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Importing Data from Excel – Part 2 of 4 – Adding Data

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May 2013News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
W hat do you do when you have a bunch of data in Excel that you need to enter into your accounting system? Do you enter it by hand? Hopefully not! Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate offers a variety of different import file formats allowing you to import
things like journal entries, invoices, estimates, commitments, and more. So, the opportunity exists to take your Excel data, put it into the proper format, and then import it. That can save you a lot of time which is why this series of articles is devoted to teaching you how to leverage this capability.
In this four-part series, we’re covering the following objectives:
1. Creating and Using Excel-Based Entry Grids – Covered last time! 2. Adding Data Validation to Excel worksheets – This Month! 3. Import-Enabling Existing Excel Worksheets 4. Importing Data from Excel with Parent/Child Records
In this part of the series, we’ll address data validation in Excel. In reality, this topic is not confined only to the context of importing data because you can use data validation in a wide range of other applications in Excel.
In last month’s article, we created a simple Excel-based data entry grid for General Ledger journal entries; so hopefully you still have that example handy! If you don’t, don’t feel bad, just download the example using the following URL:
http://www.event1software.com/downloads/misc/GLEntryGridExample.xlsx
The entry grid that we created last time is perfectly usable as-is except that it doesn’t apply any rules that keep you from entering bad information (which might result in records being rejected by General Ledger).
In the scope of this article, we’ll only use one simple example of validation, but keep in mind that the Data Validation feature of Excel could be applied to each column in your entry grid so that you can apply the appropriate rules for each of the values. In this example, we’ll use Office Connector Query to provide a list of GL account numbers. We’ll then use that list to validate
Importing Data from Excel – Part 2 of 4 – Adding Data Validation to Excel Worksheets
Importing Data from Excel –
to Excel Worksheets .....................................1
within Accounts Payable ..............................4
Online WebEx Training and Open Forums ....6
Adjust Column Feature .................................7
The Importance of Tracking and Managing
Subcontractor Compliance .........................11
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May 2013 News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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the TUG Pulse
Scott Bishop, Vice President
e-mail [email protected]
Website www.TUGweb.com
Published by TUG, The Users Group for Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating,
and sent to all members.
the data entry into the Account column of our worksheet. That way, it won’t be possible for someone to enter an invalid account. To add the list of accounts, we’ll use the Query Wizard which can be found on the Office Connector Query toolbar that should be displayed on the Add-Ins tab of Excel:
To follow the exercises, you’ll need to have Office Connector Query installed with either an evaluation or full license of Office Connector Query Designer. If you need to obtain an evaluation license, just contact your Sage Business Partner or your Customer Account Manager at Sage. You can also watch a video of the exercises being performed:
http://www.event1software.com/wp-content/movies/ocimport-validation/
Create a List 1. Navigate to Sheet2 of your workbook. 2. Click in cell A1 and type: Chart Of Accounts 3. Click in cell A3 and then click the Query Wizard button on the Office Connector toolbar. 4. When prompted, select your data folder and enter your login credentials for Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate. 5. On the first step of the wizard, select GL Account and click Next. 6. Check the box for the following columns and then click Next. • Account • Account Title 7. Click Finish since we’re not applying any conditions or specifying any other options. • A list of account numbers and titles should now be displayed in columns A and B, starting on row 3.
Name the List 1. Select the range of cells containing the account numbers. This range starts with cell A4 (the first account number) and goes through the last cell in column A that contains an account number. 2. Click in the Name Box, type AccountList, and press Enter.
The Name Box is the box that sits above the upper-left corner of your worksheet. Normally, the cell address of your current selection is displayed here. You can type a name in this box in order to assign a name for a cell or group of cells. The name that you assign can then be used elsewhere as a cell reference.
• By naming this range of cells, it can now be referenced by Excel’s Data Validation feature from anywhere in the workbook.
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May 2013News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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Apply Validation 1. Click back to Sheet1 and click inside the cell that is in the first data entry row of column A. 2. Click the Data tab on the ribbon and then click Data Validation. 3. In the Allow box, click the drop-down and pick List. 4. In the Source box, type: =AccountList • Note that this is the name you assigned in the previous section to the range containing the account numbers
5. Click OK to dismiss the Data Validation window.
NOTE: Since the entry grid was created as an Excel Table, the data validation settings that we applied to the first row are automatically copied down to any new rows that are added as you enter data.
Notice that now there is a drop-down arrow in the data entry cells of column A. When clicked, you will see a list of account numbers to choose from: Also, if you type an account number, it must be on the list or else you can’t proceed. That’s data validation at work! You can apply this concept to each of the other columns to control the range of acceptable values that can be entered.
Excel Data Validation Below are some of the other uses and capabilities of Excel’s Data Validation feature. Some of these features are explored in more detail in the online video.
• Limit the length of a text value. • In cells that should contain dates, limit the input so that only dates can be entered. Also control the range of dates that can be used. • In cells that should contain numbers, limit the input so that only numeric values can be entered. Also control the range of values that can be used. • Use custom validation by writing an Excel formula that returns TRUE (if the data is valid) and FALSE if it isn’t. • Control the messages that the user sees when the selection is in a given cell and when an invalid value is entered.
To attend an online event, please e-mail attendee(s) name and e-mail address to [email protected] You will receive an e-mail confirmation along with connection instructions once you are registered. These classes are free of charge and open to members only – one more benefit of belonging to TUG! We are adding more sessions every day. Check the Online Event Calendar at TUGweb.com for an updated list. If you
have any suggestions on sessions you would like to see, please e-mail [email protected]
Plans are well underway to bring you a rip-roaring good time, so saddle up and join us for four days of non-stop educational sessions, hands-on labs,
roundtable discussions, third-party exhibits and lots of networking, not to mention the
down-home feel of Texas.
SAVE THE DATE
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3. [Invoice Settings] – controls a number of the prompts that appear at data entry, most of which can be overridden in the entry process. Here you will find two boxes that determine what information is required at entry: [Date received usage] and [Payment date usage] – if the required box is ticked then data will have to be entered at Invoice entry or the entry will not be allowed to proceed. a. [Distribution Settings] – Sage 300 CRE has the ability to create Vendor types. The user names for these Vendor Types can be detailed under [Files], [Company Settings], [Custom Descriptions], [AP Vendor Type]. This grid is where the Vendor Types are assigned their distributions. As an example, a vendor Type of Job Cost would prompt for Job Cost Distributions. A Custom Description vendor would prompt a separate description line on each distribution (an example would be Federal Express where each distribution could be identified by the recipient). An equipment vendor could be created so that the distribution grid prompted for equipment information. We have a “Charge Back” vendor type that prompts for the information necessary to create a pass-thru invoice to Property Management. Vendor types are completely customized by the User. i. To designate a Vendor Type at the Vendor level, go to [Setup], [Vendor Setup] and select the appropriate type in the lower left hand corner of the [General] tab. b. [Charge Back Settings] refer to Property Management and the ability to create Tenant Charges directly from AP Entry. These settings include how the invoice date is determined on the Tenant invoice, mark-up prompts and the Accounting Date to be used on the PM charge in GL. c. [Warning Message Settings] – these create some valuable controls by verifying key information stored in Job Cost and disallowing entry or creating operator warnings. i. The message choices are identical to GL Control Accounts. [Warning] creates a warning message but allows the operator to choose to continue with entry. [Error] creates a message and does not allow data entry to continue. [No Msg] allows entry to continue without notifying the operator but creates a message on the Journal.
May 2013 News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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I n Parts I and II of this series, we looked at SAGE 300 CRE controls available within the General Ledger Module. In this installment, we will look at additional controls that are available at the module level. While
this article explores controls available within Accounts Payable, similar controls are available within Job Cost, Accounts Receivable, Property Management, Service Management and other Sage 300 CRE modules!
As in General Ledger, many of the controls available in AP are found at the AP Settings level. These include controls that allow you to create Approval and Pending systems to limit when invoice batches can be posted, how transactions appear on your GL current ledger, and set-ups for Vendor Types which will prompt custom distribution grids in Invoice Entry. A limited number of controls are also available at the Vendor set-up level.
AP Settings 1. Located under [File], [Company Settings], [AP Settings]. The opening dialog box stores: a. [Pending system] – can be set-up for a single or multiple users. Can be used to control or limit when invoices are posted. b. [Use approval system] – if ticked, Invoice Approval Settings become available to the right. c. [Retain 1099 totals per GL prefix] -applies if you have multiple Entities with separate Tax ID# in a single directory. Ticking this box will create the ability to issue Vendor 1099 by entity under the appropriate tax payer ID number. d. [Include historical invoice file in verification] – if you move invoices to history on a regular basis, then ticking this box will verify invoice numbers by vendor against those stored in History. It can eliminate duplicate payments on back dated invoices.
2. [Post & Interface Settings] – controls the verification process and whether entries can be created in other applications. Unless you have a specific reason not to, tick them all!!!
Control Freak – Part III: Creating Controls within Accounts Payable by: Eire Stewart
JP DiNapoli Companies, Inc.
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ii. Tolerance amounts or quantities can be set for each option. Your options are: 1. [Total amount invoiced exceeds commitment] 2. [Total units invoiced exceeds commitment] 3. [Total amount invoiced exceeds estimate] 4. [Unapproved submittal for job] can be enabled or disabled. 4. Check Settings
a. [Bank account use method] can be set so that the System automatically assigns per expense distribution – this can be extremely handy for multiple entities. The account assignment can be overridden in the Selection process. b. [Record Manual/Print Quick Checks] setting determines which updates the next check number stored in CM. Generally speaking, the correct selection should be [Quick check….]. c. Also found on this screen is [Lien waiver accumulation method]. Choices here will trigger the dollar amounts that are used to fill in the system generated Lien Releases.
i. A choice of [Accumulate by Job] will trigger a release for the total to date paid to that Vendor for a specific job. ii. [Accumulate by commitment and job, all costs] will produce a total that reflects all payments against commitments and also uncommitted costs that have been paid. iii. [Accumulate by commitment and job, commitment costs] will result in only those costs paid against commitments and will exclude uncommitted costs. 5. [GL Entry Settings] is where the designations are made for the system generated side of data entry. a. These include designation of a [Credit Card Payable account] for use with the new Credit Card feature. Designating a specific Credit Card Payable account can help with reconciliation of credit card balances.
b. The bottom portion of the window controls what information attaches to the GL transaction and can be seen on the Current Ledger and Account Inquiries, along with other reports. Multiple choices are available for all three fields. 6. [Payment Selection Settings] determines in what order invoices appear during the selection process and what additional information can be seen in the selection window. 7. [Invoice Approval Settings] – if [Use approval system] is ticked off, this window determines in what order invoices are displayed during the approval process and what additional information can be seen in the approval window. 8. [Orders] determines the order in which items appear in Invoice selection, Check printing and in Report/Inquiry tasks.
Vendor Set-up [Setup],[Vendor Setup] also contains several control features: a. Terms and Defaults: i. [Discount percent] and [Discount days] will automatically calculate the discount upon entry of each individual invoice. ii. [Payment days] and [Payment days type] will calculate the payment date based on the invoice date upon entry of each individual invoice. b. [Defaults] will prefill GL distribution, JC codes and an assortment of other information upon invoice entry. c. Both [Terms] and [Defaults] can be overridden in the invoice entry process d. [Check Settings] allows for each Vendor to have a setup when checks are created. An example is Utility Vendors where you may want [One invoice per check] to avoid checks being applied to the wrong account. e. Insurance 1 and Insurance 2 tabs control whether checks will be printed if insurance certificates have not been provided. Tick the Proof required box to prevent issuance of checks if Certificates have not been received or policies have expired.
Many of the decisions for these settings were made when Sage 300 CRE was originally installed. It might be worthwhile to take a second look and see if your original settings are still appropriate for how your company operates or if you want to take advantage of several of these control features to enhance your company’s processing controls! Become a Control Freak!
May 2013News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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May 2013 News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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TO: Oh Great and Mighty Guru From the top of Kilimanjaro to the depths of Death Valley, I have searched this great land for an answer. We need to be able to look at a drawing to see how an assembly will calculate. How, oh wise one, do you attach a graphic diagram or a drawing to an assembly?
– Graphically Challenged TO: Challenged Not only are you graphically challenged, you are geographically challenged as well...Kilimanjaro is in Africa for gosh sakes. Doesn’t anyone own a map anymore? Your estimating problem does have an easy solution, however. You can easily attach a bitmap file (.bmp) or jpeg (.jpg) to an assembly by clicking the Attach Help button in Edit Assembly. Click the Graphic File Name radio button and then browse out and select the drawing file. When in assembly takeoff, click the Attachment button to see the drawing file.
– The All Knowing Guru (Kilimanjaro??.....)
ESTIMATING TIPS & TRICKS
JUNE 2013
Tuesday, 6.4.13 1:00 p.m. ET PJ: CHANGE MANAGEMENT WORKFLOW & CHANGE REQUESTS
Wednesday, 6.5.13 11:00 a.m. ET ESTIMATING COMMITTEE - POST CONFERENCE SESSION
Tuesday, 6.11.13 1:00 p.m. ET PJ: OWNER CHANGE ORDERS
Thursday, 6.13.13 2:00 p.m. ET REAL ESTATE COMMITTEE & FORUM
Friday, 6.14.13 2:00 p.m. ET PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE MEETING
Tuesday, 6.18.13 11:00 a.m. ET SERVICE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE MEETING
Tuesday, 6.18.13 1:00 p.m. ET PJ: COMMITMENT CHANGE ORDERS
Wednesday, 6.19.13 2:00 p.m. ET CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTING COMMITTEE & FORUM
Tuesday, 6.25.13 1:00 p.m. ET PJ OPEN FORUM: PJ PROJECT MANAGEMENT TIPS & TRICKS
Wednesday, 6.26.13 11:00 a.m. ET ESTIMATING COMMITTEE & FORUM
To attend an online event, please e-mail attendee(s) name and e-mail address to [email protected] You will receive an e-mail confirmation along with connection instructions once you are registered. These classes are free of charge and open to members only – one more benefit of belonging to TUG! We are adding more sessions every day. Check the Online Event Calendar at TUGweb.com for an updated list. If you
have any suggestions on sessions you would like to see, please e-mail [email protected]
TUG Online WebEx Training and Open Forums
May 2013News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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T he Adjust Column feature in Sage Estimating can be used to quickly adjust an entire column or a particular portion of a column. Adjustments can be made to takeoff quantities, unit costs,
category amounts and totals. You can adjust quantities and dollars by a percentage, multiply or divide by a number, replace an existing amount, and add to or subtract from an existing amount. There are some differences in the adjust column options when adjusting takeoff quantities versus adjusting unit prices or amounts; below are some steps you can follow for adjusting both types of values.
Adjusting Takeoff Quantities To access the Adjust Column window, highlight the Takeoff Quantity column or specific range within the column, right click and select Adjust Column (See Figure 1) and the Adjust Column window will open. Once the window is open, select the Adjustment type from the drop down list at the top of the window (See Figure 2) and enter the amount you would like to adjust by in the Amount box (See Figure 3). For example, if you want to increase the selected range by 30%, select Percent from the pull-down menu and type 30 in the amount box. Price Linked Items Pull-Down Menu: Because you are adjusting takeoff quantities, the Price Linked Items pull-down will be grayed out as you are not adjusting unit costs and will not be affecting any linked unit prices. Lump Sum Items Pull-Down Menu: The bottom pull-down menu is how you want to address Lump Sum items within the range. Your choices are: Adjust Lump Sums, Prompt on Lump Sums, and Skip Lump Sums. The Adjust Lump Sums (See Figure 4) option will adjust the quantity and the Lump Sum Amount by the factor you have entered. If you have more than one lump sum in the range to be adjusted you can select the Prompt on Lump Sums (See Figure 5) option which allows you to either Adjust or Skip a particular lump sum (See Figure 6). The Skip Lump Sums option will not adjust the quantity or Lump Sum Amount for those items within the range.
Once you have the Adjust Column options set appropriately, click OK. You will notice that the costs in the range you selected have changed and there is a red tick mark at the top right corner of each cell that was adjusted (See Figure 7). That red mark is your indication that a particular cell has been adjusted by using the Adjust Column Option. If you hover the mouse over a cell that has been adjusted, the adjustment details will appear showing how the quantity was adjusted and what the original quantity was (See Figure 8).
Adjust Column Feature by: Scott R. Bishop, CEP HDR Constructors, Inc.
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May 2013 News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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Adjusting Unit Prices and Amounts To access the Adjust Column window, highlight the Takeoff Quantity column or specific range within the column, right click and select Adjust Column (See Figure 9) and the Adjust Column window will open. Unit prices, category amounts, and total amounts can all be adjusted. Once the window is open, select the Adjustment type from the drop down list at the top of the window (See Figure 10) and enter the amount you would like to adjust by in the Amount box (See Figure 11). You will notice that for dollar unit and amount adjustments, the Spread option is available; Spread is not an option for quantity adjustments. This will allow you to spread a lump sum amount over the range selected. Price Linked Items Pull-Down Menu: Since dollar amounts are being adjusted, the Price Linked Items pull-down will be active and the selections will allow you to determine how any linked unit prices will be affected (See Figure 12). Please take caution and be sure you understand how these potions work before adjusting price linked items. (Price Linked Items are items that have unit prices linked to other items in the database). Adjust Selected Items Only will adjust all items in the range selected based on the Adjustment type and Amount given. Adjust Selected and Price Linked Items will adjust all items in the range and will also adjust those items price linked to the items within the range selected that are located throughout the estimate. The Prompt On Price Linked Items option will give you the option of adjusting, or not adjusting, those price linked items one at a time (See Figure 13). Skip Price Linked Items will automatically skip the price linked items without being prompted.
Lump Sum Items Pull-Down Menu: The bottom pull-down menu is how you want to address Lump Sum items within the range (See Figure 14). Your choices are to Adjust Lump Sums, Prompt on Lump Sums, and Skip Lump Sums. The Adjust Lump Sums will adjust the quantity and the Lump Sum Amount by the factor you have entered. If you have more than one lump sum in the range to be adjusted you can select the Prompt on Lump Sums which allows you to either Adjust or Skip a particular lump sum (See Figure 15). The Skip Lump Sums will not adjust the quantity or Lump Sum Amount for those items within the range.
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May 2013News and Information for Users of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate & Sage Estimating
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NOTE: You can also adjust a range by adjusting overline totals. By typing the desired amount in the overline total (See Figure 16) the Adjust Column window will automatically open with the
Spread Option selected and the amount to be spread prefilled in the Amount box (see Figure 17). Make sure you select the appropriate Price Linked Item and Lump Sum Items Options and then click OK. You will notice that the overline total is now the specified amount and that the items in the range under the overline have been adjusted based on the Adjust Column properties specified (See Figure 18).
Undo Your Adjustments Even though you have adjusted quantities and/or unit prices and dollar amounts you can still undo them and get back to your original values. You can undo the entire range or one item within the range. To undo an adjustment, highlight the item or range of adjusted items, right click and select Adjust Colum. In the Adjustment Type pull-down menu select Undo Adjustment and click OK at the bottom (See Figure 19). You will notice that all red ticks disappear.
Finalize Your Adjustments Once your adjustments have been made and reviewed you can make the adjustment Final. To do this, highlight the item or range of items, right click and select Adjust Column (See Figure 20). In the Adjustment Type pull-down menu select Finalize Adjustment and click OK (See Figure 21). You will notice in the estimate that, once finalized, the red tick in the upper right hand corner has disappeared and the adjusted value remains (See Figure 22). WARNING: Once you have finalized an adjustment you cannot use the undo process to go back to the original value.
But don’t take my word for it, give it a try.
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News and Information for Users of Sage Timberline Office Software
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University of Alabama
M any companies are starting to incorporate Lean Principles into their process. Some are presenting themselves as Lean Leaders and IPD Players, while others are on the marketing
side and selling themselves as Lean. Companies are in the process of creating Lean Teams and hiring Lean Champions. But have they, or their commitments to Lean, generated any real changes?
I have constructed Assemblies for myself and I always try to use Lean as a guide and ask several questions. One, does the assembly cover 90% of the typical conditions for which the assembly was created? Two, does the assembly use common variables most efficiently? Three, are the variables easy to input and self directing?
The first question keeps the focus of the assembly on the task at hand. If you take-off a slab-on-grade, how many different types of joints do you want to include in a pass? My decision is to look at the typical slab being take-off and customize it for that condition. An exterior parking/driveway slab is different than an interior slab-on- grade. In industrial settings, heavy reinforcing and doweled joints are standard. Why try to build an assembly for all conditions?
To be Lean, you want the estimator to deal with just the variables needed to complete the task. I know that yes or no questions are easy to skip, but I also know that forcing someone to skip a lot of irrelevant questions might lead to errors and omissions. Keep your focus.
The second question leads to the creativity of the designer. If you want to use “Area – SF” as a variable, how many assumptions can you incorporate into the assembly to get lengths of various items? Using area will lend itself to use factors per square foot for calculations. This works well as long as the accuracy remains in check.
An example might be calculations for rebar laps. Calculating the length of rebar needed would be based on the spacing requirements.
If rebar is spaced at 12” on-center in each direction, the factor would be 2 linear foot per square foot of slab. If the rebar is purchased in 30’ lengths, how many splices would be required? You could take the total length and divide by 30 and round up to determine the number of bars and then adjust for splicing. This would yield an accurate result as long as the slab area is greater than 30’ by 30’. If the slab is 20’ wide and 200’ long, the result might not be as expected. To be Lean, you want to maximize the use of inputs, but not at the expense of accuracy.
Third, are the variables easy to input and self directing? This has all sorts of issues, schemes, flair or other such intentions. Do you input a 1, 2 or 3 for a selection or 100, 200 or 300? Do you try to use some kind of custom code, such as 14 as input for a 1x4 piece of lumber? Does your input match what is normal for the input of the item?
An example might be inputting the size of beams in an elevated slab. Do you use the full depth or the additional depth only? Is your input in inches or feet? The answer is not what matters; it is maintaining consistency with the overall process. Creating a consistent standard is Lean.
The use of assemblies is a Lean process. It allows the estimator to quickly perform take-off with minimal inputs and focused accuracy. The assemblies should cover all the common elements for the typical project to minimize the searching. The assemblies and variables should have some self-checking imbedded to eliminate random entry errors. Lastly, your assemblies can be very simple or very complex but they must create a system that is consistently followed.
To be Lean, you need to improve. Improvement can only come by following a consistent system so that results can be measured. Without measurements, improvement cannot occur.
News and Information for Users of Sage Timberline Office Software
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by: Vicki Roberge Sage Construction & Real Estate
I n an industry with tight margins, fines as a result of non-compliance can mean the difference between profit and loss on a project, or worse, in extreme cases, could cause a contractor to go out of business entirely.
Whether it’s an unsigned lien waiver, an outdated insurance certificate, a missing certified payroll report for a federally subsidized job, or any number of other locally mandated compliance items, the risks associated with non-compliance are real and impact both GCs and subs alike!
How are you currently tracking and managing compliance items? If you’re attempting to use an Excel spreadsheet, I’m sure you’ll agree that it’s challenging, error-prone and extremely time-consuming to say the least.
Do any of these situations sound familiar?
• Require lien waivers before paying subs. You receive an invoice from a subcontractor. You’re about to cut a check, but your manual tracking system indicates you have not yet received a signed lien waiver from that particular subcontractor. You leave the check at the front desk with a note that the subcontractor must leave the signed paperwork before receiving the check. But your note is overlooked, and you find out later the check was released to the sub.
Even though you’ve paid the sub, if one of the subcontractor’s subs or suppliers isn’t paid, they can place a lien on the property and your company could be held liable to pay the secondary tier sub or supplier before the lien is removed.
• Keeping uninsured workers off your job site. Your project is behind schedule, and as a result, your profits are at risk. You’ve brought additional subs on board whom you don’t regularly work with in order to get back on schedule. As a result, you’re not sure if you’ve just hired uninsured workers or not. If an uninsured worker gets hurt on the job, the financial impact to your business could be significant.
• Produce certified payroll reports with confidence. You’ve taken on a federally funded project and, come to find out, you were not properly tracking certified payroll reports (a requirement per the Davis-Bacon Act). Subsequently, when audited and unable to produce the certified reports, your company received a fine for $1.5 million. To make up for the loss, you’d need to book another $37.5 million in business with a targeted profit margin of 4%!
With the last release of Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate (formerly Sage Timberline Office), there is an easier way. For example:
• Require lien waivers before paying subs. Compliance automation can begin from a simple alert notifying you that the lien waiver has not yet been received, to a hard stop that will actually block the printing of a check (unless overwritten). The system can also display informational warnings during Invoice Entry and the Invoice Payment Selection process.
• Keeping uninsured workers off your job site. Track and maintain insurance certificates (general liability, automobile, umbrella, worker’s compensation, and so on) for all of the subs on the job. Compliance can be tracked globally (for all subs or all jobs) or for a particular job. So, when a commitment is setup for a job, we can set up the expectation that a copy of the insurance certificate is required and needs to be submitted in order for the sub to remain compliant.
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News and Information for Users of Sage Timberline Office Software
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May 2013
• Produce certified payroll reports with confidence. When you enter a commitment for a subcontractor, you tell Sage 300 when work was started so you can begin tracking certified reports. Then, within the Certified Reports Management hub, you simply mark that week/period as being received and continue to do so until the labor is completed for a commitment. At this time, you simply mark a particular weekly report “final.” Compliance is determined based on the starting dates and week- ending dates that you define. The system also allows you to account for work (subcontractor or lower-tier subcontractor work) that has been temporarily postponed. In other words, a certified report is not required if the sub didn’t work. By using the system setting of “no work,” your records show that the particular subcontractor is still compliant.
By implementing a fully automated compliance tracking, monitoring and alert system, you can reduce the time and money currently spent ensuring compliance, and the potential for fines due to non- compliance. The good news is that if you are on an active Sage 300 Service Plan, these capabilities are available to you today! If you’re interested in learning more, contact your business partner or your customer account manager at 800-858-7095.