Findings from the SERDC/US EPA Food Recovery Summit Sagar...آ  2019. 2. 17.آ  SERDC.org SERDC/EPA Food

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  • Findings from the

    SERDC/US EPA Food

    Recovery Summit

    February 22, 2016 1

  • SERDC.org

    SERDC SPONSOR LEVEL MEMBERS

    2

    http://www.custompolymerspet.com/

  • SERDC.org

    SERDC/EPA Food Recovery Summit

    BioCycle, NC DEQ and SC DHEC also assisted

    in the production.

    US EPA and USDA recently announced a

    national goal of reducing food waste by 50%

    by 2030.

    252 attendees came from across the country.

    3

    national goal of reducing food waste by 50% by 2030

  • SERDC.org

    Event Sponsors

    4

  • SERDC.org

    Topics

    Federal, state and industry initiatives underway

    The practices of source reduction, food rescue

    and donation, and recycling of nonedible food

    Commercial and industrial partnerships

    Regulations

    Composting and anaerobic digestion

    Key next steps in food recovery

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  • SERDC.org

    Takeaways – What Did We Learn?

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  • SERDC.org 7

    Source: Food Waste Alliance

  • SERDC.org 8

    Source: Food Waste Alliance

  • SERDC.org 9

  • SERDC.org 10

  • SERDC.org

    Data and Management

    • Pre--‐ and post--‐assessments

    • Real--‐time metrics

    • Determining which metrics are appropriate

    • Data analysis

    • Onsite vs. offsite data gathering

    • Quality control

    • Mechanism for sharing data

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  • SERDC.org

    Legal Issues

    • Incentivizing donation and reduction

    • Facilitating innovation and experimentation

    • Protections for non--‐profit organizations

    •Municipalities protecting waste as a revenue

    stream

    • Liability concerns preventing donation

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  • SERDC.org

    Program Implementation

    • Pilot programs --‐ “Start small and grow wisely"

    • Investment and planning pay off

    • Contingency planning

    • Using data to inform targeted outreach and marketing

    • Program positioning as an honor or reward

    • Flexible programs accommodate customized requirements

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  • SERDC.org

    Scalability

    • Programs across levels sharing successes and

    failures

    •Smaller--‐scale success stories

    •Modular systems and innovative solutions

    • Challenges for organizations with smaller

    physical footprints

    • Trial programs to incubate projects

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  • SERDC.org

    Cost and Savings

    • Limited resources for monitoring, sorting,

    collecting, transporting, etc.

    •Multiple successful cost--‐diversion strategies

    • Analyzing costs vs. benefits

    • Supply and demand drives job creation

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  • SERDC.org

    Collaboration and Partnerships

    • No need to “re--‐invent the wheel”

    • Support for multi--‐disciplinary partnerships

    • The role of local government

    • Success stories of implementing commercial

    bans

    • Value of building trusted relationships

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  • SERDC.org

    Accessibility

    • Up--‐front investments to design “easy” programs

    • Techniques to minimize the barrier of entry

    • Adaptable approaches/programs meet people

    where they are

    • Right--‐sizing systems and equipment

    • Economic accessibility via grants/business

    loans

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  • SERDC.org

    Education and Outreach

    • Shifting culture/conversation from “waste management” to "food conservation“

    • The power of community

    • Create change via emotional investment

    • Leverage younger generations‘ enthusiasm

    • The role of "zero--‐waste ambassadors“ and peer enablers

    • Faith--‐based organizations uniquely positioned to educate and disseminate information

    • Train. Train. Train. Train. Train.

    • Using big--‐picture awareness to inform investments and "close the loop"

    18

  • SERDC.org

    Next Steps

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  • SERDC.org

    Action Planning

    • Shifting culture/conversation from “waste management” to "food conservation“

    • The power of community

    • Create change via emotional investment

    • Leverage younger generations‘ enthusiasm

    • The role of "zero--‐waste ambassadors“ and peer enablers

    • Faith--‐based organizations uniquely positioned to educate and disseminate information

    • Train. Train. Train. Train. Train.

    • Using big--‐picture awareness to inform investments and "close the loop"

    20

  • SERDC.org 21

    November 7 – 9, 2016

  • SERDC.org

    Contact Information

    Will Sagar

    Executive Director will.sagar@serdc.org (828) 507-0123