Getting Wordy-Finland TEACHER - The Adventurous Mailbox FINLAND:!An!Adventurous!Workbook!!!!!Getting’Wordy!

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  • Finland An Adventurous Workbook

    Getting Wordy: Teacher’s Book  

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    The Adventurous Mailbox   FINLAND:  An  Adventurous  Workbook          Getting  Wordy  

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    The Adventurous Mailbox   FINLAND:  An  Adventurous  Workbook          Getting  Wordy  

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    Thank you for bringing THE ADVENTUROUS MAILBOX into your learning environment. We hope it serves as not only an enjoyable book for your students, but also as a valuable launch pad to rich and meaningful classes. We also hope our adventure series and workbooks inspire your students to gain a world perspective and respect for other cultures, as well as help you to help them achieve a bounty of academic milestones.  

     

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    The Adventurous Mailbox   FINLAND:  An  Adventurous  Workbook          Getting  Wordy  

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    In this workbook, 30 words are chosen that students are likely to

    encounter in their coursework, as well as in daily life. The definitions provided offer not just a conversational explanation of each word’s meaning, but also the extended use of the word. Each entry also contains a humorous example of the word in use, as well as a space for students to find and write down the first instance of the word being used in the text. The intention of each lesson is to provide students with a comfortable approach to in-depth understandings of the words. More, the questions were designed to hone skills in paying close attention, discrimination, and abstract reasoning.

    This teacher’s book contains solutions to all exercises in two ways: 1.) All exercises are presented in full, with the correct choices marked., allowing teachers to call on students for correct answers to easily refer to the question and answer; and 2.) An answer sheet is available following each section, which contains the correct answers for each exercise. This will make grading easier if lessons are printed out and distributed as homework.   ORGANIZATION and CONTENT

    The 30 words per adventure book are split into two lists of 15, and each list has four exercises. The two lists are then combined in the end for an additional three exercises. Including the exercise of finding each word of each list in the text, a total of 13 vocabulary exercises per adventure book (104 in all, 240 vocabulary words) are provided.  

    Welcome to Getting Wordy

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    Fill It In In either engaging sentences or narration from the character in the adventure books, students must choose the correct word (and form of the word) to fill in the blank. Say What? After reading a statement or question as if in a conversation, students must choose from a list of four which response would be the most appropriate. Choose Wisely Using situations and categories, students must choose all choices (of four) that fit. There may be more than one correct choice. In Other Words Students are asked to rewrite sentences containing a portion in bold, using a new vocabulary word to replace the bold potion. Get That Outta Here! Presented with four words, students must choose the one that has no relation to the other words. Relations may be based on meaning or situation of use. Same Same, Different Different Students are asked to find either two words out of four that are antonyms or synonyms. Crazy Talk Students must complete a crazy and humorous dialogue, requiring them to understand the context of the dialogue, including all applications and nuances of the vocabulary words.

    Types of Exercises

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    Connection Section Students must find a connection between two presented words, whether that connection is made in meaning, use, or an abstract sense of their own imagination. Example connections are provided for the teacher. Combo Mambo Students are presented with two vocabulary words that they must use together in a new sentence. Example answers are provided for the teacher. Solve It This section ends with a puzzle containing fun clues or a surprise solution. Puzzles include crosswords, word searches and others. Common Core State Standards Alignment The following list presents the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) addressed in Getting Wordy, as well as the lessons’ interaction with the source adventure book. The words and lessons are aligned to Grade 4 and Grade 5, so both grade level CCSS are addressed. Anchor Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.3 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.4 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.6

    Vocabulary Acquisition and Use CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4a CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4b CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4c CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5a CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5b CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5c

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      Utter   (v.)     /ətər/      

    To  utter  means  to  make  a  sound  with  your  voice.    It  is  really   similar  to  speak  or  say,  but  still  a  bit  different.    You  wouldn’t  ask   someone,  for  example,  What  did  you  utter  to  me?    Instead,  use   utter  when  speaking  is  not  easy:  I  was  so  nervous  I  couldn’t  even   utter  a  word!  To  speak  means  to  actually  communicate;  to  utter   means  to  just  make  sounds.  

    (adj.)  An  utter  failure  or  an  utter  disaster  means  a   complete  or  total  failure  or  disaster.  That  reminds  me  of  a   joke:    What  do  you  call  it  when  a  cow  jumps  over  a  fence   but  doesn’t  quite  make  it?    It  is  an  udder  disaster!  

      Example  from  the  book  /  page  number:     Five  whole  days  I’ve  not  uttered  one  word  at  all.     Page  Number:  6    

    Talkative  (adj.)       /ˈtôkətiv/      

    If  you  are  a  talkative  girl  or  guy,  it  just  means  you  like  to  talk  a  lot.   Being  talkative  is  not  a  bad  thing!  If  you  think  someone  talks  too   much,  you  can  say  they  are  a  chatterbox  or  gabby,  or  are  even  too   talkative.       Example  from  the  book  /  page  number:     I’m  kind  of  famous  for  being  a  pretty  talkative  guy.     Page  Number:  6        

    Word List 1  

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    Entirely  (adv.)     /enˈtī(ə)rlē/      

    1.  If  you  have  a  grandfather  who  is  entirely  hairy,  it  means  he  has   hair  all  over  his  body.    Entirely,  then,  means  completely,  totally,   or  in  every  way.  So,  if  you  say  that  a  classroom  is  made  up  entirely   of  smelly  people,  you  mean  that  every  person  in  the  class  stinks.   2.  Sometimes,  people  use  entirely  just  for  emphasis:  It  is  entirely   possible  that  my  mom  is  an  alien.  You  can  also  use  it  like  this:  I  am   not  entirely  sure  what  you  mean.      

     Entire  (adj.)  Entire  can  mean  whole:  I  slept  through  the   entire  class  (every  minute  of  it);  and  entire  can  also  mean   complete  or  total:  Do  I  have  your  entire  attention?  

      Example  from  the  book  /  page  number:     Even  if  I’m  alone  in  my  room,  I’m  entirely  capable  of  having  a   pretty  long  conversation  with  anything  lying  around,  like  my  lamp   or  my  shoe.     Page  Number:  6  

    Unison  (n.)     /ˈyo͞onəsən/    

     

    1.  If  things  happen  in  unison,  they  happen  at  exactly  the  same   time:    The  students  shouted  out  the  answer  in  unison.    2.  If  things   are  in  unison,  it  can  also  me