Great Writing 4: Great Essays Peer Editing Sheets - ?· Great Writing 4: Great Essays Peer Editing Sheets…

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  • Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.Peer editing SheetS 1

    Great Writing 4: Great Essays PeerEditingSheets

    PeerEditingSheet1 Unit2,Activity13,page62NarrativeEssayOutline

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. Is the hook interesting? If not, how could it be made more interesting?

    2. How many paragraphs are going to be in the essay?

    3. What action or event does each topic sentence show?

    Paragraph 1:

    Paragraph 2:

    Paragraph 3:

    Paragraph 4:

    Paragraph 5:

    4. Is there a good ending to the action of the story? If not, can you suggest a change to

    the ending?

    5. What kind of ending will the story havea moral, prediction, or revelation?

    6. Do you think this essay will have enough information? Does the story leave out anything important?

    Write suggestions here.

    7. The best part of the outline is:

    8. Questions I still have about the outline:

  • 2 Peer editing SheetSCopyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class. Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet2 Unit2,Activity15,page62NarrativeEssay

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. What are the three most memorable details in the essay? (Do not look back at the essay.)

    a.

    b.

    c.

    2. Identify the hook. Is it effective? Make any suggestions here.

    3. What is the main point or thesis?

    4. Reread the essay and underline all the connectors that you can find. Does the writer use them

    correctly? Circle any connectors that are incorrect.

    5. Is the story in chronological order? If necessary make any suggestions for changes to

    the order of events.

    6. Does the essay have sentence variety? If not, mark the sentences that could be varied

    or make some suggestions for sentence variety.

    7. What verb tense does the writer mainly use? Is this tense used throughout the essay?

    If not, are the different tenses necessary or should they be changed? Use a highlighter

    to mark all unnecessary changes in tense.

  • Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.Peer editing SheetS 3

    Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    8. Does the conclusion effectively end the action? If not, write a few suggestions for a

    better ending.

  • 4 Peer editing SheetSCopyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class. Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet3 Unit3,Activity11,page86ComparisonEssayOutline

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. Is the thesis statement clear? If not, make suggestions for changes.

    2. Does the writer use the block or the point-by-point method of organization? Is

    this method effective for the subject? If not, make suggestions for changes.

    3. Does each topic sentence clearly state the point of comparison? If not, make

    suggestions for improvement.

    4. Do these two subjects have enough similarities and/or differences for a good comparison essay?

    If not, why not?

    5. The best part of the outline is:

    6. Questions I still have about the outline:

  • Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.Peer editing SheetS 5

    Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet4 Unit3,Activity13,page86ComparisonEssay

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. In a few words, what is the essay about?

    2. Identify the hook. Is it effective? Make any suggestions here.

    3. Does each body paragraph contain a clear topic sentence? If not, underline any

    sections that need improvement.

    4. What method of organization does the writer use? List the main points

    that the writer compares.

    5. Are the comparisons supported with examples? (Ask Who? What? Where? When? Why? and How?)

    If not, put a star (*) next to the places that need supporting information.

    6. Does the writer use connectors correctly? If not, circle any incorrect connectors or

    any places that need connectors.

    7. Does the writer restate the thesis in the conclusion? If not, bring this to the

    attention of the writer.

    8. In the conclusion, does the writer offer an opinion or a suggestion about the two subjects?

    Do you agree with the writers final words? If not, why not?

  • 6 Peer editing SheetSCopyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class. Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet5 Unit4,Activity14,page110Cause-EffectEssayOutline

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. What kind of essay will this bea focus-on-causes essay or a focus-on-effects essay?

    Can you tell this from the thesis statement? If not, what changes can

    you suggest to make the purpose of the essay clearer?

    2. Read the topic sentence for each body paragraph. Is it related to the thesis? If not,

    mark the topic sentences that need more work.

    3. Do the supporting details relate to the topic sentences? If not, which paragraph(s)

    need to be developed further?

    4. The best part of the outline is:

    5. Questions I still have about the outline:

  • Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.Peer editing SheetS 7

    Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet6 Unit4,Activity16,page110Cause-EffectEssay

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. In a few words, what is the essay about?

    2. Reread the introductory paragraph. Do the ideas progress smoothly from the hook to the

    thesis statement? If not, what suggestions for changes would you make to the

    writer?

    3. Do all the topic sentences support the thesis statement? Mark any that do not and

    write the reason.

    4. Look at the supporting details in each paragraph. Are they related to the topic sentence?

    If not, underline the details that need revision.

    5. Check the connectors in the essay. Is it easy to understand the connection between the causes and

    effects? If not, what is missing or needs to be changed?

    6. As you reread the essay, check for wordiness. Circle any examples that you find and suggest a way to

    eliminate the wordiness.

    7. Does the writer restate the thesis in the conclusion? If not, bring this to the attention

    of the writer.

    8. Compare the introduction and conclusion paragraphs. Can you see logical connections between the

    two? If not, why not? What suggestions for improvement can you make?

  • 8 Peer editing SheetSCopyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class. Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet7 Unit5,Activity13,page134ArgumentEssayOutline

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    Answer the following questions. Circle Yes or No. If the answer to any of these questions is No, tell the writer why and make any suggestions for improvement that you can think of.

    1. Is the hook interesting? In other words, does it catch the readers attention? Yes No

    2. Is the writers opinion clear in the thesis statement? Yes No

    3. Do the topic sentences in the body paragraphs support the thesis? Yes No

    4. In each paragraph, do the supporting details relate to the topic sentence? Yes No

    5. Are the counterargument and refutation strong? Yes No

    6. Does the writer restate the thesis in the conclusion? Yes No

    7. The best part of the outline is:

    8. Questions I still have about the outline:

  • Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.Peer editing SheetS 9

    Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet8 Unit5,Activity15,page134ArgumentEssay

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. In a few words, what is the essay about?

    2. Reread the introductory paragraph. Do the ideas progress smoothly from the hook to the thesis

    statement? If not, what suggestions for changes would you make to the writer?

    3. Do all the topic sentences support the thesis statement? Mark any that do not and

    write the reason.

    4. Look at the supporting details in each paragraph. Are they related to the topic sentence?

    If not, underline the details that need revision.

    5. Underline any modals. Are must, had better, or should used correctly to assert a point?

    Are may, might, could, can, or would used correctly to acknowledge an opposing opinion?

    Make suggestions for changes where necessary.

    6. Reread the essay and look for any faulty logic. If you find any examples, write them here and

    suggest a way to eliminate the faulty logic.

    7. Find the paragraph that contains the counterargument and refutation. Is the counterargument

    stated clearly? Is the refutation strong? Does it make another point

    in support of the writers argument? If necessary, suggest changes to the writer to

    make the counterargument and refutation more effective.

  • 10 Peer editing SheetSCopyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class. Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    8. Review the essay for specific information, such as quotes, dates, and statistics. Did the writer give

    the source of this information in the essay? If not, highlight those areas on the writers

    draft and write Need Citation!

    9. Is the conclusion effective, that is, does it restate the thesis and the writers opinion?

    If not, how can the conclusion be improved?

  • Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.Peer editing SheetS 11

    Copyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet9 Unit6,Activity5,page145ReactionEssayOutline

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    Answer the following questions. Circle Yes or No.

    1. Is the background information clear? Yes No

    2. Is the writers reaction clear from the thesis statement? Yes No

    3. Do the topic sentences in the body paragraphs support the thesis? Yes No

    4. In each paragraph, do the supporting details relate to the topic sentence? Yes No

    5. Does the writer restate the thesis in the conclusion? Yes No

    6. The best part of the outline is:

    7. Questions I still have about the outline:

  • 12 Peer editing SheetSCopyright 2014 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for use in class.

    PeerEditingSheet10 Unit6,Activity7,page145ReactionEssay

    Writer: Date:

    Peer Editor:

    Topic:

    1. In a few words, what is the essay about?

    2. Read the first paragraph (introduction). Is the background information clear?

    Is there any other information that might help the reader understand the prompt?

    3. What is your general opinion of the prompt?

    4. Does each body paragraph contain a different reaction?

    Reaction 1:

    Reaction 2:

    Reaction 3:

    5. Are the reactions logical? If not, put a star (*) next to the places that you feel are unclear.

    6. Does the writer use connectors correctly? If not, circle any incorrect connectors or

    any places that need connectors.

    7. Does the writer restate the thesis in the conclusion? If not, bring this to the attention

    of the writer.

    8. In the conclusion, does the writer offer an opinion about the effectiveness or quality of the prompt?

    9. Do you agree with the writers opinion? Explain your answer.

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