JANUARY 2013 - ?· 8 9 Central to the intellectual community is the ability to freely exchange ideas.…

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  • JANUARY 2013

  • The Main Quadrangles

    From its founding in 1890 as a series of self-contained Collegiate Gothic quadrangles, the campus has expanded over more than a century into a diverse layering of architecture and open spaces expressing design innovations and attitudes over time about what makes an exceptional campus.

    The expression of these layers shall support an overarching unity defined not only through the architecture, but also through the interconnected landscape of spaces and pathways between the buildings. Always at the heart shall be the creation of an inspiring setting that facilitates the best work of extraordinary faculty, students and staff.

    Each capital project shall begin with a clear intention to strengthen the existing identity and character of the campus by reinforcing and enhancing both the rich legacy of the past and the Universitys tradition of creative innovation. We shall select architects who demonstrate design excellence commensurate with the Universitys aspirations and status as one of the worlds great centers of scholarship and teaching.

    Each projects success will be evaluated on its results in achieving programmatic objectives while enhancing sustainability and the greater campus setting. Ultimately, we aim to advance the Universitys uniquely intellectual community through architecture and open spaces that encourage the free exchange of ideas and create various opportunities for enjoyment.

    These principles shall inform the process of selecting architects and implementing designs that enhance the Universitys community, stature and purpose.

    BOARD OF TRUSTEES CAMPUS DESIGN VISION STATEMENT

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    The University of Chicago Campus

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    THE CHALLENGE

    The University of Chicago is driven by a culture of rigorous open inquiry, analysis and questioning. The design and renovation of facilities will be held to the same intensity of discussion and review to achieve design excellence. The challenge is for design teams to reflect the diversity and uniqueness of the Universitys academic programs while enhancing the existing Campus environment.

    The University is asking design teams to contribute to an environment that fosters original, agenda-setting scholarship and education. The University seeks a cohesiveness in building and landscape design that leads to an evolving University of Chicago Campus that is unified but not uniform.

    Design teams should refer to the Facility Standards (FS2) for additional standards and guidance.

    Design teams should be guided by these four principles:

    1. Promote the Exchange of Ideas2. Foster Stewardship3. Enhance Environmental Sustainability4. Strengthen the Identity and Character of the Campus

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    Central to the intellectual community is the ability to freely exchange ideas. The design of buildings and open spaces should encourage interaction and sustain the settings that bring faculty, students and staff together to create vibrant centers of campus life.

    1. PROMOTE THE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS

    ENTRIES AND GROUND FLOORS Buildings should be welcoming,

    strengthen existing gathering spaces and provide new opportunities for social interaction.

    Entrances should be evident in daytime and at night.

    The ground floor of buildings should emphasize transparency.

    Service areas should be located so as not to negatively impact pedestrian paths, important streets or building entrances.

    PUBLIC SPACES Public spaces should be generous,

    promote interaction, and be visible to those using the buildings or walking past them.

    Outdoor and indoor public spaces should be designed to have the ability for informal gatherings and hosting social interactions during both daytime and evening hours.

    Lighting and security of public spaces are critical for their success.

    Consider rooftops and terraces as participatory spaces for the campus community, accommodating social spaces, conferencing and unique

    offices.

    INCLUSIVENESS Buildings should provide universal

    access so they are not encumbered unnecessarily by level changes, ramps and stairs.

  • 1110Arley D. Cathey Learning Center

    Continued care and stewardship of the Campus require an appreciation for the existing buildings and open spaces that define the University of Chicago. New buildings and future renovations must maintain the best campus environment possible. Design teams should recognize the Universitys spirit of legacy and continuity.

    Over time, Campus buildings should anticipate a variety of programs and uses responding to new needs and unanticipated demands. New projects should be designed with a commitment to flexibility, quality and durability to provide long-term usefulness.

    2. FOSTER STEWARDSHIP

    PRESERVATION OF SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS AND OPEN SPACES Buildings that contribute to the

    legacy of the Campus should be retained and revitalized when feasible. Open spaces and significant landscapes should be identified and respected as critical components of the University of Chicago Botanic Garden.

    LONG TERM FLEXIBILITY Buildings on Campus should be seen

    as having the capacity and flexibility to outlive the original program. Appropriate attention to the design of floor plates, floor-to-floor heights, and structural systems will enable a high degree of flexibility for unanticipated future uses.

    LIFE CYCLE VALUE Anticipate future changes in

    technology and teaching methods in the planning and design of buildings and instructional spaces.

    Incorporate building systems and support infrastructure that will provide easy adaptation for new programs and future demands.

    When making building system decisions, consider initial capital investments as they impact long-term operational costs in the full life cycle of the project.

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    Design teams shall embrace the Universitys commitment to sustainability.

    Design projects should contribute to creating a more sustainable campus by improving the environment and quality of life for faculty, staff, students and visitors. Design teams are asked to bring innovation and creativity in their approach to holistic sustainability.

    3. ENHANCE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

    RESPONSIBLE USE OF NATURAL RESOURCES Design to reduce greenhouse gas

    emissions and energy consumption and to explore alternative energy sources.

    Design teams will advance high-performance buildings.

    View water as a valuable resource that should be conserved and reclaimed.

    Facilities should enhance and protect the ecology around them through sustainable, regionally appropriate landscapes.

    WASTE MANAGEMENT Reduce waste generation during

    demolition and construction. Incorporate recycled materials. Design strategies that promote

    recycling and sustainable practices.

    HEALTH AND WELLNESS Design teams should achieve high

    quality indoor environments, natural light and thermal comfort.

    Design building features to promote alternative transportation modes.

    Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts

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    The University of Chicago is part of a city deeply rooted in a tradition of architectural innovation and excellence. The Campus itself includes numerous building examples representing the architectural innovations of the time in which they were built. Notable architects on the Campus include the following: Henry Ives Cobb, Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge, Bertram Goodhue, Charles Klauder, Howard Van Doren Shaw, Holabird and Root, Eero Saarinen, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Edward Durell Stone, Walter Netsch, Edward Larrabee Barnes, Cesar Pelli, Ricardo Legorreta, Helmut Jahn, Rafael Vinoly and Tod Williams + Billie Tsien.

    A strong component of the Campus includes architecture that was ahead of its time and notable for innovation, quality and legacy. Design teams of new facilities should acknowledge this design legacy and continue the tradition of achieving design excellence.

    The ensemble of Campus buildings and many significant buildings within the community, including Frank Lloyd Wrights Robie House, reflect a diverse, high-caliber collection of architectural styles and represent a dynamic relationship between the past and the future.

    4. STRENGTHEN THE IDENTITY AND CHARACTER OF THE CAMPUS

    BUILDING ORIENTATION The design of new facilities

    should be in conversation with adjacent buildings, quadrangles and streets.

    Buildings should reinforce the quadrangle and street framework of the Campus.

    Consider daylighting and solar access in the design of new buildings.

    Design with an awareness for shadows cast on adjacent buildings and programs, as well as important open spaces.

    MATERIALS An emphasis should be placed on

    quality, exterior materials that express permanence, convey a civic presence and stand the test of time in the Midwest climate.

    Materials, colors and textures need to respond to the neighborhood or Zone in which the building resides. Some Campus Zones will be more accepting of contemporary and diverse materials.

    Limestone should be given consideration as a fundamental building material of the University of Chicago, especially when in close proximity to the Main Quadrangl