Engaging New Ideas in Education A conversation with Dr. Hetty Roessingh

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Engaging New Ideas in Education A conversation with Dr. Hetty Roessingh. How many words do you know? Language, learning and literacy for K-12 and beyond 7:00 8:15 pm Tuesday, January 19, 2010 Room 179, Education Classroom Block. Funding provided by:. (File Number 410-2006-2530). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Engaging New Ideas in EducationA conversation with Dr. Hetty RoessinghHow many words do you know?Language, learning and literacy for K-12 and beyond

    7:00 8:15 pmTuesday, January 19, 2010Room 179, Education Classroom BlockThe Prairie Metropolis Centre(File Number 410-2006-2530)Funding provided by:

    FOOTER IDENTIFICATION

  • How many words do you know?

  • BackgroundArrival of over 1.1 million newcomers since 2001Canada has a selective immigration policy that favors the best and the brightestHuge numbers raise questions about Canadas ability to fulfill the promises that draw so many here

  • BackgroundHigh SES backgroundsHigh academic expectationsDesire for post-secondary studies at universityWant careers in professions (engineering, business, and sciences)Determined, smart, tenacious

  • BackgroundImmigrant children (and increasingly the Canadian born children of immigrants) make up the futureCanada needs these newcomers to go on to post-secondary studiesBasis for a highly literate and well educated society

  • BackgroundFacing a double deficit: the inability of first generation immigrants to realize their potential due to language barriers, followed by their children who are struggling academically for the same reasons. Lost educational capital for the workplace and for Canadas future economic well being

  • BackgroundLarge increase in the numbers of coded ESL learners in the K-12 System

    Growing Numbers headed for higher educationCoded for ESL

  • What does it mean to know a word and how do we count them?

  • Quick Questions1. At what grade level is the Calgary Herald written?Grade ?2. How well do you have to read to graduate from high school?Grade ?3. At what grade level are university textbooks written?Grade ?4. How long does it take for a child to learn conversational English?Years ?5. How long does it take for a child to learn academic English?Years ?

  • Conversational vs. Academic English

  • Language Learning TrajectoriesL1 trajectory (high socio-economic status) (pink line)Grade 12 (80,000 - 100,000)

    Grade 11 (65,000)

    Grade 10 (40,000)

    Grade 9 (35,000)

    Grade 8 (30,000)Grade 7 (25,000)Grade 6 (20,000)

    Grade 5 (15,000)Grade 4 (12,000)Grade 3 (10,000)Grade 2 (8,000)Grade 1 (5,000)

    Chart2

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    AGENSCanadian Born: ESLCohort A: ESL: ELEM /no supportCohort B: ESL: ELEM with supportCohort C: ESL: JR. High with supportCohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

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  • Things to notice about the trajectoryLanguage learning is not linear, it is exponentialDistinct thresholds trigger accelerated growth forward, and these are represented by the three starsThe first star marks the easy to get gains most children seem to be able to achieve: the shift from learning to read to reading to learnThe second star marks the shift to symbolic thinking that not everyone is able to makeThe third star marks the shift to advanced and accelerated academic language

  • ESL trajectories for different age on arrival (AOA) cohorts

    How do ESL students stack up in K-12 and beyond?

  • Canadian Born: Trajectory of Canadian Born children of immigrants who received no/little ESL support (yellow line)Grade 12 (80,000 - 100,000)

    Grade 11 (65,000)

    Grade 10 (40,000)

    Grade 9 (35,000)

    Grade 8 (30,000)Grade 7 (25,000)Grade 6 (20,000)

    Grade 5 (15,000)Grade 4 (12,000)Grade 3 (10,000)Grade 2 (8,000)Grade 1 (5,000)

    Chart2

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    Canadian Born: ESL

    Age

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    Sheet1

    AGENSCanadian Born: ESLCohort A: ESL: ELEM /no supportCohort B: ESL: ELEM with supportCohort C: ESL: JR. High with supportCohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

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    19100000

    20120000

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  • Cohort A: Hypothetical trajectory of elementary aged arrivals who received no/little ESL support (i.e. AOA 12) (red line)Grade 12 (80,000 - 100,000)

    Grade 11 (65,000)

    Grade 10 (40,000)

    Grade 9 (35,000)

    Grade 8 (30,000)Grade 7 (25,000)Grade 6 (20,000)

    Grade 5 (15,000)Grade 4 (12,000)Grade 3 (10,000)Grade 2 (8,000)Grade 1 (5,000)

    Chart2

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    Canadian Born: ESL

    Cohort A: ESL: ELEM /no support

    Age

    Vocabulary

    Sheet1

    AGENSCanadian Born: ESLCohort A: ESL: ELEM /no supportCohort B: ESL: ELEM with supportCohort C: ESL: JR. High with supportCohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

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  • Cohort A: Hypothetical trajectory of elementary aged arrivals who received no/little ESL support (i.e. AOA 12) (red line)

  • Cohort B: Young arrivals who received ESL support in high school(dark purple line)Grade 12 (80,000 - 100,000)

    Grade 11 (65,000)

    Grade 10 (40,000)

    Grade 9 (35,000)

    Grade 8 (30,000)Grade 7 (25,000)Grade 6 (20,000)

    Grade 5 (15,000)Grade 4 (12,000)Grade 3 (10,000)Grade 2 (8,000)Grade 1 (5,000)

    Chart2

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    Canadian Born: ESL

    Cohort A: ESL: ELEM /no support

    Cohort B: ESL: ELEM with support

    Age

    Vocabulary

    Sheet1

    AGENSCanadian Born: ESLCohort A: ESL: ELEM /no supportCohort B: ESL: ELEM with supportCohort C: ESL: JR. High with supportCohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

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  • Cohort B: Young arrivals who received ESL support in high school(dark purple line)

  • If only . . . Earlier intervention

  • Cohort C: Jr. high aged arrivals who had ESL support at high school age (i.e. AOA is 12 14) (brown line)Grade 12 (80,000 - 100,000)

    Grade 11 (65,000)

    Grade 10 (40,000)

    Grade 9 (35,000)

    Grade 8 (30,000)Grade 7 (25,000)Grade 6 (20,000)

    Grade 5 (15,000)Grade 4 (12,000)Grade 3 (10,000)Grade 2 (8,000)Grade 1 (5,000)

    Chart2

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    Canadian Born: ESL

    Cohort A: ESL: ELEM /no support

    Cohort B: ESL: ELEM with support

    Cohort C: ESL: JR. High with support

    Age

    Vocabulary

    Sheet1

    AGENSCanadian Born: ESLCohort A: ESL: ELEM /no supportCohort B: ESL: ELEM with supportCohort C: ESL: JR. High with supportCohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

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    16500002300016000220001800016000

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  • Cohort C: Jr. high aged arrivals who had ESL support at high school age

  • Cohort D: Sr. high arrivals who had ESL support (i.e. AOA is 15+) (teal line)Grade 12 (80,000 - 100,000)

    Grade 11 (65,000)

    Grade 10 (40,000)

    Grade 9 (35,000)

    Grade 8 (30,000)Grade 7 (25,000)Grade 6 (20,000)

    Grade 5 (15,000)Grade 4 (12,000)Grade 3 (10,000)Grade 2 (8,000)Grade 1 (5,000)

    Chart2

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    Canadian Born: ESL

    Cohort A: ESL: ELEM /no support

    Cohort B: ESL: ELEM with support

    Cohort C: ESL: JR. High with support

    Cohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

    Age

    Vocabulary

    Sheet1

    AGENSCanadian Born: ESLCohort A: ESL: ELEM /no supportCohort B: ESL: ELEM with supportCohort C: ESL: JR. High with supportCohort D: ESL: SR. High with support

    1

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    143500015000120001200010000

    15400001700015000160001400012000

    16500002300016000220001800016000

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    18800004000018000350003200024000

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  • Cohort D: Sr. high arrivals who had ESL support

  • The Tipping PointThe point in the trajectory at which you no longer have recourse to L1At each AOA there is benefit to having recourse to L1For every AOA there is a certain meltdown of L1 that puts students at riskAdditive bilingualism: older arrivalsSubtractive bilingualism: younger arrivalsRegardless of AOA, for all of them there is a tipping point at a certain point in time. All of the K-12 cohorts at are at risk in higher education

  • How many words are you using . . . uncovering active vocabulary in Grade 9 PATsCompleat Lexical Tutor (Cobb, 2009) www.lextutor.ca

  • Grade 9 PAT: ESL Student Pass (56%)

  • Grade 9 PAT: Acceptable

  • Grade 9 PAT: Excellence

  • Grade 9 PAT Vocabulary Profiles

  • How many words are students using in the Grade 9 PAT?

    Chart1

    35

    610

    915

    99%

    Stretch

    Number of Words

    Sheet1

    99%Stretch

    ESL 56%35

    Acceptable610

    Excellence915

    Sheet2

    Sheet3

  • How many words do you need . . . uncovering passive vocabularyCompleat Lexical Tutor (Cobb, 2009) www.lextutor.ca

  • Language Sample: Everyday communication - excerpt from Friends Season OneRACHELOh God, come on you guys, is this really necessary? I mean, I can stop charging anytime I want.MONICAC'mon, you can't live off your parents your whole life.RACHELI know that. That's why I was getting married.PHOEBEGive her a break, it's hard being on your own for the first time.RACHELThank you.PHOEBEYou're welcome. I remember when I first came to this city. I was fourteen. My mom had just killed herself and my step-dad was back in prison, and I got here, and I didn't know anybody. And I ended up living with this albino guy who was, like, cleaning windshields outside port authority, and then he killed himself, and then I found aromatherapy. So believe me, I know exactly how you feel.ROSSThe word you're looking for is 'Anyway'...MONICAAll right, you ready?RACHELNo. No, no, I'm not ready! How can I be ready? "Hey, Rach! You ready to jump out the airplane without your parachute?" Come on, I can't do this!MONICAYou can, I know you can!RACHELI don't think so.ROSSCome on, you made coffee! You can do anything! (Chandler slowly tries to hide the now dead plant from that morning when he and Joey poured their coffee into it.)ROSSC'mon, cut. Cut, cut, cut,... Cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut,cut... (She cuts one of them and they cheer.)RACHELY'know what? I think we can just leave it at that. It's kinda like a symbolic gesture...MONICARachel! That was a library card!ALLCut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut..CHANDLER(as Rachel is cutting up her cards) Y'know, if you listen closely, you can hear a thousand retailers scream. She finishes cutting them up and they all cheer.MONICAWelcome to the real world! It sucks. You're gonna love it!FK Grade Level: 2.1

    Web VP v3 (Cobb, 2009) Vocabulary Profile:K1-K296.31%AWL0.61%Off-List3.07%BNC 99%: 6,000BNC Stretch: 12,000FK Grade Level 2.1 99% Coverage 6,000 words Stretch 12,000 words

  • Reading Sample: Calgary HeraldExplosion flattens southeast Calgary home By Stephane Massinon and Chuck Chiang, Calgary Herald January 18, 2010 CALGARY - An explosion and fire in the southeast community of Penbrooke this morning levelled one home and damaged two others, police and fire officials confirmed this morning.Fire officials said they responded to multiple calls involving an explosion in the 1400 block of Pennsburg Drive S.E. at roughly 4:30 a.m. this morning. Crews arriving on the scene said the house where the explosion took place was blown apart, with one 10-feet-by-10-feet piece landing on the other side of the street.No injuries were reported, but crews are stilling looking through the rubble to see if there were anyone caught in the home during the explosion.Thats kind of the challenge we were faced with this morning. The majority of reports were that the place was vacant, said fire department spokesman Jeff Budai.And then one of the neighbours said he thought he saw a light on prior to the explosion.The two houses next to the home where the explosion took place also suffered structural damage, officials say. The damage was so severe, crews say, that residents will have to find alternative accommodations for the immediate future.It was pretty bad. The walls in one house actually blew into (the other) a few feet. It actually pushed the furniture into the middle of their room," said Budai.Fire and arson investigators are looking into the cause of the explosion.

    FK Grade Level: 9.2Web VP v3 (Cobb 2009) Vocabulary Profile: K1-K2 90.98 / AWL 5.15 / Off-List 3.86BNC 99%: 5,000 / BNC Stretch: 7,000

    FK Grade Level 9.2 99% Coverage 5,000 words Stretch 7,000 words

  • Reading Sample: Biology 20Adaptation and Change, Chapter 4, pp 96 115, Biology, Nelson Theory of Natural Selection:Darwins theory of evolution by natural selection can be divided into five distinct ideas:Overproduction Struggle for existence (competition)VariationSurvival of the fittest (natural selection)Origin of new3 species by inheritance of successful variationsBy briefly examining the main ideas, it is possible to understand the basis of Darwins theory of evolution by natural selection.Overproduction. In simple terms, overproduction means that the number of offspring produced by a species is greater than the number that can survive, reproduce, and live to maturity. For example, if the millions of eggs laid annually by a female codfish w...

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