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EnglewoodHerald.net ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO A publication of September 5, 2014 VOLUME 94 | ISSUE 28 | 75¢ POSTAL ADDRESS ENGLEWOOD HERALD (ISSN 1058-7837) (USPS 176-680) OFFICE: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210 Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PHONE: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Englewood, Colorado, the Englewood Herald is published weekly on Friday by Colorado Community Media, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT Littleton, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210 Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES: Display: Fri. 11 a.m. Legal: Fri. 11 a.m. | Classified: Mon. 5 p.m. GET SOCIAL WITH US PLEASE RECYCLE THIS COPY Survey continues on Page 12 Funding continues on Page 12 Blitz Build project helps disabled Englewood woman By Tom Munds [email protected] The whine of drills and the hum of conver- sations of volunteers completing a handicap ramp sounded like the music of greater move- ment mobility to Maribelle Brinkoff’s ears. “I tried out the handicapped ramp they are building yesterday and I was able, without any- one’s help, to walk to the end of the driveway,” the Englewood resident said. “It is the first time getting out of the house wasn’t a major (ordeal) with a lot of help from my daughter.” The ramp construction was one of this year’s Home Builders Foundation Blitz Build projects. Spokesperson Bridgid Dunlap said the foundation organizes volunteer projects to help provide home accessibility for people with disabilities who can’t afford to have the work done. “Last year we did 61 projects and we have done 43 so far this year,” she said. “Each year, we have a blitz building weekend when we do a lot of projects at one time. Last year, the blitz completed 13 projects, and this year the blitz is doing 16 projects.” The Centennial-based foundation orga- nizes the projects. Last year, 125 volunteers worked on blitz projects. This year, 175 volun- teers signed up for the projects. Maribelle Brinkoff, left, and her daughter Cindy Stewart come out of Brinkoff ’s house to thank the volunteers who built a handicapped ramp at the Englewood home. The project was part of the Aug. 22-23 Home Builders Foundation Blitz Build. The new ramp enables the 82-year-old Brinkoff, who has to use a walker, to come out of her house and go to the driveway without assistance. Photos by Tom Munds ABOVE: Rob Fournier and other volunteers from Orepec Building Products paint the new handicapped ramp on the home of Englewood resident Maribelle Brinkoff . The ramp construction was part of the Aug. 22-23 Home Builders Foundation Blitz Build. The ramp was among 16 blitz projects done by teams of volunteers to help increase the mobility of handicapped individuals who couldn’t otherwise afford to have the work done. BELOW: Adam McCartie, left, holds a support in place as Brian Wilson uses a power drill to attach it to the handicapped ramp volunteers from Orepec Building Poducts were completing on the home of Englewood resident Maribelle Brinkoff . Ramp opens door to better life Ramp continues on Page 12 Survey: Residents like city Englewood solicited views on services, future By Tom Munds tmunds @coloradocommunitymedia.com The majority of individuals who completed the 2014 Englewood Citi- zen Survey stated Englewood is a good place to live. “Seventy-six percent of those who completed the survey rated the overall quality of life in Englewood as excel- lent or good,” Tom Miller said. “Quality of life elements include rating safety, mobility, natural environment, built environment, economy, recreation and wellness, education and entertainment and community engagement. The re- sults rated all the elements higher than the national average.” Miller, president of National Re- search Center, made the comments during the council’s Aug. 25 study ses- sion, as he summarized the results of the survey his company conducted. It is the same firm than administered the citizen survey for Englewood in 2007 and again in 2009. Miller added that economics and safety were identified as priorities for the Englewood community. The discussion focused on the sum- mary of the 2014 Englewood Citizen Overall school funding grows Two measures affect range of services, facilities By Vic Vela [email protected] As school starts, lawmakers are tout- ing an education law passed this year that many believe will help students achieve greater success. Earlier this year, the Legislature passed a pair of school funding mea- sures that Gov. John Hickenlooper later signed into law to increase spending within the state’s school finance system by $500 million. The money provides more funding for several areas of K-12 education, in- cluding school construction, preschool, kindergarten and English language learner programs. The measures increase per-pupil spending by about 5 percent and al- low schools across the state to open up 5,000 more seats for preschool and full- day kindergarten. An additional $3 million will fund financial transparency efforts that are aimed at allowing taxpayers to see how the new money is being reported and spent. “It’s important to make sure we know where the money is going to these schools, and not seeing it go into a black hole somewhere,” said Rep. Frank McNulty, R-Highlands Ranch.

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Page 1: Englewood Herald 0905

1

EnglewoodHerald.net

A R A P A H O E C O U N T Y, C O L O R A D OA publication of

September 5, 2014VOLUME 94 | ISSUE 28 | 7 5 ¢

POSTA

L AD

DRESS

ENGLEWOOD HERALD(ISSN 1058-7837) (USPS 176-680)

OFFICE: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

PHONE: 303-566-4100

A legal newspaper of general circulation in Englewood, Colorado, the Englewood Herald is published weekly on Friday by Colorado Community Media, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129.PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT Littleton, COLORADO and additional mailing o� ces.

POSTMASTER: Send address change to:9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

DEADLINES: Display: Fri. 11 a.m.Legal: Fri. 11 a.m. | Classi� ed: Mon. 5 p.m.

GET SOCIAL WITH US

PLEASE RECYCLETHIS COPY

Survey continues on Page 12

Funding continues on Page 12

Blitz Build project helps disabled Englewood woman By Tom Munds [email protected]

The whine of drills and the hum of conver-sations of volunteers completing a handicap ramp sounded like the music of greater move-ment mobility to Maribelle Brinkoff’s ears.

“I tried out the handicapped ramp they are building yesterday and I was able, without any-one’s help, to walk to the end of the driveway,” the Englewood resident said. “It is the first time getting out of the house wasn’t a major (ordeal) with a lot of help from my daughter.”

The ramp construction was one of this year’s Home Builders Foundation Blitz Build projects. Spokesperson Bridgid Dunlap said the foundation organizes volunteer projects to help provide home accessibility for people with disabilities who can’t afford to have the work done.

“Last year we did 61 projects and we have done 43 so far this year,” she said. “Each year, we have a blitz building weekend when we do a lot of projects at one time. Last year, the blitz completed 13 projects, and this year the blitz is doing 16 projects.”

The Centennial-based foundation orga-nizes the projects. Last year, 125 volunteers worked on blitz projects. This year, 175 volun-teers signed up for the projects.

Maribelle Brinko� , left, and her daughter Cindy Stewart come out of Brinko� ’s house to thank the volunteers who built a handicapped ramp at the Englewood home. The project was part of the Aug. 22-23 Home Builders Foundation Blitz Build. The new ramp enables the 82-year-old Brinko� , who has to use a walker, to come out of her house and go to the driveway without assistance. Photos by Tom Munds

ABOVE: Rob Fournier and other volunteers from Orepec Building Products paint the new handicapped ramp on the home of Englewood resident Maribelle Brinko� . The ramp construction was part of the Aug. 22-23 Home Builders Foundation Blitz Build. The ramp was among 16 blitz projects done by teams of volunteers to help increase the mobility of handicapped individuals who couldn’t otherwise a� ord to have the work done. BELOW: Adam McCartie, left, holds a support in place as Brian Wilson uses a power drill to attach it to the handicapped ramp volunteers from Orepec Building Poducts were completing on the home of Englewood resident Maribelle Brinko� .

Ramp opens door to better life

Ramp continues on Page 12

Survey: Residents like city Englewood solicited views on services, future By Tom Munds [email protected]

The majority of individuals who completed the 2014 Englewood Citi-zen Survey stated Englewood is a good place to live.

“Seventy-six percent of those who completed the survey rated the overall quality of life in Englewood as excel-lent or good,” Tom Miller said. “Quality of life elements include rating safety, mobility, natural environment, built environment, economy, recreation and wellness, education and entertainment and community engagement. The re-sults rated all the elements higher than the national average.”

Miller, president of National Re-search Center, made the comments during the council’s Aug. 25 study ses-sion, as he summarized the results of the survey his company conducted.

It is the same firm than administered the citizen survey for Englewood in 2007 and again in 2009.

Miller added that economics and safety were identified as priorities for the Englewood community.

The discussion focused on the sum-mary of the 2014 Englewood Citizen

Overall school funding grows Two measures a� ect range of services, facilities By Vic Vela [email protected]

As school starts, lawmakers are tout-ing an education law passed this year that many believe will help students achieve greater success.

Earlier this year, the Legislature passed a pair of school funding mea-sures that Gov. John Hickenlooper later signed into law to increase spending within the state’s school finance system by $500 million.

The money provides more funding for several areas of K-12 education, in-cluding school construction, preschool, kindergarten and English language learner programs.

The measures increase per-pupil spending by about 5 percent and al-low schools across the state to open up 5,000 more seats for preschool and full-day kindergarten.

An additional $3 million will fund financial transparency efforts that are aimed at allowing taxpayers to see how the new money is being reported and spent.

“It’s important to make sure we know where the money is going to these schools, and not seeing it go into a black hole somewhere,” said Rep. Frank McNulty, R-Highlands Ranch.

Page 2: Englewood Herald 0905

2 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

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�e story of rest is the rest of the storyIt’s 7:20 p.m. and Sean is bent over

physics homework, graphs that show position and velocity in relation to time. Motion maps.

The work isn’t particularly diffi-cult for him. The challenge is staying focused.

“The more I think,” he says, “the more irritated I feel.”

Sean is my 17-year-old son. He’s a high school senior and a good student.

But he’s tired.If you ask him what he looks forward

to on weekends, he’ll give you the same answer many teens do: Sleeping.

No wonder.Instead of the eight-and-a-half to

nine-and-a-half hours of sleep research has found teens need to perform at their best, Sean averages six to seven each night. Even though he sometimes slips into bed at 9:30 or 10, he usually can’t fall asleep until 11, and he’s at school most mornings by 5:45 for weight ses-sions with his baseball team. Classes begin at 7:35.

We are a tired country.The Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention has called insufficient sleep a public health epidemic, noting in a 2009 study almost 38 percent of adults had unintentionally fallen asleep during the day at least once in the preceding month and nearly 5 percent had fallen asleep while driving at least once during the same time period.

Scary. But not surprising.Like the one-third of adults in the

study, I, too, consistently sleep less than the recommended seven hours a day and often find myself longing for just a few minutes in which to rest my eyes.

The real calamity, though, is the sleep deprivation of our teenage children, who as a generation are losing the op-portunity to achieve their highest poten-tial, simply because they don’t have the few more hours needed to recharge.

“Sleep is absolutely vital, not just from a physical standpoint, but from a

mental, emotional and cognitive stand-point,” says Steve Portenga, a perfor-mance psychologist who teaches at the University of Denver and helps athletes, surgeons and others in high-risk oc-cupations perform consistently at their highest levels.

A key element to that formula is sleep.

Sean would agree.On days when he’s tired, “it’s hard

to focus. I just catch myself spacing,” he says. But when he feels rested, “it’s easier to participate in class — you feel more in it. It’s easier to comprehend and retain information … I’m just more aware, in general.”

Portenga talks about two studies that directly link sleep to performance.

In the first, two groups of people were given 12 hours to solve a difficult prob-lem. One group received the problem in the morning, so didn’t sleep before re-solving it that evening. The other group received it in the evening, so had the opportunity to sleep before coming up with an answer.

“Both had the same amount of time to solve it …” Portenga said, “but the ones who had a chance to sleep per-formed significantly better.”

In the second study, electrodes were connected to the brains of mice as they figured out a way through a maze. As the mice slept, researchers noted the same series of connections firing as had occurred when they navigated the maze. The mice were replaying their route; the brain was moving information from

short-term to long-term memory, which makes retrieving information easier down the road.

The study showed, Portenga says, that “for consolidating learning, sleep is a really vital process.”

With that knowledge in mind, the American Academy of Pediatrics, saying the average American teen is “chroni-cally sleep deprived and pathologically sleepy,” last week declared middle- and high-schoolers should begin their day at 8:30 a.m. at the earliest — essentially an hour later than most do now. Such a change would align with teens’ natural sleep cycles, which make it difficult for them — like Sean — to fall asleep before 11 p.m. And it would be key to helping “adolescents get the sleep they need to grow and learn.”

According to a National Sleep Foundation poll, 87 percent of high school students and 59 percent of sixth- through eighth-graders were sleeping less than the recommended eight-and-a-half to nine-and-a-half hours a night. Reasons range from sports, after-school activities, jobs and homework to over-active technology use.

The academy’s policy statement noted lack of sleep in teens not only translates to a decrease in learning and poorer grades, but also to more physi-cal and mental health problems and an increased risk of car accidents.

Scary. But not surprising.Senior Craig Breuker can attest to the

positive impact of a later starting time.His first class this semester starts

with second period, which means he be-gins classes at 8:30. The difference from previous years is stark.

“When I wake up, I just feel re-freshed,” he says. “When I used to wake up at 6:30, I would always feel down and groggy. I haven’t had a morning where I feel like I want to go back to bed. When I get up, I’m ready for the day to start.”

He’s more focused. He has more energy later in the day. His eyes don’t get

heavy.An A and B student, Craig practices

soccer after school until 5:15, then mows lawns until dusk, then finally heads home to do homework. If there’s time, he’ll watch some TV until turning off the lights at about 10:30.

Going to bed, he says, “is like a re-start.”

But considering only 15 percent of our country’s high schools begin the day at 8:30 or later, Craig’s sense of rested well-being belongs to a minority of teens.

There is a long way to go.School district schedules are built

around a complexity of ingredients, from bus schedules to athletics to extra-curricular activities, and a realignment of all those pieces would need buy-in from not only school officials, but also from parents and teens, themselves.

Until the paradigm shifts, until we are willing to take on the challenge — if we ever are — days for many teens will begin somewhat like this:

5 a.m. The first alarm goes off. Music blares. Sean reaches over and turns it off.

5:10 a.m. Music blares again. Unwill-ing to leave the warmth of his bed, Sean reaches over and sets a third alarm for 10 minutes later.

5:20 a.m. More music. Five more min-utes tick by and his feet hit the floor. He throws on a T-shirt, some shorts, shoes. Brushes his teeth. Washes his face.

He grabs a water bottle and heads out the door.

It is still dark, the notion of sleep already forgotten. Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. Her column earned first place in the 2013 Colorado Press Association Better Newspaper contest. She can be reached at [email protected] or 303-566-4110.

Page 3: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 3 September 5, 2014

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Page 4: Englewood Herald 0905

4 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

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Volunteers paint Englewood home County employees join in on annual activity By Tom Munds [email protected]

A normally quiet yard on South Fox Street became a beehive of activity Aug. 23 as Arapahoe County volunteers spent the day painting and caulking the home of Englewood resident Betty Couts.

“I received a true blessing, as these folks made my horrible-looking house look great,” Couts said by phone. “I was sur-prised when they called me and told me they would do this, because I wasn’t sure I would qualify. Then I was surprised when so many people showed up and worked so hard to make my home look so nice.”

The Englewood resident has lived in the home for more than 40 years. Her hus-band passed away several years ago. She said while she has done her best to keep up the outside of her home, projects like the painting and caulking were too expensive, since she lives on a small fi xed income and has taken in extended family.

The project was part of Brothers Rede-velopment’s annual Paint-A-Thon. Allison Lockwood, Brothers communication man-ager, said Arapahoe County recruited vol-unteers from among county employees for the fi rst time this year.

Carrie Olinger, county volunteer coordi-nator, organized a team from a number of departments, including County Commis-sioner Nancy Sharpe.

“It was the fi rst time we decided to do a project as a group. I talked to people and got a great response,” she said. “It was even better when we went to the job site be-cause many of our employees were joined by family members and children. We had about 20 people working on the project.”

Olinger said everyone was excited and worked hard.

“I met Betty Couts. She was so sweet and she kept telling us how much she appreci-ated what we were doing for her,” she said. “I pitched in and it was really a cool project and it was fun. I felt it was rewarding to vol-unteer for this project, to see the difference

the group made and to know we did a proj-ect that helped a very sweet lady.”

Brothers Redevelopment annually or-ganizes the paint-a-thon. So far this year, more than 100 homes have been painted during the event. Since the program began in 1978, more than 6,800 homes have been caulked, sealed and painted for senior homeowners. The average client is 74 with a monthly income of $1,400.

The volunteers and sponsors are critical ingredients to the paint-a-thon’s success. Each year, Brothers also seeks the support of individual donors and corporate spon-sors to provide money for supplies as well as volunteers to do the work.

About 20 Arapahoe County employees and o� cials got together Aug. 23 to paint and caulk an Englewood woman’s home as part of this year’s Brothers Redevelopment Paint-A-Thon. Courtesy photo s

Carrie Olinger paints around the window of an Englewood home. Olinger, who served as the Arapahoe County volun-teer coordinator for the project, recruited about 20 county employees and o� cials to paint and caulk the home that was one of the Brothers Redevelopment Paint-A-Thon projects .

Arapahoe County Commissioner Nancy Sharpe was among the team of county personnel who volunteered to paint and caulk the home of an Englewood senior citizen. The Englewood home was one of the projects done this year dur-ing the annual Brothers Redevelopment Paint-A-Thon.

Page 5: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 5 September 5, 2014

5

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Centennial Airport gets tourney tra� c Sta� report

Big events in the Denver metro area bring a rise in activity to Centennial Air-port, and this week’s BMW Championship is no different.

One of the most important profession-al golf tournaments of the year is being played at the Cherry Hills Country Club, not far down the road from the third-bus-iest general aviation airport in the nation. A mix of superstar golfers, sponsors, spec-tators and media were expected to touch down for the Sept. 4-7 competition.

The BMW Championship is the second-to-last leg of the PGA Tour’s FedEx Cup

playoffs.Historically, Centennial Airport has

been the “airport of choice” for major events, including the 2008 Democratic National Convention and Denver Broncos playoff games, an airport spokeswoman said.

Private jet travel offers greater conve-nience and a higher level of amenities, making Centennial a draw, the spokes-woman said.

So who are some of the stars who fl ew into the airport for the BMW this week? Well, confi dentiality is another of the air-port’s perks.

With no scheduled commercial airline service, Centennial Airport’s primary source of tra� c is made up of corporate charter and private business jet service. The airport, located just minutes down the road from the BMW Champion-ship at the Cherry Hills Country Club, expects to see an additional 40 to 50 jets on the ramp during the professional golf tournament, which concludes on Sept. 7. Photo by Deborah Grigsby/Centennial Airport

Page 6: Englewood Herald 0905

6 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

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Englewood Herald 7 September 5, 2014

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Apartments proposed for General Iron site Developer seeks tax credits to build a� ordable units By Tom Munds [email protected]

Scott Yates shared his vision of trans-forming a portion of the long-empty General Iron property near West Bates Avenue and South Galapago Street into an affordable housing complex.

Yates and property owner Bryant Win-slow explained their vision to the Engle-wood City Council at the Aug. 25 study session.

“Scott (Yates) came to me with the proposal to build 70 affordable hous-ing units provided we could be granted low-income housing tax credits from the Colorado Housing and Finance Author-ity,” Winslow said. “The tax credits are awarded twice a year. This cycle, we are one of 18 projects seeking the tax credits, annually awarding a tax credits to 11 to 13 projects. The Broadway Lofts project at Acoma Street is also seeking the tax credits in this award cycle.”

The men made the presentation as they asked the city council to revise the letter to CHFA giving equal priority to both projects. After the presentation and discussion, the council agreed to the re-

quest.Yates said the term “affordable hous-

ing” is defined by the federal govern-ment as housing with rents no more than 30 percent of the income of individuals or families making 80 percent of the area median income or less.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development establishes area median income for specific geographical area. The AMI for the Denver area for a family of four is $76,600. A family mak-ing 80 percent of AMI in the Denver area would have an annual income of $61,350.

Yates said his vision for the complex would have 35 apartments available for individuals or families making 60 per-cent of AMI, 18 for those making 50 per-cent of AMI and 40 for those making 40 percent of AMI. HUD classifies as very low income those making 50 percent of AMI. For a family of four, 50 percent of AMI in the Denver area is $38,350.

The developer said, if the tax cred-its are approved, he will build a quality complex that will include amenities and Class A buildings on two acres of the 16-acre site.

“There is a need for affordable hous-ing in Englewood,” he said. “We expect to serve a two-mile radius. The statistics show there are about 7,000 individuals or families who make 60 percent of AMI or less, and in Englewood there are only 262

affordable housing units available, so we definitely would be serving a need.”

Councilmember Steve Yates asked about rental rates proposed.

The developer said there will only be one and two bedroom units. Plans are to

rent a one-bedroom unit for $750, which includes utilities, while the monthly rental for a two-bedroom unit with utilities included is proposed at $900 a month. He said it would require an in-vestment of about $13.5 million.

This rendering portrays what a proposed a� ordable housing complex, to be located on two acres of the General Iron site, could look like. Plans call for the complex to have 70 apartments and, provided the developer is awarded low income housing tax cred-its, all of them will be for individuals or families with incomes that are 60 percent or less of the area median income. Courtesy art

Pooches ready to plunge into pirate pools Freedom Service Dogs fundraiser taking place for seventh time on Sept. 6 By Tom Munds [email protected]

Four-legged swimmers and splash-ers replace two-legged swimmers and splashers for the annual Doggie Plunge at Pirates Cove Family Aquatic Park in Englewood on Sept. 6.

This is the seventh year Freedom

Service Dogs has held the event to raise money for the organization while pro-viding a chance for dogs to swim and splash in the Pirates Cove pools.

The splash will be going on from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.

“Owners can sign up to spend up to two hours with their dog at the plunge,” said Karen Morrow, FSD marketing and events director. “The tickets are $15 and allow two people and one dog into the event. The dogs can swim and splash around but people are not allowed to go swimming with their pet.”

She said people can register online at www.freedomservicedogs/events or they can buy tickets at the door.

Morrow said there will be food trucks at the plunge selling people food as well as a food truck selling doggie treats.

There are also doggie life vests that can be used at no cost.

Pirates Cove Family Aquatic Park is lo-cated at 1225 W. Belleview Ave.

Owners brought about 1,000 dogs to the event last year.

There will also a place to sign up as a volunteer with Freedom Service Dogs, which has its headquarters at 2000 W. Union Ave., Englewood.

The organization was established in 1987 to create dogs to provide assistance to people with handicaps. Freedom Ser-vice Dogs rescues dogs from shelters with the goal of training each animal to perform services for a handicapped indi-vidual such as turning on lights, opening doors and even helping do the laundry.

Page 8: Englewood Herald 0905

8 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

8-Opinion

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OPINIONY O U R S & O U R S

Proper peer pressure promotes performance Sometimes just the words “peer pres-

sure” spark anxious, judgmental, and negative feelings. Especially when we attach verbs such as “succumbing to” or “giving in to” peer pressure.

And many times we direct our guidance of avoiding peer pressure to the young adults, teenagers and children in our lives. No doubt there are more temptations and access to trouble now than in any previous generation. So our advice and steering to avoid peer pressure has never been more valuable, as long as it doesn’t fall on deaf ears or comes across as, “Well when I was your age …,” because that never goes well. Or if it sounds overplayed like, “If all of your friends jumped off of the top of the mountain would you follow too?” Yikes!

Avoiding peer pressure can be turned from a negative to a positive as we encour-age those that look up to us with confi -dence boosters and nurturing self-esteem building words and actions. You know how it goes, when we tell or ask someone not to do something, especially our youth, what do they do? Exactly what we told them or asked them not to do. Having open dia-logues can be revealing about previous er-rors in judgment or examples where peers may have misled us, or perhaps we were the peer misleading others. As my friend Bert reminded me last week, sometimes when we think we are following, we could actually also be in a position of leading all of those who are following us too.

Another awesome and positive side of peer pressure is playing itself out right now

before our very eyes, ears, and through our contributions. I am talking about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. If you haven’t seen this yet or heard of it, the challenge has gone absolutely viral. People have been challenged to fi ll a bucket with water and ice and then dump the bucket over their head or have a family member or friend participate and tip the ice-fi lled bucket onto their head. Then each participant that has accepted the challenge gets to challenge others in their circle of friends, associates, or family to take the same chal-lenge. Now if they don’t take the challenge and want to avoid the fl eeting moment of freezing water spilling over their head and body, they can elect to make a donation to ALS. And in some cases I know people that have done both, accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and also made a nice fi nancial contribution to ALS.

And it’s not just ALS, just look at all the fundraisers for breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, SMA, diabetes, and so many others and include events like 5K runs, walks, auctions, golf tournaments where we sign

up to sponsor runners, walkers, golfers, and place our names on those silent auc-tion sheets, all for the greater good. And you know how it goes, sometimes we are on the fence of whether or not we will participate or sponsor someone, and then one of our friends, one of our peers does it and before we know it we have jumped in as well. And that is just incredible.

Peer pressure in business is also ex-tremely positive. There is nothing better than some healthy and friendly competi-tion. As a salesman I was always interested in how well my peers were doing. I used their productivity as a motivator to try and beat them the next day, week, or month. And it went both ways, my lifelong friend and fellow salesman would always contact me just to see what I sold that day so we could compete the following day.

So the next time we feel like cringing when we hear the words “peer pressure,” just remember it can absolutely be lever-aged as a positive infl uence in our lives and not always a negative. How about you? Have you had a positive experience with peer pressure? I would love to hear all about it at [email protected], and when we focus on the positive peer pres-sure in our lives it really will be a better than good week.

Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the former president of the Zig Zi-glar Corporation, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

Construction zone is no peaceful lane They are working on Quebec Street.I have some thoughts. I would aggres-

sively avoid the area if you have had more than one cup of coffee.

If you have spent a couple of hours at Lodo’s and go south on Quebec, prepare yourself for community service.

In all my born days — as my grand-mother used to say — I have never seen such a convolution of cones, barrels and arrows on a roadway.

You will start on the right and then you will be expected to move to the left, back to the right. Lanes disappear. The cones get closer and closer together. Do you know who M.C. Escher is? He would have loved all of this.

Take a look at “Rhythm of Illusion.” That’s exactly what Quebec is right now.

This fi gures: The name “Quebec” comes from an Algonquin word meaning “where the river narrows.”

I didn’t know that construction was go-ing on and I made the mistake of trying to get to King Soopers at midnight simply to

pick up a noodle salad. I still don’t know how I managed to get anywhere near the store.

I wanted to make a left and couldn’t. There was a guy using a jackhammer and right next to him was a worker who shouted something at me. I guess he thought I have some kind of metaphysical ability to hear something being said next to a jackham-mer.

And Smitty was barking his brains out. I eventually fi gured out that no left turn could be made, so I took a right on Park Meadows Drive and went through parts of

Lone Tree that I didn’t know existed.The good news is that I can avoid Que-

bec. Some of you can’t. It must be a night-mare on the way to work.

We experience virtual Quebecs through-out our lives. I had to take one last non-major class in order to graduate on time. Outside of my major I was a zombie in Chuck Taylors. I was lost, blocked and con-founded.

A good friend of mine went through a di-vorce and her updates sounded exactly like those cones, barrels and arrows — nothing but wickets and anxiety, mixed in with re-sidual anger and frustration.

In a month or two the cones will be gone and it might be hard to remember any of this. And that’s another thing that happens to us all of the time. Of course, some of the frustrations we experience in life do not go away, and the cones remain. A relationship goes bad and never improves.

I am not exactly sure what they are do-

Marshall continues on Page 9

Page 9: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 9 September 5, 2014

9

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[email protected]

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ing on Quebec, but I am guessing they are improving it.

Some relationships go from bad to worse, and no one comes out in hard hats to make them better. I have burned more bridges than I can count, and most of them are irreparable.

I think to myself that they are better off without me, and I am better off without them. Friendships take work — and time. I am down to less than a handful, and I am accomplishing more than I ever have be-

fore.That’s what I tell myself: I am getting

more done, but it’s meant that I have dis-connected myself more and more from the human race. There won’t be many “great guy” quotes in my obituary.

There is roadway construction all over the place, in every town (have you ever been to Detroit?). And, sure, it’s a pain in the neck. But.

I thought about Amy Van Dyken. She might say, “It’s not that bad, Craig, and it won’t last forever, will it?”

Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at [email protected].

Continued from Page 8

Marshall

Hazardous waste roundup scheduled By Tom Munds tmunds @coloradocommunitymedia.com

Since I can’t put it in the trash, what can I do with stuff like an old car battery and an old can of paint thinner?

For Englewood, Littleton and Sheridan residents, the answer to that question is the annual Household Hazardous Waste Round-up, which will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 14 and during the same hours on Sept. 22 at the Englewood ServiCenter, 2800 S. Platte River Drive.

This marks the 22nd year the event has been sponsored by the Keep Englewood Beautiful Commission. Other sponsors this year include the cities of Littleton and Sheri-dan.

Items that can be dropped off at the roundup include antifreeze, automobile bat-teries, fl ammable liquids like gasoline and paint thinner, lawn and garden chemicals, motor oil, oil-based paint and propane tanks. Items that use mercury, such as thermom-eters and barometers, will also be accepted.

There is a limit of 10 gallons of material per vehicle, and there is a cost of $20 to drop off items.

This year, residents can also drop off computers, fax machines, inkjet and toner cartridges, desktop copiers and cell phones at no charge. The roundup also will accept computer monitors and television sets but there is a charge of $15 per monitor and a $25 co-payment per television set.

The event will only accept materials from Englewood, Littleton and Sheridan residents, so individuals who drop off materials must present proof that they live in one of the three cities. Staff won’t accept materials from residents of other communities or from com-mercial fi rms.

While the roundup will accept antifreeze and motor oil, organizers remind residents it isn’t necessary to save those until the round-up, because a number of Englewood and Littleton businesses accept the items free of charge all year so the materials can be recy-cled.

A list of those businesses is given to those who visit the roundup.

Latex paint will no longer be accepted. Over the history of the roundup, hundreds of gallons of latex paint have been collected, but it is no longer considered a hazardous mate-rial and can be disposed of by removing the lid to dry it out, then putting it in the trash.

ViewHouse opens in Centennial Massive venue o� ers more than your typical restaurant By Jane Reuter [email protected]

The ViewHouse opened Aug. 29 in Centennial, leading into the public opening with an Aug. 28 sneak peek event that drew 800 people for an evening of complimentary drinks and food.

The site was home for 30 years to the Trail Dust Steak House, which closed in 2009. Rhythms bar opened there in 2010, but closed after one year. The building was vacant until the ViewHouse’s owners bought

it in 2013.No sign remains of the iconic

red, barnlike structure that was the Trail Dust, though the View-House used the rear portion of the original structure as part of its extensive remodel. The build-ing that occupies the site now is sleek, with a dark roof and large glass panels that take advantage of the mountain vistas.

The massive venue, which fronts Interstate 25 on Clinton Road, includes a large, ground-level bar with a 200-inch televi-sion — reportedly the largest in a Colorado restaurant or bar. A separate dining area on the same level that is devoid of televisions is designed to provide a quieter atmosphere. Two private dining rooms are also available.

The outdoor patio has an

8,000-square-foot courtyard with a net for volleyball or bad-minton and cornhole boards, cabana-style seating surround-ing several water features, a stage and another bar.

The restaurant’s second level includes a third large bar area and outdoor deck with moun-tain views.

The Centennial ViewHouse plans to host weekly bands on its outdoor stage.

It is the restaurant’s second location; the fi rst is in downtown Denver. In contrast to the down-town site, the Centennial menu will include more upscale dining options.

The widely varied menu in-cludes fl atbreads, pizza, salmon, ribeye, pork chops, bass, tacos, burgers, an ex-

tensive wine list and a selection of craft brews. Prices range from about $10 for a burger or taco to

$28 for a 14-ounce ribeye.The ViewHouse is at 7101 S.

Clinton Street.

From left, Denver residents Nicole Cox, Kaci Bullock, Shawn Cox and Kienan Franklin play a game of cornhole on the large patio at the Centennial ViewHouse during the restaurant’s Aug. 28 soft opening. Photos by Jane Reuter

The Centennial ViewHouse main bar includes a 200-inch television.

The Centennial ViewHouse, once the site of the Trail Dust, is a two-level restaurant with a large ground-level patio., featuring numerous water features.

Page 10: Englewood Herald 0905

10 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

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Page 11: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 11 September 5, 2014

11

Calendar of EventsFor a complete calendar of South Metro Denver Chamber events and for more information, visit our web site at www.bestchamber.com or call 303-795-0142.

Wednesday, September 3Verona Apartment Homes Ribbon Cutting5:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Verona Apartment Homes, 2691 W. Centennial Drive , Littleton, CO

Thursday, September 4Meet with Jack Tate, Candidate for Colorado House of Representatives9:00 am – 10:00 am, WhippleWood CPAs Conference Center at the Chamber2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial, CO

Friday, September 5Stand Up To Cancer Viewing Party7:00 pm – 9:00 pm, Blake Street Tavern, 2301 Blake St, Denver, CO

Friday, September 5MOSAIC An Evening of Art, Cuisine & Entertainment Colorado Center for the Blind5:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Colorado Center for the Blind, 2233 W. Shepperd Avenue, Littleton, COCost: $30/person. Purchase tickets online at www.cocenter.org or call Dan Burke at (303) 778-1130 x213

Tuesday, September 9Business After Hours Hosted by ANB Bank5:00 pm – 7:00 pm, ANB Bank - Cherry Creek, 3033 East 1st Avenue #300, Denver, CO

Thursday, September 11MOD Pizza Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting10:00 am – 12:00 pm, MOD Pizza, 8225 S. Chester St., Centennial, CO

Monday, September 15Save Lives, Sort Medical Supplies with Project C.U.R.E.7:00 pm, Project CURE, 10337 East Geddes Ave, Centennial, CO

Move over REI, there’s a new game in town. Approximately 600 people attended the grand opening and ribbon cutting held by Sierra Trading Post, an outlet store specializing in outdoor gear, on �ursday, August 28. �e event marked the Wyoming-based company’s first entry into the Colorado market; a Fort Collins location is expected to open shortly. Bargain hunters camped outside the facility with lines wrapping around the building,

hoping to win door prizes and purchase discounted outdoor gear. Prizes included gi� cards, discount cards, reusable bags, and a chance to win a trip to Jackson Hole, WY.

“[�ere were] flocks of people wrapped around the corner of the building, even some campers first in line with sleeping bags and a heater,” said attendee Aubrey Allmond.

�e ceremony began with remarks by Robert Golden, president/CEO of the South Metro

Denver Chamber, who welcomed the company to Colorado and the South Metro Denver Chamber, and introduced Gary Imig, president of Sierra Trading Post.

Imig said, “We’re thrilled to open our newest retail store in South Denver. We want shopping with us in the store to be as convenient as shopping with us online, and we’re leveraging some of the newest technology to make that happen for our South Denver customers.” Mayor of Greenwood Village Ron Rakowsky also shared a welcome on behalf of the city. �e ribbon cutting was followed by a $5,000 donation presentation by Sierra Trading Post to the �orne Nature Experience, whose mission is to build Earth stewardship by connecting youth to nature through joyful, hands-on, place-based environmental education experiences.

�e event’s attendees included several City of Greenwood Village councilmembers, as well as Sierra Trading Post executive staff. Following the ribbon cutting, eager shoppers filed into the outlet to capitalize on overstock, closeout, and minimally blemished name brand merchandise.

For more information about Sierra Trading Post, please visit www.sierratradingpost.com.

For more information about South Metro Denver Chamber membership and event opportunities, please visit www.bestchamber.com

Sierra Trading Post Opens First Colorado Location

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Littleton Ice Bucket Challenge

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Littleton challenged other local healthcare or-ganizations and accepted the challenge from sister hospital HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Colorado Springs to take the “Ice Bucket Challenge” to raise money and aware-ness for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. More than 100 HealthSouth Littleton staff mem-bers, patients and supporters gathered on the front lawn of the hospital, located at 1001 W. Mineral Ave., on Friday, Aug. 22 at 11:00 a.m. and doused themselves with ice cold water.

A barbecue lunch was provided to those who made a donation to the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the ALS Association which sup-ports local individuals who have ALS through

support, research and advocacy. Representa-tion from the organization was present at the event.

“�e Ice Bucket Challenge is a great way to highlight the care that is provided to those with neurological conditions, including ALS, at our hospital and in the community,” says David She�e, CEO of HealthSouth Littleton. “We hope our peers in the healthcare field will join us in raising awareness and have a little fun at the same time.”

ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. It causes muscle weakness especially in the arms and legs and affects one’s ability to speak, swallow and breathe. HealthSouth Littleton provides customized

therapy plans for those battling ALS which may include physical, occupational and speech therapies.

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Littleton

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Littleton is a 40-bed inpatient rehabilitation hospital that offers comprehensive inpatient rehabilitation services. Serving patients throughout the Denver metro area, the hospital is located at 1001 W. Mineral Ave. in Littleton and on the Web at www.healthsouth-littleton.com.

About HealthSouthHealthSouth is the nation’s largest owner

and operator of inpatient rehabilitation hospitals in terms of patients treated and

discharged, revenues and number of hospitals. Operating in 28 states across the country and in Puerto Rico, HealthSouth serves patients through its network of inpatient rehabilitation hospitals, outpatient rehabilita-tion satellite clinics and home health agencies. HealthSouth’s hospitals provide a higher level of rehabilitative care to patients who are recovering from conditions such as stroke and other neurological disorders, cardiac and pulmonary conditions, brain and spinal cord injuries, complex orthopedic conditions, and amputations. HealthSouth can be found on the Web at www.healthsouth.com.

Pictured from left: Mayor of Greenwood Village Ron Rakowsky; Brent Layton, assistant VP of retail opera-tions, store manager John Williams, and Gary Imig, president of Sierra Trading Post.

Driver charged in fatal crashJudge rejects bid to lower bondBy Tom [email protected]

Austin Michael Cale, the 25-year-old driver of a pickup truck involved in an Aug. 22 fatal accident in Englewood, was in 18th Judicial District Court on Aug. 28, where he was advised of the charges against him, had a bond reduction request denied and was ordered to be in court Oct. 3 for pre-trial hearing.

Cale has been in custody since his ar-rest at the scene of the accident just south of Belleview at Broadway and West Rafferty Garden Avenue.

On Aug. 28, he sat in the jury box with other defendants. He wore a blue jail jumpsuit, was handcuffed and there were shackles on his feet that were attached to a chain around his waist. When his case was

called, he joined the public defender at the lectern.

Angela Banducci of the public defend-er’s office waived the formal reading of the charges, but records show the charges filed against Cale are: vehicular homicide-DUI, a class 3 felony; vehicular homicide-

reckless driving, a class 4 felony; two charges of ve-hicular assault-DUI, class 4 felonies; two charges of vehicular assault-reckless driving, class 5 felonies; driving under the influ-ence, a misdemeanor; and reckless driving, a class 2

misdemeanor traffic offense.Banducci then requested re-

duction of the $50,000 bond.Deputy District Attorney Chris Wilcox

opposed bail reduction and then asked the court hear from the victim’s daughter, An-drea Sorrells.

“My father was killed in this accident,” the witness said. “My father was a good man. He was a retired solicitor for the gov-ernment and he was an Army veteran. I would like the bond to be the maximum allowed.”

Banducci then told the court her client is young, that he has no criminal history and no prior DUI charges. She also said the result of the portable breath test adminis-tered on Aug. 22 was .041 percent, which is below the threshold for a charge of driving while ability impaired.

“The request is the court reduce the amount of bond Mr. Cale is required to post,” she said. “If bond is posted, Mr. Cale will live with his father and there are meth-ods to insure his sobriety.”

Wilcox responded that the breath test was administered about two and half hours after the accident, and wasn’t a measure of intoxication at the time of the accident.

The prosecutor also said Cale’s records

show he failed to appear in court on two traffic charges in the past. He opposed low-ering the bond.

Magistrate Frank Mosschetti said he re-viewed the records and two witnesses said Cale was driving about 70 mph in a 35-mph zone. He noted Cale failed to appear in court on two occasions in the past and the bond of $50,000 remains in place and is consistent with the charges against the defendant.

Cale’s attorney then told the court the defendant’s father said he would post the bond. The magistrate then noted a manda-tory protection order is in place with the additional restrictions that Cale not drive, not commit any crime and not consume any alcohol, marijuana or controlled sub-stances.

Moschetti then set an Oct. 3 court date for the appearance of counsel and the pre-trial hearing.

Cale

Carjacking suspect deemed competent for trialSta� report

Ryan Cole Stone was deemed compe-tent to stand trial during an Aug. 28 status conference held at the Douglas County Justice Center in Castle Rock.

Stone is charged in connection with a

multi-county, high-speed March 12 chase that ended at about 8:15 a.m. when Stone allegedly crashed a stolen silver sedan at Lincoln Avenue and Peoria Street.

The morning rush-hour chase started in Longmont after, police say, Stone stole an SUV with a 4-year-old boy in it, then car-

jacked two other vehicles before crashing in Douglas County.

During the chase, Stone struck and in-jured a Colorado State Patrol trooper.

Stone, who is in custody, appeared with council.

Two competency evaluations were pre-

sented to the court - one from the defense’s doctor and one from the state. The court accepted the recommendation of both, finding Stone competent to proceed. The defense did not object.

A preliminary hearing for Stone is set for 2 p.m. Oct. 2 at the justice center.

Page 12: Englewood Herald 0905

12 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

12

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Mascot bill would defer to Indian panelsProposal set for public meeting on Sept. 10By Vic [email protected]

The debate over the use of American Indian mascots will come to the state Capitol next year.

State Rep. Joe Salazar, D-Thornton, is expected to carry a bill that could result in schools losing their mascots — or even losing state funding.

And the effort is sure to result in a vibrant public meeting on Salazar’s bill, which is scheduled for Sept. 10.

Salazar said his bill would require schools that receive state funding and that wish to have Indian-themed mascots to first get the OK from representatives of American Indian commu-nities.

Salazar said the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs could be in charge of making those decisions, or perhaps an-other commission would be created by lawmakers, who re-turn to the Capitol in January.

If schools don’t go before an Indian commission, Salazar said his legislation would still allow the schools to continue to use their mascots — but at a steep price.

“If they don’t want to reach out, they can use the mascot, but they don’t get state funding,” he said. “They are able to exercise their First Amendment rights, but as a state we don’t have to participate in their discriminatory conduct.”

There is an ongoing national debate over the use of Indian-themed mascots, one that has centered on the NFL’s Washing-ton Redskins.

Opponents of Washington’s mascot want it done away with because they feel it is a derogatory term that is akin to any other racial slur. The debate has led some NFL announc-ers and news organizations to move away from using the term

“Redskins.”Others blast the movement as political correctness gone

too far and say that the mascots are not racist, but rather pay homage to American Indian culture and history.

“They don’t get to make that justification,” Salazar said of that argument. “It’s the American Indian community that gets to decide if it’s racist to them. They can’t just say, `I don’t think it’s racist, so it’s not racist.’ You don’t get to decide.”

The issue will be discussed at a public meeting that is scheduled to be held at the Denver Indian Family Resource Center, 4407 Morrison Road, from 4:30-7 p.m. on Sept. 10.

There, Salazar will also talk about another piece of legis-lation that is of interest to the American Indian community — his revival of a bill that would allow out-of-state American Indian students to attend Colorado colleges at in-state tuition rates, so long as they have ties to Colorado tribes.

That legislation died in a committee hearing earlier this year.

Continued from Page 1

Ramp

Continued from Page 1

Funding

Continued from Page 1

Survey

Dunlap said the foundation receives requests from people with handicaps or their families. About half the requests are for handicap ramps. Other projects include inside modifications to provide better accessibility. She said as long as individuals meet the requirements, their names are added to the list.

The year, Brinkoff was notified that the request for a handicap ramp on her Englewood home had been ap-proved.

“I had about given up when they called and told me they would build the ramp,” she said. “It was a wonder-ful surprise. I am so happy and it was wonderful to be able to use the ramp to get out of my house without needing a lot of help.”

Volunteers from Aspen Builders took out the porch railing and built the ramp on Aug. 22. Volunteers from Orepec Building Products came in on Aug. 23 to com-plete the ramp project and put up the safety railing.

“We have 10 people here today and we are having a good time working on this project,” Jennifer Eye, Orepec team leader, said on Aug. 23. “I am glad I volunteered today. It makes me feel good to help Mrs. Brinkoff be able to get outside her home very little assistance. Being part of this project gives me a good feeling because I am

helping someone who needs help.”The work was well organized. Part of the crew cut

and pre-drilled the railing support, others put the sup-ports in place, while a third group painted the railing. Eye said she was surprised the project was moving a lot faster than she had expected.

Heather Lucero said she was having a good time working on the project.

“This is a great group of people and it feels good to pitch in to do this project,” she said.

Cindy Steward, Brinkoff’s daughter, said seeing the ramp installed was a wow moment for her and for her mother.

“Mom has serious back problems and has to use a walker to get around the house,” she said. “Before they put in the ramp, it really was a challenge to help her get outside. There was a short step down from the door to the porch and several steps from the porch to the ground. I had to try to steady her and it was painful for her and it took a long time for us to get her to the driveway.”

She said before the ramp was installed, there was no way for her mother to get out of her house without a lot of help. She said she worried because, if there was a fire and she wasn’t there, her mother would not be able to get out of the house.

“This project is wonderful,” she said. “We really thank all those who helped make it possible. We thank everyone who worked on this project and we want them to know it is a bless-ing for me and for my mom.”

About $20 million goes into a program that helps third-graders read, while $53 million will be set aside for school construction — most of that coming in the form of Amendment 64-based retail marijuana revenue, which will help in the construction of schools in rural areas.

“These investments will not only pay dividends in individual lives, but will also help build a stronger eco-nomic foundation for Colorado,” said Sen. Andy Kerr, D-Lakewood, who is the chairman of the Senate Educa-tion Committee.

Lawmakers also restored $110 million in education funding that had been stripped as a result of reces-sion-era budget cuts. Those “negative factor” cuts had slashed about $1 billion from the state’s K-12 budget.

Schools will also see an increase in the number of counselors at middle and high schools, in an effort to lower the current student-to-counselor ratio, which Senate Democrats say was at 400-1 prior to the legisla-tion being passed.

“When students are focused on their studies and have a graduation plan, they excel,” said Sen. Rachel Zenzinger, D-Arvada, who sponsored legislation to in-crease the number of guidance counselors.

The school funding pieces received the support of all Democrats and some Republicans, including outgoing Rep. Carole Murray, R-Castle Rock, who co-sponsored the Student Success Act, a major component of the school finance measures.

“It’s a tribute to the importance of education to the legislators in this state that we maximized our increase to (education) this year,” Murray said. “As we’re coming out of the recession, we had some tough decisions to make.”

Among those tough decisions was factoring in how much say local school boards have in determining how they allocate monies for their own districts.

Many Republicans wanted to see school districts have more autonomy in determining how the cash in-fusion is being spent, rather than an across-the-board system that the state controls.

Rep. Chris Holbert, R-Parker, said the school funding measures could have done more to respect school dis-tricts’ abilities to spend the money as they see fit.

“The vast majority of the 178 school boards in the state wanted us to restore the negative factor with no strings attached,” said Holbert. “But the Student Suc-cess Act was a Christmas tree of new mandates for school districts.

“School districts said to us, `No, you give us as much of the negative factor funding as you owe us and do not give us any new mandates.’”

Survey that was mailed to 1,200 residents in May.Miller said the residents who received the survey

were randomly selected from postal service listings.He said 296 residents completed and returned the

surveys, which was 26 percent of the surveys mailed out. Miller said the percentage of returned surveys ranges between 25 and 40 percent. The city was also told the national trend over the last three years has been fewer people completing and returning a citizen survey

The center compiled the results of the survey and compared those results to the results of Englewood surveys from previous years. The 2014 results also com-pared the Englewood results with the national averages called benchmarks.

Miller said this is his company’s 20th nniversary. He said the company worked with the International City

Managers Association to create the national citizen sur-vey.

“Over the years, we have administered and evaluated the results of surveys for more than 300 communities so we have data for comparisons,” he said.

The city’s communication with its residents was highly rated. Councilmember Bob McCaslin said he doesn’t hear residents say they are not getting enough information from the city.

“I think one of our concerns is, how do we get resi-dents more involved in the community,” he said. “But I do think we are seeing that improve in resident involve-ment because we are seeing more people indicating they want to volunteer to serve on our boards and com-missions.”

Mayor Randy Penn said it was a good decision to have the center conduct the survey this year.

“The center has provided us with detailed informa-tion about the survey results,” he said. “I believe this is valuable information we can use to help us make deci-sions now and in the future.”

HAVE A STORY IDEA?Email Englewood Community Editor Tom Munds at

[email protected] or call 303-

566-4108.

Page 13: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 13 September 5, 2014

13

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Page 14: Englewood Herald 0905

14 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

14-Life

Parker continues on Page 16

Take a load o� at new spot downtown

The 16th Street Mall has long been a thorn in the side of Denver dwellers who don’t shop at souvenir stores, don’t care to inhale secondhand smoke and don’t want to sign petitions.

But now the Downtown Denver Business Improvement District is installing Patio 16, an outdoor dining area in the median of the carless street between California and Stout streets.

Patio 16 opened on Aug. 28 and will offer outdoor seating, enclosed patio railings, a variety of menu options from six local ven-dors and an outdoor respite for the down-town Denver community to gather, dine and unwind. Patio 16 provides a family-friendly area staffed during hours of operation to ensure a safe, clean and friendly experience, which is open to all residents, employees and visitors.

For more information, visit www.down-towndenver.com/about-the-bid.

`Uncorked’ fall series opensStarted as a monthly event in 2010,

“Fridays Uncorked” has grown into a weekly wine and music series that continues year-around at Bonacquisiti Wine Company at 4640 Pecos St. in the Sunnyside neighbor-hood.

The fall series opens Sept. 4, and the Sept. 19 “Uncorked” event will feature the band My Old School — A Tribute to the Music of Steely Dan. My Old School is the culmination of the efforts of 12 professional Denver musi-cians who feel an affi nity to Steely Dan and the music that Walter Becker and Donald Fagen created by applying jazz to pop music.

In addition to the September music lineup, winemaker and namesake Paul Bonacquisiti will be featuring three new wine releases, including a bold spicy Petite Sirah, which last year sold out to wine club members upon release, as well as a Barbera and the [d] Red, a blend of 80 percent Merlot, 10 percent Syrah and 10 percent Zinfan-del. The [d] Red is named after Delagua, the coal camp in southern Colorado where Bonacquisti’s father was born. The [d] Red and Barbera releases will be available by the bottle and on tap at the winery in one-liter refi llable growlers.

Each event runs from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Admission is free and wine is available to purchase, as is food from a food truck that changes each week. Seating is limited, so guests are encouraged to bring a chair. The live music line-up through September includes:• Sept. 4 - Knight Groove• Sept. 12 - Heavy, Timbo and Deb• Sept. 19 - My Old School• Sept. 26 - The Hip Replacements

For more information, visit www.bonac-quistiwine.com.

Garlic by the tonThe kitchen at Saucy Noodle Ristorante

at 727 S. University Blvd. in the Bonnie Brae neighborhood cooks up more than 1,800 pounds of garlic every year, and it’s been serving it for 50 years this month — that’s well over 75,000 pounds of garlic.

Erin Markham, the third generation of the Badis family who now operates the restaurant with her husband, Nathan, held a 50th birthday celebration on Aug. 29. The party included menu specials and special prices that evoked the early days of The Noodle: Large one-topping pizzas for $3.95 and spaghetti and meatballs for $4.95.

Markham grew up at the restaurant, which her grandfather Sam bought in 1964

Oldest residential area in Denver dates to 1870s By Sonya Ellingboe [email protected]

Located just seven blocks from Den-ver’s 16th Street Mall, the historic Curtis Park neighborhood is Denver’s oldest. A Home and Community Tour on Sept. 13-14 will offer visits to 15 of the more than 500 historically signifi cant Curtis Park homes protected by Denver Landmark Preservation status and serve as a fund-raiser for Curtis Park Neighbors Inc.

When the railroad arrived in 1870, Denver’s population boomed and popu-lation increased 700 percent by 1880 — to 35,000. In 1871, the fi rst horse-drawn streetcar system started at Seventh and Larimer streets, turned on Champa Street at 16th Street and went out Cham-pa as far as 27th Street, then undevel-oped. Soon there was a mix of mansions and more modest middle-class homes in a variety of architectural styles, in-cluding Queen Anne, Italianate and Sec-ond Empire.

Residents included department store owner John Jay Joslin and Mayor Wolfe Londoner as well as clerks, bankers, teachers and blacksmiths.

In subsequent years, the neighbor-hood became one of the city’s poor-est, with most large homes carved up into small units and neglected until the area was rediscovered in the 1970s. This neighborhood now contains eight land-mark districts and has many residences on the National Register of Historic Plac-es.

Among the landmarked homes is the Italianate cottage at 2826 Curtis St., known as the West Residence — prob-ably designed by Orlando Scobey, listed as residing there in 1883-84. It shares an-other part of Denver’s history in that it housed two successive Japanese-Ameri-can owners in the period after Pearl Har-bor in 1941. Colorado Gov. Ralph Carr had expressed sympathy for these fami-lies displaced and ordered to relocation camps. Some moved to Denver hoping to be welcomed by local residents — which was not widely the case, at a time of widely spoken anti-Japanese rheto-ric. Five Points was a home for others not welcome elsewhere in Denver. (The present owner has designed the garden except for a large blue spruce.)

Also open for the tour is the Hayden-Pryor residence at 2418 Champa St., an example of Queen Anne style, dated 1886. It is said to parallel Curtis Park his-tory. It was built by Marks Amter, who borrowed $6,000 to build it and lost it to the bank in 1893, the year of the silver crash and ensuing depression, which af-fected the state. It was carved into nine units with only three bathrooms to serve many residents — perhaps as many as 27.

It was also included in 1956 B-8 (busi-ness) zoning by the Denver City Council, when 88 neighboring homes were torn down. This one survived and is now pro-tected by historic designation.

Other residences will be open and visitors can get a sense of the area’s colorful history. Advance tickets are available through Historic Denver, his-toricdenver.org, and at the Matthews-Gotthelf Mansion, 2601 Champa St., on Sept. 13 and 14.

The parlor of the West Residence at 2826 Curtis St. in Denver’s Curtis Park neighborhood, will be open during the Sept. 13 and 14 historic home tour. Photos by Tom Torgove

ABOVE: The Italianate West Residence at 2826 Curtis St. in the Curtis Park historic neighborhood is included in the Sept. 13 and 14 home tour. BELOW: The Queen Anne style Hayden-Pryor Residence at 2418 Champa is also included in the tour.

A stroll into history

IF YOU GO

The 2014 Historic Curtis Park Home and Community Tour is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 13 and 14. Tickets cost $15/$12 Historic Denver members, and are available at historicdenver.org and on tour days at tour headquarters: the Matthews-Gotthelf Mansion, 2601 Champa St. (Information provided by resident/tour chairs Gerald Horner and Linda Dowlen.)

FREE LECTURES• Sept. 13: Tom Noel, “Dr. Colorado,” will give a slide presentation: “Curtis Park: Denver’s Pioneer Streetcar Suburb,” at 11 a.m. at RedLine Gallery, 2350 Arapahoe St.• Sept. 14: Phil Goodstein, author and historian, will speak on the Jewish history of Curtis Park and have his new book, “Curtis Park, Five Points and Beyond — The Heart of East Denver” available at 11 a.m. at RedLine Gallery, 2350 Arapahoe St.

LIFES O U T H M E T R O

Page 15: Englewood Herald 0905

Hunt for history across LittletonCity’s story is subject for day of sleuthingBy Sonya [email protected]

Entertainment, antique cars and cos-tumed historic characters will appear on Main Street in downtown Littleton soon. Historic Littleton Inc. will stage its third an-nual Scavenger Hunt on Sept. 13 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Families and individuals are encouraged to become sleuths for an hour or two and learn some of the city’s story.

The starting point is at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St. — a particularly ap-propriate spot as a local historic landmark.

The Italian Renaissance-style Town Hall, a historic gem, was designed by architect J.J.B. Benedict and completed in 1920 to house Littleton’s city offices. Eventually, the city’s needs required a larger building, con-structed at 2255 W. Berry Ave., and in 1983, Town Hall began a new life as a busy arts center.

To participate, one picks up a clue list with questions about history and architec-tural details at Town Hall between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

The scavenger hunter proceeds to par-ticipating merchants, which will be marked and noted on the clue list’s map. A history of these locations will be posted on individual buildings, and clue lists will have queries about people and events.

Questions about Littleton history will be answered at each location, with images of the event’s mascot dog, Sleuth, holding needed information.

Cornices, corbels, iron work, doors, win-dows, signs … participants will also need to look closely for architectural details on historic buildings to find another set of an-swers.

A completed clue list is to be returned to Town Hall at any time before 3 p.m. (perhaps there’s time here for a bit of refreshment in one of the many nearby locations while judges read the clue lists.) Answers will be

checked for correctness, and correct ones will be entered in a drawing for prizes: $500, $300, $100, $50. (There will be additional prizes from businesses.)

Winners must be present at the drawing to receive a prize.

An additional objective, of course, is to encourage familiarity with the range of in-teresting, highly individual businesses in the unique, somewhat quirky downtown his-toric area — with the hope that discoveries of clues will mean discovery of new favor-ite places to shop and to enjoy coffee, beer, meals, tea, ice cream, chocolates and more.

Information is on the HLInc.org website.

Englewood Herald 15 September 5, 2014

15

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Littleton’s historic Town Hall Arts Center (pictured here in its holiday �nery) will serve as the headquarters for the Sept. 13 Scavenger Hunt, presented by Historic Littleton Inc. Photo by Andy Marquez

Jazz orchestra gains new artistic directorLone Tree shows have grown in popularityBy Sonya [email protected]

The Colorado Jazz Repertory Orches-tra starts its third season with changes. Director Art Bouton, Lone Tree resident and professor of saxophone at the Uni-versity of Denver’s Lamont School of Music, started the orchestra by calling on an ensemble of Colorado’s top jazz mu-sicians to perform at the Lone Tree Arts Center. In season two, it built to sold-out audiences for the last two concerts.

Bouton has formed Colorado Jazz Inc., a nonprofit corporation, to help bring the CJRO to national prominence and an-nounced a new position of artistic direc-tor.

He is “Grammy-nominated jazz artist and educator Steve Weist, a cutting-edge composer and trombonist” who has re-cently joined the Lamont School as asso-ciate professor of jazz studies and com-mercial music, Bouton announced.

Bouton said Weist “has spent seven years directing what is arguably one of the finest bands in the world, the Uni-versity of North Texas One O’ Clock Lab Band. I just had to have him out front.”

The CJRO will start its new season on Oct. 10 with “A Night in New Orleans,” featuring internationally known jazz trumpeter Byron Stripling.

“Stripling is the artistic director of the Columbus Jazz Orchestra, leader of his own quartet and constantly in demand to play with pops orchestras around the world. An extroverted performer who brings the audience into his music, the happiness that he exudes through his trumpet, his vocals and his words is reminiscent of Louis Armstrong, yet very much his own,” Bouton said.

He continued to say that Peter Olstad, the regular lead trumpet for CJRO, was not able to play in the October concert, and Weist said: “Let me call my buddy who plays lead for Count Basie. He’ll think this will be fun.” This is an example

of the kind of change Weist can bring to the band.

“Holidays With the CJRO” is sched-uled on Dec. 7 when the band will per-form big-band holiday favorites, includ-ing Duke Ellington’s “Nutcracker.”

On Jan. 23, there will be a tribute to Woody Herman’s Thundering Herd, and on March 23, vocalist Kim Nazarian of the New York Voices will be featured.

Bouton said, “This band has been a dream come true for me. To see the Arts Center packed for a tribute to Maynard Ferguson concert, with people (who brought their own trumpets) playing along to `Hey Jude,’ was just amazing.”

Tickets are on sale for the new season at the Lone Tree Arts Center box office, 10075 Commons St. in Lone Tree, lone-treeartscenter.org.

Steve Weist, new artistic director, left, and Art Bouton, executive director and saxophone player rehearse for an upcoming Colorado Jazz Repertory Orchestra concert. Courtesy photo

Page 16: Englewood Herald 0905

16 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

16

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14 years of service

and renamed from Jim Sano’s to “The Saucy Noodle,” with the culinary warning out front on its distinctive red and white canopy aw-ning: “If you don’t like garlic, go home.”

A lot of garlic goes into the Noodle’s spa-ghetti marinara, which is vegetarian but has so much garlic in it that it looks like ground beef. “The red sauce is grandmother Inez Ba-dis’ recipe,” Markham said. “It’s been a menu staple throughout the decades, alongside the most popular dish, lasagna, as well as spaghetti and the restaurant’s baseball-sized homemade meatballs.”

The menu also features one appetizer that might not catch a younger person’s eye: Morey Amsterdam’s fried ravioli. The dish is named after the late actor and comedian who is best remembered as part of the ensemble cast of the classic “The Dick Van Dyke Show” on television.

“It’s called that because in the ‘60s he came in and asked if we had such a dish, and we didn’t so he helped himself to the kitchen and made it himself,” Markham said.

OverheardEavesdropping on a woman talking on

the phone with a friend: “Nothing exciting going on, well, except for the new guy my daughter is dating right now. He is a model and he is gorgeous. She needs to marry him just so we can look at him across the table at Thanksgiving. Even my husband says, `He’s purty.’”

Penny Parker’s “Mile High Life” column gives insights into the best events, restaurants, businesses, parties and people throughout the metro area. Parker also writes for Blacktie-Colorado.com. You can subscribe and read her columns (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) at www.blacktie-colorado.com/pennyparker. She can be reached at [email protected] or at 303-619-5209.

Continued from Page 14

Parker

CURTAIN TIME

Denver premiere“Grace” by Craig Wright plays Sept. 4-27,

presented by the recently formed Silhou-ette Theatre Company at the John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. (It was on Broadway last year.) Directed by Paul Jaquith. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thurs-days; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 6:30 p.m. Sundays (no performance Sept. 7); special show Monday, Sept. 22 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $18, 303-999-9143 or silhouettetheatrecom-pany.org.

Taking wing“M. Butterfly” by David Henry Hwang is

presented by Theatre Esprit Asia from Sept. 4-28 at the Aurora Fox Studio Theatre, 9900 E. Colfax Ave., Aurora.

Performances: 7:30 p.m. on the Sept. 4 opening night; 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: theatre-esprit-asia.org.

Trauma tale“All the Rage,” written and performed

by Martin Moran, plays Sept. 6-28 at

Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Performances: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: curious-theatre.org. Related: several performances of “The Tricky Part,” which preceded “All the Rage.” See website.

Bits at Buntport“Naughty Bits,” a new original work by

Buntport Theater, plays Sept. 12 to Oct. 4 at Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Performances: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays Sept. 21, 28; 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29. Tickets: buntport.com.

Down Town Hall way“How to Succeed in Business Without

Really Trying” plays Sept. 12 to Oct. 12 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St. in downtown Littleton. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays and Saturday, Sept. 27; 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 5. Tickets: 303-794-2787, TownHallArtsCenter.com.

Page 17: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 17 September 5, 2014

17-Calendar

THINGS DO

ALFERD PACKER BACON PARTY

LITTLETON ROTARY’S second annual Alferd Packer Bacon, Bands & Beer party is from 3-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, in the parking lot at Reinke’s, 5663 S. Prince St., Littleton. Admission is a $5 donation for ages 12 and older. Money raised at the event goes to the Littleton Rotary Foundation and will be used to enhance community-wide programs and projects. Contact Jim Bisetti, 303-204-7246 or [email protected]. Go to www.clubrunner.ca/littleton/.

AREA 13.1 HALF MARATHON/5K

AREA 13.1 is a nationwide Half Marathon/5K series originated in Roswell, Georgia. This is a night race; seriously when have you ever heard of aliens invading during the day? And Castle Rock just seemed the perfect place for this event — come on, you really think that rock formed naturally like that? All runners should dress in bright colors and bring plenty of glow-in-the-dark tools to ward o� those pesky aliens that might be hiding along the course. After the run, enjoy an “out of this world” expo and after-party complete with food, hypnotic music, dancing, glow and strobe lights and more. Event starts at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, 500 Fairgrounds Road, Castle Rock. Contact [email protected] or go to http://www.alienhalf.com.

COLORADO ARTFEST AT CASTLE ROCK

ARTISTS ACROSS the country will bring their work to Colorado Artfest, the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce’s juried � ne arts show. The event features more than 176 artists, continual live main stage entertainment, strolling entertainers, a silent auction and food and beverage vendors. Artfest is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 7, in downtown Castle Rock. Go to http://www.castlerockculture.com/colorado-artfest-at-castle-rock/

LEARN ABOUT REVERSE MORTGAGES

THE LIVING and Aging Well in Lone Tree speaker series presents “Insight Into Reverse Mortgages,” by Artie Lyhl, with the Douglas County Housing Partnership. The lunch series is at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9. For information on costs, or to RSVP by Friday, Sept. 5, call 303-225-4930 or email [email protected]. Non-Lone Tree residents welcome. Program is at Lone Tree Golf Club & Hotel, 9808 Sunnindale Blvd., Lone Tree. Cost includes lunch.

HISTORY OF COLORADO AVIATION

PARKER AREA Historical Society presents the Colorado Aviation Historical Society and the Hall of Fame, and also welcomes Lance Barber, presenting Aviation Archaeology, at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Ruth Memorial Chapel, 19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker. The Colorado Aviation Historical Society and Hall of Fame was founded in 1966 and began operations in 1967. It preserves items con-nected to the history of aviation in Colorado. Barber was on the original B29 T-Square-54 restoration crew for the Lowry Heritage Museum in February 1987. He also is secretary of the Colorado General Aviation Alliance and an active � ight line lead for Rocky Mountain Airshows in Broom� eld.

THEATER/FILMHITCHCOCK CLASSIC

JOIN MOVIE host Matt Wigdahl for a screening of “Sabotage” (1936), based on Joseph Conrad’s novel, “The Secret Agent.” Program begins at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8, at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. Reserve your seat at 303-791-7323 or DouglasCountyLibraries.org.

SPOTLIGHT PRESENTS “TOY STORY,” “HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL”

SPOTLIGHT PERFORMING Arts Center presents “High School Musical” at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 12-13, featuring cast members ages 5-17, at 6328 E. County Line Road, Unit 102, Highlands Ranch. Call 720-443-2623 for tickets and information.

MUSIC/CONCERTSBIG BAND DANCE NIGHT

PROFESSIONAL DANCES will show o� a few simple steps to teach the audience some basic dance moves, and that will be followed by big band music performed by the 19-piece Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra. Enjoy an evening of music and dance from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12, in the Carriage House at the Highlands Ranch Mansion. Tickets available at any Highlands Ranch recreation center or online at www.HRCAon-line.org/tickets. If the show it not sold out, tickets will be sold at the event.

TONIC SOL-FA

TONIC SOL-FA has carved out its niche as one of the nation’s top vocal groups. The quartet will perform at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14, on the Main Stage at the Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. The group has been named one of the top � ve must-see groups in the country, and has been awarded numerous awards for original song and album in pop, gospel and holiday genres. The group has appeared on NBC’s Today Show and in Newsweek. Call

720-509-1000 or go to www.LoneTreeArtsCenter.org.

ARTLOCAL ARTISTS WORK DISPLAYED

SOUTH SUBURBAN Parks and Recreation’s centers feature temporary art exhibitions by local artists every month. From Sept. 1-30, Richard Long’s watercolor paintings will be displayed at Goodson Recreation Center, 6315 S. University Blvd., Centennial, 303-798-2476; Paint Box Guild’s varied array of artwork will be exhibited at Lone Tree Recreation Center, 10249 Ridgegate Circle, Lone Tree, 303-708-3500; Bill Utter presents his photography at the Douglas H. Buck Recreation Center, 2004 W. Powers Ave., Little-ton, 303-797-8787. Visit www.sspr.org or contact Darcie LaScala at 303-483-7072. 

CAFECITO AMIGOS

CELEBRATE CRAFT and culture at a free event at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at the Parker Library, 10851 S. Crossroads Drive. Explore the di� erent ways cultures express themselves through traditional and non-traditional crafts. To register, call 303-791-7323 or visit DouglasCountyLibraries.org.

ARTS IN THE AFTERNOON: VIVA ESPANA

WITH OPERA on Tap and Flamenco Underground, what happens when opera merges with � amenco danc-ing and music? An afternoon of sultry and � amboyant entertainment. The show promise excitement and drama with the same talent you’ve come to expect from Opera on Tap. Program is at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, on the Main Stage at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Call 720-509-1000 or go to www.LoneTreeArtsCenter.org.

EVENTSSTARLIGHT MOVIE: ‘THE LEGO MOVIE’

THE STARLIGHT movie series and street fair concludes Saturday, Sept. 6, with “The Lego Movie” at Festival Park, 200 Perry St., Castle Rock. The street fair opens at 6 p.m. and the movie begins at dusk. Go to http://www.downtowncastlerock.com/events.

GRANDPARENTS DAY ICE CREAM SOCIAL

IN HONOR of Grandparents Day, Castle Country Assisted Living will host a free ice cream social at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 7, at each of its three home - Cantril House, 221 Cantril St., Castle Rock; Valley House, 255 S. Valley Drive, Castle Rock; and Victorian House, 19600 Victorian Drive, Parker. To RSVP or for information, call 303-482-5552.

NATIONAL ASSISTED LIVING WEEK

CASTLE COUNTRY Assisted Living plans a series of events to celebrate National Assisted Living Week. The week’s events include: Brownie and Cookie Baking, 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 8, at Victorian House, 19600 Victorian Drive, Parker; Ceramics Class, 1 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8, at Cantril House, 221 Cantril St., Castle Rock, at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Victorian House, and 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Valley House, 255 S. Valley Drive, Castle Rock; an Elvis impersonator performs at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Cantril House; 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11 at Valley House; and 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, at Victorian House; “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” on Friday, Sept. 12, at 11 a.m. at Cantril House; at 1 p.m. at Valley House, and at 3 p.m. at Victorian House. Events are free and open to the public (except for the ceramics class). For information or to RSVP, call 303-482-5552.

GIVING AWAY YOUR FAMILY TREE

COLUMBINE GENEALOGICAL and Historical Society meets at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Program is “Giving Away Your Family Tree: A Treasure Trove of Family History Gifts,” by Dina Carson. Learn some clever ways to present your genealogical research in a way that family members will cherish. Contact CJ Backus, president, [email protected] or go to http://www.ColumbineGenealogy.com.

STRAIGHT FROM THE HEART

PFLAG HIGHLANDS Ranch Chapter (including the surrounding South Metro area) meets from 7-8:45 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at the James H. LaRue Library, 9292 Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Everything is con� dential and all are welcome. This month’s program includes a � lm called “Straight from the Heart,” which was nominated for an Academy Award in 2004. The video explores parents’ journeys to a new understanding of their lesbian and gay children. It is especially recommended for parents struggling with acceptance due to religious objections or other reasons. Contact info@p� aghigh-landsranch.org for more details.

HISTORY PRESENTATION

CASTLE ROCK Historical Society welcomes Dennis Potter, who will speak about the 1960 murder of Adolph Coors III. Refreshments are served at 6:30 p.m. and the program starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock.

RULER OF THE RAILZZ SKATEPARK COMPETITION

SKATEBOARDERS, BMX riders and scooter riders of all skill levels are invited to com-pete in the annual Ruler of the Railzz competition at noon Saturday, Sept. 13, at Redstone Skate Park, 3280 Redstone Park Circle, Highlands Ranch. Competition includes multiple divisions. Go to http://highlandsranch.org/2011/11/09/skate-park-programs/#Skate ParkCompetitions. Registra-

tion is recommended; same-day sign-ups will be taken from 11-11:45 a.m. Helmets are required.

COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE

IDYLLWILDE’S ANNUAL community garage sale is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12, and Saturday, Sept. 13, in the Idyllwilde community on both sides of Parker’s Canterberry Parkway, between Legend High School and Cimarron Middle School.

HEALTH/FITNESSSOUTH METRO OUT OF THE DARKNESS WALK

HELP CREATE a world without suicide by participating in the � fth South Metro Out of the Darkness Community Walk to bene� t the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The 2.9-mile walk is Saturday, Sept. 6, at Highlands Ranch High School, 9473 Cresthill Lane, Highlands Ranch. Registration begins and the Resource Fair opens at 9 a.m. and the opening ceremony and walk begin at 10 a.m. No admission required; donations are appreciated. Contact Laurie Freeman, [email protected]. Go to http://afsp.donordrive.com.

WALK TO FUND NEUROFIBROMATOSIS RESEARCH

TAKE STEPS toward a brighter future for children with neuro� bromatosis at the sixth annual Denver NF Walk on Sunday, Sept. 7, at Clement Park, 7306 W. Bowles Ave., Littleton. After the 1.5 mile walk, participants can enjoy games, prizes, food, music and more. On-leash dogs welcome. Check-in is at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 11. The walk will raise money for the Children’s Tumor Foundation, whose mission is to end neuro� bromatosis through research. To register, go to www.nfwalk.org/denver. For details about the foundation, go to www.ctf.org.

SPECIAL NEEDS YOGA

COME EXPERIENCE a form of yoga that works to improve balance, focus, coordina-tion and strength. Learn poses to reduce fatigue, sti� ness and stress, and stimulate the motor and sensory areas of the brain. Class runs from 5:15-5:45 p.m. Mondays, from Sept. 8, to Dec. 29, at the Eastridge Recreation Center, Highlands Ranch. Go to http://HRCAonline.org/TR.

SPECIAL NEEDS HIP-HOP

FOCUS OF class is a fun dance environment for ages 8 and up. Registration required. Class runs from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays from Sept. 8 to Dec. 15, at the Streetside South Dance Studio, Littleton. Go to http://HRCAonline.org/TR

RUN WILD

BRING THE kids and the dog for a fun-� lled morning in Castle Pines’ scenic Elk Ridge Park, 7005 Mira Vista Lane. The Castle Pines Run Wild has a race and distance for everyone. Run Wild is Sunday, Sept. 14, and check-in begins at 7 a.m. The 9-mile race starts at 8:30 a.m. and the 4-mile race starts at 8:40 a.m. Finish line festival begins at 9 a.m., and the awards ceremony starts at 10 a.m. The Color Me Wild Run starts at 10:30 a.m. Bring our own T-shirt (white is best) for the Color Me Wild Run. Dogs are welcome, and must be well behaved and on a leash (and their owners must have a bag or two for clean-up). Dogs are not allowed in the Color Run. Contact [email protected] or go to http://www.runwild.info.

EDUCATION HISTORY, FUTURE OF SCOTLAND

ACTIVE MINDS presents a program on the history of Scotland, the future of the country and what is happening there now from 3-4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at River-Pointe, 5225 S. Prince St., Littleton. Program is free; RSVP at 303-797-0600. The future of this country is somewhat uncertain given the national referendum on independence on Sept. 18, 2014. The lasting implications of this vote may not be clear for some time, but at a minimum, it highlights a segment of the population that is unhappy with the status quo and looking for change.

TOOLS FOR GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH

PARKER GENEALOGICAL Society welcomes Larry Dodge, presenting Tools, Search Engines and Favorite Sites, at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at Stroh Ranch Fire Station, 19310 Stroh Road, Parker. Program includes information on Internet and websites, how to ideas and getting to places you never knew about and what to do when you get there. Everyone is welcome.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to [email protected]. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

Page 18: Englewood Herald 0905

18 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

18

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Photographer puts focus on compositesPhotographer Joe Bonita will speak

about “Creation and Uses of Composite Images” when he addresses the Engle-wood Camera Club at 7 p.m. on Sept. 9. He said: “The program will explore the cre-ation of composite images and their many uses. Topics covered will be: fixing prob-lem photos; focus stacking; enhancing im-ages; overlays; creating repetition; making several photos from a single image; mir-ror dreamscapes and creating scenes that never existed …” The club meets monthly at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Visitors are welcome. In addition to a lecture, the club hosts a monthly contest of members’ photos. Guests and new members are wel-come.

Colorado Artfest setThe Castle Rock Chamber of Com-

merce hosts the annual Colorado Artfest on September 6 and 7 in the parking lots of Town Hall and the Philip S. Miller Library on Wilcox Street in Castle Rock. More than 175 artists will show their work. There will be music and the Big Eat restaurant show-case. Tickets: $5 adults; $3 seniors; chil-dren under 16 admitted free.

Garden club stages outingInstead of its usual first Wednesday eve-

ning meeting, the Littleton Garden Club will carpool to Kendrick Lake Park, 9351 W. Jewell Ave. in Lakewood, on Sept. 6 to see its xeric design, including handsome orna-mental grasses. Arrival at 10:30 a.m. Bring a lunch and water and a chair, if needed. This longtime club welcomes new mem-bers.

Storytelling talk scheduled“More than Four: Choosing a Point of

View” is Susan Rocco-McKeel’s title for the Parker Writers Group meeting from 2-4 p.m. Sept. 14 at the Parker Library meeting room, 10851 Crossroads Drive, Parker. The author, whose work is in the new “Chron-icles of Douglas County,” will discuss vari-ous possibilities for POV in telling your story. Guests are welcome — no reserva-tion needed.

Depot holds new show“Location, Location, Location” is the

title of the most recent exhibit at the Depot Art Gallery, 2069 W. Powers Ave., Littleton. Juror Marsha Wooley selected Julia Grund-meier’s oil painting “On the Street Where You Live,” as Best of Show. Other winners

included Fred Bikle, Pat Dall, Peggy Dietz, Brian Serff, Carol Broere, S. Williams and Cheryl Adams. The show runs through Nov. 9. Gallery hours: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Admission is free. 303-795-0781.

New library opens doorsThe new Sheridan Library at 3425 W.

Oxford Ave. opens with a ribbon cutting at 9 a.m. Sept. 13, with tours and festivities lasting through the day. Arapahoelibraries.org, 303-LIBRARY.

Powwow at art museumThe 25th Annual Denver Art Museum

Friendship Powwow and American Indian Cultural Celebration will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 6 on the Acoma Plaza, 13th Avenue between Broadway and Bannock in downtown Denver. Indian dancers, drum groups, artists, vendors, fry bread. Powwow and general museum ad-mission are free. Grand entry is at noon. Dance competitions until 4 p.m.

Author coming to RanchBarb Schmidt, author of “The Prac-

tice,” will speak at 7 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Highlands Ranch Tattered Cover about her book, her journey and her life-manage-ment toolkit that helps with stress man-agement and finding inner peace.

Genealogists meetColumbine Genealogical and Histori-

cal Society meets twice in September at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. The program on Sept. 9 at 1 p.m. will be “Giving Away Your Family Tree: a Treasure Trove of Fami-ly History Gifts” by Diana Carson. On Sept. 16 at 9:30 a.m., “Family Tree Maker” starts a three part series on this software with Deena Coutant. Also on Sept. 16, there will be a 1 p.m. program called “She’s Not Dead — He Took Another Bride” with James Jef-frey, offering a peek into ancestors’ house-holds. Visitors are always welcome. Col-umbineGenealogy.com.

PACE Center unveils its 2014-15 seasonNational acts, local favorites on agendaBy Sonya [email protected]

With the Parker Arts, Culture and Events Center gearing up for another season, Elaine Mariner, Parker’s cultural direc-tor, said, “Our goal in booking this season was to bring at least one national act every month while also featuring our hometown favorites. In addition, we sought to create a mix of entertainment options — from country and classic rock to Celtic and sym-phonic, with plenty of theater and dance.”

Inspire Creative, a Parker-based theater company, will co-produce the theatrical events. Tickets to most shows are on sale and a new Family Circle membership pro-gram is offered.

While singer-songwriter Clint Black’s performance on Oct. 4 is said to be sold out, tickets to other performances are available online and through the box office.

On Sept. 8, Dr. Kaboom’s one-man sci-ence show blends theater and exploration. Wonderbound ballet company will include Colorado Symphony Orchestra musicians in its program, “Enduring Grace,” on Oct. 18-19, and the Parker Symphony’s “Unseen World” concert on Oct. 24 will celebrate Halloween with music about a demon

witch and flying bats.Veteran entertainer Michael Martin

Murphy will use period costumes and traditional songs and old-time dances to evoke the spirit of the 1934 Cowboy Christ-mas Ball on Nov. 28, followed by “A Classic Parker Holiday” with the Parker Chorale and Parker Symphony on Dec. 5-6. Inspire Creative will present Scrooge and “A Christ-mas Carol” on Dec. 11-14, while “A Parker Nutcracker” will wrap up the holiday sea-son Dec. 18-21.

Rosanne Cash, daughter of Johnny Cash, will start off 2015 with a Jan. 9 show and soon after, families can travel to Oz as ”The Wizard of Oz” plays Jan. 23-Feb. 8.

Dance prevails in February with Won-derbound’s “Marie,” about Marie Antoi-nette, on Feb. 14-15, and a performance of “Swan Lake” by the Russian National Ballet on Feb. 19.

Singer-songwriter Marc Cohn appears March 14, followed by Rocky Mountain Brassworks on March 15.

Based on the best-selling children’s book series by Annie Barrows, “Ivy + Bean, The Musical” is a story of unexpected sec-ond-grade friendship on April 23. Chris-topher O’Riley, crossover pianist, presents “Out of My Hands” on April 25.

The season finale brings Celtic stars Natalie McMaster and Donnely Leahy with “Visions from Cape Breton and Beyond: a Celtic Family Celebration” on May 13.

For information and tickets, visit PACE-centeronline.org.

The Russian National Ballet will bring a production of the classic “Swan Lake” to the PACE Center this season. Photo courtesy of Columbia Artists Management

Page 19: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 19 September 5, 2014

19-Sports

SPORTS

Pirates lose football opener�in roster derails Englewood in second halfBy Tom [email protected]

Englewood wished the Aug. 26 game against Centaurus could have ended at halftime because Pirates’ injuries and a small roster resulted in the Warriors coming back in the second half to win 42-20.

The Pirates had a 20-12 halftime lead. Assistant Coach Andy Cornell reported Englewood lost starters Branden Elder, Sam Vogel and Jakey Wade to injuries and the lack of depth resulted in the Pi-rates running out of gas in the second half, when the Warriors staged their comeback.

Quarterback Sean Bowering com-pleted 14 of 24 passes for 158 yards and rushed for 156 yards.

Before he was hurt, Wade caught eight passes for 109 yards and 1 touchdown. Daryl Culbreath also had a two-yard touchdown run.

The Pirates were set to return to ac-

tion Sept. 4 at home against Kent Denver.At the Aug. 25 practice, Pirates coach

Jay Graves predicted his team would face the challenges presented by a thin roster.

“It will be an ironman year for us,” Pi-rates coach Jay Graves said. “Our starting offensive linemen are all returning let-termen and that could be team strength if they all stay healthy because we don’t have many reserves in that or any other position.”

Graves said he would have 28 players in uniform and 16 to 18 of those players will see significant playing time.

Graves said the Pirates threw the ball a lot last year but the team will mount a more balanced attack this season.

“We have Kyle Robideau, Kevin Mahler, Ben McFarland and a couple other guys who played varsity last season to anchor our offensive line,” the coach said. “They are strong, have good size and do a good job up front. They will also have to play defense. But, as long as they stay healthy, we should be pretty good up front.”

The Pirates suffered a key injury when running back and receiver Nick Bersa-

Englewood football coach Jay Graves, left, calls signals as three linemen prepare to hit a blocking sled during an Aug. 25 practice. The coach said injuries and a small roster cost the Pirates the season opener against Centaurus. Photo by Tom Munds

Pirates working to get betterImprovement is goal of non-league games, soccer coach saysBy Tom [email protected]

Even losses contribute to the Englewood High School boys soccer team’s goal of steady improvement.

“I tell the players we don’t have to be good during the early non-league games because we are just working things out,” Pirates coach Chris Kavinsky said. “We are looking, evaluat-ing our players and looking for the best per-son to put in a position to help us get better. That is the value of having seven non-league games. We want to use those games to help us be ready and have a set lineup when we start league play in the middle of September.”

Englewood lost to Evergreen on Aug. 21 and lost 6-0 to Denver West on Aug. 26.

“I saw improvement and our players do-ing some good things in the game against a very good Denver West team,” the coach said. “Our defense was under pressure most of the game and responded well in most instances.”

The Pirates played Durango at home Aug. 29, then traveled to play Bruce Randolph High school on Sept. 4 before going on the road Sept. 6 at Erie. The next home game will be at 10 a.m. Sept. 13 against Thompson Val-ley.

For the first time, the coach is dealing with the challenge of evaluating more than 30 ath-letes seeking berths on the varsity roster.

“This is the largest turnout we have had in my three years here at Englewood, and we are so pleased to see we are building the program,” he said. “We were young last year, so most of the players who were sophomores and juniors last year are back with us with a year of experience under their belts. We also have quite a few freshmen and sophomores who are out for soccer for the first time. That is important as we seek to build and improve the program.”

The coach said he has returning letter winners who will help the team. He said Luke Hall has returned in the goal and Tyler Hast-ings is playing center fullback on defense. On the attack, he expects Rodolfo Soto and Zane Miller will score some goals for the Pirates.

“We are a decent team all around and there is no one aspect of the game that can be identified as the team strength,” he said. “We have only been practicing two weeks, so we are still working out the kinks.”

He said he has a lot of young players look-ing to earn a spot on varsity.

Englewood defender Landis Carter heads the ball away from the Pirates goal during an Aug. 26 game against Denver West. Denver West won the game, 6-0. Photos by Tom Munds

LEFT: Englwood’s Austin Trail prepares to take control of the ball during the Aug. 26 non-league soccer game against Denver West. Trail, a senior, is among the returning veterans on the team. RIGHT: Englewood goalie Luke Hale stops a shot on goal by a Denver West player during the Aug. 26 match between the two schools. Hall made half a dozen saves, but the talented Denver West team won the game, 6-0.Soccer continues on Page 20

Football continues on Page 20

Page 20: Englewood Herald 0905

20 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

20

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PGA’s best to tee it up at Cherry HillsSta� report

With dozens of the world’s best professional golfers set to tee it up at Cherry Hills Country Club this week, tickets are at a premium.

No tickets will be sold at the gate for the Sept. 4-7 BMW Championship and fans are encouraged to check online at www.BMWChampionshipUSA.com for availability.

“We do expect to see maybe over 140,000 fans for the week,” said BMW Championship General Chairman George Solich.

The BMW Championship is the third — and second to last — leg of the season-ending FedEx Cup playoffs. The top 70 players in the standings advance to Cherry Hills for the first Colorado PGA men’s event since the 2006 Interna-tional at Castle Pines.

The top 125 players in the FedEx standings, which didn’t include Tiger Woods, played Aug. 21-24 at The Bar-clays in Paramus, N.J. to kick off the playoffs. Hunter Ma-han won the event, and in turn moved from 62nd to first in the standings, dropping Rory McIlroy to second.

Playoff contenders were trimmed to 100 for the Deutsche Bank Championship Aug. 29-Sept. 1 in Norton, Mass., and the top 70 will then come to Cherry Hills.

Playoff points are added to those garnered during the regular season and points will determine the eventual champion following the Tour Championship Sept. 11-14 in Atlanta. Only the leading 30 players in points after Cher-ry Hills will play in Atlanta.

In addition to Mahan and McIlroy, other celebrated players in the top 100 prior to the Deutsche Bank Cham-pionship include Bubba Watson (fifth), 2010 FedEx cham-pion Jim Furyk (sixth), Rickie Fowler (11th), Sergio Garcia (15th), Kent Denver graduate Kevin Stadler (34th), Ernie Els (39th) and Phil Mickelson (57th).

The contenders who make the Cherry Hills field will compete on a 7,352-yard, par 70 course with 3-inch deep rough.

“With the rain we’ve had, the rough has got some teeth,” Solich said.

Hall, a senior this year, is the starting varsity goalie.“Last year I was a rookie goalie,” he said. “After a year’s ex-

perience, I feel I understand the game better and I am more prepared to react to stop a shot at our goal.”

He said he knows more about what is going on and can work to be a leader of the team.

”I am playing a more aggressive style this year,” he said. ”I like that style and I think being aggressive makes me a better goalie.”

Continued from Page 19

Soccer

Continued from Page 19

Footballgel suffered a badly sprained ankle and missed the first game.

Two-year quarterback Isiah Mestas graduated so the Pirates had to find someone else to call signals. Bower-ing stepped up and won the job.

“Sean is a good athlete and is a leader for the basket-ball team,” Graves said. “He has played very well for us in the summer 7-on-7 games and in the scrimmages. He has learned our system and he will do a good job for us this season.”

Plans are to mix up the running and the passing plays. Graves said his running backs have good speed and should gain yardage behind the strong offensive line. He also said he has good, young receivers ready to catch the passes thrown by Bowering.

“We aren’t a powerhouse but, if we can stay healthy, we should be competitive this season,” Graves said.

The Pirates play three non-league games before they begin league play. Graves said most league opponents look pretty strong and it could be a battle for the league title this season.

Robideau took time out of practice Aug. 27 to tale about the coming season.

“I feel great and I am ready for the season to begin,” he said. “I am a returning letterman and I feel honored that my teammates will count on me to play hard, play well and be a team leader.”

He smiled and said he his 100 times more prepared for this season than last year.

“I have worked hard this summer,” he said. “I have spent a lot of time in the weight room so I am a lot stronger coming into the season. I also have worked hard on conditioning and building my stamina. My stamina is so much better now and I feel that is important since I am playing both ways and will probably be on the field most of the game.”

He said he has worked and improved his blocking tech-niques.

“I want to play well on offense,” he said. “But I really like playing defense. I like to use my hands to shed the blockers and hit people. I also like it because you are going full speed until the play is over. I am looking forward to the season, par-ticularly playing defense.”

Page 21: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 21 September 5, 2014

21

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• Doors • Painting • Decks • BathRemodel • Kitchen Remodels• Basements & Much More!

Call Today for a FREE ESTIMATE303-427-2955

HOME REPAIRS

INSIDE: *Bath *Kitchen's*Plumbing *Electrical, *Drywall

*Paint *Tile & Windows

OUTSIDE: *Paint & Repairs*Gutters *Deck's *Fence's *Yard

Work *Tree & Shrubberytrimming & clean upAffordable Hauling

Call Rick 720-285-0186

Free EstimatesKevin & Glen Miller

720-498-5879720-708-8380

[email protected]

www.millershandymanservicellc.com

Hardwood Floors

ALL PRO WOOD FLOORINGBeautiful Hardwood Flooring

Dustless SandingEngineered/Pre Finished/Laminate

InstallationFree Estimates and Competitive

Pricing on All Work100% Satisfaction GuaranteedCall Paul (720) 305-8650

Classic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood FloorsClassic Hardwood Floors

• Installation of new floors

• Sanding, Refinishing, Staining existing floors

• Free Estimates

303.591.7772Mike

INDEPENDENTHardwood Floor Co, LLC

• Dust Contained Sanding• New or Old Wood

• Hardwood InstallationInsured/FREE Estimates

Brian 303-907-1737

Hauling Service

• Home • Business • Junk & Debris• Furniture • Appliances

• Tree Limbs • Moving Trash • Carpet• Garage Clean Out

Call Bernie 303.347.2303

FREE ESTIMATES7 DAYS A WEEK

Instant Trash HaulingInstant Trash HaulingTRASH HAULING

Dirt, Rock, Concrete, Sod & Asphalt

• Hauling off of unwanted items/junk

• Minimum charge only $60 depending on load

• Also offer roll-off dumpsters

303.591.7772Mike Jamieson

Master HaulersHomes, Businesses, Rentals,

and GaragesClean & Move Outs

Light Moving and Cleaning303-841-0361

Home Improvement

HIGHLANDS HOMEIMPROVEMENT, INC.

Licensed/Insured

General Repair, Remodel, Electrical,Plumbing, Custom Kitchen & Bath,Tile Installation & Basement Finish

303-791-4000FREE Estimates

For ALL your Remodeling& Repair Needs A+

HOME REPAIR & REMODELProfessional, Reliable, Reasonable

Kitchens • Baths • Basements • New Additions

WE DO IT ALL, NO JOB TOO SMALLCF Specialties • 303-895-7461

Licensed/Insured

Landscaping/Nurseries

Family Owned and Operated

We are a full service design,installation andmaintenance company.

CALL DON AT [email protected] CLEANUP – SPRINKLER WINTERIZATION

AERATION/POWER RAKE – SPRINKLER DESIGN INSTALLATION AND REPAIRS – SNOW REMOVAL

TREE AND SHRUB CARE – WEEDCONTROL

MOUNTAIN HIGH LANDSCAPE, IRRIGATION, AND LAWNCARE

MOW&

SNOWCOMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL MOWING & SNOW REMOVAL

WE ALSO DO!!! Sod, Flower beds, tree trimming/removal, fence repair, power washing, gutter

cleaning, yard cleanup, debris, trash hauling, deck restoration & painting. Locally owned, operated,

licensed & insured.

Special 15% Senior Discount!CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 303-915-0501

Lawn/Garden Services

[email protected]

Weekly Mowing • Fertilization Aeration - $8/1000 sq.ft. $35/5000 sq. ft.Power Raking & Vacuuming - $85/5000 sq. ft. or $17/1000 sq.ft.

www.AMLandscapingServices.com

A&M Lawn Service• SPRING FERTILIZATION/AERATION/CLEAN UP

• SPRINKLER START-UPS/REPAIR•XERISCAPING • LANDSCAPING • FLAGSTONE OR PAVESTONE

• SHRUB/TREE INSTALLATION & PRUNING • SPRINKLER• DESIGN & INSTALLATION - PATIOS & WALKWAYS -SOD & SOIL

• AMENDMENTS - RETAINING WALLS - WATER FEATURES • LAWN MAINTENANCE - Commercial & Residential

Landscaping & Summer Mowing

WATER FEATURES • SPRINKLERS

303-791-5551CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

30 YearsExp.

FamilyOwned &Operated

No services for Castle Rock & Parker

Alpine LandscapeManagement

Weekly Mowing, Power RakingAerate, Fertilize, Spring Clean Up

Trim Bushes & Small Trees,Senior Discounts

720-329-9732

Lawn/Garden Services

PROFESSIONALOUTDOOR SERVICESTREES/ SHRUBS TRIMMED

Planted, Trimmed & Removal• Sod Work • Rock & Block Walls • Sprinklers

• Aeration • Stumps Ground • MulchLicensed / Insured

DICK 303-783-9000

FREE Estimates

Call or emailRon 303-758-5473

[email protected]

RON‘S LANDSCAPINGYard Clean-up, Raking, Weeding,

Flower Bed Maintenance, Shrubbery TrimmingSoil Prep - Sod Work

Trees & Shrub Replacement also Small Tree & Bush Removal

Bark, Rock Walls & Flagstone Work

Family owned business with over 35 yrs. exp.

Painting

• Honest pricing •• Free estimates •

We will match any written estimate!Same day service!

No job too small or too big!

303-960-7665

303-901-0947

Quality Painting forEvery Budget

• Exteriors • Interiors• Decks • Insured• Free Estimates

No Money Down

Remove the 10% discount for Seniors and Veterans and replace it with“Summer is here – schedule now!”

www.lovablepainters.com

Summer Is HereSchedule Now!

“We Treat Your Home Like It’s Our Home.”

• Interior • Exterior • Free Estimates

TCMPainting

303-956-8803

Plumbing

Residential: • Hot Water Heat • Forced Air

• Water Heaters • Kitchens • Baths • Service Repair •

Sprinkler Repair •

ANCHORPLUMBING

(303) 961-3485Licenced & Insured

Plumbing

Plumb-Crazy, LLC.“We’re Crazy About Plumbing”

ALAN ATTWOOD, Master Plumber

PH: 303-472-8217 FX: 303-688-8821

CUSTOM HOMESREMODEL

FINISHED BASEMENTSSERVICE AND REPAIR

Licensed • Insured

RALPH’S & JOE’S AFFORDABLE

Accepting all major credit cards

Insured & Bonded

Family Owned & Operated. Low Rates.

Sump pumps, water lines, garbagedisposals, toilets, sinks & more

Remodeling

AJ Gale BuildersBasements, Additions,

Highlands Ranch/Lone Tree (303)949-6330

Roofi ng/Gutters

All Types of RoofingNew Roofs, Reroofs, Repairs & Roof Certifications

Aluminum Seamless GuttersFamily owned/operated since 1980

Call Today for a FREE Estimate • Senior Discounts

(303) 234-1539www.AnyWeatherRoofing.com • [email protected]

Siding

Sprinklers

303-523-5859

Professional Installations & RepairsLifetime Warranty + SOD INSTALLATION

$AVE MONEY AND WATERFast, friendly serviceAll Work Guaranteed!

Tile

Tile

Thomas Floor Covering

~ Vinyl

303-781-4919FREE Estimates

~ All Types of Tile~ Ceramic - Granite

~ Porcelain - Natural Stone

26 Years Experience •Work Warranty

ALL PRO TILE & STONEExpert Tile, Marble, &Granite, InstallationsFree Estimates andCompetitive Pricing

All Work 100%Satisfaction Guaranteed

Call Paul (720) 305-8650

Tree Service

ABE’S TREE& SHRUB

CAREAbraham SpilsburyOwner/Operator

• Pruning • Removals • Shrub Maintenance

• FreeEstimates

720.283.8226C:720.979.3888

Certified Arborist,Insured, Littleton Resident

Window Services

Old Pro Window CleaningResidential Specialist

Over 30 years experienceQuality Work

Bob Bonnet 720-530-7580

10% OFF!For Very Special Homes, Getting The Job Done Carefully & Meticulously

303.437.1736Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

For Local News,Anytime of the Day

VisitColoradoCommunityMedia.com

SUMMER’S ALMOST OVER!BUT THERE’S STILL TIME TO HAVE YOUR GARAGE SALE!

303-566-40918 lines in18 papers303-566-4091

$45

Advertise: 303-566-4100

ServicesServices ServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesServicesS

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDETo advertise your

business here, call Karen at 303-566-4091

Page 22: Englewood Herald 0905

22 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

22

Sunday Worship8:00 & 10:45 a.m.

Sunday School Bible Study9:30am

Trinity Lutheran School & ELC(Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

303-841-4660www.tlcas.org

Trinity Lutheran Church

& School

Sunday Worship8:00 AM Chapel Service

9:00 & 10:30 AM Sanctuary10:20 AM St. Andrew Wild�ower Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

www.st-andrew-umc.com303-794-2683

Preschool: 303-794-05109203 S. University Blvd.

Highlands Ranch, 80126

Open and A�rming

Sunday 8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

1609 W. Littleton Blvd.(303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

Parker Community Churchof Religious Science

303.805.9890

Sunday 10:00 a.m. at the historicRuth Memorial Chapel on Mainstreet

www.ParkerCCRS.org

Castle Rock/Franktown Castle Rock/Franktown

Highlands Ranch

Highlands Ranch

Littleton

Littleton Parker Parker

Lone TreeGreenwood Village

United Church Of ChristParker Hilltop

10926 E. Democrat Rd.Parker, CO • 10am Worshipwww.uccparkerhilltop.org

303-841-2808

Little Blessings Day Carewww.littleblessingspdo.com

First UnitedMethodist Church

1200 South StreetCastle Rock, CO 80104

303.688.3047www.fumccr.org

Services:Sunday 8am, 9:30am, 11am

Sunday School 9:15am

worship Time

Welcome Home!Weaving Truth

and Relevance into Relationships and Life

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages

90 east orchard roadlittleton, co

303 798 6387www.gracepointcc.us

10:30AM sundays

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email

[email protected].

GR AC E PR E S B Y T E R IA N

303-798-8485

w w w.gracecolorado.comAlongside One Another On Life’s Journey

Sundays at10:00 am

Grace is on the NE Corner of SantaFe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy.

(Across from Murdochs)

You are invitedto worship with us:

SATURDAY 5:30pm

SUNDAY 9:30am

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-37707051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO

303-841-3739www.joylutheran-parker.org

S E R V I C E S :

Joy LutheranChurch

Sharing God’s Love

Parker evangelicalPresbyterian church

Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship8:45 am & 10:30 am

9030 MILLER ROADPARKER, CO 80138

3038412125www.pepc.org

Sunday Worship - 10:00amBible Study immediately followingThursday Bible Study - 7:30pm

Currently meeting at:Acres Green Elementary School

13524 Acres Green Drive303-688-9506

www.LoneTreeCoC.com

Lone TreeChurch of Christ

Serving the Southeast Denver areaCall or check our website for information on services and

social events!

www.cbsdenver.org303-794-6643

Congregation Beth Shalom

Serving the southeast Denver area

Cowboy Churchwith Kevin Weatherby

Sundays 10 amCalf’s Lowell Ranch

2330 S. I-25 www.savethecowboy.com

Christ’s Episcopal Church615 4th Street

Castle Rock, CO 80104303.688.5185

www.ChristsEpiscopalChurch.orgTWITTER: @CECCastleRock

Sunday Services8:00 a.m.

& 10:30 a.m.

WORSHIPSunday · 8:00 am & 10:30 am

SUNDAY SCHOOL9:15 am · for children and adults

PRESCHOOLServing the community ages

21/2 – 6 years

www.faithcrco.org303-688-3476

303 N Ridge Rd. • Castle Rock • CO

“Love, Learn, Laugh”

9:00 AM SUNDAY WORSHIPPastor Paul Flannery

2121 Dad Clark Drive720.259.2390

www.HFCdenver.org

Non-Denominational

“It’s not about us... It’s about servingothers... T hen God gets the Glory!”

A Hillsong Network Church

10:30amat CastleView HSw/Kids &Youth Min

mysummitchurch.com

AREA CLUBS EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update a club listing, e-mail [email protected].

PoliticalARAPAHOE COUNTY Republican Break-fast Club meets the � rst Wednesday of each month at ViewHouse Eatery, Bar & Rooftop, 7101 S. Clinton St., Centennial. Breakfast bu� et opens at 6:45 a.m. and program lasts from 7:15-8:30 a.m. For information, contact Myron Spanier, 303-877-2940; Mort Marks, 303-770-6147; Nathan Chambers, 303-804-0121; or Cli� Dodge, 303-909-7104.

ProfessionalAMERICAN ASSOCIATION of University Women, Littleton-Englewood Branch invites baccalaureates to participate in activities that further the goals of equity for women and girls, lifelong education and positive societal change. Meetings usually are Mondays each month, September through May, at Koelbel Library, Orchard Road and Holly Street, Centennial. Social time is followed by business meeting and informative program on subjects ranging from public policy issues to poetry. Call Linda Shell at 303-796-7702.

DENVER INVESTOR Club meets the � rst Thurs-day each month at 7:30 p.m. at the IHOP on Clinton Street in Englewood. Call Gail Segreto at 303-810-9015 or e-mail [email protected]. This is a nonpro� t educational club.

ENGLEWOOD CHAPTER of the Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees) needs men and women between the ages of 21 and 40 to help re-estab-lish the chapter. Jaycees work to help chapter members grow professionally and to help serve the community through hands-on projects. To become involved, call 303-914-0180 or visit www.coloradojaycees.org.

LEAGUE OF Women Voters of Arapahoe

County has two meetings per month. No unit meetings are in June through August, but the two unit meetings per month will begin again in September on second Monday evenings and second Thursday mornings. Call 303-798-2939.

LETIP INTERNATIONAL, local chapter, is a professional referral organization that meets at Maggiano’s at the Denver Tech Center, 7401 S. Clinton St., in Englewood. A Highlands Ranch chapter meets at LePeep’s, 7156 E. County Line Road. Call 303-789-7898 or visit www.letip.com.

NARFE (NATIONAL Active and Retired Federal Employees), Chapter 1089 was merged into Chapter 81. The membership meetings are from noon to 1:30 p.m. the third Friday of every month, with an optional lunch at 11 a.m., at the American Legion Post 1, at the Southeast corner of I-25 and Yale Ave (5400 E Yale).  All current and retired federal employees are invited to attend. For informa-tion call, Hank at 303-779-4268 or Darlene at 303-771-2024.

RecreationCHERRY CREEK Anglers meets at 7 p.m. every second Thursday in the Lodge Meeting Room at Gander Mountain Sports, 14000 E. Jewell Ave. Call Dennis at 303-841-3612.

KILOWATT EIGHTS is for people interested in square dancing. Dances are the � rst, third and � fth Friday each month at Malley Senior Center in Englewood. Call Ron at 303-759-4862.

MOUNTAINEERS SQUARE Dance Club meets the � rst, third and � fth Saturdays of the month at the Valley View Church of God, 4390 S. Lowell Blvd., Englewood, to square dance. Dances start at 8 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and watch. This is a healthy activity for all. Call 303-798-4472.

ServicesHOMECOMING INC. o� ers caregivers of low-

income seniors who are frail, disabled or unable to live alone without care in Adams, Arapahoe, Je� erson and Denver counties respite care. Assistance includes personal care and homemaking. Call Pamela Dombrowski-Wilson or Trini Marti-nez at 303-526-2318 for an application and information.

SocialARAPAHOE SERTOMA Club meets on Thurs-days at the Englewood Elks Club, 3690 S. Jason, Englewood. Contact Ken Kelley at 303-789-9393 or [email protected].

DAUGHTERS OF the American Revolu-tion, Columbine Chapter meets at 1 p.m. every second Saturday at Castlewood Library, 6739 S. Unita St., Englewood. Call Michelle Brown at 303-979-7550.

DAUGHTERS OF the British Empire is a national organization with a philanthropic purpose. For almost a century, DBE has been a common bond for women of British heritage living in the United States. DBE is open to women who are citizens or residents of the U.S. who are of British Commonwealth birth or ancestry or who are married to men of British Commonwealth birth or ancestry. There are six chapters in Colorado, including chapters in Littleton, Englewood, Centennial, Evergreen and Boulder County. Call Chris at 303-683-6154 or Olive at 303-347-1311, or visit www.dbecolorado.org and use the contact form available.

SERTOMA CLUB of DTC meets on Thursdays at Mangia Bevi Restaurant, Englewood. Contact David Oppen-heim at 303-850-7888 or [email protected].

EMBROIDERERS GUILD of America Colorado Chapter meets at Bethany Lutheran Church at Hampden Avenue and Colorado Boulevard in Englewood the fourth Tuesday each month from 9:30 a.m. to noon, excluding December and July. Meetings include needlework projects, needle art education, lectures and workshops of all levels. Guests are invited. Call Marnie Ritter at 303-791-

9334.

ENGLEWOOD LIONS Club, serving the Engle-wood community since 1926, meets at 7 a.m. Thursdays, except the � rst Thursday when the group meets at noon, at the Englewood Meridian, 3452 S. Corona St., Englewood. If you’re interested in working to improve our community as a member of the world’s largest service club, come and look us over. We invite men and women to join the Lions for a meal, good fellowship, a weekly program and to learn more about Lions Club International and the activities of our local Lions Club. Call Dave Newman at 303-237-0751 or Bruce Nordwall at 303-789-1145 with any questions.

THE ROTARY Club of Englewood meets each Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at the Wellshire Inn, 3333 S. Colorado Blvd, Denver. For information, contact Josh Staller at 303-721-6845, or visit rotaryclubofenglewood.org.

FRIENDSHIPS ARE Golden, a Precious Moments collectors club, meets the fourth Thursday each month at Castlewood Library in Englewood. Dinner provided by club members at 6 p.m., meeting from 7-9 p.m. Give back to the community by doing local charity work. Talk and share stories about Precious Moments. Call Leota Stoutenger, club president, at 303-791-9283.

GRACE CHAPEL Mothers of Preschoolers meets second and fourth Wednesdays from 9-11:30 a.m. at Grace Chapel, I-25 and County Line Road, Englewood. Call Karleen Wagner at 303-799-4900 or visit www.gracechapel.org.

NEWCOMERS AT Grace Chapel in Englewood welcomes women who are new to the Denver area. Learn about the group’s ongoing Bible study, make new friends, and be encouraged about God’s faithfulness and what hap-pens after the boxes are unpacked. Call Carolyn Chandler at 303-660-4042 for information on welcome teas, Bible study, � eld trips and get acquainted luncheons.

Page 23: Englewood Herald 0905

Englewood Herald 23 September 5, 2014

23

NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesTo advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

Public NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesNotice To Creditors

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of Anthony L. Larson,

a/k/a Anthony Lee Larson,a/k/a Anthony Larson,a/k/a Tony L. Larson,

a/k/a Tony Larson, DeceasedCase Number 2014PR30678

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to District Court of ArapahoeCounty, Colorado on or before January 5,2015, or the claims may be forever barred.

Martha Moore LarsonPersonal Representative7649 S. Rosemary CircleEnglewood, CO 80112

Legal Notice No.: 3219First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 19, 2014Publisher: The Englewood Herald

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of Barbara Jean Hogue,

aka Barbara J. Hogue,aka Barbara Hogue, DeceasedCase Number: 2014 PR 30664

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of ArapahoeCounty, Colorado on or before December22, 2014 or the claims may be foreverbarred.

John R. HoguePersonal Representative5159 S. Danube StreetCentennial, Colorado 80015

Legal Notice No: 3212First Publication: August 22, 2014Last Publication: September 5, 2014Publisher: Littleton Englewood Herald

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of Nancy Roberts Berge,

aka Nancy R. Berge,aka Nancy Berge,

aka Nancy Lee Berge,aka Nancy L. Berge, DeceasedCase Number: 2014 PR 30652

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of ArapahoeCounty, Colorado on or before December22, 2014 or the claims may be foreverbarred.

Steven E. BergePersonal RepresentativeC/o Mark D. Masters, Esq.2696 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 350Denver, Colorado 80222

Legal Notice No: 3214First Publication: August 22, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Littleton Independent

Notice To Creditors

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of Nancy Roberts Berge,

aka Nancy R. Berge,aka Nancy Berge,

aka Nancy Lee Berge,aka Nancy L. Berge, DeceasedCase Number: 2014 PR 30652

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of ArapahoeCounty, Colorado on or before December22, 2014 or the claims may be foreverbarred.

Steven E. BergePersonal RepresentativeC/o Mark D. Masters, Esq.2696 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 350Denver, Colorado 80222

Legal Notice No: 3214First Publication: August 22, 2014Last Publication: September 4, 2014Publisher: Littleton Independent

Government Legals Public Notice

Legal Notice No.: 3222First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 5, 2014Publisher: The Englewood Herald

45

Government Legals Public Notice

Legal Notice No.: 3217First Publication: August 29, 2014Last Publication: September 12, 2014Publisher: The Englewood Herald

Government Legals Public Notice

Legal Notice No.: 3223First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 5, 2014Publisher: The Englewood Herald

GILLIT

Government Legals Public Notice

Legal Notice No.: 3224First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 5, 2014Publisher: The Englewood Herald

oLSoN

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGARAPAHOE COUNTY

ARAPAHOE COUNTY WATERAND WASTEWATER

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTPETITION FOR INCLUSION

PROPOSAL: A petition for inclusion intothe Arapahoe County Water andWastewater Public Improvement Districthas been filed with the Board of CountyCommissioners of Arapahoe County, act-ing as the ex officio Board of Directors ofthe Arapahoe County Water andWastewater Public Improvement District.

Petition Information:Name(s) of Petitioner(s):TEAM Technologies LLC

Description of Property: Lot 4 A-1,Douglas County Industrial Park F001, 4thAmendment, County of Douglas, State ofColorado

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that onSeptember 23, 2014 at 9:30 a.m., or assoon thereafter as the calendar of theBoard of County Commissioners permits,the Board of County Commissioners of Ar-apahoe County, Colorado, acting as theex officio Board of Directors of the Ar-apahoe County Water and WastewaterPublic Improvement District, will hold apublic hearing at which all interestedpersons and citizens will be given theopportunity to be heard concerning thePetition for the above-described inclu-sion into the Public Improvement Districtin accordance with the provisions of Sec-tion 30-20-520, Colorado Revised Stat-utes. All persons having objections to thisPetition may appear at this public hearingand show cause why the Petition shouldnot be granted. The hearing will be held inthe East Hearing Room, Arapahoe CountyAdministration Building, 5334 SouthPrince Street, Littleton, Colorado.

The Petitioners are the owners of prop-erty proposed to be included into the Ar-apahoe County Water and WastewaterPublic Improvement District. Additional in-formation about the Petition is available inthe Office of the Board of County Commis-sioners of Arapahoe County, 5334 SouthPrince Street, Littleton, Colorado.

Matt Crane, Clerk to the Board

Legal Notice No.: 3220First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 19, 2014Publisher: Englewood Herald

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGARAPAHOE COUNTY

ARAPAHOE COUNTY WATERAND WASTEWATER

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTPETITION FOR INCLUSION

PROPOSAL: A petition for inclusion intothe Arapahoe County Water andWastewater Public Improvement Districthas been filed with the Board of CountyCommissioners of Arapahoe County, act-ing as the ex officio Board of Directors ofthe Arapahoe County Water andWastewater Public Improvement District.

Petition Information:Name(s) of Petitioner(s):TEAM Technologies LLC

Description of Property: Lot 4 A-1,Douglas County Industrial Park F001, 4thAmendment, County of Douglas, State ofColorado

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that onSeptember 23, 2014 at 9:30 a.m., or assoon thereafter as the calendar of theBoard of County Commissioners permits,the Board of County Commissioners of Ar-apahoe County, Colorado, acting as theex officio Board of Directors of the Ar-apahoe County Water and WastewaterPublic Improvement District, will hold apublic hearing at which all interestedpersons and citizens will be given theopportunity to be heard concerning thePetition for the above-described inclu-sion into the Public Improvement Districtin accordance with the provisions of Sec-tion 30-20-520, Colorado Revised Stat-utes. All persons having objections to thisPetition may appear at this public hearingand show cause why the Petition shouldnot be granted. The hearing will be held inthe East Hearing Room, Arapahoe CountyAdministration Building, 5334 SouthPrince Street, Littleton, Colorado.

The Petitioners are the owners of prop-erty proposed to be included into the Ar-apahoe County Water and WastewaterPublic Improvement District. Additional in-formation about the Petition is available inthe Office of the Board of County Commis-sioners of Arapahoe County, 5334 SouthPrince Street, Littleton, Colorado.

Matt Crane, Clerk to the Board

Legal Notice No.: 3220First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 19, 2014Publisher: Englewood Herald

PUBLIC NOTICE

Crown Castle on behalf of Sprint pro-poses to collocate antennas with acenterline height of 56-feet in an exist-ing 83.2-foot building at the approx. vi-cinity of 8360 S. Valley Hwy., Engle-wood, Douglas County, CO 80112. Pub-lic comments regarding potential effectsfrom this site on historic properties may besubmitted within 30-days from the date ofthis publication to: Trileaf Corp, Tim Re-del, [email protected], 10845 Olive Blvd,Suite 260, St. Louis, MO 63141, 314-997-6111.

Legal Notice No.: 3221First Publication: September 5, 2014Last Publication: September 5, 2014Publisher: The Englewood Heraldand the Centennial Citizen

BEInformed!Informed!Read the Legal Notices!

OF GAMESGALLERYc r o s s w o r d •   s u d o k u

& w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

GALLERY OF GAMESc r o s s w o r d •   s u d o k u & w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

SALOME’S STARSFOR THE WEEK OF SEPT. 1, 2014

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Be careful not to allow the backers of a new financial “deal” to pull the wool over the Lamb’s eyes. It could hold fewer plusses and more negatives than you were first led to believe.

TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) It’s a good idea to fin-ish all incomplete tasks so that you can devote your attention to next week’s projects. The weekend could hold surprises for romantic Fernandas and Ferdinands.

GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) A workplace suggestion you made a while ago that you might have forgot-ten could come back with a request to turn it from idea to reality. Your social life picks up considerably this weekend.

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) Someone from the past could return with an intriguing opportunity for a future project. Check into it, by all means. But don’t neglect your current responsibilities in the meantime.

LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) Keeping your claws sheathed and using good humor instead to counter someone who’s bad-mouthing the Big Cat isn’t easy. But it’s the best way to avoid more problems down the line.

VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) A workplace situation could improve if you’re less critical and more support-ive of those who are, after all, trying to do their best. Let them know you’re there to help when necessary.

LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) A new job offer might not carry all the benefits you’re seeking. Make sure you know what you’re entitled to, what is off the table and what is negotiable before you make a decision.

SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) A social obligation you would rather get out of could hold some surprisingly positive aspects. Why not go and see for yourself? A family member makes a curious request.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Before tackling that new project awaiting you at home or on the job, take time out for some much-deserved pampering to help lift your spirits and restore your energy levels.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) Your social calen-dar begins to fill up more quickly than you expected. And that’s great. You deserve to enjoy some good fun after so much time spent on serious matters.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) A domestic situ-ation continues to improve, thanks to all the tender, loving concern you’ve shown. A colleague makes a questionable move that you might want to check out sooner rather than later.

PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) A sudden turn in a ro-mantic relationship calls for both a rational and pas-sionate response. Keep the love level high, but also find out why the problem arose in the first place.

BORN THIS WEEK: You often set high standards for others. But to your credit, you set the same expec-tations for yourself.

© 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK? Want to know what clubs, art exhibits, meetings and cultural events are happening in your area and the areas around you? Visit our website at www.coloradocommunitymedia.com/calendar.

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24 Englewood Herald September 5, 2014

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