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DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF EDUCATION Maria Montessori was born in Italy in 1870 She became Italy’s first qualified woman doctor in 1896 Maria Montessori was a trail blazer for women’s rights Her focus became children with disabilities Dr. Montessori believed in supporting a child’s freedom and growth. Dr. Montessori believed that no human being is educated by another person. “He must do it himself or it will never be done” Montessori brought forth a revolutionary faith in children that turned the role of teacher into an observer, one who guides and supports child led interest Montessori built her entire educational approach around the special needs and characteristics of each of these four stages of growth which she termed “Planes of Development” Birth to six (infancy) Six to twelve (childhood) Twelve to eighteen (adolescence) Eighteen to twenty-four (transition to adulthood) The Montessori classroom is indeed a child’s world, geared to the size, pace and interests of the child. This is where the young child cultivates his/her desire to learn Casa dei Bambini – In Italian it means “Children’s House” was Dr. Montessori’s First School. It opened in San Lorenzo, Rome, on January 6th back in 1907

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Page 1: DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF …

DR. MARIA MONTESSORITHE MONTESSORI METHOD OF EDUCATION

Maria Montessori was born in Italy in 1870

She became Italy’s first qualified woman doctor in

1896Maria Montessori was a trail

blazer for women’s rights

Her focus became children with disabilities

Dr. Montessori believed in supporting a child’s freedom

and growth.

Dr. Montessori believed that no human being is educated by

another person. “He must do it himself or it will never be

done”

Montessori brought forth a revolutionary faith in children

that turned the role of teacher into an observer, one

who guides and supports child led interest

Montessori built her entire educational approach around

the special needs and characteristics of each of these four stages of growth which she

termed “Planes of Development”

Birth to six (infancy)Six to twelve (childhood)

Twelve to eighteen (adolescence)

Eighteen to twenty-four (transition to adulthood)

The Montessori classroom is indeed a child’s world, geared to the size, pace and interests of the child. This is where the young child cultivates his/her

desire to learn

Casa dei Bambini – In Italian it means “Children’s House” was Dr. Montessori’s First School. It opened in San Lorenzo, Rome, on January 6th back in 1907

Page 2: DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF …

Dr. Maria Montessori

Casa dei Bambini 1907

Casa dei Bambini 2019

YMA Intermediate Programs (Gr 4 -6) & High School (Gr 9 – 12) Student Government

Page 3: DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF …

MONTESSORI CURRICULUM

Curriculum materials promote the

development of social skills, emotional growth

and physical coordination as well as cognitive preparationThe use of materials is based on the young

child’s unique aptitude for learning which Dr.

Montessori Identified as the “absorbent mind”

CurriculumPractical Life Exercises

Sensorial Development Exercises

Language Exercises

Math Exercises

Cultural Art Exercises

In the Montessori classroom the objective is approached in

two ways: first by allowing each child to experience the excitement of learning by his own choice, rather than being

forced; and second, by helping him to perfect all his natural tools for learning, so

that his ability will be a maximum in future learning

situations

The multi-age classroom enables younger children to

learn from older children and experience new challenges through observation. Older children reinforce their own

learning by teaching concepts they have mastered, while

developing leadership skills and serving as a role model. There is cooperation rather than competition between

ages. This arrangement mirrors real work experiences in which individuals work and socialize

with people of all ages

Page 4: DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF …

MONTESSORI VS. TRADITIONAL

• EMPHASIS ON COGNITIVE STRUCTURE AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

• TEACHER’S ROLE IS UNOBTRUSIVE; CHILD ACTIVELY PARTICIPATES IN LEARNING

• ENVIRONMENT AND METHOD ENCOURAGE INTERNAL SELF-DISCIPLINE

• INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP INSTRUCTION ADAPTS TO EACH STUDENT’S LEARNING STYLE

• MIXED AGE GROUPING• CHILDREN ENCOURAGED TO TEACH, COLLABORATE, AND

HELP EACH OTHER• CHILD CHOOSES OWN WORK FROM INTERESTS, ABILITIES• CHILD FORMULATES CONCEPTS FROM SELF-TEACHING

MATERIALS

• EMPHASIS ON ROTE KNOWLEDGE AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

• TEACHER’S ROLE IS DOMINANT, ACTIVE; CHILD IS A PASSIVE PARTICIPANT

• TEACHER IS PRIMARY ENFORCER OF EXTERNAL DISCIPLINE• INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP INSTRUCTION CONFORMS TO THE

ADULT’S TEACHING STYLE• SAME AGE GROUPING• MOST TEACHING IS DONE BY TEACHER AND

COLLABORATION IS DISCOURAGED• CURRICULUM STRUCTURED WITH LITTLE REGARD FOR CHILD’S

INTERESTS• CHILD IS GUIDED TO CONCEPTS BY TEACHER

Page 5: DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF …

MONTESSORI VS. TRADITIONAL

• CHILD WORKS AS LONG AS HE/SHE WANTS ON A CHOSEN PROJECT

• CHILD SETS OWN LEARNING PACE TO INTERNALIZE INFORMATION

• CHILD SPOTS OWN ERRORS THROUGH FEEDBACK FORM MATERIALS

• LEARNING IS REINFORCED THROUGH CHILD’S OWN REPETITION OF ACTIVITY, INTERNAL FEELINGS OF SUCCESS REPETITION

• MULTI-SENSORY MATERIALS FOR PHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPMENT

• ORGANIZED PROGRAM FOR LEARNING CARE OF SELF AND SELF-CARE ENVIRONMENT (SHOE POLISHING, SINK WASHING, ETC.

• CHILD USUALLY GIVEN SPECIFIC TIME FOR WORK• INSTRUCTION PACE SET BY GROUP NORM OR TEACHER• ERRORS CORRECTED BY THE TEACHER• LEARNING IS REINFORCED EXTERNALLY BY REWARDS,

DISCOURAGEMENTS• FEW MATERIALS FOR SENSORY, CONCRETE MANIPULATION• LITTLE EMPHASIS ON INSTRUCTION OR CLASSROOM

MAINTENANCE

Page 6: DR. MARIA MONTESSORI THE MONTESSORI METHOD OF …

YMAWORLD AS CLASSROOM

“BRINGING EDUCATION TO LIFE AND LIFE TO EDUCATION”

• Classes connect to the world helping students understand personal and global interdependence

• Field connect to the world helping students on trips to conduct first-hand research such as studying wildlife and nature, exposure to the arts and other cultures, and business and entrepreneurship