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DID THEY REALLY JUST SAY THAT?!” · –“When you say the phrase ‘that’s retarded,’ it makes me feel sad that as a society we’ve basically conflated disability with badness

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  • “…DID THEY REALLY JUST SAY THAT?!”

    NAVIGATING BIAS IN THE CLASSROOM

    Lena Tenney, MPA, MEd. | Coordinator of Public EngagementPronouns: they/them/theirs | Honorific: Mx. Tenney

    OSU New Faculty Orientation| August 16, 2019

  • YOU ARE NOT ALONE!• In the last 2 months, have you experienced or

    observed a comment that made you uncomfortable or was inappropriate?– 62% yes– 38% no

    • Did anyone intervene? – 20% yes– 70% no

    Pre-Presentation Survey, OSU Active Bystander Training: 8/29/2017

  • YOU ARE NOT ALONE!• If you chose not to intervene, please select

    why:– 11% fear for safety – 6% fear of judgement– 46% did not know what to do or say– 31% did not feel comfortable intervening

    Pre-Presentation Survey, OSU Active Bystander Training: 8/29/2017

  • DISCUSSION• What factors might be contributing to this

    disconnect between how often people witness bias incidents and how often people intervene in bias incidents?

    • What factors might make you hesitant to intervene in a bias incident?

  • BEN

    EFIT

    SOF

    INCL

    USIV

    ELE

    ARN

    ING

    ENVI

    RON

    MEN

    TSOutcomes for all students

    Student engagement

    Cognitive complexity in

    problem solving

    Innovation in problem solving in

    team environments

    Milem and Hakuta, 2000; Gurin et al., 2002; Hurtado et al., 2003; Milem, 2003; Antonio et al., 2004; Page, 2007; Page, 2010

  • WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BEAN ACTIVE BYSTANDER?

    Image Credit

    http://dreamatico.com/data_images/people/people-4.jpg

  • THE BYSTANDER EFFECT• Diffusion of responsibility

    – The more people who are present, the less likely that someone will take action during a situation

    • Social influence– Groups monitor behavior, individuals don’t want

    to violate norms

    Darley, J.M., Latane, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: Diffusion of responsibility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 8, 377–383.

  • THE BYSTANDER EFFECT

    Image Credit

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  • DISCUSSION• For you personally, is there a difference between

    situations where it is your identity versus not your identity that is being targeted?

    • Why is that the case?

    • Does this influence how you choose to address the situation? If so, how?

  • CONTEXT MATTERS• Safety• Power dynamics• Self-preservation• Identities of those present and absent• Institutional culture and norms• Personal values and priorities• Responsibilities as an instructor

  • WHY BE AN ACTIVE BYSTANDER?

    Image Credit

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BNjCbaXw9No/UtROSOUWTII/AAAAAAAAEjo/1YUPtAvDf74/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/why-me.png

  • IMPLICIT BIAS CAN TURN EVEN OUR BESTINTENTIONS INTO UNWANTED OUTCOMES

    Intent Effects of Implicit

    BiasOutcome

  • Attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner.

    Image Credit

    DEFINING IMPLICIT BIAS

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://abctutors.in/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Brain-gears-horizontal1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://abctutors.in/?attachment_id=518&docid=4Q5EP7NipZOywM&tbnid=l0-yi0hrVvI6XM:&vet=1&w=3757&h=1608&bih=582&biw=1244&q=gears%20in%20the%20brain&ved=0ahUKEwimqsLc5tjSAhUE44MKHSkGAOIQMwhAKAIwAg&iact=mrc&uact=8

  • http://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/implicit-bias-training/

    UNDERSTANDING IMPLICIT BIAS

  • DEFINING MICROAGGRESSIONS

    “…brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory or negative racial slights and insults to the target person or group.”

    Sue, D.W., Capodilupo, C.M., Torino, G.C., Bucceri, J.M., Holder, A.B., Nadal, K.L., et al. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life. American Psychologist, 62, 271–286.

  • Boysen, G. A., Vogel, D. L., Cope, M. A., & Hubbard, A. (2009). Incidents of bias in college classrooms: Instructor and student perceptions. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 2(4),

    219–231.

  • Adapted from the "Colleges need a language shift, but not the one you think" by Dr. Dafina-Lazarus Stewart in Inside Higher Ed.

    DIVERSITY, INCLUSION, EQUITY, AND JUSTICE

    Inclusion vs. Justice

    Inclusion Asks…

    “Has everyone’s ideas been heard?”

    Justice Responds…

    “Whose ideas won’t be taken as seriously because they aren’t in the majority?”

  • Adapted from the "Colleges need a language shift, but not the one you think" by Dr. Dafina-Lazarus Stewart in Inside Higher Ed.

    DIVERSITY, INCLUSION, EQUITY, AND JUSTICE

    Inclusion vs. Justice

    Inclusion Asks…

    “Is this environment safe for everyone to feel like they

    belong?”

    Justice Responds…

    “Whose safety is being sacrificed and minimized to

    allow others to be comfortable maintaining dehumanizing views?”

  • HOW CAN I BE ANACTIVE BYSTANDER?

    Image Credit

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  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• Use humor

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWynJkN5HbQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWynJkN5HbQ

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Be literal/refuse to rely on the assumption being made– A lot of common phrases rely on figurative

    language, unspoken assumptions, and stereotypes. Being literal can illustrate how these phrases don’t actually make sense and can be harmful

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• Be literal/refuse to rely on the

    assumption being made– “I don’t understand. Is that supposed to be

    a joke? Can you explain to me why it’s supposed to be funny?”

    – “Let’s powwow at the end of the day.” “I don’t know if that’s enough time to plan a whole powwow, but I’m willing to have a meeting.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Ask questions that invite discussion– Bring further clarity to the person’s

    intentions and what they’re trying to communicate

    – Help to open up dialogue by inviting the person into a conversation where they feel heard rather than shut down

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Ask questions that invite discussion– “What do you mean when you say that?”– “Do you know what that word actually

    means?”– “Can you explain your thought process to

    me? I want to be sure I understand how we reached such different conclusions.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • State that you are uncomfortable– Indicate your discomfort with the language

    used, the underlying message in the language, and/or the context of the situation

    – Elaborate or keep it simple

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• State that you are uncomfortable

    – “That kind of language makes me uncomfortable, could you please not use it around me?”

    – “I think I understand what you’re trying to say, but could you please rephrase it in a more inclusive manner?”

    – “That kind of comment isn’t really appropriate at this conference.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Create a conversation speedbump– Slow down the conversation to

    acknowledge that something is amiss and open up possibilities for discussion in the present or future

    – Cue other people to chime in and state that they are also uncomfortable

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• Create a conversation speedbump

    – “I’m not sure what I think about that. I’m going to have to think about that more.”

    – “I’m not sure how I feel about that.”– “Ouch!”– “Whoa!”– “Seriously?!”– “I’m not an expert, but my understanding is that

    that language is outdated. Does anyone else know what might be a better way to phrase that? If not, I’ll try to Google it.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Use direct communication– Be clear about the problem and/or

    consequences– Speak honestly and from the heart, using “I

    statements” to communicate how you are feeling, why that is the case, and what could be done

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Use direct communication– “This is unacceptable behavior.”– “When you say the phrase ‘that’s retarded,’

    it makes me feel sad that as a society we’ve basically conflated disability with badness. Even though I know you’re not meaning to be hurtful, I can’t help but feel sad that we tend to use that word so casually.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• Redirect/refocus the conversation

    – “While we could discuss that more if we had time, we are limited on time so I’m going to redirect us back to the main topic.”

    – “That falls outside the scope of this particular session, so I’m going to ask that we refocus on our primary topic.”

    – “I wish we could hear more about your ideas, but we need to be respectful of all our speakers’ time. So at this point, I’m going to turn the floor over to our next panelist.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT

    • Remind people of personal and/or institutional values– Tap into people’s innate sense of being a

    good person and place that at the focus of why you are addressing the comment

    – Redirect people back to institutional policies, norms, and/or agreements

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• Remind people of personal and/or

    institutional values– “I know that you want to be an ally, and that’s

    exactly why I wanted to check in about the comment you made.”

    – “Clearly we have different personal opinions about this topic. Regardless, the code of conduct does say that we are expected to not create sustained disruption of talks so I’m going to ask us to move along and return the floor to the speaker.”

  • STRATEGIES FOR SPEAKING OUT• Remove the person from the situation

    – “This conversation is no longer productive, so I am ending it.”

    – “You have already been asked to yield the floor. We are going to continue with our session so the choice is yours: to rejoin the conversation in a civil manner or to leave the room.”

    – “You have been given several chances to take accountability for the harm of your words, whether you meant to be harmful or not. At this point, I am going to have to ask you to exit the session.”

  • CONTINUING THE CONVERSATION• Offer support to people who may have been

    directly affected by the biased comment

    • Consider what could be done in order to prevent the situation next time

    • Be a consistent champion of challenging bias

  • PROACTIVELY MITIGATE BIAS• Syllabus design

    – Statement(s) about classroom values/expectations/behavior, course content

    • Structure of the first day of class– Introductions, methods for getting to know your students,

    communication prior to first day• Group project member selection processes• Office hours• Continually commit to creating an inclusive classroom

    environment– UCAT programs, MCC programs, Kirwan Weekly Forums

  • BEINGCALLED

    OUT / IN

  • CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION• Kirwan Institute Weekly Forums

    • Every other Thursday

    • 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM

    • 33 W. 11th Ave., 1st floor conference room

    http://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/weeklyforum/

  • Image Credit

    http://68.media.tumblr.com/97970e9720b0824f43eed14a735ab720/tumblr_o6ufn9aEi41rzzhceo1_500.jpg

  • QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

    Image Credit

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  • FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT OUR WEBSITE:

    KIRWANINSTITUTE.OSU.EDU

  • NEXT SESSIONS

    Slide Number 2Slide Number 3You Are Not Alone!You Are Not Alone!Slide Number 6Benefits of Inclusive �Learning EnvironmentsWhat Does It Mean to Be �an Active Bystander?The Bystander EffectThe Bystander EffectSlide Number 11Context MattersWhy Be an Active Bystander?Implicit bias can turn even our best intentions into unwanted outcomesDefining Implicit BiasUnderstanding Implicit BiasDefining MicroaggressionsSlide Number 19Diversity, Inclusion, Equity, and JusticeDiversity, Inclusion, Equity, and JusticeHow Can I Be an �Active Bystander?Strategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutStrategies for Speaking OutContinuing the ConversationProactively Mitigate BiasBeing �Called �Out / InContinue the ConversationSlide Number 47Questions and AnswersSlide Number 49Next Sessions