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  • Explica tin g t h e role of p a r t n e r s hips in c h a n gin g t h e h e al t h a n d w ell-b ein g of local

    co m m u ni tie s: a p rofile of n eig h bo u r hood r e n e w al a c tivity

    focus e d on p ro moting h e al t h a n d w ell-b ein g in S alfor d a n d t h e

    no r t h w e s t r e gion a n d t h e no r t h e a s t of E n gla n d. Volu m e 2: 2 0 0 9

    Ho w a r t h , ML, Warn e, T, Cook, G, Daw so n, P a n d Ellio t t , D

    Tit l e Explica ting t h e role of p a r t n e r s hips in c h a n gin g t h e h e al th a n d w ell-b ein g of local co m m u ni tie s: a p rofile of n eig h bou r hood r e n e w al a c tivity focus e d on p ro moting h e al t h a n d w ell-b ein g in S alfo rd a n d t h e no r t h w e s t r e gion a n d t h e no r t h e a s t of E n gla n d. Volum e 2: 2 0 0 9

    Aut h or s H ow a r t h , ML, Warn e, T, Cook, G, Da wso n, P a n d Elliot t , D

    Typ e Article

    U RL This ve r sion is available a t : h t t p://usir.s alfor d. ac.uk/id/e p rin t/15 7 2 9/

    P u bl i s h e d D a t e 2 0 0 9

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  • Explicating the role of partnerships in changing the health and well-being of local communities: A profile of Neighbourhood Renewal Activity Focused on Promoting Health and Well-being in Salford and the North West Region and the North East of England

    URBANregeneration m a k i n g a d i f f e r e n c e

    Volume 2: 2009 Authors: Michelle Howarth & Tony Warne: Salford Centre for Nursing, Midwifey and Collaborative Research

    University of Salford Glenda Cook, Pam Dawson and Denise Elliott: School of Health, Community and Education Studies, Northumbria University

  • Urban Regeneration: Making a Difference

    Contents

    Project Context

    Chapter 1 A profile of Neighbourhood Renewal Activity Focused on

    Promoting Health and Well-being in Salford and the North

    West Region

    1.1 Introduction

    1.2 Aims of the Scoping Exercise

    1.3 The Extent of Deprivation in the UK

    1.4 The North West Health Context.

    1.5 North West Indicators of Deprivation in Health and Well-being

    1.6 Evidence of Neighbourhood Renewal in the North West.

    1.7 Summary

    1.8 Focus on Salford.

    1.9 Regeneration Activity in Salford

    1.10 Salford’s Neighbourhood Renewal Context.

    1.11 References

    1.12 Websites

    Chapter 2 A Profile of Neighbourhood Renewal Activity Focused on

    Promoting Health and Well-being in the North East Region

    2.1 Introduction

    2.2. Aims of the Scoping Exercise

    2.3 Search strategy

    2.4 The North East and its population

    2.5 The Extent of Deprivation in the North East

    2.6 The Health Context of the North East

    2.7 Long-term health and well-being goals for the North East

    2.8 Regeneration partnerships in the North East

    2.9 Summary

    2.10 References

    2.11 Web sites

    Chapter 3 Profile Summary of North West and North East England

    Neighbourhood Renewal Activity: promoting health and

    well-being

    2.1 Introduction

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  • 2

    Urban Regeneration: Making a Difference

    The Project Context

    Introduction

    This scoping and mapping report is one of three outputs from a project: Explicating the role of partnerships in changing the health and well-being of local communities , one of a number of projects in a larger Higher Education Funding Council Strategic Development Fund project ( HEFCE ) entitled: Urban Regeneration: Making a Difference. This was a collaborative venture between Manchester Metropolitan University, Northumbria University, University of Salford and University of Central Lancashire. Bradford University was an affiliated partner.

    This overarching project had two aims:

    • To address key urban regeneration challenges in the North of England through inter-disciplinary collaboration between the partner universities and practitioner organisations, particularly in the public and voluntary sectors, and to enhance their collective impact on society

    • To build a long term strategic alliance between core university partners while developing a distinctive form of knowledge transfer (KT), which is both teaching and research-driven, in order to meet the needs of organisations and professionals in business and the community

    Four thematic areas were identified, which reflect important issues in the regeneration of the North of England and map on to the breadth and depth of expertise amongst the university partners and an existing firm base of collaboration with external organisations.

    One university led on each theme, but every university will contribute to each theme. The themes were: Crime, Community Cohesion, Health and well-being and Enterprise. (http://regennorth.co.uk )

    Health and Well-Being Theme

    The North of England has some of the worst health profiles in the UK, with startling inequalities in the health experience of different population groups as defined by geographical and social group. Relative proportions of deaths from cancer, heart disease and stroke in particular, have been rising in recent years. Rates of long-standing physical and mental health are also high compared with other parts of the country.

    These patterns are manifestations of the degree of well-being in the community, which is affected by a wide range of factors, including housing, poverty, transport, employment etc, covering the whole spectrum of regeneration issues. Availability for work is a natural consequence of health and well- being, with some parts of the North having amongst the highest figures of worklessness in the UK.

    Whilst the public sector is the mainstream provider of support, through the National Health Service and local authorities, the non- statutory sector plays a vital complementary role and is critical to sustaining the welfare of some of the most vulnerable communities and sections of the population. This includes charities and not-for-profit organisations such as housing associations. It is a diverse and fragmented sector with an ability to be highly responsive to new ideas.

    Effective cross-sector working is fundamental to the challenge of meeting the needs of vulnerable populations and working towards the inclusion of marginalised groups. Universities have a key role to play in this process, yet this form of knowledge transfer is only in its infancy, with huge potential for development.

    The NHS and local authorities are heavily dependent on the higher education sector as a source of professionally qualified people and as a resource for further professional development and research and evaluation. This is complemented by practical, action-research in a number of HEIs, which is focused on the needs of communities of practice.

    The Health theme identified 4 important areas which link health to regeneration:

    • Health, employment and well- being, including the social and economic dimensions of regeneration;

    • Ageing and disability, including the health and social care dimensions of regeneration;

    • Enabling environments, including the physical and cultural dimensions of regeneration;

    • Public health and primary care, including health inequalities.

    In addition, a core focus across all of the projects will be on increasing the skill and knowledge level of those working in health and well-being regeneration. From (http://regennorth.co.uk)

  • 3

    Urban Regeneration: Making a Difference

    The Project: Explicating the role of partnerships in changing the health and well-being of local communities

    It is clear that concepts of partnership and collaboration underpin the successful implementation of urban regeneration initiatives. What is less clear is how partnership working impacts upon the health and well-being aspects of urban regeneration. Evaluations of outcomes are limited, and little comprehensive information is available as to the extent of any such activities across the North West and North East regions. This project sought to examine the issues in relation to these and to develop a framework for supporting the analysis of effective partnership working.

    Key aims of the project

    There were four main aims of the project:

    1. A scoping and mapping exercise to develop a profile of community health and well-being needs and associated neighbourhood renewal activity in Salford and the northwest, and in Newcastle and the northeast

    2. A revie