English 10 Literature Lesson #35 Mr. Rinka Odes, Prose Poetry & Sonnets

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Text of English 10 Literature Lesson #35 Mr. Rinka Odes, Prose Poetry & Sonnets

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  • English 10 Literature Lesson #35 Mr. Rinka Odes, Prose Poetry & Sonnets
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  • Ode A complex, generally lengthy lyric poem on a serious subject. My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk: Ode to a Nightingale John Keats
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  • Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats http://www.shmoop.com/ode-grecian-urn/ http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/ps285400_l.jpg
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  • Background In 1819 Keats wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn. He wrote a total of 5 odes that are all considered literary masterpieces. Ode on a Grecian Urn is his most famous ode because of its often quoted statement, Beauty is truth, truth beauty.
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  • Background When Keats wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn he was ill with tuberculosis and felt the approach of death. He addresses the subject of immortality in the poem. The speaker in the poem is talking to a marble Greek urn.
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  • Background Keats would have seen many Greek urns at the British Museum which had a great collection of archeological finds. Urns are known not only for their beautiful shape but for the pictures that adorn them.
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  • Background This ode focuses on the stories that these pictures tell, stories of love, passion, nature, and death.
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  • Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15564 http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd106/TheAutark/AchillesKillsHector.jpg
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  • Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time, Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape Of deities or mortals, or of both, In Tempe or the dales of Arcady? What men or gods are these? what maidens loth? What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy?
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  • Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal--yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!
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  • Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu; And, happy melodist, unwearied, For ever piping songs for ever new; More happy love! more happy, happy love! For ever warm and still to be enjoy'd, For ever panting, and for ever young; All breathing human passion far above, That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloy'd, A burning forehead, and a parching tongue.
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  • Who are these coming to the sacrifice? To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, And all her silken flanks with garlands drest? What little town by river or sea shore, Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel, Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn? And, little town, thy streets for evermore Will silent be; and not a soul to tell Why thou art desolate, can e'er return.
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  • O Attic shape! Fair attitude! with brede Of marble men and maidens overwrought, With forest branches and the trodden weed; Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought As doth eternity: Cold pastoral! When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, 'Beauty is truth, truth beauty'--that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
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  • Ode on a Grecian Urn Analysis by John Keats http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/keats/section4.rhtml http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd106/TheAutark/AchillesKillsHector.jpg
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  • 1 st Stanza The speaker in the poem is speaking to the urn. He marvels at the picture on the urn that are frozen in time. Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time,
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  • 1 st Stanza The speaker describes the urn itself as a historian that tells a story. Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme:
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  • 1 st Stanza The speaker looking at the figures on the urns side, wonders what legends they illustrate and where they come from. What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape Of deities or mortals, or of both, In Tempe or the dales of Arcady?
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  • 1 st Stanza He then focuses on a group of men chasing women and wonders what their story is. What men or gods are these? what maidens loth? What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape? What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy?
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  • 2nd Stanza He states that the music that is not heard is greater than real music because it is outside the bounds of time. Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone:
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  • 2nd Stanza The speaker looks at a picture of a young man playing a pipe who is with his lover lying beneath a glade of trees. Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare;
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  • 2nd Stanza The speaker tells the young man he will never kiss the young maiden but should not feel bad because her beauty will never fade. Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal--yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!
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  • 3rd Stanza The speaker looks at the trees and expresses happiness because they will never shed their leaves. Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu;
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  • 3rd Stanza He is happy that the pipers song will always be new. And, happy melodist, unwearied, For ever piping songs for ever new;
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  • 3rd Stanza The speaker is happy that the love between the boy and girl will last forever, not like mortal love which eventually fades in its passion and ends in conflict. More happy love! more happy, happy love! For ever warm and still to be enjoy'd, For ever panting, and for ever young; All breathing human passion far above, That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloy'd, A burning forehead, and a parching tongue.
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  • 4th Stanza The speaker now focuses on a group of villagers who are leading a cow to sacrifice. Where are they going? Where have they come from? Who are these coming to the sacrifice? To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, And all her silken flanks with garlands drest?
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  • 4th Stanza http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/keats/section4.rhtml http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/keats/section4.rhtml He considers the town they have left and remarks that the streets will remain empty; the townspeople will never return. What little town by river or sea shore, Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel, Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn? And, little town, thy streets for evermore Will silent be; and not a soul to tell Why thou art desolate, can e'er return.
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  • 5th Stanza Now, the speaker addresses the urn itself and states that much like the concept of eternity, the urn stimulates us to think outside of our usual context. O Attic shape! Fair attitude! with brede Of marble men and maidens overwrought, With forest branches and the trodden weed; Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought As doth eternity: Cold pastoral!
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  • 5th Stanza http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/keats/section4.rhtml http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/keats/section4.rhtml He realizes that when his generation is dead, the urn will remain in other circumstances than the speakers. When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours,
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  • 5th Stanza For future generations, the urn will continue to teach its message that, Beauty is truth, truth beauty. The idea is the only one the urn knows and the only one it needs to know. a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, 'Beauty is truth, truth beauty'--that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
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  • Prose Poetry Poetry written in prose form but using poetic devices to express a single emotion or idea. Loveliest of trees, the cherry now Is hung with bloom along the bough, And stands about the woodland ride Wearing white for Eastertide. Loveliest of trees, the cherry now A. E. Housman
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  • Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio By James Wright http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15590
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  • In the Shreve High football stadium, I think of Polacks nursing long beers in Tiltonsville, And gray faces of Negroes in the blast furnace at Benwood, And the ruptured night watchman of Wheeling Steel, Dreaming of heroes.
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