Engaging Dual Language Learners and their Families in ... Engaging Dual Language Learners and their

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  • Soodie Ansari, San Mateo County Office of Education

    Carola Matera, CSU Channel Islands

    Engaging Dual Language

    Learners

    and their Families in

    Linguistically and Culturally

    Responsive Learning

    Environments

  • Activity

    • Find a partner

    • Each person will have 1 minute to talk

    without being interrupted

    • Person 1: List strategies that you know

    about and/or use to support DLLs

    • Person 2: Share how families can

    support home language development

    in collaboration with teachers

  • Large Group Discussion

     I noticed…

     I wonder…

  • children

    ๏ Dual language learners

    ๏ English learners

    ๏ English language learners

    ๏ Second language learners

    ๏ New language learners

    ๏ Bilingual

    ๏ Limited English proficient

    ๏ Long-Term English Learners

  • Quality for All

    What are the quality components in a TK

    classroom with children who are DLLs?

  • Quality for DLLs

    Key concepts:

    Intentionality

    Collaboration with families

    Resources/Strategies

  • our understanding of...

    our views about...

    CULTURE

    LANGUAGE

  • BELONGING

    Courtesy of Briana Grace Photography

  • 5 Great things about Multilingualism

  • BEING MULTILINGUAL

    Improves memory and

    cognitive function

    Facilitates English language

    development

    Promotes school literacy

    Fosters identity formation and

    sense of self-esteem

    Strengthens family

    relationships, including

    extended family members

    Potential for biliteracy

    Has positive effects for mental

    health

    Facilitates access to a

    specialized workforce, social

    groups and enriched life

  • “It’s important for me to teach my children Spanish

    for communication and closeness.

    If they lose Spanish, I lose them.”

    Parent Participant at ECLDI training, San Mateo County

  • Extra-Ordinary Learning

  • • Children’s brains are wired to learn more than one language

    • Learning and developing in more than one language does NOT delay growth

    nor development

    • Instead, it promotes more efficient cognitive functioning, academic

    achievement and enhances learning

    English

    • Negative consequences in losing home language

  • INTENTIONALITY

  • ๏ Simultaneous Bilingualism: child develops two languages at the same time (typically

    before age 3)

    ๏ Sequential Bilingualism (also known as successive bilingualism): child is learning a

    second language after the foundation for his

    first language has been established (typically

    after age 3).

    ๏ Receptive Bilingualism: child is able to understand a great deal more than he can

    produce in a given language.

    Paths To Bilingualism

  • S

    L e a rn

    in g &

    D e v e lo

    p m

    e n

    t

    Birth Age 4 Age 5

    Supporting Learning &

    Development

    in Sequential DLLs

    Stechuk (2012)

  • S

    L e a rn

    in g &

    D e v e lo

    p m

    e n

    t

    Birth Age 4 Age 5

    Supporting Learning &

    Development

    in Sequential DLLs

    Stechuk (2012)

    E

  • S

    L e a rn

    in g &

    D e v e lo

    p m

    e n

    t

    Birth Age 4 Age 5

    Supporting Learning &

    Development

    in Sequential DLLs

    Stechuk (2012)

    E

  • S E

    L e a rn

    in g &

    D e v e lo

    p m

    e n

    t

    Birth Age 4 Age 5

    Supporting Learning &

    Development

    in Sequential DLLs

    English-only

    Stechuk (2012)

  • S E

    L e a rn

    in g &

    D e v e lo

    p m

    e n

    t

    Birth Age 4 Age 5

    Supporting Learning &

    Development

    in Sequential DLLs

    English-only

    English with Systematic

    Home Language Support

    Stechuk (2012)

  • S E

    L e a rn

    in g &

    D e v e lo

    p m

    e n

    t

    Birth Age 4 Age 5

    Supporting Learning &

    Development

    in Sequential DLLs

    English-only

    Stechuk (2012)

  • Stages of Second Language Acquisition

    Home Language Stage:

    •When a child finds herself in a setting where

    others speak a language different from hers, often

    times she’ll continue speaking her home language,

    especially with other children, even if they do not

    understand.

    •Child will eventually speak her home language

    only with those who understand it or stops using it

    all together.

    Source: PEL guide & CPIN

  • Stages of Second Language

    Acquisition Observational/Listening Stage:

    • Observes what others do, paying close attention

    to how they behave in certain settings, and when

    they speak

    • Tries to connect what is said with what is

    happening (which is why use of visuals, props

    and cues are so critical during this stage)

    • Child is typically quiet during this stage and uses

    nonverbal means to communicate. In home

    language environment, child tends to be more

    verbal.

    Source: PEL guide & CPIN

  • Stages of Second Language

    Acquisition

    Fluid Language Stage:

    • Use full sentences in a variety of contexts, but

    are still learning and expanding their

    knowledge of the new language

    • Demonstrate understanding of rules of the

    English Language

    • Use new language more creatively

    Source: PEL guide & CPIN

  • Stages of Second Language

    Acquisition Telegraphic/Formulaic Speech Stage:

    •Child uses a few content or function words (e.g.,

    “me out” or “Sara eat”

    •Child relies on familiar or repetitive ‘chunks’ or

    formulas, for example:

    “wanna ___,” (‘wanna play’ or ‘wanna go

    home’)

    “gimme ___,” (‘gimme book’ or ‘gimme juice’)

    Source: PEL guide & CPIN

  • WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?

  • Learning a Language

    Learning in a Language

  • COLLABORATION

    WITH FAMILIES

  • ๏ Learn about families’ skills and talents

    ๏ Build community amongst families

    ๏ Create more meaningful learning experiences for children

    ๏ Support children in seeing their families as contributors to their community

    Families’ Funds of Knowledge

  • WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?

  • RESOURCES/STRATEGIE

    S

  • http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-

    system/cultural-linguistic/center/home-

    language.html

    RESOURCE:

    HOME LANGUAGE SERIES

  • Call children by

    their name

    accurately (last name included not first letter)

    Discuss

    differences and

    similarities in all

    languages

    Languages in the

    room: color-coded

    multilingual labels

    songs, chants,

    poems, stories in

    home languages (ask parents for help)

    books, artifacts

    and displays

    reflect the

    children’s culture

    theme/units

    involve family &

    community

    participation

    make connections

    with children’s

    personal

    experiences,

    Pathways to Seal

    of Biliteracy

    quality books in all

    language/s,

    throughout the

    classroom

    friendship and

    survival

    words/phrases in

    English

    Environmental & Social-Emotional Supports

  • Back

  • Back

  • Discuss

    differences and

    similarities

    between

    languages,

    cognates

    Encourage use of

    home language,

    Avoid back to back

    translation

    academic

    language: rich,

    complex and

    varied in both

    languages

    bilingual picture

    dictionaries,

    hands-on

    experiences to

    explore concepts

    and vocabulary

    Questioning

    techniques that

    respond to

    language

    proficiency level

    SMALL groups

    peer to peer

    dialogue, dialogic

    reading practices,

    children as

    storytellers