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By Leigh Ann Rutledge Accent Editor As the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approaches, Pastor Mike Doak wants us to “re”member those who lost and gave their lives for the United States of America. Pastor Doak of Church of Christ Christian Disciples of Carrollton is the featured speaker at the 912 Project Cere- mony set for Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. in Carrollton High School gym. The 912 Project was established to remind citizens how the US was united as a nation the day after the 9/11 attacks when race, political choice and religion weren’t the focus. Pastor Doak has a viewpoint on the attacks and how the country responded that is differ- ent but also similar to the ma- jority of citizens. He was one of the few people to be onsite at the Pentagon and Ground Zero the day of the attacks. Reflecting back on that surreal time, he re- members the little things, that out of a tremendous tragedy, the spirit of the US shows and life goes on. “I remember it was such a beautiful day. The sun was shining, the sky was clear, just beautiful,” he said. SEPTEMBER 11, 2001 Mike Doak, special agent in charge of the Technical Surveil- lance and Forensic Science Divi- sion of the US Treasury Department, and his unit were in Norfolk, VA, participating in a joint training exercise with the Naval Amphibious Group, which began at 7 a.m. “As odd as it seems now, the cooperative training was aimed at assessing asymmetrical (not government sponsored) terrorist organiza- tions and evaluating their elec- tronic capabilities,” said Doak. “These training sessions are held periodically. Sort of a ‘war games with electronic devices. Each part of the group has a part to play. We were trying to see how quickly we could lock onto their signals and ei- ther decrypt or disarm them.” At 8:50 a.m. a steady cas- cade of partici- pant pagers began to go off. “The early re- ports we re- ceived said a light commer- cial aircraft strayed off course and struck the north tower of the World Trade Center,” ex- plained Doak. “Within min- utes, the as- sessment was upgraded, in- terceptors launched and the Federal Avi- ation Adminis- tration (FAA) ordered all pri- vate and com- mercial aircraft to land imme- diately.” Doak noted it is his opinion when the FAA grounded all aircrafts, they probably saved more lives. At 9:20 a.m., the Secretary of Treasury ad- vised Doak’s Emergency Re- sponse Team (ERT) to respond to the Pentagon and initiate the continuity of op- erations plans (COOP) restoring communication on a local, state and federal level. Doak arrived at the Pentagon at 11:45 a.m. His group deployed “CP-Majestic,” which was their rolling communications fleet. By 3:30 p.m., secure communica- tions and a rescue/recovery plan were in place at the Pentagon and Doak and his ERT were sent to Ground Zero at the World Trade Center in New York City. The AT&T Telecommunica- tions Building is located across the street from the Twin Towers. The entire communication sys- tem for Manhattan and its Bur- roughs is located in the AT&T building. When the towers were hit, a large beam from one of the towers was propelled into the side of the AT&T building. AT&T officials knew how to get their system up and running if there was water damage, but had no idea how to protect and restore it after fire damage. Officials de- cided to shut the entire system down, thus knocking out all modes of communication, result- ing in no landline or cellular service inbound or outbound from Manhattan for two weeks. Plus the damage to the Twin Towers severely de- graded the Secret Ser- vice’s ability to manage secure White House communications. Tower 7 in the World Trade Cen- ter Complex housed Secret Service offices. Doak and his team were needed to set up a communication system for all levels of government, which be- came known as the “switch- board for Ground Zero.” The Lincoln Tunnel is a 1.5- mile long tunnel under the Hudson River, connecting Wee- hawken, NJ, and the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Three tubes carry six lanes of traffic, close to 120,000 vehicles per day, making it one of the busiest vehicular tunnels in the world. The ERT group traveling in CP Majestic, entered the Lin- coln Tunnel at 11:30 p.m. “It was eerily surreal. We were the only vehicle in the tunnel and that never happens,” said Doak. “The only sound was our siren.” A member of Doak’s team is a Vietnam vet- eran and was among the sol- diers treated badly upon his re- turn from the war. “When we ex- ited the Lincoln Tunnel, we were greeted by your average-Joe New Yorkers standing there offering bottles of water, waving flags and cheering us on. My friend was astonished. Seeing the response of the people, he was pow- erfully overcome. It was a healing for him, he had come full circle.” This was one of many of the “little pockets of wonder sprinkled within” tragedy. Once on-scene, the team estab- lished a repeater site at the FBI Joint Command Post Fa- cility and worked non-stop for the next 72 hours es- tablishing encrypted satellite, cellular and landline com- munication links. Being the “Switch- board of Ground Zero,” they had the only fax machines and burnt up three of them processing messages from 39 federal agencies. Doak and his team were responsible for getting communica- tions up and run- ning to have a secure landing zone for President George W. Bush when he visited Ground Zero. For the next 12 weeks, they helped with rescue and re- covery efforts, gath- ered and processed forensic evidence and recovered files and evidence lost in the collapse of Building 6 (US Customs House Resident Agencies) and 7, the Secret Service offices. Doak noted the site was a “cloud of dust” that gave it an “air of unbelievability.” All debris from the area was transported to a forensic facility at Staten Is- land where it was sifted and searched for remains and perti- nent information needed by families of those killed in the at- tacks. Members of Doak’s team assisted in this process. His team also helped gather files and evidence from the Treasury office in Tower 6. The explosion at the Twin Towers caused a reaction that practi- cally sucked the insides out of the building, stairwells were gone, along with drywall and ceiling tiles. Doak was one of the men who went inside the unstable building. “We knew which offices were on what floor and where to look for items,” he said. “We were gathering infor- mation on one of the floors, and the walls are gone, but there sits the secretary’s Rolodex on the corner of her desk, unscathed. And the window blinds were bil- lowing in the breeze. The win- dows were gone but the blinds were intact.” Doak calls the Rolodex and window blinds more of those “pockets of won- der” or so-called normalcy in the scope of the situation. He feels these “little pockets of wonder” were signs that life goes on. “I went to find coffee for my crew about 6 a.m. Sept. 12 and was walking along and saw a wheel assembly from an air- plane lying on the ground near a building. I looked at it in a kind of disbelief,” Doak ex- plained. “Then I looked directly across from the wheel assem- bly and saw a bagel cart covered with soot and ash with the ro- tisserie still rotating and bagels on it.” (The rotisseries in bagel carts run off a car battery.) Doak admits he and his team, along with a lot of responders are somewhat desensitized to the situation at the time be- cause they are there to do their job. “We were used to living out of a suitcase, not knowing what is coming next,” he said. “It all goes to back to those little things. We received passenger lists from the planes, mani- festos, so much information. Then a fax came in telling a worker his wife had given birth and they were both fine.” See ATTACKS, C-2 ACTIVITIES Sept. 10 - Agriculture, Natural Resources & Conservation Expo at McClester/Kenwood Farm, 4701 Meter Rd., Mechanicstown. Exhibits, demonstrations, youth events. For info call 330-627- 9852. Sept. 10 - Dancing on the Bridge, Malvern. Arts & crafts, food, entertainment, vehicle show. For info, call 330-863- 1316. Sept. 12 - Carroll Co. Board of Elections regular board meeting at 9 a.m. in the board office. Sept. 12 - NOTE DATE CHANGE! PERI meeting at noon at Ponderosa. Speaker is Ollie Hawkins, superintendent of Car- roll Golden Age Retreat. Sept. 14 - Carroll Co. Humane Society Rabies Clinic 5:30-7 p.m. at Carroll County Fairgrounds. Cost is $7 for dogs, cats and fer- rets. No pregnant animals. All animals must be on a leash or caged. Sept. 17 - Car Seat Check 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Huebner Chevrolet, 1155 Canton Rd., Carrollton. For info, contact Car- roll Co. Health Dept. at 330-627- 4866. Sept. 17 - Carrollton Class of 1943 reunion at Ponderosa from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 18 - Turkey Shoot at Leesville Property Owners, 5480 Autumn Rd., Carrollton. Doors open at 10 a.m. Sept. 18 - Lake Mohawk Fall Fest - Open to public 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Crafts, demonstrations, entertainment. For info or re- serve your craft space, call 330- 863-1031. Sept. 24 - Scarecrows on the Square, Carrollton. Fun activi- ties! For info, visit www.carrollcountyartscenter.org. See EVENTS, C-2 Mike Doak recalls horrifying days at Ground Zero, asks community to remember...move on FREE PRESS STANDARD Section C Sept. 8, 2011 Contact the Accent Editor on the web at: [email protected] Accent Up Coming Events A “Civil War Tea” is planned for Sept. 11 from 1-5 p.m. at the McCook House Civil War Museum in Carrollton. Guests will be seated outside on the back porch, weather permitting, and will be served by members of the 1860s Ladies Study Group in period clothing. Cost is $5 per person and includes a tour of the museum, hot and cold tea, open face sandwiches, cookies and sweets. Reservations not required. The event is open to the public. From left is Shirley Anderson, curator of the McCook House Civil War Museum, Kay Gotschall and Haley Leslie, 4, of Carrollton. Pixie Furbee, (left) and Marjorie Sanderson hold the “Pay It Forward” quilt being auctioned at the Sept. 18 Hospice event. The second annual “Treasures of Time” will take place Sept. 16 at Days Inn of Carrollton. This event raises funds for Community Hospice patient care in Carroll County. Everyone is encouraged to bring one item from the following categories to be appraised: glassware, coins, jewelry, watches, military and firearms, pottery, china and col- lectibles. Appraisals can be done on toys, linens, quilts, primitives and small furniture. A “pay it forward” quilt will be auctioned during the live auc- tion. The family of a patient served by Community Hospice of Carroll County several years ago donated the quilt. The quilt win- ner will have the option to keep the item for him or herself or hold the quilt for a year and do- nate the quilt to a non-profit or- ganization of their choice to use as a fundraiser. This is the sec- ond time the quilt has made its way to a Community Hospice fundraising event. The event features a silent auction from 1-2:30 p.m. fol- lowed by a live auction at 3 p.m. While tickets are required for the silent auction and to have an appraisal, the live auction is open to the public. See QUILT, C-2 ‘Pay it Forward’ quilt will be auctioned during Hospice event Tea time at McCook House ‘Lest We Forget’ is theme of 9-11 event A 9-11 remembrence cere- mony is Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. at the Carrollton High School gymnasium. The theme for the event is “Lest We Forget.” This event coincides with the 10th an- niversary of the 9-11 attacks. Speakers include Pastor Mike Doak, Rick Eddy, Allan Furbee and Chuck Pearson. Those attending are asked to dress in red, white and blue. For more information con- tact Lisa Walker at 330-739- 0025. HEALING BEGINS. Americans began the healing process and watched in awe as the twin light beams lit up the New York skyline following the September 11 attacks. This photo, pro- vided to Pastor Mike Doak by one of his crew members, shows the Statue of Liberty taking on a unique glow. AT LEFT: The AT&T Communications Building sustained dam- age as a result of a beam from one of the Twin Towers piercing the other side of the building. An American flag showed the country’s resiliance. CENTER. Four days after the attack on the Twin Towers, crews worked round the clock to search for victims. The South Tower, still partially standiing, is shown the background. ABOVE. Members of Mike Doak’s crew sort through the rubble four days after the attacks. Remembering 9-11

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  • By Leigh Ann RutledgeAccent Editor

    As the 10th anniversary of the9/11 attacks approaches, PastorMike Doak wants us toremember those who lost andgave their lives for the UnitedStates of America.

    Pastor Doak of Church ofChrist Christian Disciples ofCarrollton is the featuredspeaker at the 912 Project Cere-mony set for Sept. 10 at 7 p.m.in Carrollton High School gym.The 912 Project was establishedto remind citizens how the USwas united as a nation the dayafter the 9/11 attacks whenrace, political choice and religionwerent the focus.

    Pastor Doak has a viewpointon the attacks and how thecountry responded that is differ-ent but also similar to the ma-jority of citizens. He was one ofthe few people to be onsite at thePentagon and Ground Zero theday of the attacks. Reflectingback on that surreal time, he re-members the little things, thatout of a tremendous tragedy, thespirit of the US shows and lifegoes on.

    I remember it was such abeautiful day. The sun wasshining, the sky was clear, justbeautiful, he said.

    SEPTEMBER 11, 2001Mike Doak, special agent in

    charge of the Technical Surveil-lance and Forensic Science Divi-sion of the US TreasuryDepartment, and his unit werein Norfolk, VA, participating in ajoint training exercise with theNaval Amphibious Group, whichbegan at 7 a.m. As odd as itseems now, the cooperativetraining was aimed at assessingasymmetrical (not governmentsponsored) terrorist organiza-tions and evaluating their elec-

    tronic capabilities, said Doak.These training sessions are heldperiodically. Sort of a war gameswith electronic devices. Eachpart of the group has a part toplay. We were trying to see howquickly we could lock onto theirsignals and ei-ther decrypt ordisarm them.

    At 8:50 a.m.a steady cas-cade of partici-pant pagersbegan to go off.The early re-ports we re-ceived said alight commer-cial aircraftstrayed offcourse andstruck thenorth tower ofthe World TradeCenter, ex-plained Doak.Within min-utes, the as-sessment wasupgraded, in-t e r c e p t o r slaunched andthe Federal Avi-ation Adminis-tration (FAA)ordered all pri-vate and com-mercial aircraftto land imme-diately. Doaknoted it is hisopinion whenthe FAAgrounded allaircrafts, theyprobably savedmore lives.

    At 9:20 a.m.,the Secretary ofTreasury ad-vised DoaksEmergency Re-sponse Team(ERT) to respond to the Pentagonand initiate the continuity of op-erations plans (COOP) restoringcommunication on a local, stateand federal level.

    Doak arrived at the Pentagon at11:45 a.m. His group deployedCP-Majestic, which was theirrolling communications fleet. By3:30 p.m., secure communica-tions and a rescue/recovery planwere in place at the Pentagon andDoak and his ERT were sent toGround Zero at the World Trade

    Center in New York City. The AT&T Telecommunica-

    tions Building is located acrossthe street from the Twin Towers.The entire communication sys-tem for Manhattan and its Bur-roughs is located in the AT&T

    building. When the towers werehit, a large beam from one of thetowers was propelled into theside of the AT&T building. AT&Tofficials knew how to get theirsystem up and running if therewas water damage, but had noidea how to protect and restore itafter fire damage. Officials de-cided to shut the entire systemdown, thus knocking out allmodes of communication, result-ing in no landline or cellularservice inbound or outboundfrom Manhattan for two weeks.

    Plus the damage to theTwin Towers severely de-graded the Secret Ser-vices ability to managesecure White Housec o m m u n i c a t i o n s .

    Tower 7 in the World Trade Cen-ter Complex housed SecretService offices. Doak and histeam were needed to set up acommunication system for alllevels of government, which be-came known as the switch-

    board for Ground Zero. The Lincoln Tunnel is a 1.5-

    mile long tunnel under theHudson River, connecting Wee-hawken, NJ, and the borough ofManhattan in New York City.Three tubes carry six lanes oftraffic, close to 120,000 vehiclesper day, making it one of thebusiest vehicular tunnels in theworld.

    The ERT group traveling inCP Majestic, entered the Lin-coln Tunnel at 11:30 p.m. Itwas eerily surreal. We werethe only vehicle in the tunneland that never happens, saidDoak. The only sound wasour siren. A member ofDoaks team is a Vietnam vet-eran and was among the sol-

    diers treated badly upon his re-turn from the war. When we ex-ited the Lincoln Tunnel, we weregreeted by your average-Joe NewYorkers standing there offeringbottles of water, waving flags andcheering us on. My friend was

    astonished. Seeingthe response of thepeople, he was pow-erfully overcome. Itwas a healing forhim, he had comefull circle. This wasone of many of thelittle pockets ofwonder sprinkledwithin tragedy.

    Once on-scene,the team estab-lished a repeater siteat the FBI JointCommand Post Fa-cility and workednon-stop for thenext 72 hours es-tablishing encryptedsatellite, cellularand landline com-munication links.Being the Switch-board of GroundZero, they had theonly fax machinesand burnt up threeof them processingmessages from 39federal agencies.Doak and his teamwere responsible forgetting communica-tions up and run-ning to have asecure landing zonefor President GeorgeW. Bush when hevisited Ground Zero.For the next 12weeks, they helpedwith rescue and re-covery efforts, gath-ered and processedforensic evidenceand recovered files

    and evidence lost in the collapseof Building 6 (US CustomsHouse Resident Agencies) and 7,the Secret Service offices.

    Doak noted the site was acloud of dust that gave it anair of unbelievability. All debrisfrom the area was transported toa forensic facility at Staten Is-land where it was sifted and

    searched for remains and perti-nent information needed byfamilies of those killed in the at-tacks. Members of Doaks teamassisted in this process.

    His team also helped gatherfiles and evidence from theTreasury office in Tower 6. Theexplosion at the Twin Towerscaused a reaction that practi-cally sucked the insides out ofthe building, stairwells weregone, along with drywall andceiling tiles. Doak was one ofthe men who went inside theunstable building. We knewwhich offices were on what floorand where to look for items, hesaid. We were gathering infor-mation on one of the floors, andthe walls are gone, but there sitsthe secretarys Rolodex on thecorner of her desk, unscathed.And the window blinds were bil-lowing in the breeze. The win-dows were gone but the blindswere intact. Doak calls theRolodex and window blindsmore of those pockets of won-der or so-called normalcy inthe scope of the situation.

    He feels these little pockets ofwonder were signs that life goeson. I went to find coffee for mycrew about 6 a.m. Sept. 12 andwas walking along and saw awheel assembly from an air-plane lying on the ground neara building. I looked at it in akind of disbelief, Doak ex-plained. Then I looked directlyacross from the wheel assem-bly and saw a bagel cart coveredwith soot and ash with the ro-tisserie still rotating and bagelson it. (The rotisseries in bagelcarts run off a car battery.)

    Doak admits he and his team,along with a lot of respondersare somewhat desensitized tothe situation at the time be-cause they are there to do theirjob. We were used to living outof a suitcase, not knowing whatis coming next, he said. It allgoes to back to those littlethings. We received passengerlists from the planes, mani-festos, so much information.Then a fax came in telling aworker his wife had given birthand they were both fine.

    See ATTACKS, C-2

    ACTIVITIESSept. 10 - Agriculture, Natural

    Resources & Conservation Expoat McClester/Kenwood Farm,4701 Meter Rd., Mechanicstown.Exhibits, demonstrations, youthevents. For info call 330-627-9852.

    Sept. 10 - Dancing on theBridge, Malvern. Arts & crafts,food, entertainment, vehicleshow. For info, call 330-863-1316.

    Sept. 12 - Carroll Co. Board ofElections regular board meetingat 9 a.m. in the board office.

    Sept. 12 - NOTE DATECHANGE! PERI meeting at noonat Ponderosa. Speaker is OllieHawkins, superintendent of Car-roll Golden Age Retreat.

    Sept. 14 - Carroll Co. HumaneSociety Rabies Clinic 5:30-7 p.m.at Carroll County Fairgrounds.Cost is $7 for dogs, cats and fer-rets. No pregnant animals. Allanimals must be on a leash orcaged.

    Sept. 17 - Car Seat Check 10a.m. to 1 p.m. at HuebnerChevrolet, 1155 Canton Rd.,Carrollton. For info, contact Car-roll Co. Health Dept. at 330-627-4866.

    Sept. 17 - Carrollton Class of1943 reunion at Ponderosa from11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Sept. 18 - Turkey Shoot atLeesville Property Owners, 5480Autumn Rd., Carrollton. Doorsopen at 10 a.m.

    Sept. 18 - Lake Mohawk FallFest - Open to public 11 a.m. to5 p.m. Crafts, demonstrations,entertainment. For info or re-serve your craft space, call 330-863-1031.

    Sept. 24 - Scarecrows on theSquare, Carrollton. Fun activi-ties! For info, visitwww.carrollcountyartscenter.org.

    See EVENTS, C-2

    Mike Doak recalls horrifying days at Ground Zero, asks community to remember...move on

    FREEPRESS

    STANDARD Section C Sept. 8, 2011Contact the Accent Editor on the web at:

    [email protected]

    UpComingEvents

    A Civil War Tea is planned for Sept. 11 from 1-5 p.m. atthe McCook House Civil War Museum in Carrollton.

    Guests will be seated outside on the back porch, weatherpermitting, and will be served by members of the 1860sLadies Study Group in period clothing.

    Cost is $5 per person and includes a tour of the museum,hot and cold tea, open face sandwiches, cookies and sweets.Reservations not required. The event is open to the public.

    From left is Shirley Anderson, curator of the McCookHouse Civil War Museum, Kay Gotschall and Haley Leslie, 4,of Carrollton.

    Pixie Furbee, (left) and Marjorie Sanderson hold the Pay ItForward quilt being auctioned at the Sept. 18 Hospice event.

    The second annual Treasuresof Time will take place Sept. 16at Days Inn of Carrollton.

    This event raises funds forCommunity Hospice patient carein Carroll County. Everyone isencouraged to bring one itemfrom the following categories tobe appraised: glassware, coins,jewelry, watches, military andfirearms, pottery, china and col-lectibles. Appraisals can be doneon toys, linens, quilts, primitivesand small furniture.

    A pay it forward quilt will beauctioned during the live auc-tion. The family of a patientserved by Community Hospice ofCarroll County several years agodonated the quilt. The quilt win-ner will have the option to keepthe item for him or herself orhold the quilt for a year and do-nate the quilt to a non-profit or-ganization of their choice to useas a fundraiser. This is the sec-ond time the quilt has made itsway to a Community Hospicefundraising event.

    The event features a silentauction from 1-2:30 p.m. fol-

    lowed by a live auction at 3 p.m.While tickets are required for thesilent auction and to have an

    appraisal, the live auction isopen to the public.

    See QUILT, C-2

    Pay it Forward quilt will beauctioned during Hospice event

    Tea time at McCook House

    Lest We Forget istheme of 9-11 event

    A 9-11 remembrence cere-mony is Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. atthe Carrollton High Schoolgymnasium.

    The theme for the event isLest We Forget. This eventcoincides with the 10th an-niversary of the 9-11 attacks.

    Speakers include PastorMike Doak, Rick Eddy, AllanFurbee and Chuck Pearson.

    Those attending are askedto dress in red, white and blue.

    For more information con-tact Lisa Walker at 330-739-0025.

    HEALING BEGINS. Americans began the healing process and watched in awe as the twinlight beams lit up the New York skyline following the September 11 attacks. This photo, pro-vided to Pastor Mike Doak by one of his crew members, shows the Statue of Liberty taking ona unique glow.

    AT LEFT: The AT&T Communications Building sustained dam-age as a result of a beam from one of the Twin Towers piercingthe other side of the building. An American flag showed thecountrys resiliance.

    CENTER. Four days after the attack on the Twin Towers, crewsworked round the clock to search for victims. The South Tower,still partially standiing, is shown the background.

    ABOVE. Members of Mike Doaks crew sort through the rubblefour days after the attacks.

    Remembering 9-11