Fine Foodies Spring 2012

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Fine Foodies magazine Spring 2012 issue

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  • SPRI

    NG

    201

    2

    Plus:] DELI DELIGHTS] SEASONS IN GREECE] MARY BERRYS TOP RECIPES

    Fine FoodiesPassionate about good food

    Spring 2012

    Pick up your free

    foodie magazine

    INTERVIEW

    MICHEL ROUX JR ON LIFE IN THE FAMOUS CULINARY DYNASTY

    MICHEL ROUX JR ON

    The RouxlegacyThe Rouxlegacy

    BE INSPIRED BY THE TV CHEFS INDIAN

    ADVENTURE

    GordonRamsays

    Indian adventure

    GordonRamsays

    Indian adventure

    Plus: DELI DELIGHTS ] SEASONS IN GREECE ] MARY BERRYS TOP RECIPES ]

    a.indd 1 7/3/12 10:25:11

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    Target Publishing Ltd, The Old Dairy, Hudsons Farm, Fieldgate Lane, Ugley Green, Essex CM22 6HJTelephone: 01279 816300www.finefoodiesmag.com

    Editor: Rachel Symonds e: editor@finefoodiesmag.com t: 01279 810088

    Contributors: Jennifer Britt, Jane Baxter, Aglaia Kremezi

    Sub Editor: Jeff Munn-Giddings

    Group Commercial Manager: Ruth Gilmour e: ruth.gilmour@targetpublishing.com t: 01279 810084

    Sales Executives: Ben Brooks e: ben.brooks@targetpublishing.com t: 01279 810068

    Production Daniella Randazzo e: daniella.randazzo@targetpublishing.com t: 01279 810097

    Design Clare Holland e: clare.holland@targetpublishing.com

    Administration/Distribution Julie Torkington e: julie.torkington@targetpublishing.com t: 01279 810072

    Accounts Lorraine Evans e: lorraine.evans@targetpublishing.com t: 01279 816300

    Managing Director David Cann e: info@targetpublishing.com

    ISSN 2046-438XPublished by Target Publishing Limited. Printed in

    the UK by The Magazine Printing Company plc www.magprint.co.uk 2012 Target Publishing Ltd. Produced on environmentally friendly chlorine free paper derived from sustained forests. The Publishers cannot accept any responsibility for the advertisements in this publication. To protect our environment papers used in this publication are produced by mills that promote sustainably managed forests and utilise Elementary Chlorine Free process to produce fully recyclable material in accordance with an Environmental Management System conforming with BS EN ISO 14001:2004.

    Fine FoodiesPassionate about good food T

    his issue I had the pleasure of interviewing the popular chef and, increasingly, TV personality, Michel Roux Jr.

    Michel Jr is one of a number of top chefs who make up the Roux culinary dynasty and to say this family is talented when it comes to food is something of an understatement.

    Michel Jr talked to me about his early food memories and the things that influenced him in the

    kitchen, and this got me thinking about the rest of us. Clearly, we dont all come from such a famed food family and with a father such as Albert Roux as a mentor, but whats true for all of us is that our early memories shape how we view things in later life, and this includes our attitude to food.

    If, for instance, you have grown up with fast food being the norm, where everything comes from the freezer and nothing is cooked from scratch, its quite likely this will carry through into our adult lives. Equally, if we have never been shown the basic skills of cooking, we dont understand how different ingredients work together and simply dont realise how cost effective home cooking is then why would we be a keen cook?

    One of the aims of Fine Foodies is to show readers that cooking from scratch, using wholesome, fresh ingredients is easy to do and can be far more economical than living off convenience foods. This is especially the case when we choose foods that are in season in the UK, which havent had to be flown halfway across the world. This issue is the turn of the leek, a very versatile vegetable that can be included in plenty of dishes. Turn to page 22 for advice from the Riverford Kitchen about how you can cook up some simple dishes.

    Also in this issue, Mary Berry offers us some sumptuous, yet pretty simple recipes, developed over a career spanning some deacdes, or if you fancy something a little spicier, turn to page 26 where Gordon Ramsay whets the appetite following his journey through India.

    I hope this has given you some food for thought and gets you inspired to get into the kitchen. Its always great to hear what our readers think of Fine Foodies. Whether its a cooking tip for your fellow readers, to reporting a recipe that turned out really well (or not!) or simply to shout about how great your local store is, Id love to hear from you. Why not drop me an email at editor@finefoodiesmag.com or log onto our Twitter page @finefoodies you never know, your thoughts may be next issues star letter and you could bag a prize as a reward. Rachel

    RACHEL SyMONDS

    SPRING 2012 FINE FOODIES

    Welcome

    contents.indd 3 7/3/12 10:40:54

  • ContentsProduct news

    FINE FOODIES SPRING 2012

    COvEr StOry

    12 Michel Roux Jr The celebrated chef on his early food memories, learning his trade away from the family, and his remaining ambitions

    FEaturES

    18 Food focus From the deli Jennifer Britt explores

    a sumptuous selection of foods from the deli counter

    26 Recipe Indian-inspired recipes from Gordon Ramsays latest book

    30 Recipe After decades in the business, Mary Berry selects some of her favourite dishes

    34 Global foodie Aglaia Kremezi on Greeces finest food

    rEgularS

    6 Letters What youre talking about this issue 8 Foodie bites Whats going on in the world of fine food 10 Shelf life Explore the latest products in store

    16 UK fare Fine Foodies takes a closer look at the culinary landscape of the Isle of Wight

    22 In season Whats ideal for eating and cooking with at this time of year? Riverford Organic tells all

    40 Drink up From wines and cocktail ideas to the newest hot drinks

    42 Fine Foodie hero Gabriel David

    SPRING 2012

    Fine FoodiesPassionate about good food

    12 26 18

    30

    34

    contents.indd 4 12/3/12 14:08:20

  • ContentsProduct news

    FINE FOODIES SPRING 2012

    COvEr StOry

    12 Michel Roux Jr The celebrated chef on his early food memories, learning his trade away from the family, and his remaining ambitions

    FEaturES

    18 Food focus From the deli Jennifer Britt explores

    a sumptuous selection of foods from the deli counter

    26 Recipe Indian-inspired recipes from Gordon Ramsays latest book

    30 Recipe After decades in the business, Mary Berry selects some of her favourite dishes

    34 Global foodie Aglaia Kremezi on Greeces finest food

    rEgularS

    6 Letters What youre talking about this issue 8 Foodie bites Whats going on in the world of fine food 10 Shelf life Explore the latest products in store

    16 UK fare Fine Foodies takes a closer look at the culinary landscape of the Isle of Wight

    22 In season Whats ideal for eating and cooking with at this time of year? Riverford Organic tells all

    40 Drink up From wines and cocktail ideas to the newest hot drinks

    42 Fine Foodie hero Gabriel David

    SPRING 2012

    Fine FoodiesPassionate about good food

    12 26 18

    30

    34

    contents.indd 4 12/3/12 14:08:20 Pg 5 - Teapigs Tipon FPC.indd 1 14/03/2012 08:34

  • Your foodiesTWEET CORNERWe asked our followers the simple question, whats for dinner?

    Char su chow mein with shredded leeks and fennel.JOSH SUTTON @GUYROPEGOURMET

    Pitta bread with hummus with red onion marmalade. Again.@STOKESSAUCES

    Chicken fajitas, spicy wedges and homemade salsa.@SAMGURR Beef wellington and seasonal vegetables.@FOODZBELIEV

    Please circle

    Mr / Mrs / Ms Full name:

    Address:

    Postcode: Contact tel:

    Email:

    Signature: Date:

    FF SPRING12

    READER OFFERS

    From time to time we may wish to make you aware of special offers from carefully selected companies. If you do not wish to receive such offers, please tick this box

    The Garlic Farm Olives Et Al

    Star letter could it be you?Do you have something that youd like to share with other readers, something that will inspire them, encourage them to visit their local store or is just good news? Wed love to hear from you. And, of course, wed also like your comments about the magazine.

    The winner of this months star letter will receive a selection from family owned producers, Cottage Delight, offering the perfect opportunity to sample their handmade fine foods. All of the products are Gold Great Taste Award Winners from 2011, including favourites such as Lemon Curd, as well as the authentic flavours of Thai Mussamum Curry Paste.

    Write to: Rachel Symonds, Editor, Fine Foodies, The Old Dairy, Hudsons Farm, Fieldgate Lane, Ugley Green, Bishops Stortford CM22 6HJ or email editor@finefoodiesmag.com

    SLOW THANKSI just wanted to thank you for theJan/Feb edition of Fine Foodies. Who thought to put the slow cooker recipes in, because whoever did thank you, what a great idea. I have a slow cooker and use it all the time I wouldnt be without it but have never seen any slow cooker recipes in any magazines. It was wonderful to find not one but three delicious recipes. I cant wait to cook them for my family, and they cant wait for me to cook them for them! Thank you. KIRSTEN LYNCH, FLEET, HAMPSHIRE

    Letters

    6 FINE FOODIES SPRING 2012

    StarLetter

    FINE PRAISEPicked up a copy of Fine Foodies in our local Italian deli, Buongiono Italia what a great magazine, beautifully printed. I have known Buongiorno Italia, in St Albans, for over 17 years and in that time it has always been (almost) a hidden secret. Now that it has expanded to a deli and cafe it still makes a visit a real Italian experience.BRIAN DAVIES, REDBOURN, HERTFORDSHIRE

    WinterWinterwarmersThe cold weather is upon us, so dust off the slow cooker and get creative with some sumptuous recipe ideas from The Slow Cookbook.

    Recipes

    28 FINE FOODIES JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2012

    Pea, ham and potato soup Serves: 4-6A firm favourite with everyone, this soup tastes even better served the next day. Go easy on the salt when adding seasoning as the ham may be salty enough for most peoples taste.

    Prep: 15 minutesFreeze up to three months In the slow cooker: Cook auto/low for eight hours or high four hours, then auto/low eight hours or high four hours

    Ingredients: 1.1kg (212lb) unsmoked ham 1 bay leaf 1tbsp olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1tbsp Dijon mustard 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 sprigs of rosemary Handful of thyme, leaves only 900ml (1 pints) hot beef stock for the slow cooker (1.2 litres/2 pints for the traditional method)

    450g (1lb) frozen peas 3 potatoes, peeled and chopped into bite-sized pieces

    Method: Preheat the slow cooker, if required. Sit the ham and bay leaf in the slow cooker and cover with 900ml (1 pints) of water. Cover and cook on auto/low for eight hours or on high for four hours, then remove the ham and set aside. Discard the stock, or strain and reserve a little to add to the soup. Heat the oil in a large heavy-based pan over

    a medium heat, add the onion, and cook for three to four minutes until soft. Season with salt and pepper, then stir in the mustard, garlic, and herbs (reserve some thyme leaves for garnish). Add a little stock and bring to the boil, then tip in the peas (if you prefer them pured, pulse them gently in a liquidiser or use a stick blender).

    Transfer to the slow cooker, add the remaining stock and the potatoes, cover, and cook on auto/low for eight hours or on high for four hours. Remove any fat from the ham, chop into bite-sized pieces, and stir into the soup. Taste and season as needed. Garnish with the reserved thyme leaves and serve with wholemeal bread.

    Add the ham and bay leaf to a large pan, cover with 1.2 litres (2 pints) of water and bring to the boil. Partially cover, reduce to a simmer, and cook for about one hour or until the ham is cooked. Skim away any scum that comes to the surface of the pan as you go. Discard the stock, or strain and reserve a little to add to the soup. Set the ham aside until cool enough to handle. Heat the oil in a large heavy-based pan over a medium heat, add the onion, and cook for three to four minutes until soft. Season with salt and pepper, then stir in the mustard, garlic, and herbs (reserve some thyme leaves for garnish). Add a little stock and bring to the boil, then tip in the peas and remaining stock. Bring to the boil,

    reduce to a simmer, and cook for 45 minutes, topping up with hot water as needed. About 20 minutes before the end of the cooking time, bring a separate pan of water to the boil. Add the potatoes, bring back up to the boil, and then simmer for 12 to 15 minutes until soft. Drain and set aside. Remove the rosemary from the soup, then use a stick blender to gently pure the peas, or ladle them into a liquidizer and pulse a couple of times. Return them to the pan and stir in the potatoes. Remove any fat from the ham, chop into bite-sized pieces, and stir into the soup. Taste and season as needed. Garnish with the reserved thyme leaves and serve with wholemeal bread.

    Traditional method Prep: 15 minutes Cook: 2 hours

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    warmers

    JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2012 FINE FOODIES 29

    Freeze up to 3 months In the slow cooker: Prep: 20 minutes Cook: 15 minutes precooking; auto/low eight hours

    Ingredients: 2 oxtails, about 1.35kg (3lb) each, cut into bite-sized pieces Salt and freshly ground black pepper

    2tbsp olive oil 2 red onions, sliced 3 garlic clove, finely chopped Pinch of dried chilli flakes 350ml (12fl oz) red wine 4 star anise Handful of black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 8 soft prunes, stoned and chopped 600ml (1 pint) hot beef stock for the slow cooker (900ml/1 pints for the traditional method)

    4 clementines or 2 oranges, peeled and sliced into rings Small bunch of curly parsley leaves, finely chopped

    Method: Preheat the slow cooker, if required. Season the oxtail with salt and pepper. Heat half the oil in a large flameproof casserole over a medium heat, then add the meat in batches, and fry for eight to 10 minutes until browned on all sides. Remove from the casserole and set aside. Heat the remaining oil in the casserole over a medium heat, add the onions, and cook for three to four minutes to soften. Stir through

    the garlic and chilli flakes, then pour in the wine and let it simmer before adding it to the slow cooker together with the meat, star anise, peppercorns, bay leaf, prunes, and stock. Cover with the lid and cook on auto/low for eight hours. Add the clementines for the last 30 minutes of cooking. Shred the meat from the bone into the slow cooker, and discard the bone, bay leaf, and star anise. Serve on a bed of pasta, sprinkled with the parsley.

    Braised oxtail with star anise Serves 4-6 Rich and robust, oxtail makes a change from beef and braising it very slowly tenderizes it to the full. Prunes are always a tasty addition to a

    stew as their sweetness and texture complement the meat.

    Preheat the oven to 150c (300F/gas 2). Season the oxtail with salt and pepper. Heat half the oil in a large flameproof casserole over a medium heat, then add the meat in batches, and fry for eight to 10 minutes until browned on all sides....