Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming 3-4 Linear Programming Holt Algebra 2 Solve linear programming problems. Objective

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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming 3-4 Linear Programming Holt Algebra 2 Solve linear programming problems. Objective
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Linear programming is method of finding a maximum or minimum value of a function that satisfies a given set of conditions called constraints. A constraint is one of the inequalities in a linear programming problem. The solution to the set of constraints can be graphed as a feasible region.
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming In most linear programming problems, you want to do more than identify the feasible region. Often you want to find the best combination of values in order to minimize or maximize a certain function. This function is the objective function. The objective function may have a minimum, a maximum, neither, or both depending on the feasible region.
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Yums Bakery bakes two breads, A and B. One batch of A uses 5 pounds of oats and 3 pounds of flour. One batch of B uses 2 pounds of oats and 3 pounds of flour. The company has 120 pounds of oats and 135 pounds of flour available. Write the constraints for the problem and graph the feasible region. Example 1: Graphing a Feasible Region
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Let x = the number of bread A, and y = the number of bread B. The constraints: The number of batches cannot be negative. The combined amount of oats is less than or equal to 180 pounds. x 0 y 0 5x + 2y 120 3x + 3y 135 The combined amount of flour is less than or equal to 135 pounds. Example 1 Continued
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Graph the feasible region. Vertices of the feasible region:
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Yums Bakery wants to maximize its profits from bread sales. One batch of A yields a profit of $40. One batch of B yields a profit of $30. Use the profit information and the data from Example 1 to find how many batches of each bread the bakery should bake. Part 2: Solving Linear Programming Problems
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Part 2 Continued Step 3 Evaluate the objective function at the vertices of the feasible region. (x, y)40x + 30yP($)
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Sue manages a soccer club and must decide how many members to send to soccer camp. It costs $75 for each advanced player and $50 for each intermediate player. Sue can spend no more than $13,250. Sue must send at least 60 more advanced than intermediate players and a minimum of 80 advanced players. Find the number of each type of player Sue can send to camp to maximize the number of players at camp. Example 2: Problem-Solving Application
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Solve Let x = Advanced Let y = Intermediate
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Example 3 A book store manager is purchasing new bookcases. The store needs 320 feet of shelf space. Bookcase A provides 32 ft of shelf space and costs $200. Bookcase B provides 16 ft of shelf space and costs $125. Because of space restrictions, the store has room for at most 8 of bookcase A and 12 of bookcase B. How many of each type of bookcase should the manager purchase to minimize the cost?
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming Solve
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming 4. Ace Guitars produces acoustic and electric guitars. Each acoustic guitar yields a profit of $30, and requires 2 work hours in factory A and 4 work hours in factory B. Each electric guitar yields a profit of $50 and requires 4 work hours in factory A and 3 work hours in factory B. Each factory operates for at most 10 hours each day. Graph the feasible region. Then, find the number of each type of guitar that should be produced each day to maximize the companys profits.
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  • Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming