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Deepening Impact 2014 Annual Report KENYA

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  • DeepeningImpact

    2014AnnualReport

    KENYA

  • OurVision

    OurMission

    SharedValues

    A world without poverty and injustice in which every person enjoys their right to a

    life with dignity.

    To work with poor and excluded people to eradicate poverty by overcoming injustice

    and inequity that causes it.

    Published by ActionAid KenyaAll Africa Conference of Churches Building, Waiyaki WayP.O. Box 42814-00100, NairobiTelephone: +254 (020) 4440440/4/9Email: [email protected]: www.actionaid.org/kenya.org

    Cover Photo: Titus ParkleaEditor: Lucy Wanjiku MuriithiDesign & Layout: Melva Consult

    Photocopies of all or part of this publication may be made provided that the source is acknowledged. ActionAid Kenya would appreciate receiving details of the use of any of this material in training, research or programme design, implementation or evaluation.

    MutualRespect

    Humility

    EquityandJustice

    Solidaritywiththepoor,powerlessand

    excluded

    CourageofConviction

    HonestyandTransparency

    Integrity

    Fairness

    Accountability

  • AbbreviationsForeword

    IntroductionExternal ContextInternal Context

    Programme PrioritiesSecuring basic rights for women and girls

    Access and Control over Land and Natural ResourcesAccountability at all levels

    Disaster management and resilience building

    Organizational Processes and ChangesImproved leadership and governance of the organization for enhanced

    accountabilityDiversify and grow our funding

    Financial management systems to ensure timely management decision making and increased accountability to all stakeholders

    Effective program quality management to deepen impacteffective organization structure and work force to deliver the strategy

    Financial StatementsAudited Financial Statement

    Governance Structure

    0406

    070809

    1112142124

    2627

    2829

    3031

    3233

    38

    CONTENTS

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    AAI ActionAid International AAK ActionAid Kenya ACORD Agency for Cooperation and Research in Development ASALs Arid and Semi-Arid Areas ASALs Arid and Semi-Arid Lands CDF Constituency Development FundCLNSA Coast Land Non-State Actors CSG County Steering Group CSO Civil Society OrganisationDANIDA Danish International Development AgencyDFID Department for International DevelopmentDSG District Steering CommitteeEMCA Environmental Management and Coordination Act FFS Farmers Field SchoolFGG Fair Green and Global FGM Female Genital Mutilation HAP Humanitarian Accountability Practices IWD International Womens Day KDRP Kenya Drought and Resilience Programme KFSSG Kenya Food Security Steering Group KLA Kenya Land Alliance KNHRC Kenya National Human Rights CommissionLRP Local Rights Programme MCA Member of County AssemblyMRF Malindi Rights ForumMWRO Mwangaza Women Rights Organisation NACC National AIDS Control Council (NACC) NDMA National Drought Management AuthorityNDMA National Drought Management AuthorityNLC National Land CommissionPA Provincial AdministrationPBO Public Benefits Organization PFA Public Financing for Agriculture VAW/G Violence against Women/GirlsWFP World Food Programme

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  • Foreword

    It is a great pleasure to share with you ActionAid Kenyas (AAK) programme achievements through this Annual Report 2014. This report will help you learn how AAK is facilitating processes, working with women living in poverty and exclusion and other marginalized groups to eradicate poverty.

    The external environment continued to be very dynamic and volatile. This was highly driven by high poverty prevalence, inequality, low accountability, low investment and inadequate farm productivity. Patri-archal system of governance and other cultural prac-tices continued to foster rights violations to women and girls. Government expenditure for development remained low at only 22% of the national budget undermining provision of basic services to commu-nities. Fragile security affected AAIK operations in several counties.

    Internally, 2014 was a year of happening for AAIK. It was mid-year in the implementation of our current Country Strategy Paper (CSP) Making Our Rights Count 2012-2017. Thus a CSP review was done to reflect into our past achievements and focus on deepening our impact for the remaining period of the strategy. The main output was a Revised Country Strategy Paper 2015- 2017.

    The revised CSP contained the emerging issues and learnings from the review, changing external and internal contexts and how these are impacting AAIK work, what we are going to do differently given the context packaged as game changers and new ways of working and revised key priorities both to mission and organizational development objectives.

    Notable achievements were strong empowerment of communities around strategic objectives, strong focus on impact in our work with women, imple-mentation of relevant and responsive programs and strong engagement with County governments. From the organizational development perspective, AAK developed and operationalized an Organizational Development Strategy, ensuring various policies and procedures are in place for increased efficiency. It

    also facilitated the upgrading of the Information Tech-nology infrastructure and rolling out the web-based monitoring and evaluation system. Additionally, in-ternal audits were conducted and monthly manage-ment accounts generated. With regard to fundrais-ing, AAK achieved 98% supporter retention, ensuring constant income for the country programme. AAK also achieved strong international relations with its partners both within the AAI federation as well as outside.

    These achievements were not devoid of challenges. Notable challenges included inadequate targeting to reach people living in poverty and exclusion, lack of adoption of integrated community-led planning processes, weak youth engagement to influence political and accountability processes, inadequate technical support to LRPs to steer local priority work, grounding our campaigns work with local contexts, weak evidence generation through research, shrink-ing AAK visibility in policy influencing spaces, weak synergy across mission priorities and weak staff and partners capacity and conceptualization of Human Rights Based Approach, womens rights and moni-toring and evaluation.

    We are grateful to our child sponsorship supporters and institutional donors who helped us in raising funds and implementing our program activities. Many thanks to the communities we work with and especially women and girls for enabling us make a positive change in the war of eradicating poverty. For AAK team, especially the front line staff and partners, we celebrate the achievements of 2014 while also looking in future into delivering the promises under the revised strategy. Last we celebrate our General Assembly and National Board for oversight offered throughout the year.

    Bijay KumarExecutive DirectorActionAid Kenya

    Bijay KumarExecutive DirectorActionAid Kenya

    Elizabeth Wakilo Righa Board ChairActionAid Kenya

    Elizabeth Wakilo Righa Board ChairActionAid Kenya

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  • Introduction01

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  • External Context

    Kenya is a largely patriarchal society, which has contributed to womens subjugation in both the pri-vate and public spheres. Violence against Women and Girls (VAW/G) is high in Kenya despite Affirma-tive Action provisions in Articles 175c), 177b) and 197 of the Constitution of Kenya 2010 that prohibits discrimination and negative practices. Violence continues to manifest in the form of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), early and forced marriages, in-cest, rape, battery, widow inheritance and exclusion from electoral and political processes. According to the 2014 Kenya Demographic Health Survey (KDHS), women are more likely to experience phys-ical violence.

    Gender equity index remains low at 0.6081 as evidenced by the low share of parliamentary seats held by women. The representation of women in the National Assembly is only 19% while the Senate has 27% of women. This is below the Constitu-tional threshold of two-thirds principle of gender representation (Articles 27 and 81).

    Devolution of power and accountability to the 47 counties promises to transform Kenya through in-clusive growth and equity in public service delivery. County governments and opposition continued to pressure for more allocation of funds to devolved structures. Elected leaders especially Members of County Assemblies (MCAs) also agitated for higher pay. As result, government continued to operate with a high recurrent expenditure with very little funds left for development.

    On 30th Sep 2014, Kenya was classified as a mid-dle-income country after a statistical reassessment by The Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. Kenya effectively became Africas ninth largest economy with a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of $55.2 billion. The 2013 economys growth rate was also revised to 5.7% with a similar projection for 2014. Poverty levels in the country remained at 45.9% while the life expectancy was pegged at 61 years1. Rebasing the national account implies that there is a decline in opportunities for funding in the North due to de-prioritization of Kenya thus leading to a decline in traditional support for CSOs work2.

    22%

    46%

    2%

    Developmentexpenditure

    Operation &Maintainance

    Debt payment &pending bills

    Personalemolments

    30%

    Government ExpenditureFigure 1: County government expenditure analysis 2013/14

    Source: Controller of budgets report 2013/14

    Introduction

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  • In 2014, Kenya experienced an emerging fragile security context3 with Militia groups in major towns presenting a serious security problem. The Govern-ment has been forced to step up security as well as tackle high youth unemployment.

    Land in Kenya is a critical resource impacting people and livelihoods and holding great econom-ic, cultural, environmental and political importance. The quest for gender equality has not been alien to rights to land use and ownership4. Land reforms have however provided a beacon of hope for a more equitable and favourable situation for women to own, manage, access and transfer or otherwise transact in land and immovable property5.

    Kenya has great potential from its growing and youthful population, a dynamic private sector, a new constitution, and its pivotal role in East Africa to be one of Africas success stories. However, the country is facing challenges of poverty, inequality, governance, low investment and low farm produc-tivity to achieve rapid, sustained growth rates that will transform the lives of ordinary citizens6. Devo-lution is a challenge, but also an opportunity for greater distribution of economic opportunities7.

    Internal Context

    The year 2014 was the mid-way point of imple-menting the current Country Strategy Paper Making Our Rights Count. The mid-term review for the CSP was conducted through a participatory process involving communities, staff and other stakehold-ers. During the review, emphasis was laid on what worked well and the areas that the organization needed to sharpen its focus on to deepen impact. The review also focussed on the mission & organi-zational development priorities of the CSP.

    From the CSP review, some assertions were made. One overriding caveat was that the CSP is not a new strategy but a revised version under the ban-ner Making Our Rights Count Revised strate-gy 2015 2017. Other assertions made included; the centrality of women living in poverty and exclu-sion, deepening of accountability systems within the organization as well as with the communities we work with, mainstreaming of resilience and con-flict sensitivity approaches as we implement AAKs activities, strengthening engagement with the youth as well as forging deeper partnerships with . A strong focus on empowering the communities we work with as well as a strong performance oriented organizational culture ranks key as an output of the review process.

    1 Mohamed Wehliye, Principal Benefits of rebasing Economy, in the East African Standard, 2nd October 2014, p. 11; see also Nic Chee seman, Recalculating Kenyas GDP: Kenyans may pay for the appearance of wealth, in Democracy in Africa, (http://democracyinafrica.org/recalculating-kenyas-gdp-kenyans-may-pay-appearance-wealth/#, downloaded on 10th April 2014) 2 AAK, Deepening Making Our Rights Count, p. 93 European Interagency Security Forum, The Future of Humanitarian Security in Fragile Contexts: An Analysis of Transformational Factors Affecting Humanitarian Action in the Coming Decade, (European Interagency Security Forum, 2014), p. 84 Joanne Monene, Toward the Realization of Land Rights for Women in Kenya (http://ke.boell.org/sites/default/files/uploads/2014/02/to ward_the_realisation_of_land_rights_for_women_in_kenya.pdf, downloaded 10th April 2014)5 Ibid.6 Kosta Kioleoglou, Kenya: Dependence on Real Estate May Disappoint, in the African Executive, 04th 11th February 20157 Ibid.

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  • The review process also pointed to the need to make certain shifts, adopt new ways of working that seek to strengthen AAKs interventions/initiatives so as to achieve greater impact. These suggested shifts are referred to as the game changers and news ways of working. Game changers refer the changes envisioned in AAKs work in its strategic objective of achieving greater impact while AAKs new ways of working are process-oriented chang-es related to its approaches and methodologies aimed at facilitating change in communities.

    The Board approved the revised strategy in Sep-tember 2014 followed by a light restructuring which re-established three clusters and the policy unit. The re-introduction of the clusters strives to enhance support to LRPs in terms of supervision, administration as well as technical advice. The policy and research unit was re-established as a deliberate step to assist AAK reclaim its visibility in the policy influencing spaces.

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  • Programme Priorities

    Strategic objective: Ensure Women and Girls living in poverty and exclusion gain power to secure their rights.

    Across 16 counties, ActionAid supported communi-ty education, mobilisation and response to Violence against Women and Girls (VAW/G) both in public and private spaces reaching approximately 20,800 women and girls. Equally, AAK joined in on national initiatives aimed at creating a favourable legal envi-ronment and legislation that enhances government commitment to ending violence against women and girls. AAK continued to work closely with five women movements to undertake women empow-erment actions through trainings and community forums.

    Women and girls are safe from violence in both private and public spaces

    In all LRPs and areas where we have presence through partners, ActionAid supported awareness raising of communities to recognize and challenge violence against women and girls. More support by men and boys in curbing VAW/G led to more women reporting cases of violence against women and girls. The development of Standard Operat-ing Procedures by the government as well as the capacity enhancement of service providers led to uniformity in management and handling of VAW/G cases with 192 reported cases utilising the proce-dures. Some of the cases reported included rape, wife battery, child negligence, early marriage and Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). A total of 201 cases were reported to local leaders and police in Marafa, Elangata Wuas, Kongelai, Tangulbei and

    Kishushe LRPs. ActionAid also facilitated capacity building for 265 teachers and community leaders on recognizing, reporting and management of VAW/G cases.

    AAK offered support to communities and partic-ipated actively in development of the Prevention against Domestic Violence Bill 2013. The legislation recognizes different forms of domestic violence such as physical, sexual, psychological and eco-nomic violence and gives guidelines on handling them. The Bill also seeks to protect survivors of do-mestic violence and provide protection for spouses and children or dependents within the family unit. ActionAid also proposed establishment of a board to design, supervise and co-ordinate public aware-ness programmes on protection against domestic violence as well as to advise the Government on matters relating to protection against domestic violence and the implementation of the Bill.

    Women occupy leadership positions and influence decision making at all levels

    Though Kenya recorded the highest number of women in leadership following the 2013 elections in its history, there is still a long way to go to achieve gender equity in elective and nominated public bodies and decision making organs through the two third principle.The principle stipulates that no more than two thirds of the members of any public elective and nominative body will be of the same gender.

    Securing basic rights for women and girls

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  • Winnie Nyamataga a 16 year old and a pupil in Ko-kamange- Kuria she will sit for her Kenya Certificate of Primary Education at the end of the year 2014. Winnie is a little different from all the pupils preparing to sit for their KCPE- she is a testimony that there can be life after child pregnancy. My parents were not able to pay fees for both of us while two other children were in primary and secondary school. A man tricked me and I got married to him and school came to a halt for me. I was married for three years and got three miscarriages during that time. I wanted to go back to school but I knew that anyone who was married could not go to school. My dreams were gone with the wind I thought Winnie says. I heard about the return to school campaign being run by Actionaid when I came to visit my mother and saw that as an opportunity to fulfil my long harboured desire to continue with my studies adds Winnie.

    Winnie is back to school now and registered for this years KCPE exam. She will be sitting for the exams with her younger brother who is also in class 8. She joined the Girls forum in her school and actively participates in their discussions and activities. She has had a second chance to education which is her right and has been.

    Following a proposal in parliament to scrap off the two thirds gender affirmative action in the Consti-tution - 2010, AAK supported a women and devo-lution conference aimed at setting the stage for communicating the womens/gender agenda to the women in the senate, national assembly and the county assemblies. The conference sought to bring on board the targeted women leaders as agents of change who can serve as catalysts for progress and development in each county. The proposal to scrap off the affirmative action is still in parliament awaiting tabling for debate.

    During the year, AAK supported about 200 girls forums across 16 counties reaching 4600 girls. The girls forums are intended to provide a safe space for girls in schools to meet and share issues of con-cern in an environment that is supportive and safe.

    Challenges and Lessons Learnt

    Despite the Constitution providing a raft of rights to protect women and girls, they still continue to be among the poorest and most at risk in Kenya. Despite the efforts AAK has continue to make in ensuring women and girls gets empowered, pa-triarchy remains deeply entrenched in cultures of many communities and these must be confronted. Another challenge has been the poor operation-alisation and enforcement of the Constitution and other attendant laws in Kenya that outlaw gender discrimination.

    Life after child pregnancy

    Case Study

    20,800

    200

    Women and Girls supported

    Girls forumssupported

    16CountiesWorked in 5 Women MovementsSupported

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  • Land in Kenya is a critical resource impacting peoples livelihoods and holding great economic, cultural, environmental and political importance. The land reform agenda in Kenya was sparked off by the National Land Policy 2009 and further anchored in Kenyas Constitution. Nevertheless the current struggle on land and natural resources relate to enactment of laws to govern community land, address historical injustice, forestall land grabs including reverting land that has already been grabbed back to the community and ensure fair share of benefits to communities affected by mining and other extractive sector industries.

    While working to entrench women interest and control over land, these areas of land and natural resources struggle formed the bulk of our pro-gramme focus in 2014. During this period, AAK interventions focused on building the capacities of communities and supporting them to secure their land rights.

    Increased access and control over land and other natural and productive re-sources

    Key milestones under these result area included:

    Mobilization of County Executives and Assem-blies for Greater Support to Land Reform Agenda: ActionAid supported a two day awareness creation process for 30 Members of County Assemblies drawn from the Coastal Counties of Mombasa,

    Kwale, Taita Taveta, Kilifi, Tana River and Lamu. This forum enlightened the MCAs on their role on land reforms in their respective counties. In response to this action, Mombasa and Kwale County Govern-ment initiated a process of developing a localised land policy and allocated resources towards land adjudication and titling.

    As a response for the need to fast track land reforms at national level, ActionAid launched the Land for Communities and with Women cam-paign. The seven day process was marked with a number of actions that heightened the need for land reforms in the country prompting Ministry of Lands to move fast to begin land registry cleaning exercise. The launch of Land for Communities and with Women Campaign also triggered other CSO actions that heightened the need for land reforms. The launch of the campaign attracted 458 women.

    Promoting women land rights and claims: With support from Oxfam Ireland, ActionAid consol-idated the formation of six Women Land Rights Chapters. Additional capacity development for the leadership of this women land rights chapters was done that sought to take the leaders through existing land laws and policies and due process to be followed in advancing women land rights. This culminated in a Rural Women Assembly in coast region bringing over 200 women together to advance women land rights. AAK further supported the efforts of 200 women to secure both individual and joint land titles.

    Access and Control overLand and Natural ResourcesStrategic objective: To work with communities living in poverty and exclusion to facilitate their access and control of land and productive resources for improved livelihood security

    Programme Priorities

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  • Outreaches targeting women were also held in Kanagoni and Kubuka villages of Kilifi County on women land rights and the importance of women representation in the land boards and communal land committees. Similar outreaches were conduct-ed in Mombasa and Siaya Counties. The Women Land Chapters supported a number of women who were at the verge of being dispossessed of their land. In the coming year, the Women Land Chapters will serve as a spring board for amplifying women land rights claims and act as a build up to the forthcoming Kilimanjaro summit.

    Increased clarity on the role of Provincial Admin-istration: Bamburi LRP supported three trainings for provincial administration and community represen-tatives on their roles in land administration as pro-vided for in the Land Laws. The Provincial Adminis-tration (PA) has in the past played a big role in land transactions that dispossessed communities of their land. Under the existing land laws, the role of the Provincial Administration in implementation of Land Laws is limited to security provision and sup-

    porting alternative dispute resolution mechanism. This action has led to cessation of administrators involvement in negotiating land transactions/ and curbing malpractices that compromise land rights of local communities.

    Support of Community Petitions to Courts and Other National Bodies: ActionAid supported com-munity members of Yala Swamp who successfully made an application to the appeal chambers after being dissatisfied with the ruling from the High Court of Kenya which had dismissed their applica-tion on a technicality against a multinational called Dominion Farm. The case touched on the com-munity being disenfranchised by Dominion Farm after the multinational flooded their communal land. The ruling on this case indicated that there was a violation of Article 159 (2) (d) of the Constitution of Kenya which states that justice shall be adminis-tered without undue regard to procedural technical-ities. A similar petition by Marereni Communities was made through the area Member of Parliament to the President. A Presidential directive was issued

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  • for respective government departments to con-duct investigations and report to the President on the extent of encroachment of community land by salt mines. The report produced was contested by Marereni community and The Malindi Rights Forum which stalled the flawed recommended actions.

    Successful Support to Resistance to Evictions: ActionAid linked Kamnarok Community of Barin-go County with The National Land Commission. The commission drafted a letter and directed the County Government of Baringo to stop any forceful eviction from Kamnarok to pave way for wildlife conservation. At the time when ActionAid inter-vened, heavy machinery had been mobilized to the site to pull down houses including public utilities such as schools.

    In Taita Taveta, ActionAid supported peaceful com-munity protests and sit-ins that led to the County Governor to visit Kishushe and gave support to the communitys claims. This action led to petitioning of The National Land Commission that had earlier written a letter in recognition of land claims by Wan-jala Mining Company. The protests by the com-munity residing in Kishushe compelled the com-

    mission to withdraw their earlier letter that falsely recognized the claims of the mining company.

    Strengthened Policy and Legislation Processes: AAK, Coast Land Non-State Actor (CLNSA) and Institute for Law and Environmental Governance (ILEG) contributed to policy and legislation pro-cesses in a number of ways. AAK in partnership with ILEG engaged the Constitutional Implementa-tion Commission on reviewing the Community Land Bill as well as conducted consultations with local communities on issues of benefit sharing from nat-ural resources in Kwale, Kilifi and Siaya Counties. The engagements with communities in Kilifi helped to stop imminent encroachment by a multinational investor into the iconic Arabuko-Sokoke Forest. AAK further mobilized communities from Takaungu, Marereni, Mwakirunge, Yala Swamp and Kwale to attend meetings organized by Historical Injustices Task Force and present their views.

    A Task Force to Address the Yala Swamp Com-munity Issues Established: Communities residing in the Yala Swamp submitted a memorandum to the County Assembly through a friendly MCA. As a result of this memorandum, the Governor formed

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  • a task force to look into the community concerns. The task force has so far held several village level meetings with affected community members.

    Development of a binding code to guide investor conduct: AAK partnered with the Institute for Law and Environmental Governance (ILEG) to develop two research papers as a basis for developing policy briefs focusing on community participation and benefit sharing from natural resources among communities, Counties and The National Govern-ment. These policy briefs were used to influence the Benefit Sharing Bill and are further designed to facilitate discussions and engagements with policy makers in the course of advocating for the adoption of the investment principles in 2015.

    Development of an Advocacy strategy for Kwale Natural Resource Network: AAK alongside ILEG facilitated training for Kwale County Natural Re-source Network as well as supporting the network to develop its current five year Strategic Plan and its accompanying Advocacy Strategy.

    Strengthening networks and coalitions: AAK is a member of Coast Land Non-State actors and at national level is a member of the National CSOs working Group on community land. Strengthened Mechanisms for Support to Hu-man Rights Defenders: Human Rights Defenders (HRDs) are faced with myriad of risks ranging from intimidation through arrests, confinement & imprisonment, branding as associates of outlawed groupings and are often subjects of judicial harass-ment. As a long-term approach to minimize risks for HRDs, AAK conducted a three day training for 30 HRDs drawn from CSOs, community groups and women facilitators of land rights on risk assess-ment and management. The training, facilitated by Protection International, equipped the HRDs with knowledge on assessing risks as they conduct their

    activism work. The trainings focussed on mapping of security incidents and drawing lessons, drawing security strategies and plans, drawing prevention plans & emergence plans and outlining implemen-tation roadmap with roles and responsibilities. AAK is following up to ensure that the HRDs and their institutions have developed risk management plans and are implementing them. AAK also intends to bolster this step by institutionalizing support mech-anisms for Human Rights Defenders.

    AAK further partnered with eight (8) NGOs in an ef-fort to build solidarity movements with the commu-nities ahead of a court case where seven individu-als were charged with alleged malicious damage to property. AAK together with the eight partners facili-tated community members to attend the court case which was a clear demonstration that the case was a matter of public interest. The eight NGOs that AAK partnered with included; The National Coa-lition on Human Rights Defenders-Kenya, Kenya National Commission on Human Rights, Protection International and American Jewish World Services. Others were Peace Brigades International, Shield for Justice, Freedom House and Coast GRT- Kilifi.

    County Baseline 2013/2014 2014/2015

    BaringoMigoriKakamegaWest Pokot

    3%4%3%2%

    3%***7%8%6%

    County agriculture budgets: 2013/2014 & 2014/ 2015

    Figure 3: % Budget allocation trends for agricultural sector during 2013/14 & 2014/15 financial years

    200Women

    140

    supported to access land titles

    Members of County Assemblies trained

    6,000Farmers supported

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  • Improved Income and Livelihood Diversity

    Partial devolution of agriculture has brought the control of the sector in close proximity to women smallholder farmers to influence budget allocation in the sector as well as improve efficiency of land use. Owing to competing priorities in the Counties, majority of the Counties have been unable to put more than 7% of their budget to the Agriculture sector. This has had a ripple effect to the declining aggregate allocation to the sector nationally. The programme focus under this outcome area placed more emphasis on three aspect

    i) Improving livelihoods through diversification of livelihoods.

    ii) Strengthening farmer associations and movements

    Influencing the pattern of resource allocation in agriculture sector towards women small-holder farmers.

    Increased budget allocation by the ministry of agriculture in four counties: During the period of 2013 - 2014, ActionAiid engaged in processes aimed at influencing budget allocation and priori-tization of women smallholder farmer concerns in the four Counties of Kakamega, Migori, Baringo and West Pokot respectively. The downstream actions included mobilizing and strengthening four farmers networks and groups and building their capacity in policy advocacy.

    The upstream actions included awareness creation of 140 Members of County Assembly and Executive drawn from the four counties on policy framework guiding agriculture, the need for increased invest-ment in the sector as well as supporting key policy influence meetings with farmers from the partici-pating counties. These actions led to increase in budgets allocations by the counties for the current financial year:

    Strengthening of Farmer Platforms and Institu-tionalization of Spaces for Engagement: AAK strengthened women farmers networks and estab-lished special consultative structures (platforms) to support dialogues on policy, agriculture budgetary allocation and accountability in In Kuria, Khwisero, Baringo and West Pokot.

    The Women Association of Kitui County (WAKC) is a federation of eight women savings and credit cooperatives. It currently has a membership of over 2,000 women most of them smallholder farmers. The association initiated by AAK in 2013, has continued to advocate enhanced budgetary allo-cation the agriculture sector as well as advocating for women rights in Kitui County

    The association, whose motto is Women united can do all things, exist to advance the women agenda in the County. Many women have joined the association in the County in order to participate in governance by ensuring that their opin-ions and perspectives are considered when decisions con-cerning them are made by those in position of leadership. The association rides on the numerical strength of women as explained by Florence Muia, one of the members. In Kitui County, women are the majority and they are the most voters, unfortunately, they are under-represented in decision making and have low access to public resources and opportunities in this County.

    The association participated in 2014 years Kitui County bud-get hearing forums. The women made the necessary prepa-rations by conducting an analysis of the proposed county budget to establish whether their priorities and perspectives had been taken onboard and adequately resourced. They pressurized the county to increase allocations to this minis-try besides other demands. This action borrows significant-ly from the position paper the women had earlier presented during the first Kitui County Rural Women Assembly in 2013. Among the top priorities are development projects in health and sanitation, water and agriculture, education and entre-preneurship. After these consultations, Jecinta, one of the members of the WAKC had this to say, I thought it is very difficult to influence the county government, I am very happy to see that the governor can listen to women. The journey has just started and we will go far.

    Women united can do all thingsKitui County

    Through these initiatives, women are now consult-ed in agriculture county processes, sit in critical ag-riculture sector committees and in some instances sub granted by county governments and account back to government. Progressively, farmer groups are now being given tenders by government to sup-ply certain farm inputs, a case in point being the tis-sue culture banana that farmers in Khwisero supply to other farmers through government tenders.

    Transformation in county processes through Ru-ral Women Assemblies: ActionAid has supported emergence and strengthening of Women Assem-blies across the three counties of Kitui, Kilifi,

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  • Baringo and Kajioado. In Kilifi County, the Women Assembly continued to engage county leadership on ensuring women have access & control to land while Baringo and Kajiado Women Assemblies were key in influencing progressive policies for eradication of FGM.

    Supporting livelihood diversification and devel-opment of alternatives: ActionAid worked with approximately 6000 farmers to improve their agri-cultural production and income. In Isiolo, Makima and Mwingi ActionAid promoted various technolo-gies and diversification approaches including the construction of an irrigation scheme in Isiolo that is providing water to over 200 farmers, fish farming ventures as well as small scale rabbit rearing. Other interventions supported included water and soil conservation and poultry rearing among others live-lihood diversification interventions. Through these efforts, over 1,997 farmers and 1483 field School members benefitted from this work with a majority of the beneficiaries being women. For purposes of strengthening this work, AAK partnered with Agri-culture Sector Development Support Programme to develop value chain linkages for commodities pro-duced by women in Bamburi, Marafa and Elangata Wuas LRP.

    Strengthened Cooperative Movements: ActionAid provided institutional and operational support to seven small-holder farmers cooperatives in three project sites. Beyond playing a key role in advoca-cy and auditing agriculture sector budgets, these cooperatives have negotiated better access by farmers to inputs, markets and information. The cooperatives have also become legitimate champi-ons of issues affecting small-holder farmers while engaging with decision makers on various issues. For instance, in Mwingi Sub-County, the resident small-holder cooperative managed to influence the county government to allocate KES 1.5 million towards the construction of a honey processing plant in Thaana. In Isiolo County, the cooperative society engaged with the Water Resource Manage-ment Authority and managed to secure a permit for the construction of Kakili Irrigation Scheme where ActionAid was unable to make head-way. In Isiolo County, the cooperatives bodies led sustained land and advocacy rights work against forceful acquisition of land by the Kenya Defence Forces while cooperatives in Makima advocated for lasting solutions to land problems affecting the area. In Kuria, Kongelai, Khwisero and Tangulbei LRPs, the

    cooperatives led in accountability processes in the agriculture sector through budget tracking and informing policy formulation.

    In order to improve farmer engagements with policy makers, ActionAid trained farmers from the seven LRPs on policy advocacy, budget tracking and influencing and leadership which led to increased confidence levels in engaging duty bearers.

    Geo-Mapping Basic Services in Communities: AAK worked with Youth in Isiolo, Mwingi and Makima to develop an online platform that allows to access basic services in select locations of the counties through google maps. This technological platform is a major progress in moving advocacy engagement online. This innovative platform can be accessed through the following URL: www.vija-na-action-mapping.net.

    Improved incomes and resilience: The mid-term review and PRRPs have indicated that men and women farmers have improved their resilience to vagaries of weather. Further, farmers indicated that their incomes had registered marked growth as a result of viable alternatives and better linkages with markets. In addition, statistic show that women feel they are contributing more significantly to deci-sions at the household level and community level. Women also initiated and strengthened their table banking activities during the year under review. Most women linked their strong sense of empower-ment to their economic status which was felt most at the household level. They articulated how the various AAK projects made significant changes to their lives on their journey to empowerment.

    Strengthening partnerships for improved incomes and livelihoods: ActionAid continued support-ing farmers to participate in innovation platforms that aim at improving their incomes. In Mwingi Sub-County, an innovation platform on green grams brought together interested players such as researchers, seed multipliers & stockists, farmers, bulk buyers as well as government representatives to seek solutions to the problems that bedevil the crop which include affordability of quality seed, pest & diseases, value addition and post-harvest losses among others. In Mbeere, a countywide innovation platform addressed bottlenecks in the fish farming industry such as fingerling shortage, quality and cost of feed and markets for the har-vest. Through this process, women farmers were

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  • mobilized and supported to start a fish breeding and production farms for fingerlings.

    Improved market access for women farmers and inclusion in value chain support: AAK supported cooperative to secure better and stable markets for their farmers. In Isiolo, AAK linked farmers with Finlays, enabling them produce high quality french beans for the export market while in Kuria, AAK promoted inclusion of vulnerable women in passion fruit commodity value chain support.

    Challenges and Lessons

    Despite all these successes, several challenges were faced around land access, use and owner-ship. The infighting between the Ministry of Land and National Land Commission was detrimental to AAKs engagement with the two bodies in an effort to find solutions to land problems in almost all areas where AAK works. Threats to human rights defenders at community level remained the most significant and mission threatening challenge over the period prompting training of HRDs in Bamburi LRP while initiating partnerships with Protection In-ternational to address the challenge. These strate-gic actions require significant resources and there was a growing reluctance of donors to fund explicit land issues hence affecting the overall success of this intervention. Lack of political commitment on land reforms was also a major issue in the year under review cutting across all levels due to vested interests in land transactions. Going forward, AAK will continue building the capacity of communities to engage in land reform processes at both the national and county levels.

    Low investment in agriculture continued to adverse-ly affect communities ability to diversify their liveli-

    hoods and incomes. The low investment was as a result of declining budgetary allocation at national level, low burn rates in agriculture due to delayed disbursement of budget to counties, competing priorities and inadequate policy legislation among Members of the County Assembly (MCAs).

    Some of the lessons learnt around revitalizing the agriculture sector included proper programming so as to ensure vulnerable and relief dependant households/ communities are food. There also exist a window of opportunity to influence pro-wom-en, pro-poor budget allocation in agriculture sector at the county level. However, actions supporting increased allocations at this level ought to be lever-aged by actions that keep track on overall national allocation to the sector. Even though agriculture is partially devolved, there is room for counties to negotiate better policy reforms and its envisaged that the changes negotiated at this level are more likely to impact positively on women smallholder farmers.

    There is also need to improve intra county resource flow to facilitate frontline staff in the Ministry of Agriculture to discharge their mandate effectively. This lesson is informed by the fact that farmers in a number of counties continued to experience delays in service delivery due to delays in authorization for fund utilization.

    Cooperatives and commodity interest groups have also emerged at County level with women farmers getting entrenched in relevant commodity value chain processes. This value chain driven model of increasing productivity and income was useful but nevertheless should be promoted in a balanced manner to ensure food production and preservation of biodiversity does not suffer.

    Figure 1: Social Audit group in a budget analyis session in Taita Taveta County

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  • ActionAid Kenya continued to provide the much needed civic education support reaching 3,680 women & men through various trainings. Approxi-mately 33,151 women and youth were mobilized to participate in various campaigns to monitor the de-livery of basic rights and analyse local and national policies. This was coupled with building community capacity to articulate and meaningfully engage not only in influencing quality basic service deliv-ery but also in demanding for their rights. Various community based structures had their capacities strengthened through trainings to monitor delivery of basic services across six counties. These include 15 basic delivery committees and 13 social audit groups.

    Figure 1: Social Audit group in a budget analyis session in Taita Taveta County

    Accountability at All LevelsStrategic objective: Empower communities living in poverty and ex-clusion to hold state and its institutions accountable for fulfilment of their basic rights

    Programme Priorities

    Institutions, Policies and Legal Frameworks that Promote theRealization of Basic Rights to Food, Health, Education and SocialSecurity

    There were significant milestones made in 2014 with regard to enhancing women and youth partici-pation in national and county governance in Kenya for improved accountability and basic service delivery.

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  • A total of 5,695 people (3,581 women, 2,114 men) participated in discussions and monitoring of basic service delivery in Nairobi, Baringo, Busia, Taita Taveta, Mombasa and Siaya Counties through social audit work. A total of 56 devolved fund proj-ects were audited in these counties with the audit reports being presented in community workshops that brought together 3,000 people (2000 women, 1000 men). The participants in the workshops also participated in the 2014/2015 budget review and analysis discussions that sought to share gaps in basic service provision with the respective County Government officials.

    Another four basic service delivery committees in health, education and water were established culminating in advocacy forums that demanded changes in budget allocations in the aforemen-tioned counties. As a result, Baringo County reduced the recurrent expenditure allocation from 62% in 2013/14 budget to 43% in 2014/15 budget as well as increasing the development allocation to 57% in the 2014/15 from 38% in the 2013/2014 budget.

    Taita Taveta County re-adjusted its budget to in-crease water projects from 16 to 64 hence reducing distances that women and girls had to travel for water while also increasing the number of residents accessing this basic right. A similar increase was also seen in agriculture resulting in each of the 20 wards being allocated a tractor for farming. Going forward, social audit groups will be monitoring and gathering data for the community score cards for these service to ensure accountability and im-proved access.

    The demand for basic service provision cannot be conducted in isolation without building the capacity for both the supply and demand side to integrate and mainstream human rights in policy formulation, budget making, planning and implementation. This necessitated the establishment of a pilot project with the County Governments of Lamu, Nakuru and Taita Taveta in partnership with the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) and the MS Training Centre for Development Corporation (MS TCDC).

    AAK worked with The Kenya Primary School Head teachers Association (KEPSHA) to hold their annual conference whose aim was to strengthen and support the Childrens County Governments.

    The week-long conference had an attendance of over 7,000 head teachers from across the country. Out of these, AAK trained 1,100 head teachers on promoting rights in schools with an aim of having increased engagement of stakeholders to claim childrens rights to education at community and county level, increased child participation in school governance processes and promotion of safe and non-violent environment for children.

    Increased Transparency and Ac-countability in Generation, Alloca-tion and Use of Resources to Realize Basic Rights

    Closely linked with basic service provision is the need for progressive realisation of tax reforms to ensure delivery of basic rights in counties which translates to increased demand for counties to re-allocate revenue for these services for people living in poverty and exclusion.

    Community awareness of tax justice remained critical in AAKs work while providing linkages to basic rights in a bid to encourage communities to engage in county budget allocations discourse as well as join the campaign for progressive realisa-tion of tax reforms for basic service delivery. The good governance festival which was held in the reporting year with the theme tax power was a good platform for engaging with citizens on tax jus-tice issues. A total of 21,497 (17,083 women, 4,414 men) participated in campaigns, trainings, dialogue forums and debates on tax justice. The programme also developed Information Education and Infor-mation (IEC) materials on tax justice while working closely with Activista, women and youth move-ments with the express aim of empowering them to lobby the County and National governments to enact and implement progressive tax reforms and policies.

    A critical component of the democratic and gover-nance work was the capacity building of LRP staff and AAK partners on the new system of devolved structures and governance. Through partnering with the Global platforms and MS-TCDC Arusha, the programme organized 48 trainings reaching 789 people including staff, partners and communi-ties from across the country on pro-poor budget-ing, policy making within the devolved structures and human rights based approach.

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  • Challenges and Lessons Learnt

    The teething problems of the new devolved struc-tures affected AAKs engagement with county officials. AAK however established a good work-ing relationship with Taita Taveta County officials including the Governors office which contributed greatly to advancing governance work especially in integration of human rights in the realisation of devolution. AAK engaged with the Kenya School of Government to adopt the Human Rights Cur-riculum for Realisation of Devolution after going through a lengthy validation process by The Kenya Institute for Curriculum Development (KICD).

    In engaging with various government institutions both at national and county level on public service provision as well as from capacity assessment conducted with county governments, it was evident that counties continue to work, plan and budget without basing their activities on the progressive Bill of Rights as enshrined in the Constitution. Security issues in Lamu and Mombasa Counties was a constant risk in AAKs governance work. Due to runaway insecurity in Lamu, the National Govern-ment imposed a dusk to dawn curfew which greatly impeded and slowed AAK activities in the region. AAK continued to work with communities living in

    poverty and exclusion to build their resilience in face of natural and man-made shocks and crisis in the reporting period. ActionAid strategically devel-oped its resilience work by working with communi-ties, particularly women, to build their disaster pre-paredness capacities as well as influence County governments, relevant institutions and systems for enhanced resilience.

    33,151

    1,100

    Participated in basic rights campaigns

    Head teacherstrained on child rights

    56 Devolved fund projects audited

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  • Enhanced Preparedness to Disas-ters and Conflicts

    In 2014, AAK together with five START Network consortium members led the development of an in-country proposal for a project dubbed Shifting the Power project. Shifting the Power is a three year project that aims to strengthen the role of local organizations in the humanitarian system to become active leaders and decision makers in the sector. The project also seeks to improve local or-ganizations capacities for humanitarian response, strengthen their role in networks and influence international actors to promote the role of local and national organizations. The project will collate doc-umentation, case studies and learning to evidence the approach and promote its replicability.

    Under the year in review, AAK participated in the UN Climate Change Conference held in Lima, Peru. The recently released Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change Synthesis Report shows that hu-man-induced climate change is already impacting people and ecosystems through ocean acidifica-tion, sea level rise, extreme heat events and pro-found changes in the Arctic. The report also shows that we can expect much worse if we do not take rapid, decisive action to break the worlds fossil fuel addiction.

    AAK facilitated the development of a sustainability assessments as well as development of guidelines for sustainable water and sanitation projects under the auspices of Maji na Uhai framework in the year under review. Through partnership with Safaricom Foundation, ActionAid UK provided development assistance to vulnerable rural communities mainly in the Arid and Semi-arid Lands (ASAL). These included water supply, water sanitation and hygiene interventions in order to mitigate disasters that perennially affect communities in the mentioned areas as well as build their resilience. A sustainabil-ity assessment was done providing a clear under-standing of how the projects are faring as well as their sustainability capabilities once the exit strategy is set in motion.

    During the reporting period, the organization car-ried out The Core Humanitarian Standards testing in one LRP. The Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability is an initiative that has been developed with the intent of supporting hu-manitarian and development actors to deliver qual-ity assistance, promote the well-being & dignity of communities and people affected by crisis as well as increase accountability to them. Through this framework, independent and autonomous human-itarian standard-setting bodies apply a consistent terminology and approach to their standards while

    Disaster Management andResilience BuildingAAK continued to work with communities living in poverty and exclusion to build their resilience in the face of natural and man-made shocks and crisis in the reporting period. ActionAid strategi-cally developed its resilience work by working with communities, particularly women, to build their disaster preparedness capaci-ties as well as influence County governments, relevant institutions and systems for enhanced resilience.

    Programme Priorities

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  • coordinating the use and support of the Core Hu-manitarian Standard, ensuring users of standards can better understand and implement standards for the benefit of those they seek to assist.

    In 2014, the Accountability in Emergencies Re-source Book was developed by five ActionAid countries, who came together to take leadership in this effort on behalf of the wider ActionAid federa-tion. AAK took a lead role together with Denmark, Haiti, Myanmar and Pakistan in developing the re-source book aimed at providing critical information to staff on accountability in emergencies.

    AAK phased out the three year Kenya Comprehen-sive Drought Resilience Programme (KDRP) in the reporting period. The KDRP came about in 2011 after the Government of Kenya declared drought a national disaster and highlighted the humanitarian crisis, particularly in the northern part of the coun-try. ActionAid Kenya responded to the drought by designing a two-phase comprehensive drought resilience programme dubbed Kenya Comprehen-sive Drought Resilience Programme (KDRP).

    The three year programme focused on building resilience as seen by ActionAid Kenya and other humanitarian agencies as the most effective way to respond to disasters worsened by climate change and structural vulnerabilities. The first phase of the KDRP was to provide relief to overcome the immediate humanitarian crisis with the second phase focusing on building resilience amongst the communities to be better able to cope with future disasters. The programme was implemented in 14 areas where AAK was already working and where the drought was considered the most severe.

    During the period under review, AAK in collabora-tion with World Food Programme (WFP) developed resilience structures particularly for water and soil

    conservation through the cash for assets reaching 12,107 households in Mwingi. AAK together with local leaders and the provincial administrators mobilised 23 new and existing Farmer Field and Learning Schools (FFLS) within the Cash for Assets (CFA) project supported by WFP benefitting 663 households. Through the same partnership, AAK reached 36,400 community members through gen-eral food distribution, 24,000 people through Food for Assets and another 990 people through supple-mentary feeding programme in Isiolo.

    Equally, AAK in liaison with Livestock Production and Veterinary Services Department was able to train 20 target beneficiaries on poultry vaccination and poultry production. These community poultry vaccinators were trained and supported with fully equipped 10 cooler boxes and 10 vaccine carriers which they utilized by vaccinating approximately 2000 birds during the reporting period.

    61,390

    20

    people supported with relief food

    poultry vaccinators trained

    23 Farmer field and learning schoolssupported

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  • Organizational Processes and Changes

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    In 2014, AAK sought to give more power and autonomy to field offices. This was done by ensur-ing more supervision, administration and techni-cal support was within or closer to LRPs through devolution of power to the LRPs and regions. While ensuring effective mechanisms are in place for up-ward and downward accountability, this was done in line with recommendation from the revised CSP.

    Effective and Efficient National Board and General Assembly

    The year under review saw a transition in the or-ganizations National Board with the election of a board member during the Annual General Meeting held on 25th July 2014. The AGM also accepted the appointment of an AAI representative to the Board, Mr. Ruud van den Hurke who is the Execu-tive Director of ActionAid Netherlands. Additionally, for the first time, the General Assembly member-ship recruited 12 people from the communities and partners that AAK work with making AAK more accountable to the people that it works with.

    The General Assembly and the National Board continued to work together with the Management to steer the organisation towards the achievement of its missions priorities. The Board and General Assembly members joined Management in various organizational events and participated in a number of community initiatives.

    Effective organogram with clear responsibilities, accountabilities and reporting lines

    In 2014, ActionAid Kenya conducted a mid-term review of its CSP with the objective of assessing progress and performance against the strategy while seeking to sharpen the focus for the remain-der of the strategy period. From the Organizational Development perspective, the review pointed out the need to analyse the existing structure, process-es and practices and align them to the agreed rec-ommendations from the CSP review. The mid-term CSP review on the Organization Development area recommended changes be made to the organo-gram with the intention of re-positioning AAK to be more effective and efficient while implementing the second phase of The CSP.

    The review also recommended that the Policy and Programmes department be split into two separate departments. The Policy Department will focus on matters of policy influencing through advocacy, research and campaigns at international, national and county governments levels. Three clusters were also introduced to enhance supervision, ad-ministration and technical support to LRPs.

    Under the Programmes Department, several national positions were introduced to coordinate women rights, mainstreaming resilience & emer-gencies, grant management and compliance as well strengthen AAKs child sponsorship work.

    Improved Leadership and Governance for EnhancedAccountability

    Organizational Processes and Changes

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  • Whereas AAK has relied heavily on child spon-sorship funds, the income from this source has steadily declined over the past five years. During the CSP review, it was apparent that AAK has to rethink its fundraising strategy and look at ways of diversifying its funding base. AAK therefore invest-ed in enhancing its capacity for fundraising and grant management.

    Regular supporters base main-tained and expanded Under sponsorship fundraising, AAK processed and relayed communication to all supporters leading to a supporter retention rate of 98%. AAK successfully organised the national annual spon-sorship review and training for all sponsorship staff in LRPs and head office as well as all new LRP managers. The unit also supported start-up ac-tivities in Kathonzweni LRP, generating 1,427 child profiles. AAK received 650 new links in the year from Italy.

    AAK hosted child sponsorship induction for eight new staff from South Africa, Malawi, Tanzania, Lesotho, and Kenya. The team visited one of the new LRPs and assisted in continued awareness creation among communities on the child spon-sorship concept. The team also participated in fun-day activities and message collection in some LRPs bringing together over 200 participants which

    included parents, area education officers, teachers and community resource persons.

    As part of AAKs supporter retention strategy, select children together with supporters from Italy did vid-eo message collection for sponsored children. The activity, which motivated stakeholders to continue supporting child sponsorship activities, was done with 2,217 children from Makima, Kathonzweni and Bamburi LRPs.

    Stable and Diversified Funding Through International Partnership Development

    The year saw the achievement of the set income targets. The approved CSP fundraising strategy was operationalized part of which was geared to-wards the launch of local fundraising initiatives. As a result of this and recommendation from the CSP review, new areas of resource mobilization were ini-tiated towards end of 2014 such as the introduction Local High Value Fundraising which was launched in 2014 while individual/ voluntary fundraising is scheduled for 2015.

    Similarly, a donor scoping study was commis-sioned and it provided intelligence to necessitate expanded donor engagement and networking aimed at increasing donor relations and ultimately increasing funding from institutional donors.

    Diversification and Growth in Funding

    Organizational Processes and Changes

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  • Organizational Processes and Changes

    Effective Internal Control Systems

    The internal audit team performed its review of the organisations financial statements and operations as per the approved work plan for 2014. It provid-ed an opinion on the adequacy, compliance and operating effectiveness of internal controls and other financial and operating policies and proce-dures. In addition to strengthening accountability mechanisms, the unit also sought to add value. The risk register and audit programs were updated periodically to incorporate any subsequent chang-es and ensure that they remain relevant to AAKs requirements.

    Maintaining Healthy ReserveLevels

    The financial health of the organisation was sta-ble throughout the year. AAK closed the year at a positive reserve level of 2.2 Months which is within the AAI reserve policy. Though there was a sub-stantial drop in income both from AAK partners and Goods in kind, there was a net positive growth in the reserve level.

    Effective Contract Management System

    During the reporting period, AAK implemented 36 projects with a total grant portfolio from donors to

    the tune of KES 841,572,000. Fifteen projects end-ed in 2014 while 21 transited to 2015. The grants/projects were classified under four strategic objec-tives in AAK CSP 2012-2017 as follows:

    The programme team ensured the organization complied with the Memorandum of Understanding obligations to the respective donors by imple-menting the agreed activities and reporting within the stipulated timelines. This ensured the donors disbursed the grants within the stipulated timelines. Where it was foreseen that activities would not be implemented in the given period due to reasons beyond AAKs control, the project implementers communicated this in advance to the respective donors requesting for an extension of time.

    ActionAid ensured the donor relationships were maintained to increase the likelihood that the proj-ects would be considered in the subsequent level of grants.

    The budget absorption in 2014 was relatively good for AAK. We intend to sustain the same in the coming years. The unit also continued to provide accurate and timely monthly management reports including narrative reports for timely and informed implementation while ensuring that all taxes and statutory payments were paid on time.

    Financial Management Systems to Ensure Timely ManagementDecision Making and IncreasedAccountability to All Stakeholders

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  • In line with its Accountability Learning and Planning System (ALPS) and Human Rights based Ap-proach, ActionAid Kenya worked with communities and partners to develop a results-based Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) system that ensured that all AAK processes, operations and interventions effectively contributed to achievements of clearly defined objectives while ensuring downward and upward accountability. This was done through re-viewing & operationalizing of M&E structures in line with global M&E systems and enhanced capacity building of staff & partners.

    Effective Monitoring andEvaluation System for Enhanced Accountability, Decision-Making and Effectiveness

    To enhance efficiency for M&E activities in the organization in the reporting period, AAK launched an online M&E system. Some 33 staff were taken through a training facilitated by the consultant who developed the system for buy in and adoption. Staffs were trained on how to log in to the system, input data and make reports for respective units. All LRP based staff and over 40 partners were trained on the online M&E system, participatory methodol-ogies and reporting procedures.

    During the year under review, AAK undertook PRRPs at the national and LRP level. These pro-cesses, which were done in a participatory man-ner, were very important in informing the mid-term review of the current CSP as well as the annual planning and budgeting for the year 2015.

    In order to enhance accountability across all levels, a training workshop was held for staff which largely focussed on the senior management and program staff. The workshop was meant to enhance skills and knowledge and culminated in the development of various accountability frameworks which will be significant in the delivery of revised CSP. Some of the frameworks developed were geared towards enhancing existing processes such as transpar-ency boards, participation & inclusion, complain mechanisms & resolution, delivery of basic rights, mobilization and financial management. Finaliza-tion and adoption of these frameworks will be done in 2015.

    Communication unit worked hand in hand with the programmes team to build solidarity with people liv-ing in poverty and exclusion by profiling their voices and amplifying them to the local and international media. The unit also utilized social media networks such as Facebook and Twitter which provided time-ly communication mechanism for staff, partners and the general public.

    The communication unit undertook the inaugural Junior Communication Fellows Programme which admitted the first six fellows. The early career en-trants benefitted from skills and knowledge to influ-ence their thinking and perceptions about poverty, its causes and social justice. The programme will seek to influence more young people to be game changers and social crusaders against poverty as well as key advocates in Human Rights Based Approach to development.

    Effective Program QualityManagement to Deepen Impact

    Focus: Organizing AAKs work around outcomes and impacts that create long lasting result areas along performance and longer term goals.

    Organizational Processes and Changes

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  • Effective Organization Structure and Work Force to Deliver the Strategy

    Organizational Processes and Changes

    Adequate, Competent, Committed and Motivated Staff for Achieve-ment of AAKs Missions Priorities

    Induction and on-boarding: In January 2014, AAK held a comprehensive induction for 13 new staff which lasted for three weeks. The induction en-abled the new staff to come up with performance objectives which were synchronized with their respective positions. AAK also introduced one performance management feedback mechanism which was in the form of a letter giving feedback on the strengths and weak areas for improvement for staff.

    To support staff development, AAK prepared and shared the 2014 training calendar based on the

    proposed trainings needs for staff raised in their appraisal documents. This was the first time AAK shared the training calendar and this encouraged staff to request for various training.

    AAK also had the international HR audit conducted in Kenya. From the audit findings, Kenya scored an average score of 2.9 out of 4. As a recommenda-tion, AAK initiated awareness creation on policies to ensure compliance.

    Finally, AAK implemented a salary increment for all staff employed after December 31st 2013. AAK also secured an AMREF cover for staff and their dependents which affords them 2 free air evacua-tions in a year.

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  • FinancialStatements

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  • Audited Financial Statements

    Organizational Processes and Changes

    The following are the audited financial statements for Actionaid Kenya for the year ended 31st De-cember 2014. The statements were audited by Ernst and Young. The auditors expressed an un-qualified opinion.

    Regular giving incomes have steadily gone down over the years due to natural attrition; similarly there was a decline in partnership income attributed to a number of contracts coming to an end.

    Total incomes raised during the period totalled to 8.3million. This is a 19% decrease from last year due to the decrease in the Goods in Kind received for distribution from the World Food programme.

    IncomeType

    2009 000

    2010 000

    2011 000

    2012 000

    2013 000

    2014 000

    Regular GivingOfficial PartnershipGoods in KindOther IncomesTotal

    3,9702,2406,783

    3813,031

    3,7642,3816,000

    20712,352

    3,7754,7615,800

    5414,390

    3,4285,4528,024

    6416,968

    3,2934,2912,659

    7310,316

    3,0603,7121,372

    2068,350

    0

    2,000

    4,000

    6,000

    8,000

    10,000

    12,000

    14,000

    16,000

    18,000

    2019-2014 Income Trends

    Inco

    me

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

    Other IncomesGoods in kindOfficial PartnershipRegular Giving

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  • Statutory Cost Analysis

    Project CostsSupport CostsFundraising CostsGovernance Costs- Inter and Exter AuditorsGovernance Costs- OthersTotalProject Costs as % of Total CostsFund raising Costs as % of Total IncomeSupport Costs as % of total Costs

    2009 000

    11,3528173919230

    12,68290%3%6%

    2010 000

    10,5189044458340

    11,99088%4%8%

    2011 000

    10,9654363785337

    11,86992%3%4%

    2012 000

    14,4745603705836

    15,49893%2%4%

    2013 000

    9,5295774064837

    10,59790%4%5%

    2014 000

    6,6148834146861

    8,04082%5%

    11%

    Expenditures

    Total expenditures during the period totalled 8,040 million which was a decline by 24% from the 2013 expenses of 10,597 million. The decrease in ex-penditure is attributed to reduction in the goods in kind distributed during the year.

    Chart: Expenditures by Strategic Objectives

    The project costs during the year made up 82% of the total costs while the support costs were 11%. These are within the recommended ranges as a measure of operational efficiency.

    Programme Expenditure by Strategic Objectives

    18

    16

    16

    28

    22

    Livelihoods andNatural Resources

    Governanve ofBasic Rights

    Women Rights

    Emergenciesand Resillience

    Cross Cutting

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  • ACTIONAID KENYA STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2014

    2014

    Grant income and Goods in kind

    Finance Income

    Other income

    Net Transfers

    Total Income

    Surplus/deficit for the year

    Direct expenditureProgramme costs

    Other expenditureTransfers to AAI

    Staff costs

    Depreciation

    Non Capital Assets

    Motor vehicle maint. fuel and repairs

    Travel and accommodation

    Telecommunication, postage and stationery

    Office running and maintenance costs

    Rent and rates

    Professional fees

    Bank charges

    Insurance

    Other costs

    Utilities water and electricity

    Fund raising costSponsorship Costs

    TOTAL EXPENDITURE

    5

    6

    7

    14(v)

    8

    14 (iv)

    9

    12

    10

    11

    2013

    INCOME

    TOTAL SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) FOR THE YEAR

    EXPENDITURE

    Note KShs000 KShs000

    1,176,496

    6,080

    19,152

    1,410

    637,333

    31,746

    307,889

    22,064

    1,219

    37,744

    53,280

    17,571

    13,717

    21,581

    10,143

    1,638

    3,835

    1,410

    2,322

    28,232

    1,495,054

    12,438

    2,128

    3,265

    962,024

    37,117

    274,898

    16,420

    1,929

    33,375

    43,367

    18,729

    10,656

    20,685

    9,882

    1,262

    3,267

    3,315

    3,269

    26,789

    1,203,138

    11,413

    1,191,725

    1,512,885

    45,901

    1,466,984

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    ACTIONAID KENYA STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2014

    2014

    Non-current assets

    Property, plant and equipment

    Current assets

    Receivables, prepayments and deposits

    Due from ActionAid International

    Cash and Bank Balance

    Total Assets

    Fund balances

    Unrestricted funds

    Current liabilities

    Accruals, creditors and other payables

    Deferred income

    TOTAL EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

    Surplus (Deficit) for the year

    Adjustments for:

    Depreciation (12)

    Interest Income (6)

    Operating gain (deficit) before working capital changes

    Changes in Working Capital

    Receivables, prepayments and deposits (13)

    Deferred income (17)

    Accruals, creditors and other payables (16)

    Net cash from operating activities

    Cash flows from investing activities

    Acquisition of assets

    12

    13

    14(iii)

    15

    16

    17

    2013

    ASSETS

    EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

    CASH FLOW STATEMENT

    Note KShs000 KShs000

    35,172

    35,963

    188,549

    146,413

    249,996

    26,220

    129,881

    11,413

    22,064

    (7,186)

    26,291

    (8,680)

    (56,274)

    (43,720)

    (82,383)

    (29,472)

    27,764

    27,283

    340,940

    98,691

    238,583

    69,940

    186,155

    45,901

    16,420

    (7,395)

    54,926

    34,642

    (111,293)

    27,430

    5,705

    (11,209)

    406,097

    406,097

    494,678

    494,678

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    ACTIONAID KENYA STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2014

    2014 2013

    Note KShs000 KShs000

    (29,472)

    152,391

    7,186

    159,577

    47,722

    98,691

    146,413

    (11,209)

    (252,943)

    7,395

    (245,548)

    (251,052)

    349,743

    98,691

    Net cash from investing activities

    Cash flows from financing activities

    Due from ActionAid International

    Interest Income

    Net cash from financing activities

    Net Increase /decrease in cash and bank balances

    Cash and bank balances at 1 January

    Cash and bank balances at 31 December

  • Action Aid KenyaGovernance Structure

    05

  • ActionAid Kenya 2014-15Board Members

    Mrs. ELizabethMay WakiloRighaBoard Chair ActionAid Kenya

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    Paul Kiayai LeringatoVice ChairActionAid Kenya Board

    DR. Loreen Iminza Maseno - OumaBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

    Abubakar K. SaidBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

    Mayaka X FrancisBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

    Eunice KetaBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

    Mwita Thomas NyangiTreasurerActionAid Kenya Board

    Ruud Van Den Hurk Board MemberActionAid Kenya

    Bijay KumarSecretary to the Board and Executive DirectorActionAid Kenya

    Isabella MwagodiBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

    William NtoinaBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

    Fatuma H. AhmedBoard MemberActionAid Kenya

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    Binti Ali KizaActionAid Kenya

    Dommie YamboActionAid Kenya

    Eunice KetaActionAid Kenya

    Irene TulelActionAid Kenya

    Lucy LooboActionAid Kenya

    Daisy AmdanyActionAid Kenya

    Dr. Alfred OngraActionAid Kenya

    Feddis Mbura SalameActionAid Kenya

    Jacqueline MutukuActionAid Kenya

    Mayaka X FrancisActionAid Kenya

    Daniel Musyoki MaimboActionAid Kenya

    Dr. Otiende AmolloActionAid Kenya

    Francis OpetuActionAid Kenya

    Joseph NdeteiActionAid Kenya

    Pendo Truphena MaryActionAid Kenya

    David KithaleActionAid Kenya

    Edward SwakaActionAid Kenya

    Hajji MwakioActionAid Kenya

    Kibuga KariithiActionAid Kenya

    Qabale JirmaActionAid Kenya

    Diana MookeActionAid Kenya

    Emily AdhiamboActionAid Kenya

    Halake DidoActionAid Kenya

    Lilian MahiriActionAid Kenya

    Safina Kwekwe TsunguActionAid Kenya

    ActionAid Kenya General Assembly

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    Mumbi NgugiActionAid Kenya

    Paul KiayaiLeringatoActionAid Kenya

    Mrs. ELizabeth May Wakilo RighaActionAid Kenya

    Irungu HoughtonActionAid Kenya

    Mwita T. Nyangi ActionAid Kenya

    William NtoinaActionAid Kenya

    Linda OchielActionAid Kenya

    Bijay KumarActionAid Kenya

    Ruud Van Den HurkActionAid Kenya

    Abubakar K. SaidActionAid Kenya

    Isabella MwagodiActionAid Kenya

    Fatuma H. AhmedActionAid Kenya

    Dr. Loreen Iminza Maseno - OumaActionAid Kenya

    Samuel Muga OwadeActionAid Kenya

    Not Pictured above:Dr. Argata Guracha, Halima Sheikh, M. J. Gitau, Sam Oduor, Zeinab Ali, Josephine Wambui Ngugi, Martin Mkung, Dr. David Kiprotich, Fatuma Hawa and Pamela Mburia.

  • ActionAid Kenya Senior Management Team 2015

    Bijay KumarExecutive Director ActionAid Kenya

    Makena MwobobiaHead of ProgrammesActionAid Kenya

    Susan OtienoHead of FundraisingActionAid Kenya

    Kenyatta MaithaHead of Policy and CampaignsActionAid Kenya

    Samson MichuraCluster ManagerActionAid Kenya

    Jack OdhiamboHead of FinanceActionAid Kenya

    Jane Labatt KigenCluster ManagerActionAid Kenya

    Edna IndimuliHuman Resource MangerActionAid Kenya

  • ActionAid Kenya Staff

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  • All Africa Conference of Churches Building, Waiyaki WayIbium House, Second FloorP.O Box 42814-00100, NairobiLandline : +254 (020) 4440440/4/9Safaricom Lines : +254 722518220, +254 722207749Airtel Lines : +254 733333352, +254 733330053Email : [email protected]

    www.actionaid/kenya.org