Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Chapter 4 Cultural Shock.

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  • Slide 1
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Chapter 4 Cultural Shock
  • Slide 2
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Upon Completion of this Chapter Understand the nature of cultural shock and its relationship to success in overseas work Be able to identify the typical stages of culture shock Learn ways to alleviate cultural shock including careful selection of personnel Understand the role of cultural stress and dealing with cultural shock Understand public and private self topics
  • Slide 3
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Cultural shock is the trauma you experience when you move into a culture different from your home culture. Frustrations may include lack of food, unacceptable standards of cleanliness, different bathroom facilities, and fear for personal safety.
  • Slide 4
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin People experience cultural shock when they are in a country where yes may mean no, where prices are negotiable, and where laughter may signify anger. People who visit our reside temporarily in another country are called sojourners.
  • Slide 5
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Upon her arrival in La Paz, Bolivia, from Atlanta, Georgia, Katherine Montague asked directions to the ladies room at the local university. Upon entering, she observed three males using urinals and made a hasty retreat. Her U.S. colleagues explained that all restrooms were unisex; Katherine decided to take a taxi to her hotel.
  • Slide 6
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Major Symptoms of Cultural Shock Homesickness Boredom Withdrawal (avoiding contact with host nationals) Need for excessive amounts of sleep Compulsive eating/drinking Irritability Exaggerated cleanliness
  • Slide 7
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Marital stress Family tension and conflict Chauvinistic excesses Stereotyping of host nationals Hostility toward host nationals Loss of ability to work effectively Unexplainable fits of weeping Physical ailments (psychosomatic illnesses) Major Symptoms of Cultural Shock
  • Slide 8
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Asia Shock (a type of cultural shock U.S. people experience) has five progressive stages: Frustration with the culture, e.g., the language, food, and local customs. Unwillingness to understand the rationale behind the local ways of doing things. Ethnocentricity; U.S. persons label Asians as dishonest because they say one thing and do another; consider face-saving as dishonest. Racism use of unflattering labels for Asians. Avoidance of the culture; U.S. persons form clubs rather than intermingle with people of the culture.
  • Slide 9
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Strategies for Coping with a New Culture During Short Visits Nonacceptance of the host culture; traveler behaves as he/she would in the home culture. SubstitutionThe traveler learns the appropriate responses/behaviors in the host culture and substitutes these responses/behaviors for the ones he/she would ordinarily use in the home culture.
  • Slide 10
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin AdditionnThe person adds the behavior of the host culture when in the presence of nationals but maintains the home culture behavior with others of the same culture. SynthesisIntegrates or combines elements of the two cultures, such as combining U.S. dress and that of the Philippines. ResynthesisThe integration of ideas not found in either culture (U.S. traveler to China chooses to eat neither American nor Chinese food, but prefers Italian). Strategies for Coping with a New Culture During Short Visits
  • Slide 11
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Stages of Cultural Shock Stage 1: Excitement and fascination with the new culture; the "honeymoon" stage. Stage 2: Crisis or disenchantment period; excitement has turned to disappointment. Stage 3: Adjustment phase; you begin to accept the new culture, try new foods, see the humor in situations. Stage 4: Acceptance or adaptation phase; feel at home in the new culture and become involved in activities of the culture. Still respects theirs own culture. Stage 5: Reentry shock; follows the stages identified earlier: excitement, crisis or disenchantment, adjustment, & adaptation.
  • Slide 12
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Problems Related to Reentry Shock Finding a new niche in the corporate structure at home. Adjusting to lower standards of living. Problems reestablishing personal and professional relationships. Dealing with readjustment problems of children, including the difference in their educational experience abroad.
  • Slide 13
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Replace the Golden RuleDo unto others as you would have them do unto you. Change to. Bennetts Platinum RuleDo unto others as they would have done unto them To alleviate cultural shock, try to see the environment from the perspective of the host nationals.
  • Slide 14
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Alleviating Cultural Shock by Careful Selection of Overseas Personnel Sensitive, cooperative, able to compromise Open to others' opinions Reaction to new situations; appreciation of cultural differences Understanding of own values and aware of values in other cultures Reaction to criticism Understanding of U.S. government system Ability to develop contacts in new culture Patience and resiliency
  • Slide 15
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Training Models Intellectual or classroom modelinvolves giving facts about the host country using a variety of instructional methods Area training or simulation model emphasizes affective goals, culture specific content, and experiential processes Self-awareness or human relations model based on the assumption that the trainee with self-understanding will be more effective in the overseas assignment
  • Slide 16
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Cultural awareness model emphasizes cultural insight and stresses affective goals and an experiential process Interaction approach participants interact with people in the host country and compare values and behaviors Multidimensional approach attempts to combine cognitive, affective, and behavioral aspects of training Training Models
  • Slide 17
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Feedback and Rewards Appraisal and reward system must reflect the purpose and expectations of the assignment (profit or building a presence in the country). Reward systems may include special allowances for housing, hardship, home leave, medical, taxes, etc. Reward system must compensate for what U.S. persons are leaving behind and must be based on the idea of equity (the ratio between what is contributed and what is received).
  • Slide 18
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Developing Employees to Their Potential Plan for repatriation, including reasons for the assignment and how the employee will contribute to the company upon his/her return. Allow adequate time for readjustment before employee reports to work. Provide compensation for transition expenses. Assist in locating proper housing. Show appreciation to family for contributions. College students are pursued for language proficiency and overseas experience.
  • Slide 19
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Aspects of Cultural Shock Cultural Stressalleviate stress by reading up on the country, studying the language, and becoming aware of customs and traditions in the culture. Social Alienationcultivate friendships with persons from home and host cultures; include host nationals in social events.
  • Slide 20
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Social Class and Poverty-Wealth Extremesmentors in host culture can be helpful in advising U.S. persons regarding acceptable ways of dealing with poverty-wealth extremes. Financial Informationshould be provided before going to the culture; also financial counseling before reentry. Aspects of Cultural Shock
  • Slide 21
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Relationships and Family Considerations The failure of a spouse and other family members to adapt to the new culture can cause early return of expatriates; companies should provide training for employees and their family to minimize adjustment problems. Encourage children to discuss their anxieties and fears.
  • Slide 22
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin The Johari Window can be translated into ones public self and private self. The public self may include information about a persons work, family, and interests. The public self is small for the Japanese; it is large for U.S. persons. The private self may include feelings, personal information, and opinions. The private self is large for the Japanese; it is small for U.S. persons. U.S. people share personal information.
  • Slide 23
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Public and Private Self The Johari Window Things I KnowThings I Dont Know Things Others Know Things Others Dont Know ArenaBlind Spot HiddenUnknown
  • Slide 24
  • Ferraro, The Cultural Dimension of International Business "One of the byproducts of a successful adjustment to the host culture is that our old notions of our culture will never again be the same. After one lives for a while in Switzerland or Germany, the U.S. no longer seems to be the epitome of cleanliness; when compared to the Japanese, the typical American seems loud and boisterous; after a stint in a developing nation, people in the U.S. seem rushed and impersonal. Somehow home isn't what one had remembered."
  • Slide 25
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Topics Covered: Review Your Materials Carefully Culture Shock Stages of Cultural Shock Alleviating Cultural Shock Aspects of Cultural Shock Relationships and Family Considerations Public and Private Self
  • Slide 26
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Case 1 Larry was sent to Japan to represent his company and wanted to make a good impression on his Japanese hosts. He immediately asked them to call him by his first name and told several humorous stories intended to break the ice. He brought along gifts containing his companys logo and asked about the state of the Japanese economy. Larry got the impression that things were no going well and that he many have behaved inappropriately. What advice would you give him?
  • Slide 27
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Case 2 Karl, his wife, and five- year- old son were completing a three- year assignment in Brazil and were scheduled to return to the United States in a month. Karl would return to work at the home office in Chicago. What should Karl and his family do to lessen the shock of returning to their home culture?
  • Slide 28
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Case 3 Franks company was planning to enter the Mexican market and had sent him to meet with Juan, the manager of the firm with which they planned to establish a partnership. They agreed to meet for lunch at 2 p.m. at a restaurant in Mexico City. At 2:30, Frank, thinking he had misunderstood the time or place, was leaving when he encountered Juan, who did not apologyze for being late. Juan then ordered a special brandy for them and proceeded to talk about the local museums, churches, and other points of interest. Frank indicated that he did not have time to visit local sites and was anxious to discuss their proposed business partnership. When the brandy arrived, Frank declined, saying he did not drink alcoholic beverage during the day. Each time Frank tried to turn the discussion to business, Juan immediately changed the subject to other topics, including inquiring about Franks family and personal life. At the end of the two- hour lunch, no business had been discussed. Frank returned to the United States the following day and reported to his supervisor that the Mexican firm apparently had no interest in the proposed partnership. How could Frank have better prepared himself for the cultural shock he experienced?
  • Slide 29
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Case 4 Janice Davis, a marketing representative for a U.S. firm, was looking forward to her assignment in Japan because she had visited the country on one occasion. However, her anticipation quickly turned to frustration. Because all stores signs were in Japanese, she didnt know where to buy even a broom. Directions and instructions for using appliances were in Japanese. How could Janice have better prepared herself for the cultural shock she experienced?
  • Slide 30
  • Intercultural Business Communication, 4th ed., Chaney & Martin Cases

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