Engaging with shape Some activities for engaging students with ideas about shape and the relationships between shapes and stories

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    16-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Engaging with shape Some activities for engaging students with ideas about shape and the relationships between shapes and stories </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Engaging with shape What is shape? Why should we teach shape? How do we teach shape? When should we start teaching shape? </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> What is shape? How do you describe shape? How can you see/describe shape without prior experiences in working with shape? What are you describing with n &lt; 30? Why describe what you see when it is not necessarily like that in the underlying distribution? </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Why should we teach shape? Why describe distributional shape? Should we be getting students to describe shape of sample distributions with n &lt; 30? </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> How do we teach shape? How do you introduce/expose students to ideas of shape? Should we build students general knowledge about shapes of population distributions of common everyday variables? </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Sketching shapes We will give you very quick glimpses of some dot plots one at a time Sketch the shape in the Sketch of Shape column on your handout </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 1. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 1. </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 2. </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 2. </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 3. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 3. </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 4. </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 4. </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 5. </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 5. </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 6. </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 6. </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 7. </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 7. </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 8. </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 8. </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 9. </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Sketch of shape 9. </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> Reflection: Seeing shape What did you look for when catching a glimpse of the plot? Are your plots similar to your neighbours? </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> Describing shape (hand out strips) Choose one plot and with your neighbour discuss how your Year 10 students would describe the shape What sort of language would they use? </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> Connecting shape and context In pairs, match each context with its graph contexts given at bottom of page 1 </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> Connecting context and shape (collect strips, give out plots) In pairs, discuss the shape of the distribution for each variable (page 2) Sketch your predicted distribution Give some idea of x-values Justify the sketch of your predicted distribution Students can present their sketch and justification to the rest of the class Show and discuss with the class the actual distributions from some collected data </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> Using shape to tell the story In pairs, write a full description of your plot (page 3) use statistical terminology where appropriate write in terms of the context give some idea of x-values </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> Using shape to tell the story Detach page 3 and give your description to another pair Dont let them see your plot Ask them to sketch the distribution from your description </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> Using shape to tell the story Detach page 3 and give your description to another pair Dont let them see your plot Ask them to sketch the distribution from your description Compare with the handed-out plot (Collect the handed-out plots) </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> Engaging with shape One of the keys for unlocking the story behind the data Develops the skill of what to look at and what to look for Is there anything interesting, unusual, or unexpected? What are the data trying to tell us? Thank you! </li> </ul>