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Georgetown 2010-11 [File Name]

[Name] [Tournament Name]

***1NC

Georgetown 2010-11 [File Name]

[Name] [Tournament Name]

OFF[A] Interpretation: Assistance must go to the government For means in support of Oxford Dictionary 2011[Oxford University Press, http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/for?region=us] for(for) Pronunciation:/fr, fr/ preposition 1 in support of or in favor of (a person or policy): they voted for independence in a referendum

Syria refers to the government Dictionary.com 2011http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Syria Syria [seer-ee-uh] Show IPA noun 1. Official name, Syrian Arab Republic. a republic in SW Asia at the E end of the Mediterranean. 16,137,899; 71,227 sq. mi. (184,478 sq. km). Capital: Damascus. 2. a territory mandated to France in 1922, including the present republics of Syria and Lebanon (Latakia and Jebel ed Druz were incorporated into Syria 1942): the French mandatory powers were nominally terminated as of January 1, 1944. 3. an ancient country in W Asia, including the present Syria, Lebanon, Israel, and adjacent areas: a part of the Roman Empire 64 b.c.a.d. 636.

[B] Violation: The plan gives assistance to the opposition [C] Prefer our interpretation: 1. Limits thousands of NGOs and other potential recipients. Each one is a potential aff. 2. Ground domestic politics is necessary and educational ground. They make debates about who gets assistance not why we give it. [D] T is a voting issue, or the aff would read a new indisputable case every debate

Georgetown 2010-11 [File Name]

[Name] [Tournament Name]

OFFObama has de-prioritized all other legislative issues to secure PTC extension Nicholas, 12/31(Columnist-Detroit Free Press, http://www.freep.com/article/20111231/NEWS15/111231019/obamacampaign-strategy, Obama hints at campaign strategy pitting him against 'do-nothing' Congress) HONOLULU, Hawaii Heading into the new year, President Barack Obama will insist that Congress renew the payroll tax cut through the end of 2012, but will otherwise limit his dealings with an unpopular Congress, and instead travel the country to deliver his re-election message directly to voters, a White House aide said In terms of the presidents relationship with Congress in 2012 the state of the debate, if you will the president is no longer tied to Washington, D.C., said spokesman Josh Earnest in a press briefing in Honolulu, Hawaii. The assertion is striking given that Obama, as president for nearly three years, is both the symbol and personification of the federal government. It also offers a glimpse into an Obama reelection strategy that will target a do-nothing Congress much in the style of Harry S. Trumans re-election campaign in 1948. With most legislative cliffhangers behind him, Obama does not consider the rest of his policy agenda to be a must-do for lawmakers, Earnest said. Rather, the White House believes Obama is well-served by continuing to distance himself from a Congress often blamed for Washingtons gridlock and infighting. As the year unfolds, Obama will roll out more initiatives designed to boost the economy and assist struggling families using executive authority, the White House aide said. Obama has already unveiled 20 such measures under the new slogan, We cant wait. Earnest said that the White House goal is to contrast the image of a gridlocked, dysfunctional Congress with a president whos leaving no stone unturned to try to find solutions to the difficult financial challenges and economic challenges facing this country. Obama will also make the case for passage of his $447 billion jobs package, most of which Congress has rejected over the past three months. His jobs plan includes money to keep public workers on the job and rebuild the nations roads, ports and bridges. But it seems doubtful that hell push Congress to enact his jobs plan with the same focus that he brought to the payroll tax cut debate. Nothing else on Obamas menu requires congressional action as urgently as the tax cut, the White House said. If Congress were to let the payroll tax cut expire at the end of February, tens of millions of Americans would be hit with a tax increase, harming the fragile economic recovery, the White House contends.

Democracy assistance drains political capital McLaughlin, contributing writer The Washington Diplomat, 5/31/11(Seth, Key Foreign Policy Players Try to Master Capitol Hill, The Washington Diplomat) But it's not just politicos in Washington and anxious Americans who are following the partisan showdown. The city's diplomats have been intently watching the congressional sparring as well. After all, strengthening economic ties with the world's largest economy is among every diplomat's top priorities. Whether it's development assistance or trade and investment, the state of the U.S. government checkbook matters not just to Americans, but to the world. However, after a decade of tax cuts coupled with two wars, a housing boom and bust and an economic recession, America's bloated and battered checkbook needs rebalancing. Both Republicans and Democrats agree that with a budget deficit of $1.5 trillion and climbing along with a national debt of about $14.2 trillion federal spending must be curbed. But by how much, from where and how fast, especially in the midst of a still fragile recovery and sagging unemployment, will be the talk of the town for months to come. Immediately after the dust settled over the budget for the 2011 fiscal year that ends Sept. 30, both sides set their sights on the 2012 numbers that will also decide the amount of money and manpower the United States releases across the globe. Though the State Department and foreign operations budget represent a sliver of total spending, most peg it at about 1 percent of more than $3.5 trillion federal budget, money spent on diplomacy and development has become a convenient whipping post for voters and lawmakers searching for quick answers to the country's financial mess, but also wary of the fallout from reforming the real drivers of federal spending popular entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare, and spending on defense (also see "America's Foreign Affairs Budget Faces Congressional Chopping Block" in the March 2011 issue of The Washington Diplomat). Even if politicians are more willing to broach so-called third rail subjects like Medicare and Medicaid, the international affairs budget still faces the threat of significant cuts by lawmakers determined to show fiscal

Georgetown 2010-11 [File Name]

[Name] [Tournament Name]

restraint across the board. A congressman would be hard pressed to take away grandmother's Medicare and justify giving more assistance to rebel fighters in Libya, for instance, even if the two cases aren't exactly correlated. Explaining fiscal nuance is not an easy sell. Politically speaking, it's simply easier for lawmakers to cut foreign aid than to go after programs that have a more noticeable effect on their constituents back in their home districts. But like entitlement programs, the Pentagon is where the actual spending and by extension potential savings is. In general, the budget for international affairs has amounted to about $50 billion annually in recent years while the Defense Department racks up roughly $700 billion a year, including most war expenditures. Yet both parties have only flirted with the idea of touching the Defense budget, which has become a sacred cow among lawmakers of all stripes. Public misperceptions also drive the political expediency. Americans think that 25 percent of the federal budget goes to foreign assistance, according to a recent poll by the University of Maryland's Program on International Policy Attitudes. The real amount? The total international affairs budget comes in at under 1.5 percent. But you can be sure both sides will be clawing over every scrap of that 1.5 percent. As it stands, the fiscal 2011 budget allocated $48.3 billion for State and foreign operations an $8.4 billion reduction from the president's requested amount though it was on par with 2010 levels. As part of the $38 billion of cuts in the 2011 budget, about $500 million was carved out of the State Department's budget compared to last year, while U.S. payments to the United Nations will be decreased by $377 million. Pay for Foreign Service officers was also frozen, and USAID operating expenses were trimmed by $39 million.

Economic collapse Political Correction 12-12, factchecking branch of the Media Matters Action Network, Republicans:Payroll Tax Holiday Isn't "Stimulating" Enough, http://politicalcorrection.org/factcheck/201112120007 Zandi: "Without That Payroll Tax Cut This Year, I Think We'd Be Skirting Recession Now." During a June 26, 2011, appearance on CNN's State of the Union, Moody's Analytics economist Mark Zandi stated: "On the other side of that, there are a few things I think that can be done that would make a difference in the very short term if we need it. So extending the payroll tax holiday for another year seems like a reasonable thing to do. I think that can get done politically. Without that payroll tax cut this year, I think we'd be skirting recession now because of the higher energy prices." [CNN's State of the Union, 6/26/11, emphasis added] Moody's: Every Dollar In Reduced Revenue From Payroll Tax Cut Expands Economy by $1.27. According to the Center on Budget and Policy priorities: The rationale for enacting the temporary payroll tax cut last December - the economy was weak and a payroll tax cut would provide a more efficient bang-for-the-buck than many other tax-cut options - has become still more compelling today, given the renewed signs of economic weakness. At a time of soft economy-wide demand, the tax cut increases consumer purchasing power in a manner that is both substantial (boosting take-home pay by 2 percent fo

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