Getting Started - Getting Started - Hydroponics Getting Started Everything You Need to Know - Hydroponics

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  • Getting Started - Hydroponics

    Getting Started Everything You Need to Know - Hydroponics.Please Connect to the Internet When Viewing this Information Package.

    Home.

    History of Hydroponics.

    General Hydroponics.

    Benefits Hydroponic Food Production.

    Build Your Own Hydro Systems.

    Hydro Media & Supplies.

    Mineral Elements / Nutrient Mixing Directions.

    Advanced Nutrient Management.

    Super Nutrients.

    Mixing Hydroponic Juices.

    Mineral Deficiencies in Plants

    pH Acidbase.

    Foods Grown in Hydroponics.

    Hydroponic gardening can be VERY complicated, with computers and sensors controlling everything from watering cycles to nutrient strength and the amount of light that the plants receive.

    On the other hand, hydroponics can also be incredibly simple, a hand watered bucket of sand with a single plant is also a method of hydroponic gardening. Most hobby oriented hydroponics systems are somewhere between the two extremes mentioned above.

    The "average" home hydroponic system usually consists of a few basic parts: a growing tray, a reservoir, a simple timer controlled submersible pump to water the plants and an air pump and air stone to oxygenate the nutrient solution. Of course, light (either natural or artificial) is also required.

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  • Getting Started - Hydroponics

    Using CO2 Successfully.

    Most Common Problems.

    Postharvest Handling Systems.

    Debate "Organics" or "Hydroponics"

    Hydroponic Terminology

    Beginner's Growing Tips.

    Periodic Table of Elements.

    Conversion Calculation Tables.

    Science projects.

    References.

    Visit Our Wholesale Website.

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    http://www.surplushome.com/http://www.surplushome.com/
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    Hydroponic gardening can be VERY complicated, with computers and sensors controlling everything from watering cycles to nutrient strength and the amount of light that the plants receive.

    On the other hand, hydroponics can also be incredibly simple, a hand watered bucket of sand with a single plant is also a method of hydroponic gardening. Most hobby oriented hydroponics systems are somewhere between the two extremes mentioned above.

    The "average" home hydroponic system usually consists of a few basic parts: a growing tray, a reservoir, a simple timer controlled submersible pump to water the plants and an air pump and air stone to oxygenate the nutrient solution. Of course, light (either natural or artificial) is also required.

    file:///D|/new/pages/right.htm [2/8/2004 8:55:23 PM]

  • History of Hydroponics

    History of Hydroponics.

    Hydroponics basically means working water ("hydro" means "water" and "ponos" means "labor"). Many different civilizations have utilized hydroponic growing techniques throughout history. As noted in Hydroponic Food Production (Fifth Edition, Woodbridge Press, 1997, page 23) by Howard M. Resh: "The hanging gardens of Babylon, the floating gardens of the Aztecs of Mexico and those of the Chinese are examples of 'Hydroponic' culture. Egyptian hieroglyphic records dating back several hundred years B.C. describe the growing of plants in water." Hydroponics is hardly a new method of growing plants. However, giant strides have been made over the years in this innovative area of agriculture.

    Throughout the last century, scientists and horticulturists experimented with different methods of hydroponics. One of the potential applications of hydroponics that drove research was for growing fresh produce in nonarable areas of the world. It is a simple fact that some people cannot grow in the soil in their area (if there is even any soil at all). This application of hydroponics was tested during World War II. Troops stationed on nonarable islands in the Pacific were supplied with fresh produce grown in locally established hydroponic systems. Later in the century, hydroponics was integrated into the space program. As NASA considered the practicalities of locating a society on another plant or the Earth's moon, hydroponics easily fit into their sustainability plans. This research is ongoing.

    But by the 1970s, it wasn't just scientists and analysts who were involved in hydroponics. Traditional farmers and eager hobbyists began to be attracted to the virtues of hydroponic growing. A few of the positive aspects of hydroponics include:

    The ability to produce higher yields than traditional, soil-based agriculture Allowing food to be grown and consumed in areas of the world that cannot support crops in the

    soil Eliminating the need for massive pesticide use (considering most pests live in the soil), effectively

    making our air, water, soil, and food cleaner

    Commercial growers are flocking to hydroponics like never before. The ideals surrounding these growing techniques touch on subjects that most people care about, such as helping end world hunger and making the world cleaner. In addition to the extensive research that is going on, everyday people from all over the world have been building (or purchasing) their own systems to grow great-tasting, fresh food for their family and friends. Educators are realizing the amazing applications that hydroponics can have in the classroom. And ambitious individuals are striving to make their dreams come true by making their living in their backyard greenhouse, selling their produce to local markets and restaurants.

    file:///D|/new/pages/history_of_hydroponics.htm [2/8/2004 8:55:23 PM]

  • General Hydroponics

    General Hydroponics.

    Crops

    Crops produced in today's modern greenhouse ranges are many and varied. They can be loosely categorized as follows:

    vegetables including tomatoes, cucumbers, fancy lettuces, bell peppers, cherry tomatoes and a host of minor ones such as radish, melon and strawberry

    cut flowers e.g. roses, mums, carnations potted flowers e.g. geraniums, azalea, poinsettia, tulip numerous bedding plants

    Growing Media

    Porous, well aerated substrate are used as anchorage for the plants root system and feeding area. Rockwool and Heydite are the most popular as they are most readily available, and easiest to use and transport. There are various other mediums which are not as widely used. Click for more info

    Growing Techniques

    There are different ways to bring water to the plants. Learn more about growing techniques.

    Nutrient Film Technique, Drip-Irrigation or Micro-Irrigation, Aeroponics / Deep Water Culture, Flood & Drain, Home Hobbyist Systems, Passive Planters / Hydroculture.

    Carbon Dioxide Enrichment

    In an outdoor garden the CO2 level in the air is about 300 parts per million (ppm). Plants thrive when

    they are able to take in a higher level of CO2. Growers today monitor their greenhouse CO2 levels with

    special purpose control monitors which in turn operate CO2 burners or generators to replenish CO2

    consumed by the plants.

    HAF (Horizontal Air Flow)

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  • General Hydroponics

    Working with CO2 enrichment and indeed an important part of the greenhouse environment is horizontal air flow. Conceived in the late seventies following research involving finer aspects of greenhouse air circulation, horizontal air flow, or HAF as it is now referred to, is widely used.

    Security

    Commercial growers end up with very sizeable portions of their yearly turnover as work-in-process. The closer the crop gets to harvest, the higher the risk of catastrophic loss, should a key part of the greenhouse's climate control system fail. Accordingly, growers go to great lengths to protect themselves. Early warning is a vital part of their security. Most now employ automatic phone dialers with electronic voice simulation to alert them of impending problems long before serious crop damage can occur.

    Biologicals

    Environmental concerns are uppermost in the minds of today's consuming public. The horticultural industry has been working for many years to reduce its dependence on chemical pesticides, many of which have been linked to cancers. Numbers of key pesticides have been deregistered for particular crops, others have been removed from the market altogether. Promising advances have been made in the use of predator insects in greenhouse ranges as natural biological control against pest insects. While much work remains to be done to educate the grower in their use, progressive members of the industry are now well on their way to 100% biological insect control.

    Bumble Bees

    Until recently, pollination of greenhouse tomato crops was accomplished with a labourious method of fruit truss vibration utilizing battery operated hand-held vibrators ("electric bees") manually touched against mature flower sets. It was a strictly artificial way of simulating natural pollination in the absence of a natural outdoor environment where wind and insects are the vectors. In today's modern tomato ranges, hives of bumble bees are placed strategically amongst the crop and left to accomplish naturally what has been, until now a monotonous and tedious task for greenhouse staff.

    Lighting

    In order to get the best possible results from a Controlled Environment Agriculture System, we will need to bring the spectrum and intensity of sunlight indoors. This is accomplished using High Intensity Discharge lamps. These lamps, in conjunction with specially designed luminaries, will reflect light downwards to plants, where it may be utilized to the maximum. Click for more info.

    Climate Controls