31 1.54 0.43 2001 105 667 772 0.57 141 720 0.32 1.64 0.41 2002 81 629 710 0.54 97 665 0.23 1.57 0.27 2003 83 563 646 0.50 113 590 0.27 1.42 0.30 2004 87 962 1049 0.82 96 991 0.24 2.45 0.23 2005 99 1093 1192 0.93 120 1125 0.30 2.78 0.29 2006 82 719 801 0.62 141 745 0.35 1.84 0.34 Note : Data for the years 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 36: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

36

Table – 13 :Trend in Fatal & Serious Accidents and Death & Serious Injury Rates in Coal Mines – Place-wise

Number of Fatal Accidents Number of Serious Accidents Death Rate per 1000 Persons Serious Injury Rate per 1000 PersonsYear Below

Ground Open- Cast

Above Ground

Overall BelowGround

Open-Cast

AboveGround

Overall Below Ground

Open- Cast

Above Ground

Overall Below Ground

Open- Cast

Above Ground

Overall

1997 94 27 22 143 440 79 158 677 0.41 0.42 0.14 0.33 1.71 1.25 1.05 1.44 1998 80 24 24 128 346 72 105 523 0.36 0.35 0.16 0.30 1.41 1.06 0.70 1.14 1999 74 30 23 127 408 77 110 595 0.33 0.43 0.16 0.29 1.73 1.19 0.81 1.37 2000 62 38 17 117 444 108 109 661 0.30 0.74 0.13 0.31 1.92 1.67 0.82 1.54 2001 67 26 12 105 464 73 130 667 0.43 0.38 0.10 0.32 2.10 1.12 1.07 1.64 2002 48 22 11 81 434 92 103 629 0.27 0.32 0.11 0.23 2.07 1.43 0.80 1.57 2003 46 23 14 83 380 82 101 563 0.33 0.35 0.13 0.27 1.85 1.30 0.77 1.42 2004 49 32 6 87 757 82 123 962 0.27 0.47 0.05 0.24 3.69 1.24 1.02 2.45 2005 51 28 20 99 833 98 162 1093 0.34 0.41 0.16 0.30 4.06 1.44 1.35 2.78 2006 42 28 12 82 546 62 111 719 0.47 0.41 0.10 0.35 2.66 1.01 0.90 1.84

Note : Data for the years 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 37: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

37

TABLE-14 : Trend in Fatal & Serious Accidents and Death Rates & Serious Injury Rates in Metalliferous Mines

Year No. of accidents Number of persons

Rate per 1000 persons

employed Fatal Serious Total

Accident frequency rate per

1000 persons

employed

Killed Seriously injured

Death Serious

1997 68 246 314 1.82 75 262 0.43 1.52

1998 50 234 284 1.72 58 252 0.35 1.53

1999 59 207 266 1.69 70 228 0.44 1.45

2000 50 160 210 1.34 54 166 0.34 1.06

2001 62 178 240 1.76 72 186 0.53 1.36

2002 50 174 224 1.64 62 178 0.45 1.30

2003 51 147 198 1.45 61 163 0.45 1.19

2004 55 150 205 1.43 62 163 0.43 1.14

2005 55 93 148 1.03 59 98 0.41 0.68

2006 57 59 116 0.81 70 68 0.49 0.47

Note : Data for the years 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 38: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

38

TABLE-15 : Tend in Fatal & Serious Accidents and Death & Serious Injury Rates in Metalliferous Mines - Placewise

Number of Fatal Accidents Number of Serious Accidents Death Rate per 1000 Persons Serious Injury Rate per 1000 PersonsYear Below

Ground Open- Cast

Above Ground

Overall Below Ground

Open-Cast

Above Ground

Overall Below Ground

Open- Cast

Above Ground

Overall Below Ground

Open- Cast

Above Ground

Overall

1997 7 39 22 68 106 33 107 246 0.42 0.47 0.38 0.43 5.57 0.42 1.99 1.52 1998 6 32 12 50 89 40 105 234 0.33 0.43 0.22 0.35 5.07 0.60 1.97 1.53 1999 6 40 13 59 96 29 82 207 0.49 0.55 0.25 0.44 6.22 0.44 1.67 1.45 2000 7 30 13 50 66 38 56 160 0.49 0.37 0.25 0.34 4.65 0.46 1.12 1.06 2001 5 45 12 62 59 37 82 178 0.46 0.63 0.36 0.53 5.57 0.53 1.82 1.36 2002 5 33 12 50 52 40 82 174 0.49 0.54 0.28 0.45 5.07 0.53 1.89 1.30 2003 3 31 17 51 57 25 65 147 0.52 0.45 0.42 0.45 7.36 0.43 1.56 1.19 2004 5 36 14 55 54 35 61 150 0.62 0.47 0.32 0.43 6.70 0.53 1.34 1.14 2005 3 41 11 55 27 22 44 93 0.37 0.50 0.24 0.41 3.35 0.30 0.95 0.68 2006 3 41 13 57 22 14 23 59 0.37 0.61 0.28 0.49 2.98 0.24 0.50 0.47

Page 39: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

39

TABLE-16 :Trend in Fatal and Serious Accidents and Death Rates & serious Injury Rates in Oil Mines

No. of accidents Number of persons

Rate per 1000 persons employed

Year

Fatal Serious Total

Accident frequency rate

per 1000 persons

employed

Killed Seriously Death Serious

1997 2 19 21 0.73 2 23 0.07 0.80

1998 6 20 26 0.88 7 21 0.24 0.71

1999 2 23 25 0.98 2 23 0.08 0.90

2000 1 27 28 1.19 1 28 0.04 1.19

2001 9 21 30 1.23 9 22 0.37 0.90

2002 2 31 33 1.48 2 31 0.09 1.39

2003 1 21 22 1.18 1 22 0.05 1.18

2004 2 38 40 2.09 2 40 0.10 2.09

2005 2 15 17 0.89 2 15 0.10 0.78

2006 5 12 17 0.89 5 12 0.26 0.63

Note : Data for the years 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on31.12.2006.

Page 40: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

40

Table-17 : Cause wise & place wise fatal accidents in coal mines Cause Yr. BCCL CCL ECL MCL NCL NECL SECL WCL CIL SCCL IISCo NLC TISCo Other Total

04 3 2 5 2 0 0 3 4 19 6 0 0 1 0 26

05 7 1 2 2 0 0 4 1 17 1 0 0 0 0 18

Fall of roof

06 2 0 3 1 0 0 2 1 9 3 0 0 1 0 13

04 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 6 1 0 0 0 0 7

05 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 1 1 7

Fall of sides

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 4

04 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 5

05 1 1 3 0 0 0 1 2 8 3 0 0 1 0 12

Rope haul- ages

06 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 4 4 0 0 0 0 8

04 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 9 1 2 1 0 0 13

05 0 2 2 2 0 0 4 4 14 0 0 0 0 2 16

Dum- pers

06 1 2 1 1 4 0 0 2 11 0 0 0 0 1 12

04 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 7 0 0 0 0 1 8

05 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 5

Truck tanker etc.

06 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

04 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 3 7 0 0 1 0 1 9

05 1 1 3 2 1 0 3 1 12 3 1 0 0 0 16

Other Machi- nery

06 4 1 0 0 2 0 2 4 13 2 0 1 0 0 16

04 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 5

05 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

Explo sives

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

04 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 4

05 1 1 2 0 2 1 0 0 7 2 0 0 0 0 9

Fall of per -son

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2

04 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

05 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 0 4

Fall of obj -ect

06 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 2 0 0 7

04 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 7 0 0 1 1 0 9

05 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 2 10

Other causes

06 2 2 1 0 0 0 2 5 12 2 1 1 1 0 17

04 7 5 10 2 0 1 5 6 36 10 0 0 3 0 49

05 11 4 9 3 0 1 7 5 40 8 1 0 2 0 51

Below- grou- nd

06 7 1 5 1 0 0 3 6 23 14 2 1 2 0 42

04 3 5 5 2 3 1 1 5 25 1 2 2 0 2 32

05 1 4 3 4 1 0 5 4 22 2 0 1 0 3 28

Open- cast

06 2 4 1 1 6 0 4 2 20 3 0 4 0 1 28

04 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 5 0 0 1 0 0 6

05 3 0 5 3 2 0 2 1 16 2 0 0 0 2 20

Above- grou- nd

06 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 6 11 0 0 0 1 0 12

04 11 10 16 4 3 2 7 13 66 11 2 3 3 2 87 05 15 8 17 10 3 1 14 10 78 12 1 1 2 5 99

Total

06 11 6 7 2 7 0 7 14 54 17 2 5 3 1 82 N.B. Figures are number of accidents. Data of 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 41: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

41

TABLE-18 Cause wise & Place wise Serious Accidents in Coal Mines

Cause Yr. BCCL CCL ECL MCL NCL NECL SECL WCL CIL SCCL IISCo NLC TISCo Other Total

04 11 1 10 0 0 0 7 4 33 8 1 0 1 1 44

05 1 1 4 4 0 0 7 3 20 17 0 0 1 0 38

Fall of roof

06 2 0 7 0 0 0 5 1 15 8 0 0 0 0 23

04 7 1 6 0 0 0 11 6 31 31 4 0 1 0 67

05 4 1 1 0 0 0 9 6 21 22 0 1 1 0 45

Fall of sides

06 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 4 8 14 0 0 0 0 22

04 15 6 32 0 0 0 17 12 82 43 0 0 2 0 127

05 4 2 8 0 0 0 11 7 32 135 0 0 0 0 167

Rope haul- ages

06 9 0 18 1 0 0 9 8 45 116 0 0 0 0 161

04 1 2 4 1 1 0 1 4 14 1 0 0 0 0 15

05 2 5 2 1 4 0 3 2 19 4 0 0 0 0 23

Dum- pers

06 1 1 0 0 2 0 3 1 8 6 0 0 1 0 15

04 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 5

05 3 0 0 1 1 0 3 1 9 1 0 1 0 0 11

Truck tanker etc.

06 3 0 0 1 4 0 1 2 11 7 0 1 0 0 19

04 4 1 6 3 3 0 12 7 36 5 1 0 1 0 43

05 4 3 3 0 1 0 16 5 32 32 0 0 0 0 64

Other Machi- nery

06 0 2 5 5 0 0 12 7 31 55 1 0 0 0 87

04 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 1 8 0 0 0 0 0 8

05 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 5

Explo sives

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

04 23 11 50 10 1 1 24 16 136 159 4 1 3 4 307

05 14 6 18 3 2 0 21 8 72 203 0 0 0 2 277

Fall of per -son

06 11 5 18 1 2 0 9 8 54 134 0 0 0 2 190

04 5 1 25 1 4 0 10 13 59 118 5 1 0 0 183

05 4 2 16 3 5 0 13 4 47 214 0 0 0 0 261

Fall of obj -ect

06 4 0 11 3 0 0 2 3 23 98 0 0 0 0 121

04 9 3 48 2 0 0 23 3 88 72 2 1 0 0 163

05 5 4 10 2 0 0 12 4 37 164 0 0 0 1 202

Other causes

06 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 7 15 66 0 0 0 0 81

04 58 15 148 5 0 1 73 38 338 396 15 0 5 3 757

05 20 7 44 6 0 0 68 30 175 656 0 0 2 0 833

Below- grou- nd

06 19 3 55 6 0 0 36 28 147 398 1 0 0 0 546

04 8 7 14 7 5 0 13 11 65 12 3 1 1 0 82

05 11 11 7 5 10 0 9 6 59 35 0 2 0 2 98

Open- cast

06 9 4 1 3 3 0 6 5 31 28 0 1 1 1 62

04 11 5 24 5 4 0 22 17 88 29 0 2 2 2 123

05 10 7 11 3 3 0 18 5 57 104 0 0 0 1 162

Above- grou- nd

06 3 1 7 3 5 0 5 8 32 78 0 0 0 1 111

04 77 27 186 17 9 1 108 66 491 437 18 3 8 5 962

05 41 25 62 14 13 0 95 41 291 795 0 2 2 3 1093

Total

06 31 8 63 12 8 0 47 41 210 504 1 1 1 2 719

N.B. Figures are number of accidents. Data of 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 42: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

42

TABLE-19: Cause wise & Place wise Fatal Accidents in Non-Coal Mines

Cause Yr Oil Copper Galena Gold Iron Ore L.Stone Magan. Stone Others Total

04 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2

05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

Fall of roof

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

04 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 5 5 12

05 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4 6

Fall of sides

06 0 0 0 0 1 4 2 0 4 11

04 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Rope Haul- age

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

04 0 0 0 0 5 5 1 0 0 11

05 0 0 0 0 3 5 0 1 1 10

Dum- pers

06 0 0 0 0 7 2 0 1 0 10

04 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 2 7

05 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 3

Truck tanker

06 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 2 8

04 2 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 3 9

05 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 5 10

Other Machi nery

06 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 3 6

04 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3

05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4

Explo sives

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 3

04 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 6

05 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 2 5 14

Fall of per -son

06 3 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 6 14

04 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 3

05 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 6

Fall of obj -ect

06 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 6

04 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 4

05 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

Other cause

06 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 4

04 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 5

05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3

Below grou- nd

06 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

04 0 0 0 0 5 11 1 8 11 36

05 0 0 0 0 7 9 0 9 16 41

Open cast

06 0 0 0 0 11 10 2 4 14 41

04 2 0 1 0 7 1 1 0 4 16

05 2 0 1 0 9 1 0 0 0 13

Above grou- nd

06 5 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 18

04 2 0 3 0 12 12 3 8 17 57

05 2 0 1 0 16 10 0 9 19 57

Total

06 5 0 1 1 16 12 2 4 21 62

N.B. Figures are number of accidents.Figures for 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

Page 43: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

43

TABLE-20: Cause wise & Place wise Serious Accidents in Non-Coal Mine

Cause Yr. Oil Copper Galena Gold Iron Ore L.Stone Magan. Stone Others Total

04 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

05 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2

Fall of roof

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

04 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3

05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Fall of sides

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

04 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

05 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Rope Haul- age

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

04 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 6

05 0 1 0 0 5 1 1 0 0 8

Dum- pers

06 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

04 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 5

05 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Truck tanker etc.

06 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 4

04 3 0 1 0 13 3 0 0 4 24

05 0 2 1 1 7 2 2 0 3 18

Other Machi nery

06 1 0 5 0 7 0 2 0 0 15

04 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

05 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

Explo sives

06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

04 9 0 5 3 12 2 6 1 3 41

05 3 0 6 0 10 2 1 0 0 22

Fall of per -son

06 4 0 3 2 6 1 0 0 3 19

04 6 0 10 10 8 2 0 0 2 38

05 2 0 8 4 4 2 0 0 0 20

Fall of obj -ect

06 0 0 2 5 4 1 1 0 3 16

04 20 0 11 21 7 5 1 0 4 69

05 9 1 7 4 8 1 0 0 4 34

Other cause

06 7 0 2 2 0 1 1 0 2 15

04 0 0 21 22 0 0 6 0 5 54

05 0 0 14 9 0 0 2 0 2 27

Below grou- nd

06 0 0 7 6 0 0 5 0 4 22

04 0 0 2 0 21 6 0 2 3 34

05 6 4 0 0 10 5 1 0 2 28

Open cast

06 4 0 3 1 9 1 0 0 0 18

04 38 1 7 13 24 8 3 0 6 100

05 9 0 10 1 24 4 2 0 3 53

Above grou- nd

06 8 0 2 2 12 3 0 0 4 31

04 38 1 30 35 45 14 9 2 14 188

05 15 4 24 10 34 9 5 0 7 108

Total

06 12 0 12 9 21 4 5 0 8 71

Page 44: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

44

N.B. Figures are number of accidents. Figures for 2005 and 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are as on 31.12.2006.

TABLE-21: State wise details of accident statistics for Coal Mines during the year 1998-2006

Fatal Serious

State Year No. of acc.

Persons killed

Fatality rate per

1000 persons No. of

accidents Persons injured

Injury rate per 1000 persons

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1998 32 37 0.54 103 107 1.56 1999 25 27 0.39 94 112 1.63 2000 27 34 0.51 85 91 1.35 2001 25 25 0.38 105 117 1.79 2002 14 23 0.37 117 125 2.00 2003 19 44 0.73 88 92 1.52 2004 11 14 0.23 437 447 7.48 2005 12 12 0.20 795 800 13.39

Andhra Pradesh 2006 17 20 0.33 504 510 8.54 Assam 1998 2 2 0.70 1 1 0.35

1999 1 1 0.33 2 2 0.65 2000 1 1 0.33 1 1 0.33 2004 2 2 0.74 1 1 0.37

2005 1 1 0.37 0 1 0.37

1998 37 42 0.25 149 160 0.96 Bihar 1999 40 42 0.27 154 169 1.07

2000 6 6 0.17 82 84 2.31 2001 7 8 0.23 82 82 2.32 2002 7 7 0.20 79 82 2.34 2003 9 9 0.26 63 65 1.85 2004 3 4 0.11 68 69 1.92 2005 7 7 0.20 55 56 1.56

Chhattisgarh 2006 3 3 0.08 31 31 0.86

1998 2 2 1.18 4 4 2.35 1999 0 0 0.00 3 3 1.34 2000 1 1 0.47 5 5 2.36 2001 2 2 1.10 6 6 3.29 2002 1 1 0.60 2 2 1.20 2003 0 0 0.00 3 3 1.76 2004 0 0 0.00 2 2 1.18 2005 1 1 0.59 1 1 0.59

Gujarat 2006 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.59

1999 1 1 1.56 0 0 0.00 Jammu & 2000 0 0 0.00 1 1 1.09

Page 45: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

45

2003 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.99 2004 0 0 0.00 3 3 2.92

Kashmir 2005 0 0 0.00 1 3 2.92

2000 31 39 0.26 160 176 1.19 2001 23 52 0.37 125 145 1.03 2002 26 27 0.20 133 149 1.10 2003 21 22 0.17 117 124 0.96 2004 27 30 0.25 147 156 1.28 2005 31 51 0.42 78 92 0.75

Jharkhand 2006 25 75 0.62 42 45 0.37

1998 18 20 0.21 69 80 0.86 1999 25 28 0.31 80 90 1.00 2000 19 21 0.39 54 63 1.18 2001 14 14 0.28 67 73 1.47 2002 14 17 0.35 49 55 1.12 2003 7 7 0.14 51 54 1.09 2004 8 9 0.19 71 74 1.52 2005 15 16 0.33 64 69 1.42

Madhya Pradesh 2006 14 15 0.31 36 41 0.84

1998 11 12 0.35 44 49 1.43 1999 7 7 0.21 41 42 1.28 2000 9 18 0.54 75 78 2.32 2001 7 12 0.38 76 79 2.53 2002 8 8 0.26 49 51 1.66 2003 4 7 0.23 54 56 1.84 2004 11 11 0.38 39 41 1.41 2005 5 5 0.17 27 28 0.96

Maharashtra 2006 8 8 0.27 30 32 1.10

1998 5 8 0.48 17 17 1.02 1999 7 7 0.39 16 17 0.96 2000 2 2 0.11 17 18 1.02 2001 4 4 0.25 11 11 0.69 2002 3 3 0.18 17 17 1.04 2003 7 7 0.38 12 12 0.65 2004 4 4 0.22 17 17 0.95 2005 10 10 0.56 14 14 0.79

Orissa 2006 2 2 0.11 12 20 1.12

1999 0 0 0.00 1 1 5.85 1998 1 1 0.14 1 1 0.14 1999 2 2 0.27 5 5 0.67 2000 3 3 0.42 2 2 0.28 2001 5 5 0.68 6 7 0.95

Rajasthan Tamil Nadu

2002 1 1 0.14 11 11 1.51

Page 46: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

46

2003 1 2 0.22 8 11 1.21 2004 3 3 0.31 3 3 0.31 2005 1 1 0.10 2 3 0.31

2006 5 5 0.51 1 1 0.10

1998 0 0 0.00 7 7 1.79 1999 0 0 0.00 4 4 0.59 2000 2 2 0.31 4 4 0.61 2001 1 1 0.16 9 9 1.45 2002 0 0 0.00 3 3 0.49 2003 2 2 0.33 9 9 1.49 2004 2 2 0.33 5 5 0.82 2005 2 2 0.33 3 4 0.65

Uttar Pradesh 2006 3 3 0.49 0 0 0.00

1998 20 22 0.23 128 134 1.40 1999 19 23 0.26 195 205 2.33 2000 16 17 0.21 175 184 2.24 2001 17 18 0.23 180 191 2.41 2002 7 10 0.13 169 170 2.29 2003 13 13 0.18 157 163 2.24 2004 16 17 0.24 169 173 2.45 2005 14 14 0.20 53 54 0.76

West Bengal 2006 5 10 0.14 62 64 0.91

1998 128 146 0.30 523 560 1.40 1999 127 138 0.29 595 650 1.37 2000 117 144 0.31 661 707 1.54 2001 105 141 0.32 667 720 1.64 2002 81 97 0.23 629 665 1.57 2003 83 113 0.27 563 590 1.42 2004 87 96 0.24 962 991 2.45 2005 99 120 0.30 1093 1125 2.80

Total 2006 82 141 0.35 719 745 1.80

Note : Figures for 2005 & 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are upto 31.12.2006.

Page 47: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

47

TABLE-22: State wise details of accident statistics for Metalliferous Mines during the year 1998-2006

Fatal Serious

State Year No. of

accidents Persons killed

Fatality rate per

1000 person

s No. of

accidents

Persons

injured

Injury rate per 1000 persons

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1998 3 4 0.48 7 7 0.84 1999 4 4 0.50 10 12 1.50 2000 7 7 0.87 7 7 0.87 2001 8 10 1.20 2 4 0.48 2002 5 5 0.60 3 3 0.36 2003 10 13 0.84 2 5 0.32 2004 4 4 0.47 3 3 0.35 2005 5 7 0.83 0 1 0.12

Andhra Pradesh 2006 3 6 0.71 0 1 0.12 Assam 1999 0 0 0.00 1 1 2.55

1998 4 4 0.21 18 25 1.34 1999 4 4 0.24 11 11 0.65

Bihar 2000 1 1 0.97 0 0 0.00

2000 3 3 0.21 21 21 1.47 2001 0 0 0.00 25 26 2.32 2002 1 1 0.09 25 25 2.15 2003 1 1 0.04 21 21 0.91 2004 5 6 0.58 16 19 1.84 2005 1 1 0.10 17 17 1.64

Chhattisgarh 2006 2 3 0.29 14 15 1.45

1998 3 4 0.96 3 4 0.96 1999 0 0 0.00 3 3 0.69 2000 2 2 0.49 3 3 0.74 2001 2 3 0.75 2 2 0.50 2002 1 1 0.24 1 1 0.24 2003 1 1 0.12 5 5 0.58 2004 1 1 0.21 1 1 0.21

Goa 2006 4 9 1.92 0 0 0.00

1998 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.29 1999 0 0 0.00 3 3 0.93 2000 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.33 2001 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.37 2002 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.36

Gujarat 2005 4 4 1.28 1 1 0.32

1998 1 2 0.53 0 0 0.00 Haryana

1999 8 8 2.18 0 1 0.27

Page 48: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

48

2000 1 1 0.24 0 0 0.00 2001 4 4 1.17 0 1 0.29 2002 2 2 0.50 0 0 0.00 2003 1 2 0.26 0 0 0.00

2004 1 1 0.24 0 0 0.00 1999 0 0 0.00 2 2 2.23 2001 2 2 2.38 0 0 0.00 2002 2 5 5.50 0 0 0.00 2003 1 3 1.72 1 1 0.57 2004 1 1 0.86 0 0 0.00 2005 2 2 1.72 0 0 0.00

Himachal Pradesh 2006 2 3 2.58 0 0 0.00 Jammu & Kashmir 2006 1 1 8.20 0 0 0.00

2000 6 6 0.36 9 9 0.54 2001 4 7 0.52 11 11 0.81 2002 11 12 0.92 17 17 1.30 2003 2 2 0.08 11 11 0.43 2004 7 8 0.61 12 12 0.92 2005 5 5 0.38 7 7 0.53

Jharkhand 2006 4 4 0.31 9 9 0.69

1998 6 6 0.32 97 97 5.13 1999 6 9 0.50 74 80 4.49 2000 4 4 0.23 53 53 3.05 2001 7 7 0.51 60 60 4.41 2002 2 2 0.15 67 67 5.09 2003 5 5 0.18 53 54 1.97 2004 1 1 0.07 54 57 4.04 2005 3 3 0.21 21 21 1.49

Karnataka 2006 6 6 0.42 10 11 0.78

2000 0 0 0.00 1 2 1.79 2001 1 1 0.67 0 0 0.00 2004 1 1 0.55 0 0 0.00

Kerala 2005 0 0 0.00 1 1 0.55

1998 4 4 0.15 32 34 1.30 1999 10 11 0.42 32 36 1.36 2000 6 6 0.59 18 18 1.77 2001 5 5 0.59 17 17 2.00 2002 2 2 0.24 12 13 1.54 2003 1 1 0.06 9 9 0.55 2004 2 4 0.45 6 7 0.78 2005 0 0 0.00 7 7 0.78

Madhya Pradesh 2006 1 1 0.11 2 4 0.45

1998 1 2 0.43 9 9 1.93 Maharashtra

1999 2 2 0.40 7 7 1.42

Page 49: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

49

2000 1 1 0.19 2 2 0.38 2001 0 0 0.00 3 3 0.58 2002 5 7 1.33 6 6 1.14 2003 0 0 0.00 9 9 0.85 2004 1 1 0.15 5 5 0.75 2005 3 3 0.45 2 2 0.30

2006 1 1 0.15 4 6 0.90 2000 0 0 0.00 1 1 5.75 Meghalaya

2003 0 0 0.00 1 1 2.18 1998 10 13 0.38 19 23 0.68 1999 7 7 0.22 11 12 0.37 2000 6 7 0.22 4 5 0.16 2001 9 9 0.33 11 11 0.41 2002 8 8 0.28 14 14 0.49 2003 9 10 0.17 8 12 0.21 2004 7 7 0.22 14 16 0.51 2005 12 13 0.41 6 8 0.25

Orissa 2006 9 9 0.28 6 6 0.19

1998 15 15 0.58 46 48 1.86 1999 13 20 0.80 51 55 2.19 2000 8 10 0.40 37 39 1.54 2001 13 17 0.76 44 47 2.10 2002 10 16 0.74 24 27 1.25 2003 18 21 0.53 25 33 0.83 2004 19 22 1.06 37 38 1.83 2005 10 11 0.53 29 30 1.44

Rajasthan 2006 16 19 0.91 14 14 0.67

1998 2 3 0.35 2 4 0.46 1999 3 3 0.36 1 3 0.36 2000 2 2 0.22 3 5 0.54 2001 4 4 0.42 2 2 0.21 2002 0 0 0.00 3 3 0.40 2003 1 1 0.06 2 2 0.11 2004 4 4 0.49 1 4 0.49 2005 9 9 1.10 2 3 0.37

Tamil Nadu 2006 8 8 0.98 0 2 0.25

1998 1 1 0.40 0 0 0.00 1999 1 1 0.55 1 2 1.10

Uttar Pradesh 2000 1 2 2.44 0 0 0.00

2000 1 1 0.85 0 0 0.00 2001 1 1 0.82 0 0 0.00 2002 1 1 0.78 1 1 0.78 2003 1 1 0.39 0 0 0.00

Uttaranchal

2004 1 1 0.67 1 1 0.67

Page 50: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

50

2005 1 1 0.67 0 0 0.00 1999 1 1 0.55 0 0 0.00 2000 1 1 0.60 0 0 0.00

West Bengal 2001 2 2 1.05 0 1 0.53

1998 50 58 0.35 234 252 1.53 1999 59 70 0.44 207 228 1.45 2000 50 54 0.34 160 166 1.06 2001 62 72 0.53 178 186 1.36 2002 50 62 0.45 174 178 1.30 2003 51 61 0.45 147 163 1.19 2004 55 62 0.43 150 163 1.14 2005 55 59 0.41 93 98 0.68

Total 2006 57 70 0.49 59 68 0.47

Note : Figures for 2005 & 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are upto 31.12.2006.

TABLE-23: State wise details of accident statistics for Oil Mines during the year 1998-2006

Fatal Serious

State Year No. of

accidents Persons

killed

Fatality rate per

1000 person

s No. of

accidents

Persons

injured

Injury rate per 1000 persons

1 2 3 4 5.00 6 7 8.00 1998 0 0 0.00 2 2 3.58 1999 0 0 0.00 2 2 3.50 2000 0 0 0.00 7 7 12.57 2001 1 1 1.37 7 7 9.59 2002 0 0 0.00 2 2 4.29 2003 0 0 0.00 3 3 2.96 2004 0 0 0.00 1 1 4.20

Andhra Pradesh 2005 0 0 0.00 2 2 8.40 Arunachal Pradesh 2001 1 1 4.76 0 0 0.00

1998 4 5 0.39 12 12 0.93 1999 1 1 0.08 12 12 0.95 2000 0 0 0.00 9 10 0.78 2001 6 6 0.45 10 11 0.82 2002 0 0 0.00 15 15 1.26 2003 1 1 0.13 14 14 0.16 2004 1 1 0.14 26 28 3.87 2005 1 1 0.14 11 11 1.52

Assam 2006 2 2 0.28 9 9 1.24

1998 2 2 0.14 6 7 0.50 Gujarat

1999 0 0 0.00 7 7 0.69

Page 51: Dgms Notes

Standard Note, 01.01.2007

51

2000 0 0 0.00 8 8 0.97 2001 1 1 0.13 2 2 0.26 2002 1 1 0.13 9 9 1.13 2003 0 0 0.00 4 5 0.35 2004 1 1 0.10 6 6 0.59 2005 0 0 0.00 2 2 0.20

2006 1 1 0.10 1 1 0.10 2004 0 0 0.00 2 2 27.03 Rajasthan

2006 0 0 0.00 2 2 27.03 1999 0 0 0.00 2 2 4.31 2000 0 0 0.00 2 2 3.03 2001 0 0 0.00 2 2 2.52 2002 0 0 0.00 4 4 5.43 2004 0 0 0.00 1 1 1.13

Tamil Nadu 2006 2 2 2.27 0 0 0.00

1999 1 1 1.23 0 0 0.00 2000 1 1 1.96 0 0 0.00 2002 1 1 1.43 0 0 0.00 2004 0 0 0.00 2 2 6.37

Tripura 2005 1 1 3.18 0 0 0.00

2000 0 0 0.00 1 1 2.17 West Bengal 2002 0 0 0.00 1 1 2.17

1998 6 7 0.24 20 21 0.71 1999 2 2 0.08 23 23 0.90 2000 1 1 0.04 27 28 1.19 2001 9 9 0.37 21 22 0.90 2002 2 2 0.09 31 31 1.39 2003 1 1 0.05 21 22 1.13 2004 2 2 0.10 38 40 2.09 2005 2 2 0.10 15 15 0.78

Total 2006 5 5 0.25 12 12 0.63

Note : Figure for 2005 & 2006 are provisional. Data for 2006 are upto 31.12.2006

Page 52: Dgms Notes

DGMS TELEPHONE DIRECTORY (AS ON 01.01.2007)

P-PERSONAL, EPB-EPABX

A-7

HEAD OFFICE, DHANBAD- 826001 EPABX - For speed call : (0326) 2221005, 2221006, 2221007,

2221008, 2221009 Through operator : 2221002, 2221003, 2221004

FAX- (0326) 2221027 (DG), 2221020 (DDG(HQ), 2221020 (DDG(Elec)

e-mail :[email protected] DGMS Website : www.dgms.net, www.dgms.in

Sl. Name Office Resid. 1 M.M Sharma, CIM 2221000 2221041

2221042 2 K.Mondal Sr.P.A to DG EPB-318 2206765 3 DDG(HQ) 2221021 2206735 4 R.Prasad DDG(Elec) 2221038 2221161 5 A. Biswas Dir(MSE) 2221013 2221171 6 PC Rajak Dir(DMRS) 2221040 2206768 7 N Singh Dir(SD) 2221018 2221163 8 TS Mukerjee Dir (Mech) 2221039 2221166 9 A.K.Meghraj Dir(SOMA) 2221015 2206747

10 S.S. Mishra, DD (Accts.) 2221037 2206760 11 A.K.Sinha Dir(S&T) 2221037 2221167 12 P.Ranganatheswar Dir(Exam) 2221036 2221168 13 S.S Mishra, DD(B&A) 2221016 2206760 14 G.Vijaykumar DD(Hq) EPB-384 2206737 15 R.M.Bhattacarhee DD(S&T) 2221019 2206753 16 ME Murkute DD(S&T) EPB-402 2206770 17 SD Chidarwar DD(Exam) EPB-401 2221162 18 Ram Abhilash DD(Exam) EPB-442 2206742 19 NSRK Prasad EPB-415 2221176 20 JK Roy EPB-329 2206762 21 M.K.Das DD(Elec) EPB-413 2206758 22 S.Venkatraman DD (Mech) EPB-377 2221164 23 KS Yadav DD(Elect) EPB-387 2206766 24 Dr. PK Shishodiya, DD(OH) EPB-407 2206763 25 Dr. SS Chakraborty AD(OH) EPB-412 - 26 T.K. Mahapatra Dir(Stat) 2221023 2206759 27 Dir(Stat) EPB-311 - 28 TK Lahari, DD(Stat) EPB-313 - 29 Amitava Saha DD(Stat) EPB-314 30 TK Burman LO Gr.I 2221024 - 31 P.S.Banerjee DD(HQ) EPB-335 2221175

32 B.K.srivastava Sr.SO EPB-357 - 33 SR Sharma Hindi Officer EPB-365 - 34 B.K.Mishra Sr. SO/ DDO EPB-349 - 35 S. Ganguly JSO(S&T) EPB-405

PAY & ACCOUNTS OFFICE, DHANBAD. 1 S. Kumar, A.A.O 2221017 2203449-P CENTRAL ZONE, DHANBAD- 826001 FAX : (0326) 2221029 e-mail : [DDG(CZ)] 1 J.P.Kashyap Dy.DG 2221030 2221170 2 R. Ramachandran Dir(Elec) 2221031 2221180 3 HK Srivastava, DD (Mech) 2221032 2221178 4 DD (Mech) EPB-444 5 GL Kanta Rao, DD (Elec) - 2206756 6 M.K.Malviya DD(Elec) - 2221177 7 Dr.A.Dan AD (OH) -

REGION I, DHANBAD - 826001. 1 A.Kumar Dir 2221033 2221169 2 P.K.Palit DD EPB-448 2221173 3 Ujjal Tah DD EPB-446 2206749 REGION II, DHANBAD - 826001 1 S. M.Suthar, Dir 2221034 2206733 2 H.C. Yadav, DD EPB-447 2206731 3 A.K.Sur DD EPB-438 2221172 REGION III, DHANBAD – 826001 1. P.K.Sarkar Dir 2221035 2221165 2. R.T.Mandekar DD EPB- 2221174 3. A.K.Porwal DD EPB- 2206769

EASTERN ZONE,SITARAMPUR – 713359 FAX : (0341) 2510717

1 Satish Puri Dy.DG 2510710 2510711 2 B.K,Panigrahi Dir (Elec) 2510372 2510716 3. G.Nagraj Venkatesh Dir (Mech) 2511375 2511375 3 B.K. Lama, DD (Elec) 2511371 2511371 4 B.S. Nim, DD (Elec) 2511378 2511378 5 Madhukar Sahay DD(Elec) 2511374 2511374 6 R.N.Singh DD(Mech) 2510715 2510715 7 Dr. A. Sen, AD (OH) 2510721 2254498

REGION NO. I, SITARAMPUR - 713359 1 Munna Tandi Dir 2510712 2510712 2 N. Murawat, DD 2511373 2511373

3. Md.Rafique Syed DD 2511380 2511380 REGION NO. II, SITARAMPUR – 713359

1. A. K.Jain, Dir 2510713 2510720 Sl. Name Office Resid.

2. P.K.Maheswari DD 2511341 2511341 3. PK. Kundu DD 2511376 2511376

REGION NO. III, SITARAMPUR – 713359 1. U. Saha, Dir 2510714 2510714 2. Arvind Kumar DD 2511377 2511377 3. S.K.Mondal DD 2510719 2510719

DIGBOI SUB REGION, DIGBOI, ASSAM (STD- 03751) 1. CB Prasad DD 264456 264371

SOUTH EASTERN ZONE MANAS OPP. RANCHI HILL, RATU Rd,

RANCHI-834001 FAX: (0651)2280145 e-mail : [email protected] [DDG(SEZ)]

1. KK Passi Dy.DG 2280746 2230905 2. SK Thakur, DD(Elec) 2282412 2207126 3. G.P. Rao, DD(Elec) 2282412 2245687 4. D.B. Naik DD (Mech) 2282412 2360452

RANCHI REGION, RANCHI 1. K.Nageswar Rao Dir 2280141 2563791 2. D.K.Mallik DD 2281696 2206515 3.

RAMGRAH SUB REGION, RAMGRAH CANTT.,

HAZARIBAGH DISTRICT, BIHAR. (STD – 06553) 1. T.Vidyapathi, DD 222248 222168

BHUBANESWAR REGION, Plot No. L-1,Nayapalli(Near Swoti

Plaza Hotel),PO RRL Campus BHUBANESWAR : 751007 FAX : (0674) 2302561

1. R.Kulsreshtha Dir 2302561 2591348 2. Subhasis Roy DD 2301452 2572857 3. C Ramesh Kumar DD 2301452 2571508

CHAIBASA REGION, CHAIBASA, SINGHBHUM (WEST), BIHAR, FAX: (06582) 256480

1. R.B.Chakrobarty Dir 256480 256223 2. S.Soren DD 256449 256283 3. M.R. Mandve DD 256449 256006

KODERMA REGION, JHUMRRITILAIYA, DISTRICT- HAZARIBAGH (BIHAR)

FAX : (06534) 223483 1. S.Krishnamurty Dir 222401 222577 2. S. Bagchi 222579 223288

Page 53: Dgms Notes

DGMS TELEPHONE DIRECTORY (AS ON 01.01.2007)

P-PERSONAL, EPB-EPABX

A-8

WESTERN ZONE CGO COMPLEX,A-BLOCK, 6th FLOOR, SEMINARY HILLS,

NAGPUR : 440006 FAX : (0712) 2511021 Tel.no. connected to internet: 2511022

EPBX – 2511026 (provided to all fficers) e-mail : [email protected] [DDG(WZ)]

Sl. Name Office Resid. 1 Rahul Guha Dy.DG 2511020 2511722 2 B.N.Mishra, Dir(Elec) 2511023 2511634 3 K.M.Ghosh, DD (Elec) 2511026 2511726 4 S.K.Mukesh DD(Elec.) 2511026 2511030 5 2511026 2511727 6 Dr. George John AD(OH) 7. Ritu Shukla Law Astt. NAGPUR REGION- I, NAGPUR

1 D.K.Saxena Dir 2511025 2570406 2 U.K.Saha, DD 2511026 2511027 3. N.Razak DD 2511026 2544373

NAGPUR REGION- II, NAGPUR 1 S.K.Dutta Dir 2511024 2533683 2 B.L.Meena DD 2511026 2511727 3 U.K. Sharma, DD 2511026 2511028

PARASIA SUB-REGION, PARASIA, CHHINDWARA, MP (STD – 07161)

1 T.K.Mondal DD 220048 220007 JABALPUR REGION , 1568, NAPIER TOWN, JABALPUR-

482001 FAX (0761) 2411856 1 A. Bhattacharjee Dir 2316691 26774731 2 B.P.Singh DD 2408287 2641136 3 K.Sharma DD 2408287 2677473 4 RAM Parekh DD 2408287 2640328 BILASPUR REGION, SECL CAMPUS, BILASPUR PIN-495001. FAX : (07752) 246493

e-mail : [email protected] 1 J.L.Chandrakar Dir 246493 241200 2 D.K.Sahu DD 246494 248415 3 B.Papa Rao DD 246494 240548 4. Mihir Choudhary DD 246494 519167

SOUTHERN ZONE APHB Complex, Gruhakalpa, Block II, (Ist floor),MJ Road,

Nampally, Hyderabad- 500 001 FAX-040-24602504, Internet- 24602512 (PBX No.2460-2509, 2510, 2511)

e-mail : [email protected] [DDG(SZ)] Sl Name Office Residence 1 SJ Sibbal Dy.DG 24602505 2353808 2 D.Kumar Dir(Elec) 22602506 23002977 3 U.N.Pandey DD(Elec) 24602511 23518716 4 5 SI Hussain Dir(SOMA) 23305253 6 Dir(Mech) - - 7 Dr. K. Sarkar AD(OH) 24602511 -

HYDERABAD REGION No. I APHB Complex, Gruhakalpa, Block II, (IInd floor),MJ Road, Nampally, Hyderabad- 500 001

1 A.Waheed Dir 24602507 23341387 2 R.Subramanian DD 24602510 23513670 3 S.K.Gangopadhay DD 24602510 27902337

HYDERABAD REGION No. II APHB Complex, Gruhakalpa, Block II, (IInd floor),MJ Road, Nampally, Hyderabad- 500 001

1 V.Laxminarayana Dir 24602508 23532944 2 U.P.Singh DD 24602510 27732321 3 M.Narsaiah DD 24602510 27868613 CHENNAI REGION, No.46(OLD)/5(New), 2nd Street, Block ‘AA’ ANNA NAGAR, CHENNAI- 600 040 (TN) FAX-044-26206770

1 B.P.Ahuja Dir 26206771 26206717 2 B.J.Sreedhar , DD 26206772 26206716 3 N. Sharma DD 26206772 26630639

GOA REGION, FATIMA BLDG, 2 FLR BERNARDO COSTA RD, MARGAO : 403601 FAX-0832 - 2702335 Tel.No. connected to internet : 2702335

e-mail : [email protected] 1 Dir 2730985 2 Goutam Moitra DD 2714010 2751937

NELLORE SUB-REGION, OPP.SP.BUNGLOW, DARGAMITTA, NELLORE. (STD-0861)

1 DD 2327363 2327363

BELLARY SUB REGION, BELLARY (STD-08392) 1 DD Saha DD 240614 240491

NORTHERN ZONE ANNA SAGAR LINK ROAD, AJMER : 305001

FAX : (0145) 2425781 e-mail : [email protected]

S Name Off Res. 1 Deepak Gupta Dy.DG 2428670 2627261 2 S.K. Talukdar DD(Elec) 2425204 2641533 3 D. Pandey DD(Mech) 2425652 2624283 4 Radhey Shyam DD(Elec) 2621838 2621828 5. Prabhat Kumar DD(SOMA) 2621919 2644352 AJMER REGION, AJMER

1 D.Sengupta Dir 2425537 2627504 2 E.Jayakumar DD 2425792 3 4 S.Haldar DD 2622043 5 UDAIPUR REGION, 10A, MOKASH MARG, ASHOK NAGAR,UDAIPUR – 313001,FAX: (0294) 2417962

1 N.K.Kherada Dir 2417962 2450935 2 Sanjeevan Roy DD 2418102 2425405 3 Satish Kumar DD 2418102 2462338 4 M.Tikadar DD 2418102 2467225 GHAZIABAD REGION, R.NO.201&203,CGO COMPLEX, HAPUR RD, GHAZIABAD, FAX : (0120) 2721894

e-mail : [email protected] 1 K.K.Sharma Dir 2711597 2519816 2 Mohan Singh Dir(CMC) 3944622 2703413 3 S. K. Das DD 2789483 2789611 4 V.Vinodkumar DD(S&T) 2721894 2756177