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Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING Version 1.0 September, 2001 ©2001 Jim Gleason All Rights Reserved www.guitarpm.com

Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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Page 1: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA

CHORDFINGERING

Version 1.0 September, 2001©2001 Jim GleasonAll Rights Reserved

www.guitarpm.com

Page 2: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 2

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Page 3: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

INTRODUCTION ............................................................... ............................................ 7

Reading Fretboard Diagrams ............................................................................................................8

Reading Tablature ............................................................................................................................12

Fretboard Note Names and Staff Locations ....................................................................................14

SCALES DEFINED ............................................................... ....................................... 23

What Is An Octave?..........................................................................................................................24

What Is A Scale?...............................................................................................................................24

What Is A Chord?.............................................................................................................................25

OCTAVE SHAPES ............................................................... ......................................... 27

The Full Fretboard Octave Pattern ..................................................................................................28

Breaking It Down To What You Can Reach.....................................................................................31

INTERVALS ............................................................... ....................................................... 37

What Is An Interval? ........................................................................................................................38

Fingering Whole Steps.....................................................................................................................38

Fingering Half Steps ........................................................................................................................39

Three Ways To Finger Whole And Half Steps..................................................................................40

Numbering The Major Scale Tones .................................................................................................40

Recognizing The Half Steps In the Major Scale ..............................................................................41

Play A Major Scale On One String...................................................................................................42

Memorize Seven Major Scale Fingerings.........................................................................................42

123

Contents

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Contents

CONSTRUCTING MAJOR SCALES ............................................................... 45

Strict Vertical Position .....................................................................................................................46

Beginning A Major Scale From the Little Finger On the Sixth String .............................................47

Major Scale Fingering Numbers ......................................................................................................50

Beginning A Major Scale From the Index Finger On the Sixth String ............................................51

CHORD CONSTRUCTION PREP............................................................... ...... 55

The Intervals Necessary To Construct A Major Chord...................................................................56

Perfect Fifth Fingerings....................................................................................................................56

Major Third Fingerings ...................................................................................................................57

Perfect Fourth Fingerings ................................................................................................................68

CHORD FORMULAS ............................................................... ................................. 59

What Are Chord Roots And Formulas?...........................................................................................60

Chord Formulas By Family..............................................................................................................60

CONSTRUCTING MAJOR CHORDS ............................................................ 63

Common Major Chords By Octave Shape ......................................................................................64

Reference Roots And Octaves..........................................................................................................65

Constructing Major Chords From The Root ..................................................................................66

THE ROOT ID SYSTEM............................................................... ............................ 69

What Is Strict Vertical Position? ......................................................................................................70

What Are Chord Roots, Tone Centers, Keys And Chord Progression? ..........................................70

What Is A Root ID? ..........................................................................................................................74

Combining Root IDs .......................................................................................................................76

Why Can’t I Just Use The Octave Shapes Instead Of The Root ID? ................................................77

PRINCIPLES OF FINGERING............................................................... .............. 79

General Rules...................................................................................................................................80

Changing Position ...........................................................................................................................80

Out-Of Position Notes.....................................................................................................................81

5

678

9

4

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Contents

CONSTRUCTING ARPEGGIOS ............................................................... ......... 83

Overview..........................................................................................................................................84Memorize Reference Arpeggios ......................................................................................................84Choose A Fretboard Area ................................................................................................................88Construct A Major Scale..................................................................................................................90Access The Chord Formula .............................................................................................................91Identify All Chord Tones .................................................................................................................91Major Arpeggios In All Twelve Positions.........................................................................................94Deriving All Arpeggios From Major ...............................................................................................97Summary Chord Fingerings ............................................................................................................99

“SPELLING” MAJOR SCALES............................................................... .......... 101

Spelling Major Scales Defined .......................................................................................................102Preparing To Determine Chord Roots ..........................................................................................102Key Signatures ...............................................................................................................................103The Cycle Of Fifths ........................................................................................................................106Q & A On Key Signatures ..............................................................................................................106Using Key Signatures To Spell Major Scales ..................................................................................107

STRUCTURAL CHORD TYPES ............................................................... ........ 109

Chords Are Usually Constructed In Thirds ..................................................................................110Chord Types...................................................................................................................................114

IDENTIFYING THE CHORD ROOT.............................................................. 123

The Root Is Usually The Lowest Note In A Series Of Thirds ........................................................124Incomplete Chords ........................................................................................................................126Add-Tone And Suspended Chords................................................................................................130Synonyms ......................................................................................................................................132

ESSENTIAL CHORD TONES............................................................... .............. 135

The Third, The Seventh and The Chord Name .............................................................................136Implied Chord Tones .....................................................................................................................139Essential Chord Tone Charts .........................................................................................................142

10

11

1213

14

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Contents

CHORD INVERSION............................................................... ................................ 151

What Is Inversion? .........................................................................................................................152

Root Position .................................................................................................................................152

First Inversion ................................................................................................................................152

Second Inversion ...........................................................................................................................152

Third Inversion ..............................................................................................................................152

Using The CD Rom ............................................................... .................................. 155

Search By Chord Name..................................................................................................................156

Search By Chord Grid....................................................................................................................157

Navigation And Keyboard Shortcuts ............................................................................................157

Advanced Searches ........................................................................................................................158

FIGURE OUT ANY CHORD FINGERING ................................................ 161

The Goal Is To Not Need The CD Rom.........................................................................................162

The Procedure................................................................................................................................162

APPENDICESA COMMON CHORD FINGERINGS .......................................................... 163

B EXERCISES ............................................................... ................................................ 169

C SUMMARY CHORDS ............................................................... ........................ 191

D TWO NOTE CHORDS ............................................................... ....................... 195

E SCALE TONE CHORDS ............................................................... .................... 201

F CHORDS BY TYPE ............................................................... ............................... 209

15

16

17

Page 7: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Reading Fretboard Diagrams

• Reading Tablature

• Fretboard Note Names & Staff Locations

Introduction

Page 8: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 8

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Reading Fretboard Diagrams

this diagram......

represents this viewof the fretboard

The vertical lines represent strings. The horizontal spaces are frets (numbered alongside the diagrams). The actual metal fret is indicated by the horizontal line at the bottom of each space on the diagram.

vertical lines are strings(numbered above diagram)

horizontal spaces are frets(numbered alongside the diagram)

6 5 4 3 2 1

1

2

3

4

Page 9: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Dots

Dots in these diagrams indicate fi ngered notes. Chord tones are fi ngered simultaneously. Scale or arpeggio tones (chords played one note at a time) are fi ngered individually.

unmarked stringsare not sounded

“T ” indicates anote fretted withthe left thumb.

a circle above a stringindicates it is playedopen (not fretted)

The Barré

The barré is a group of notes all on the same fret of two or more strings. It is fi ngered with a straight portion of one fi nger. It uses the classical wrist position, with the base of the fi ngers parallel to the fretboard. Fret the barré with the harder edge of your fi nger when you can. Avoid the creases opposite your knuckles, since they can mute notes.

In the “F” chord shown below with fi nger numbers, it is left up to the reader to interpret that the fi rst fi nger is placed across all six strings (as shown by the diagram to it’s right).

2

1

F I

4

11

3

barreF I

barre

3

Bb I

3

1

3barre

Bb I

barre

Guitarists Playing Left-Handed Guitars

Guitarists playing left-handed guitars should interpret references to the right hand as left and vice-versa. For the left-handed guitarist, all diagrams should be imagined in “mirror image”.

as shown mirror image

Page 10: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

ROMAN NUMERALS AND CHORD NAMES

Roman Numerals

A roman numeral above the top right of the diagram indicates the number of the top fret on the diagram.

A plain letter name, such as “D” indicates a major chord. A small “m” after a letter name indicates a minor chord. “D” means “D major”, while “Dm” means “D minor”. A few more common chord symbol abbreviations are shown a couple of pages later.

A II

Roots and Tone Centers

A chord root is the note after which a chord is named (“D” is the root of a D major chord). A tone center is the note after which a scale is named (“C” is the tone center of a C Lydian scale).

D maj. chord II C Lydian scale VII

Page 11: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Movable Diagrams

Movable diagrams have no roman numeral on their upper right and therefore have no specifi ed top fret number. They may be placed anywhere on the fretboard according to their chord root(s) or tone center(s). If notes on a diagram are indicated by dots, a circled or enlarged dot indicates the chord root or tone center.

movablemovable

named after named after

The numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4 within diagrams indicate left hand fi ngers. The fi nger number on the chord root or tone center may be circled.

When numbers higher than 4 are used in a diagram, all of the numbers indicate scale, chord or arpeggio tones.

Procedure Of Reading Chord Diagrams

You read the previous pages and are anxious to play songs. How complicated can it be? True, chord diagrams are a simple graphic representation of fi ngers on the fretboard, but be careful not to make an error in reading them. It is quite common that someone new to reading chord diagrams “thinks” they have read a diagram correctly, and doesn’t fi nd out until much later (if at all) that they have made an error.

Page 12: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

TAKE YOUR TIME AND READ CHORD DIAGRAMS RIGHT THE FIRST TIME.

1. Read the header (Gm III) with the chord name and roman numeral for position.

2. Read across the frets one string at a time from the sixth (largest) string to the fi rst string. Allow three to fi ve seconds for each string. The strings are numbered from sixth to fi rst as you scan across the diagram from left to right.

3. A few things to be careful to recognize:

• whether notes are on the same fret or different frets

• when there is an “empty” fret.

• when notes are on adjacent strings

• when a string is skipped.

CHORD ABBREVIATIONS & SYMBOLS

7 = seventh chord (dominant) 9 = ninth chord

7#5 = seventh sharp fi ve chord (dominant) 9#5 = ninth sharp fi ve chord (dominant)

7b5 = fl at fi ve chord (dominant) 9b5 = ninth fl at fi ve chord (dominant)

7#9 = seventh sharp nine chord (dominant) °7 = diminished seventh chord

C = C major chord Cm = C minor chord

6 = sixth chord (major sixth chord) m6 = minor sixth chord

6/9 = sixth add nine chord m6/9 = minor sixth add nine chord

∆7 = major seventh chord m7 = minor seventh chord

∆9 = major ninth chord m9 = minor ninth chord

/9 = major add nine chord m/9 = minor add nine chord

m7b5 = minor seventh fl at fi ve chord sus. 4 = suspended fourth chord

m(ma7) = minor, major seventh sus. 2 = suspended second chord

n3 = no third

n5 = no fi fth

Page 13: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 13

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Reading TablatureThis system of notation is a graph of the guitar strings from the perspective of looking down on the guitar as you’re playing it. The tablature indicates where each note is fretted. Numbers on the strings indicate frets and are written from left to right in the sequence they are to be played. In this book, tablature is written below all music notation.

Symbols For Fingers

The symbols that indicate the fi ngers of each hand are shown below. They are typically placed below the standard music notation, between the music notation and the tablature.

fretting hand plucking hand

Page 14: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Symbols Above The Tablature

Symbols above each tablature number indicate the suggested fretting fi nger. Right hand symbols are shown above or below notes in the standard music notation. The right hand fi nger symbols are “p” (pulgar = thumb in Spanish), “i” (indice = index fi nger in Spanish), “m” (medio = middle fi nger in Spanish) and “a” (anular = ring fi nger in Spanish). In reading the tablature, remember that the top string on the tablature is the smallest, fi rst string.

this row of numbers represents the fretting fingers

this top line represents the first string (smallest)

this bottom line represents the sixth string (largest)

fret numbersthis row of arrows

shows the downwardand upward picking strokes

these are the symbolsused to representthe fretting fingersÄ

3

4

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3

4

b

57

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Supplementary Grid Diagrams

The grid diagrams shown above the music notation in the diagram below are aids in reading the tablature. Instruc-tion on reading these grid diagrams is on the following pages. The gird diagrams are used in this course where the fretting hand mainly retains a particular chord fi ngering. You still should read the guitar part in the tablature, since it shows the exact sequence of notes.

1

Am I

32

this row of arrowsshows plucking fingers

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

plucking:pa

3

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3

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C I

3

plucking fingers

Page 15: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 15

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

* Guitar sounds one octave lower than written.

Fretboard Note Names & Staff LocationsA D G B EE

FA# D# G#

C F

B E AC# F#F#

C FA#

D GG

C# F#B

D# G#G#

D G C E AA

Eb Ab DbF

BbBb

E A DF#

BB

FA# D#

G CC

B E

G C F A DD

G# C# F# A# D#D#

A D G B EE

Ab Db Gb Bb EbEb

F# G# C#C#

Gb Ab DbDb

Bb Eb

Gb

D# G# C# A#A#

Db Gb Eb AbAb

Db GbGb

Bb Eb Ab

6

FA# D# G#

C

B E AC#F#

C F Bb DG

C# F#B

D#G#

D G C EA

Db Gb EbAb

DbGb

Bb Eb Ab

5 4 3 2 1

Bb

F

F#

G

G#

A

Ab

Gb

Page 16: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 16

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

FIRST POSITION NATURAL NOTES

Play the notes below and speak the letter names. Notice that “E” to “F” and “B” to “C” are one fret apart. The other alphabetical pairs of notes (AB, CD, DE, FG and GA) are two frets apart. Remember, the musical alphabet starts over after “G”.

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

E

0

t

F

1

t

G

3

t

A

0

t

B

2

t

C

3

t

D

0

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2

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t

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B

t

0

A

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G

t

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t

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D

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B

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FIRST POSITION NATURAL NOTES

WITH DUPLICATIONS AT THE FIFTH (AND FOURTH) FRETS

The example below shows the locations of fretted notes which are the same pitch and note names as the next smaller string open. Except for the third string, this occurs at the fi fth fret. The third string, fourth fret, is the same pitch as the second string, open.

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

A

5

t

A

0

t

D

5

t

D

0

t

G

5

t

G

0

t

B

4

t

B

0

t

æ

ææ

E

5

t

E

0

t

b

Page 17: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 17

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

NOTE NAMES ON THE STAFF

The Staff

The staff is a group of fi ve horizontal lines on which music is written. The plural is usually “staves”, but may be “staffs”. Bar lines (above) are vertical lines written across the staff to divide it into groups of beats. Each group of beats is called a bar. Time signatures indicate the number of beats in the bars that follow it, as well as the relative beat value of each note.

`

the staff the time signature

bar line

bar line bar line

one measure

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4ª ª

Ledger lines are short lines placed above or below the staff to add to its range.

Note Parts

The parts of notes are the head, stem, fl ag, beam and dot. The head of a note is an oval. It is centered vertically on or between the lines of the staff. The whole note’s only part is its head.

flag

multipleflags

multiplebeams

beam

dothead

stem

head

head

Page 18: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

The stem of a note is a vertical line connected to the head. It connects to the left if it goes down from the head and to the right if it goes up. Stems on note heads above the middle of the staff are usually written down. Stems on heads below the middle of the staff are usually written up. Stems on the center line of the staff can be written up or down.

A fl ag or a beam halves the time value of a note. Each additional fl ag or beam cuts the value in half again. A dot multiplies the value of a note by one and a half. Two dots multiply the value of a note by one and three quarters.

Up And Down Stems

When two voices (two instruments or voice parts) are written on the same staff, the upper part is usually written with all stems up and the lower part with all stems down:

Treble And Bass Clefs

A clef is a sign placed on the staff at the beginning of a piece of music to indicate the placement of the letters. The letters used in music include “A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.”

The treble clef or “G” clef assigns the letter “G” to the second line from the bottom of the staff. Guitar music is written on the treble clef. Notes on the treble clef are completely above those on the bass clef in pitch.

The bass clef or “F” clef assigns the letter “F” to the second line from the top of the staff. Notes on the bass clef are completely below those on the treble clef in pitch.

Page 19: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 19

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Middle C

Middle C is the C nearest the middle of the piano keyboard. It is the “dividing line” between the treble and bass clefs. It is on the fi rst ledger line below a staff using the treble clef and the fi rst ledger line above a staff using the bass clef.

The treble and bass clefs were originally part of the great staff, which had eleven lines. The top fi ve lines were extracted to make the treble clef, and the bottom fi ve lines were extracted to make the bass clef. The center line of the great staff was middle C.

The notes on the staves are in alphabetical order:

Guitar Transposes One Octave

Guitar is usually written on the treble clef, transposed down one octave.

Page 20: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 20

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Memorizing Note Names

The letter names on the treble clef are easy to memorize with the use of a few associations. From bottom to top, the notes on the lines of the staff are the fi rst letters of the words in this sentence: Every Good Boy Does Fine. From bottom to top, the notes on the spaces of the staff spell the word “FACE.”

The notes on the lines (including ledger lines) are in an alternate alphabetical pattern: A, C, E, G, B, D, F, A, C, etc. Likewise, the notes on the spaces are in the same alternate alphabetical pattern: A, C, E, G, B, D, F, A, C, etc. Memorize the alternate alphabetical cycle shown at the right below:

Note Names In Reverse Order (GFEDCBA or “gee-fed-cee-bah”)

Most of us were not taught to think the alphabet backward, as well as forward. In music, whenever notes descend (go down) a seven tone scale such as the major scale, you will need to think the letters backward. As a memory device, think of the reverse series of letters as a middle eastern-sounding word, pronounced: “gee-fed-cee-bah”. Of course, the notes continue down the scale after “A”, forming the cycle “GFEDCBAGFED, etc.”

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Clockwise, thisshows note namesascending a scale

Clockwise, thisshows note namesdescending a scale

Page 21: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 21

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

MEMORIZING FIRST POSITION NOTE NAMES

Memorizing First Position Note Names On The Staff

• The notes go up from line to space in alphabetical order.• “E”, “F” and “G” each occur in three places in the range of notes shown below.• “A”, “B”, “C” and “D” each occur in two places in the range of notes shown below.• The lowest of each of the natural notes in fi rst position is below the staff.• The middle of each of the sets three notes with the same name (E, F and G) is near the bottom of

the staff.

lowest middle highest

• Spaces (notes between lines) are FACE, from bottom to top. Going up on lines beginning with the third ledger line below the staff is also FACE.

• Lines from bottom to top are represented by the fi rst letter of each word in the sentence: Every Good Boy Does Fine. Going up on spaces beginning with the note below the third ledger line below the staff is also EGBDF.

• “B” is on the center line of the staff. Think of it as the “bulls-eye” (see the arrow at the right above).• FACE and EGBDF overlap in the every-other-letter cycle FACEGBD shown at the right below.

the center line is “B” for “bulls-eye”

theo 1.0472 theo 1.0472

The every-other note lettercycle includes “FACE” and EGBDF

(Every Good Boy Does Fine).

FA

C

EG

B

D

Ä

E

t

F

t

G

t

A

t

B

t

C

t

D

t

E

t

F

t

G

t

A

t

B

t

C

t

D

t

E

t

F

t

G

t

Ä

F

t

A

t

C

t

E

t

E

t

G

t

B

t

D

t

F

t

t

F

t

A

t

C

t

E E

t

G

t

B

t

D

t

F

t

Page 22: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 22

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Memorizing First Position Note Names On The Guitar

• The open strings, from sixth to fi rst string are Eat A Darn Good Breakfast Early (E A D G B E).

• E to F is one fret. B to C is one fret.• AB, CD, DE, FG and GA are each two frets apart.• There are three each of the notes E, F and G.• The note name at any fret on the sixth string is the same at that fret on the

fi rst string.• Octaves “skip” one or two strings, depending on their angle. Octaves are

notes which have the same name, but are eight letter names apart (counting the starting and ending notes). See the diagrams at the left below.

• Octaves of A, B, D, E and G each include an open string.• The fi ngering pattern on strings 1, 2 and 6 is open, 1, 3.• The fi ngering pattern on strings 5 and 4 is open, 2, 3.• The fi ngering pattern on string 3 is open, 2.• Memorize the locations of the notes after which each chord is named below

The top fret on all of the diagrams below is the fi rst fret. The tiny circles above the chord diagrams indicate open strings (not fretted). Notes enclosed in the large circles below have letter names after which the chord is named. In each diagram, the notes enclosed in the large circles are octaves (eight letter names apart)`. Letter names for notes above the diagrams indicate open strings.

skip 2 strings

skip 1 string

E A

1

E I

32 2

1

3 43

2

1

2

3

12

1

4

11

3 2

1

3 4432

32

1

32

1

2

3

E

E

EF

F

F

G

G G

A

A B

BC

C D

D

F I G I A I B7 I C I D I

Dm IAm IEm I

D G B EF C F

B E A

G C F D G

Page 23: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• What Is An Octave?• What Is A Scale?• What Is A Chord?• Can A Chord Be A Scale And Vice-versa?

1Scales andChords Defi ned

Page 24: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 24

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 1: Scales And Chords Defi ned

What Is An Octave?When notes are arranged in ascending or descending alphabetical order, every eighth note repeats. This range between the fi rst and eighth notes in this alphabetical order is called an octave.

C major scale, range one octave

Ä

4

4

â

4

43

t

C

0

t

D

2

t

E

3

t

F

æ

ææ

0

t

G

2

t

A

0

t

B

1

t

C

æ

ææ3

|

one octave

1

|

G major scale, range one octave

Ä

!4

4

â

4

40

t

G

2

t

A

0

t

B

1

t

C

æ

ææ

3

t

D

0

t

E

2

t

F#

3

t

G

æ

ææ

0

|

one octave

3

|

What Is A Scale?A scale is a collection of between fi ve and twelve notes (inclusive) that spans an octave. When playing the notes of a scale in ascending or descending order, they repeat at the octave.

C major Scale, seven notes per octave

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

letter names:

C

8

t

D

10

t

E

7

t

F

8

t

10

t

G

7

t

A

9

t

B

10

t

C

7

t

D

9

t

E

6

t

F

8

t

G

æ

ææ

10

t

A

7

t

B

8

|

C

C major scale VIII

4

2

1

22

4 4 4

1

2

3

1 1

3

Page 25: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 25

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 1: Scales And Chords Defi ned

C minor 7/11 pentatonic scale, fi ve notes per octave

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

letter names:C

8

t

Eb

11

"t

F

8

t

G

10

t

8

"t

Bb

10

t

C

8

"t

Eb

10

t

F

æ

ææ

8

t

G

11

" t

Bb

8

|

C

Cm7/11 VIII

4

1 111

4

3 4

1

3

1 1

3

4

C whole tone scale, six notes per octave

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

letter names:C

8

t

D

10

t

E

12

t

F#

9

!t

11

!t

G#

8

"t

Bb

10

t

C

12

t

D

9

t

E

11

!t

F#

9

!t

G#

11

" t

Bb

æ

ææ

C

8

AC whole tone VII

3

1

11

2

4

1

3

1

2

4

1

3

C chromatic scale, twelve notes per octave

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

letter names:C

8

t

C#

9

! t

D

10

t

D#

11

!t

7

t

E

8

t

F

9

!t

F#

10

t

G

11

!t

G#

6

t

A

8

!t

A#

9

t

B

æ

ææ

10

t

C

C chromatic VII

2

4

1

2

1

3

1

2

4

1

3

1

3

What Is A Chord?A chord is a collection of two or more notes which, when sounded at once, create a sound that can be used in a piece of music. Any chord tone may be doubled. A chord with three different, notes may have four notes, where one note occurs twice. Two note chords are typically referred to as intervals.

Two Note Chords

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

57

|

|

58

|

ææ7

5

|

|

87

|

|

perfect fifth minor sixth minor sixth major sixth

Page 26: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 26

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 1: Scales And Chords Defi ned

Three Note Chords

Ä

3

4

â

3

4

355

«|«|«|

565

«|«|

«|

555

«|

«|«|

334

«|«|«|

æ

ææ

552

«|

«|

«|

G

C E

C IIIA

F VC

F

A

Am VC E G

G III

B

D

A5 II

AE

A

Three Note Chords With Note Doubling

Ä

3

4

â

3

4

87555

«|

«|

«|

«|«|

33211

«|

«|«|«|

«|

57755

«|

«|

«|«|«|

755433

«|«|

«|

«|

«|

«|

æ

ææ

55220

«|

«|

«|«|

«|

A

C

F I

F

F

C

B

G I

D G

D G

C

G

C

C IE

E

C

Am I

AE

EA

A5 I

E

E

A

A

A

Page 27: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

2Octave Shapes

• The Full Fretboard Octave Pattern• Breaking It Down To What You Can Reach

Page 28: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 28

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

The Full Fretboard Octave Pattern

THE “DIAMOND AND “Z” PATTERN

Each note on the guitar fretboard repeats in the same pattern. The pattern could be described as a “diamond and Z”. The diamond part of the pattern was drawn onto the fretboard diagram of “F” notes below. The “diamond and Z” was drawn onto the other diagrams. The heavy lines show one occurrence of the pattern. The diamond and Z could also be likened to a kite.

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

The diamond and Z pattern occurs on every note. It moves up the fretboard (toward the guitar’s bridge) in the same alphabetical order as notes progress up each string.

WHAT’S SO SIGNIFICANT ABOUT THE REPETITION OF EACH NOTE?

In working toward mastering the fretboard for whatever styles you’re into, you need to learn to fi nger scales, chords, arpeggios and melodies in two ways:

• playing in one key all over the fretboard

• playing all keys in one area of the fretboard

A D G B EE

FA# D# G#

C F

B E AC# F#F#

C FA#

D GG

C# F#B

D# G#G#

D G C E AA

Eb Ab DbF

BbBb

E A DF#

BB

FA# D#

G CC

B E

G C F A DD

G# C# F# A# D#D#

A D G B EE

Ab Db Gb Bb EbEb

F# G# C#C#

Gb Ab DbDb

Bb Eb

Gb

D# G# C# A#A#

Db Gb Eb AbAb

Db GbGb

Bb Eb Ab

6

FA# D# G#

C

B E AC#F#

C F Bb DG

C# F#B

D#G#

D G C EA

Db Gb EbAb

DbGb

Bb Eb Ab

5 4 3 2 1

Bb

F

F#

G

G#

A

Ab

Gb

Page 29: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 29

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

OctavesThe repetitions of each note that are closest to each other are eight notes apart in a major scale, so they are called octaves. Each of the smaller diagrams below shows an eight note range of a major scale fi ngering, which spans an octave. You should play the major scale each of the small diagrams. Play the notes in numerical order, from “1” to “1”. The circled notes on each of the smaller diagrams are one octave apart.

1

1

2 7

6

5

4

1

1

7

6

5

4

3

2

3

7

1

1

5

3

6

2

4

7

6

1

1

52

3

4

1

1

7

3 6

5

4

2

1

1

3

6

5

7

4

2

A major scale II A major scale II

A major scale IV

A major scale VII

71

6

2 5

3

4

1

A major scale XI

A major scale IV

A major scale IX

If you can play a major scale in any particular octave area, you can modify the major scale to make any other scale or chord, arpeggio or melodic phrase. All scales, chords, arpeggios and melodic phrases can be represented with the numbers and altered numbers of the major scale.

Page 30: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 30

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

Playing In One Key All Over The FretboardIf you were to play all of the diagrams above on the fretboard relative to the large diagram, with the top fret on the large diagram assigned to a specifi c fret, you would be playing major scale fi ngerings in one key all over the fretboard. The key would be named after the note on which the “1’s” occurred (which would all be the same note).

When playing a scale, arpeggio or melodic phrase at any particular location on the fretboard, you need to orient you current octave shape to the sequence of them, having memorized other fi ngerings categorized by their octave shape.

Playing In All Keys In One Area Of The FretboardBy playing all of the diagrams below with the top fret located at same place on the fretboard, each one will produce a different major scale, in all twelve keys (shown in fi fth position below). Each vertical pair of diagrams shows scale tone numbers on the top diagram and fretting fi nger numbers on the bottom diagram.

major scales in all keys, fi fth position

7

1

6

2 5

3

4

1

3

2

1

4 4

1

2

4

scale tones

fingers

Eb major V

1

1 1

2 7

7

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

2 3

scale tones

fingers1

4 4

3 3

4

3

1

3

4

1

2

4

1 1

C major V

1

1 3

2 7

7

3

6

6

5

4

4

4

2

3

scale tones

fingers1

3 3

2 2

4

2

1

2

3

1

1

3

1

4

B major IV

1

1 1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

42

3 2

scale tones

fingers

4

2

1

2

3 3

4

1

2

4

2

1

44

1 1

Bb major V

1

12

6

5

4

3

7

scale tones

fingers

1

33

4

3

1

4

2

D major V

1

22

6

5

4

3

7

scale tones

fingers

1

22

4

2

1

4

1

Db major IV

7

6

1

1

52

3

4

scale tones

fingers

1

3

2

4

11

3

4

F major V

6

1

1

5

7

2

3

4

scale tones

fingers

2

1

3

1

4

1

2

3

E major IV

7

1

1

5

3

6

2

4

scale tones

fingers

3

1

4

3

4

1

2

1

G major V

7

1

3

5

3

6

2

4

scale tones

fingers

2

1

3

2

4

1

2

1

Gb major IV

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1

scale tones

1

4

2

1 1

3

4

1

3

4

33

4

2

3 3

4

fingers

A major V

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1

scale tones

fingers

1

4

1

1 1

2

4

1

2

4

22

4

1

2 2

4

Ab major IV

the keys shown below are in fifth position, but involvethe index finger reaching to the fourth fret

Page 31: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 31

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

Breaking It Down To What You Can Reach

We can comfortably reach a span of four or fi ve frets, so the full fretboard pattern of octaves needs to be conceived in sections. Sections of three or four frets can be related to octaves.

FIVE CHORD ROOT SHAPES

The notes after which the open string chords E, D, C, A and G are named form the octave shapes shown at the left. In each of the fi ve different chord diagrams, the circled notes are the notes after which the chord is named.

In the small “E form” diagram, “A” notes are shown in the shape that originated with the circled “E’s” in an open position “E” chord. Likewise with the “D”, “C”, “A” and “G” forms, the “A” notes are in the shape of an open string chord after the form is named.

EDCAGE

The circled notes are the chord roots. The roots of each chord represent a unique octave form. The octave forms occur in the order E, D, C, A, G, then repeat. To signify that the order repeats, I refer to the order as ED CAGE.

G

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A A

the order of shapes:"EDCAGE"

E formA notes V

A

A

A

G#

E I

EB

D I

A I

G I

C I

A

E EB

D

F#A

C

E

C

A

A

C#E

B

GD B

G G

G#

E I

EB

E EB

D

D formA notes VII

C formA notes X

A

A formA notes XII

G formA notes XIV

E formA notes XVII

Page 32: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 32

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

THE SEVEN OCTAVE FINGERINGS

The diagrams below can be played in any position (at any fret). Numbers within the diagrams indicate fretting fi ngers.

3

1 4

1

1

4

1

3

Primary Octave FingeringsThese are "two string, two fret" octaves.

3

1

1

3

Secondary Octave FingeringThe only un-compensated "three string,-three fret" octave (compensated versionsare shown at the right).

These are "three string, three fret" octaves withcompensation for tuning on the smallest two strings.

1

4

These are "two string, two fret" octaves withcompensation for tuning on the smallest two strings.

Notes on the smallest two strings mustrelatively be moved up one fret (higher in pitch),when combined with the larger four strings..

Notes on the smallest two strings must relativelybe moved up one fret (higher in pitch), whencombined with the larger four strings.

THE FIVE OCTAVE SHAPES

By combining two pairs of the seven octaves and using the other three octaves unchanged, fi ve octave shapes are produced.

1

3

1

3

1

4

1

4

1

3

1

4

1

3

1

3 4

1

3

1

Page 33: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 33

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

Here are the fi ve octave shapes. Notice how each one occurs as the roots of an open string chord:

1

3

1 1

4

1

3

1

3

1

3

4

C I G ID I A IE IE E

E

G#

B

D

D

A F#

C

C

E

EG

E A C#

A E G

GG

D B

B

`

Each Octave Shape Is Also An Octave FormThe fi ve octave shapes are named after either the strings on which they occur (641 shape) or the open string chord to which they are related (E form).

641 shapeE form

42 shapeD form

52 shapeC form

53 shapeA form

631 shapeG form

1

3

1 1

4

1

3

1

3

1

3

4

The Octave Forms For Every NoteNow that we have dissected the Diamond and Z pattern of octaves in the the individual octave forms, let’s put them back together and look at them for all keys.

Every note occurs in the same series of octave forms. Compare the diagrams below. In regard to pitch, “G” is a whole step (two frets) above “F”, “A” is a whole step above “G” and “B” is a whole step above “A”. Remember, “up in pitch” is toward the bridge, which would be physically down on these diagrams.

As you progress up alphabetically through the keys, the diamond and Z pattern “grows” onto the fretboard from the head of the guitar. Likewise, as you progress down alphabetically through the keys, it “dissappers” off of the fretboard. Be able to visualize the “diamond and Z” pattern up or down the fretboard.`

Page 34: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 34

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

E formA notes V

A

D formA notes VII

C formA notes X

A

A formA notes XII

G formA notes XIV

E formA notes XVII

E formBb notes VI

D formBb notes VIII

C formBb notes XI

A formBb notes XIII

G formBb notes XV

E formBb notes XVIII

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

BB

BB B

BB

BB B

B

A

E formB notes VII

D formB notes IX

C formB notes XII

A formB notes XIV

G formB notes XVI

E formB notes XIX

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

B

B

BB

B

B

B

B

BB

B

B

A

A

E formC notes VIII

D formC notes X

C formC notes XIII

A formC notes XV

G formC notes XVII

E formC notes XX

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

C

C

CC

C

C

C

C

CC

C

C

E formDb notes IX

D formDb notes XI

C formDb notes XIV

A formDb notes XVI

G formDb notes XVIII

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

DD

DD D

DD

DD

D D

G formDb notes VI

E formD notes X

D formD notes XII

C formD notes XV

A formD notes XVII

G formD notes XIX

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

D

G formD notes VII

D

D

DD

D

D

D

D

D D

D

Page 35: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 35

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

E formEb notes XI

D formEb notes XIII

C formEb notes XVI

A formEb notes XVIII

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

G formEb notes VIII

EE

EE E

EE

EE

EA formEb notes VI

E formE notes I

D formE notes II

C formE notes V

A formE notes VII

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

G formE notes IX

E

E E

E

E formE notes XII

E

E

E E

E

E

E

E

E formF notes I

D formF notes III

C formE notes VI

A formE notes VIII

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

G formF notes X

F

F F

F

E formF notes XIII

F

F

F F

F

F

F

F

E formF# notes II

D formF# notes IV

C formF# notes VII

A formF# notes IX

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

G formF# notes XI

E formF# notes XIV

F FF

FF

FF F

FF

F

E formG notes III

D formG notes V

C formG notes VIII

A formG notes X

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

G formG notes XII

E formG notes XV

G

GG

G

G

G

G

G G

G

G

G

E formAb notes IV

D formAb notes VI

C formAb notes IX

A formAb notes XI

fret 5

fret 1

fret 12

fret 17

G formAb notes XIII

E formAb notes XVI

AAA

AA

AA

A AA

A

Page 36: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 36

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 2: Octave Shapes

Page 37: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• What Is An Interval?• Fingering Whole Steps• Fingering Half Steps• Three Ways To Finger Whole And Half Steps• Numbering The Major Scale Tones• Recognizing The Half Steps In the Major Scale• Play A Major Scale On One String• Memorize Seven Major Scale Fingerings

3Intervals

Page 38: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 38

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

What Is An Interval?An interval is a measurement of the difference in pitch between two notes. Intervals are compared to distances between notes in the major scale. Before discussing the major scale, you’ll need to know about the units used to measure the distances between its notes. The whole step is a standard unit of measurement that indicates (on the guitar) a distance of two frets. The half step indicates a distance of one fret.

Fingering Whole StepsWhole Steps On A Single String

These can be fretted in any position (anywhere up and down each string). Notice that this fi ngering is the same for each pair of strings. Of course, the notes could be fretted with any combination of fi ngers.

3

1

3

1

3

1

3

1

3

1

3

1

Whole Steps With One Note On An Open String

This fi ngering is the same for each pair of strings. The fretted notes could be fretted with any fi nger.

3 3 3

2

3

Whole Steps Fretted On Each Of Two Adjacent Strings

This fi ngering is the same for each pair of strings except the third and second string, where it is fretted with one “empty” fret between the fi ngers, instead of two. The notes could be fretted with any practical combination of fi ngers.

4

1

4

1

4

1

3

1

4

1

Page 39: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 39

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

Fingering Half StepsHalf Steps On A Single String

These can be fretted in any position (anywhere up and down each string). Notice that this fi ngering is the same for each pair of strings. Of course, the notes could be fretted with any combination of fi ngers.

2 2 2 2 2 21 1 1 1 1 1

Half Steps With One Note On An Open String

This fi ngering is the same for each pair of strings. The fretted notes could be fretted with any fi nger.

4 4 4

3

4

Half Steps Fretted On Each Of Two Adjacent Strings

This fi ngering is the same for each pair of strings except the third and second string, where it is fretted with two “empty” frets between the fi ngers, instead of three. The notes could be fretted with any practical combination of fi ngers.

1

4

1

4

1

4

1

4

1

4

Page 40: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 40

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

Three Ways To Finger Half And Whole StepsThere are three ways to fi nger half steps and three ways to fi nger whole steps (not involving open strings):

2

4

4

1

1

1

a half step on one stringmay be on any string,at any position,with any fingers

3

1 whole stepmay be on any string,at any position,with any fingers

a half step on two stringsmay be on adjacent pair of stringsexcept NOT the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers(as long as you can reach!) 4

1 whole step on two stringsmay be on adjacent pair of stringsexcept NOT the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers(as long as you can reach!)

a half step on two stringsthe unique fingeringon the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers

3

1 whole step on two stringsthe unique fingeringon the second and third strings,at any position,with any fingers

Numbering The Major Scale TonesIn the solfeggio system, the intervals of the major scale are labeled with the syllables “do, re, me, fa, sol, la, ti”. Here is a C major scale, played in the fi rst position (with the fi rst fi nger at the fi rst fret) and labeled both with the solfeggio syllables and the numbers 1 through 7:

Ä

4

4

â

4

43

t

1do

0

t

2re

2

t

3me

3

t

4fa

0

t

5sol

2

t

6la

0

t

7ti

1

t

1do

1

t

1do

0

t

7ti

2

t

6la

0

t

5sol

æ

ææ

4fa

3

t

3me

2

t

2re

0

t

1do

3

t========================Ä

4

4

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

â

4

43

t

mmmm

1do

0

t

mmmm

2re

2

t

mmmm

3me

3

t

mmmm

4fa

0

t

mmmm

5sol

2

t

mmmm

6la

0

tmmmm

7ti

1

tmmmm

1do

1

tmmmm

1do

0

tmmmm

7ti

2

t

mmmm

6la

0

t

mmmm

5sol

æ

ææ

4fa

3

t

mmmm

3me

2

t

mmmm

2re

0

t

mmmm

1do

3

t

mmmm

letternames:

solfeggio:

Page 41: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 41

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

Recognizing The Location Of The Half Steps In The Major Scale

In making up major scale fi ngerings, you should think of the notes by number, one through seven. Be aware that the half steps (one fret intervals) occur between numbered major scale tones 3 and 4 and between 7 and 1 (ascending in pitch). These scale steps are circled in the example above. The remaining steps of the major scale are whole steps apart, which include the intervals between the following pairs of numbered scale tones: “1 to 2”, “2 to 3”, “4 to 5”, “5 to 6” and “6 to 7”.

The intervals between the numbered tones of the major scale were illustrated earlier in the section on Major Scale Intervals, using the “string diagrams” shown below.

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

C

D

E

A

B

C

F

G

G

A

B

C

D

E

F#

G

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

majorscale intervals

C majorscale

majorscale intervals

G majorscale

Page 42: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 42

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

Play A Major Scale On One StringThis is an E major scale, named after “E”, the note on which it begins and ends. A traditional set of names for the notes of a major scale is “do, re, me, fa, sol, la, ti, do.” The eighth note has the same name as the fi rst one and is referred to as being an octave higher than the fi rst note. Speak their names of the notes below as you play them.

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

0

t

do

2

! t

re

4

! t

me

5

t

fa

7

t

sol

9

! t

la

11

!t

ti

12

t

do

12

t

do

11

!t

la

9

! t

ti

7

t

sol fa

5

t

me

4

! t

re

2

! t

do

0

t

The tones of the major scale can also be labeled with the numbers “1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1”. Again, the eighth note has the same name as the fi rst one and is called an octave. Speak the numbers as you play the notes.

Notice that the distance between the tones are whole steps, except half steps between “3” and “4” and between “7”

and “1” (where “1” begins the next octave).

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

1

0

t

2

2

! t

3

4

! t

4

5

t

7

t

5

9

! t

6

11

!t

7

12

t

1

12

t

1

11

!t

7

9

! t

6

7

t

5

æ

ææ5

t

4

4

! t

3

2

! t

2

0

t

1

Memorize Seven Major Scale FingeringsBy memorizing these fi ngerings, you’ll be prepared to relate a major scale to any chord, anywhere on the fretboard. Pay close attention to the numbers between the tablature and the music notation for each note. These numbers indicate the steps of the major scale on which each note occurs. In each fi ngering, notice the half steps between “3” and “4” and between “7” and “1”,

In the numbering system shown at the left of each staff below (fi ngering 1, fi ngering 2, etc.), each fi ngering is numbered after the lowest reachable tone (by pitch) on the sixth string. This is emphasized by the circled numbers on the diagrams.

Numbers shown in parenthesis on the diagrams are optional third string fi ngerings for the same scale tone (by number) on the second string.

The text beneath the title of each fi ngering diagram (“reach with index fi nger”, “no reaches!”, etc.) describes which (if any) fi ngers should have to reach out of the range of four consecutive frets. These references do not necessarily include the optional notes on the third string.

Page 43: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 43

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

1

1

t

2

3

t

3

5

t

4

1

t

3

t

5

5

t

6

2

t

7

3

t

1

5

t

2

2

t

3

3

t

4

5

t

5

3

t

6

5

t

7

1

t

1

3

t

2

æ

ææ

3

5

t

c b

fingering 1reach with

index fingerª

ª

n n n

n n n

n n n

n n n1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

2

3

t

3

5

t

4

6

t

5

3

t

5

t

6

7

t

7

3

t

1

5

t

2

7

t

3

3

t

4

5

t

5

3

t

6

5

t

7

6

t

1

3

t

2

5

t

3

æ

ææ

6

t

4

c b

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

3

5

t

4

6

t

5

8

t

6

5

t

7

t

7

8

t

1

5

t

2

7

t

3

8

t

4

5

t

5

7

t

6

5

t

7

6

t

1

8

t

2

5

t

3

6

t

4

æ

ææ

8

t

5

c b

fingering 2reach with

index finger

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6)

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7)

fingering 3no reaches!

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7)

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

4

6

t

5

8

t

6

10

t

7

7

t

8

t

1

10

t

2

7

t

3

8

t

4

10

t

5

7

t

6

9

t

7

10

t

1

8

t

2

10

t

3

6

t

4

8

t

5

æ

ææ

10

t

6

c b

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

5

8

t

6

10

t

7

12

t

1

8

t

10

t

2

12

t

3

8

t

4

10

t

5

12

t

6

9

t

7

10

t

1

8

t

2

10

t

3

11

t

4

8

t

5

10

t

6

æ

ææ

12

t

7

c b

fingering 4reach with

index finger

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

fingering 5reach with

index finger

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )3

7

3

Page 44: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 44

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3: Intervals

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

6

10

t

7

12

t

1

13

t

2

10

t

12

t

3

13

t

4

10

t

5

12

t

6

14

t

7

10

t

1

12

t

2

10

t

3

11

t

4

13

t

510

t

612

t

7

æ

ææ

13

t

1

c b

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

fingering 6reach withlittle finger

2 3

Ä"4

4

â

4

4

7

12

t

1

13

t

2

15

t

3

12

t

13

t

4

15

t

5

12

t

6

14

t

7

15

t

1

12

t

2

14

t

3

11

t

4

13

t

5

15

t

612

t

713

t

1

æ

ææ

215

t

c b

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 7no reaches!

42

3 2

2

In order that you can refer to all seven fi ngerings on the same page, they are shown in diagram form below:

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1reach with

index finger

fingering 2reach with

index finger

fingering 3no

reaches!

fingering 4reach with

index finger

fingering 5reach with

index finger

fingering 6reach withlittle finger

fingering 7no

reaches!

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6)

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7) 3

7

3

`

Page 45: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

4ConstructingMajor Scales

• Strict Vertical Position• Beginning A Major Scale From the Little Finger On the Sixth String• Major Scale Fingering Numbers• Beginning A Major Scale From the Index Finger On the Sixth String

Page 46: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 46

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Strict Vertical Position(primarily for single note playing)

Position is numbered after the fret at which your index fi nger is placed. In that position, the other three fi ngers are assigned one of the next three frets in-a-row toward the body of the guitar. In other words, each of the four fi ngers are assigned to one of four consecutive frets.

The examples below show the fi rst string. The position numbers would be the same, regardless of which string the fi ngers were placed upon.

1

2

3

4

V1

2

3

4

VI1

2

3

4

VII

fifthposition

sixfhposition

seventhposition

fifthfret

sixthfret

seventhfret

You can also reach one fret out-of-position with the index and little fi ngers:

1

2

3

4

IV V VI

fifthposition

sixfhposition

seventhposition

fourthfret

fifthfret

sixthfret

1

4

1

2

3

4

1

4

1

2

3

4

1

4

QUIZ: In what position are each of the examples below?

Example 1 Example 2 Example 3

2

Xtenthfret

3

IIsecondfret

IIsecondfret

1

answers: Example 1: eleventh position. Example 2: third position. Example 3: second OR third position.

Page 47: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 47

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Beginning A Major Scale FingeringFrom The Little Finger On the Six String

Be careful not to change position. Position was defi ned above. Let’s start in fi fth position. Play the note at the sixth string, eighth fret and think of it as scale tone one:

Vfifthfret

4

scale tone 1

The interval from scale tone one to scale tone two should be a whole step. According to the fi ngering for a whole step shown in the previous section, a whole step above step one would be here:

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 2

The interval from scale tone two to scale tone three should be a whole step. According to the fi ngering for a whole step shown in the previous section, a whole step above step two would be here:

Vfifthfret

3scale tone 3

So far, you should have played this:

Ä

â

æ

ææ

4

8

t

11

5

t

23

7

t

3

=========Ä

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

â

æ

ææ

4

8

t

mmmm

11

5

t

mmmm

23

7

t

mmmm

3fingers:

scale tones:

Page 48: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 48

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

The interval from scale tone three to scale tone four should be a half step. According to the fi ngering for a half step shown in the previous section, a half step above step three would be here:

Vfifthfret

4scale tone 4

The interval from scale tone four to scale tone fi ve should be a whole step. That would be here:

Vfifthfret

1scale tone 5

The interval from scale tone fi ve to scale tone six should be a whole step. That would be here:

fifthfret

3scale tone 6

V

The interval from scale tone six to scale tone seven should be a whole step. According to the fi ngering for a half step shown in the previous section, that presents two options:

fifthfret

4scale tone 7

Vfourthfret

1scale tone 7

IV

The interval from scale tone seven up to scale tone one should be a half step. If you chose the fi rst fi nger option in fi ngering scale tone seven, don’t fret scale tone one with the second fi nger (that would change position).

fifthfret

1scale tone 1

V

Page 49: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 49

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

You should have come up with one of the fi ngerings below. The fi rst version uses the little fi nger for scale tone seven, while the second version uses the little fi nger for both scale tones seven and one.

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

41

8

t

12

5

t

33

7

t

44

8

t æ

ææ

15

5

t

36

7

t

47

9

t

11

5

t

================Ä

4

4

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

â

4

4

41

8

t

mmmm

12

5

t

mmmm

33

7

t

mmmm

44

8

t

mmmm

æ

ææ

15

5

t

mmmm

36

7

t

mmmm

47

9

tmmmm

11

5

tmmmm

fingers:

scale tones:

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

1

8

t

42

5

t

13

7

t

34

8

t

4

æ

ææ

5

5

t

16

7

t

37

4

t

11

5

t

1

================Ä

4

4

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

â

4

4

1

8

t

mmmm

42

5

t

mmmm

13

7

t

mmmm

34

8

t

mmmm

4

æ

ææ

5

5

t

mmmm

16

7

t

mmmm

37

4

tmmmm

11

5

tmmmm

1fingers:

scale tones:

If you continue the fi ngering through the next octave higher, you should get the following:

fifthfret

1

scale tone 1

V

3

scale tone 2

V1

scale tone 3

V

2

scale tone 4

V

4

scale tone 5

V1

scale tone 6

V

3

scale tone 7

V

4

scale tone 1

V

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

1

5

t

12

7

t

33

5

t

14

6

t

2

æ

ææ

5

8

t

465

t

177

t

318

t

4

================Ä

4

4

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

â

4

4

1

5

tmmmm

12

7

tmmmm

33

5

tmmmm

14

6

tmmmm

2

æ

ææ

5

8

tmmmm

465

tmmmm

177

tmmmm

318

tmmmmm

4fingers:

scale tones:

Here is the entire two-octave fi ngering you have made:

Ä

4

4

â

4

4

fretting:

scale tones:41

8

t

12

5

t

33

7

t

44

8

t

5

t

18

7

t

36

4

t

47

5

t

11

7

t

32

5

t

13

6

t

24

8

t

48

æ

ææ

5

t

16

7

t

37

8

t

41

c

Page 50: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 50

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Now begin the fi ngering again at the sixth string, eighth fret, scale tone “1” and descend as far as the position permits:

fifthfret

1

scale tone 1

Vfifthfret

3

scale tone 7

V

down a half step tobegin at

fifthfret1

scale tone 6

V

down a half step to

Major Scale Fingering NumbersI number major scale fi ngerings according to the number of lowest note fi ngered with the index fi nger on the sixth string. The fi ngering you have just made, is called major scale in-position fi ngering 6. Other fi ngerings called three-note-per-string major scale fi ngerings use slightly different rules regarding playing in position. The seven in-position fi ngerings are shown below. Scale tones are numbered. The scale tone numbers shown in parenthesis are options, where the same note can be fi ngered on the second string.

In-Position Fingerings

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1reach with

index finger

fingering 2reach with

index finger

fingering 3no

reaches!

fingering 4reach with

index finger

fingering 5reach with

index finger

fingering 6reach withlittle finger

fingering 7no

reaches!

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6)

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7) 3

7

3

The in-position fi ngerings lend themselves to playing chord and arpeggio structures within the scale. Melody is largely an ornamentation of chord tones, so these fi ngerings work well to improvise. Three-note-per-string fi ngerings are better suited to playing scale runs, since picking can be the same for every string and the fi nger patterns are more repetitious and easier to recall. Here are the three-note-per-string major scale fi ngerings:

Page 51: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 51

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Three Note-Per-String Fingerings

4

6

7

2

3

41

7 3

1

5

4

1

2 5

63

4

7 3

1

2 5

2 15

6 2 53

4

67 3

44

6 2

1

53

67

2 5

3

15 4

6

7

3

4

67

2 5

3

6

7

315

4

7

5

6

4

6

7

3

4

1

72

15

15

6 2 5

67 3

4

7

1

2

6 2 15

67 2

5

3

1 4

6

7 3

6 2

15

3

6

7

2

3

2 15 4

7 3

2

4

1 4

2

41

7

fingering 1/2 fingering 2/3 fingering 3/4 fingering 4/5 fingering 5/6 fingering 6/7 fingering 7/1

`

Three-note-per-string major scale fi ngerings shown above combine in-position fi ngerings, and are numbered accordingly. Fingering 1/2 combines in-position fi ngerings 1 and 2; fi ngering 2/3 combines in-position fi ngerings 2 and 3; and so on.

Let’s get back to constructing in-position fi ngerings....

Beginning A Major Scale Fingering From The Index Finger On the Six String

Be careful not to change position. Position was defi ned at the beginning of this chapter. Let’s start in fi fth position. Play the note at the sixth string, fi fth fret and think of it as scale tone one:

Vfifthfret

1

scale tone 1

The interval from scale tone one to scale tone two should be a whole step. You may use the second or third fi ngers. If you use the second fi nger, you are in sixth position. If you use the third fi nger you are in fi fth position.

Vfifthfret

2scale tone 2

Vfifthfret

3scale tone 2

Page 52: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 52

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Using either the second or third fi ngers for scale tone “2”, you could use the fourth fi nger for scale tone “3”. This is shown in options 1 and 2, below:

:fingering scale tones “1”, “2“ and “3” with OPTION 1

V

4scale tone 3

Vfifthfret

1

scale tone 1

V

2scale tone 2

fingering scale tones “1”, “2“ and “3” with OPTION 2

IV1

scale tone 3

Vfifthfret

1

cale tone 1

V

2scale tone 2

fourthfret

If you used the third fi nger for scale tone “2”, there is another option for scale tone three:

fingering scale tones “1”, “2“ and “3” with OPTION 3

IV1

scale tone 3

Vfifthfret

1

scale tone 1

V

3scale tone 2

fourthfret

The interval from scale tone three to scale tone four should be a half step. Regardless of which option you used in fi ngering scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” (see above), scale tone “4” would be fi ngered the same:

Vfifthfret

1

scale tone 4

Using option 3 for scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” presents a problem in fi ngering two consecutive notes with the same fi nger, which can make it diffi cult to play through the scale quickly:

fifthfret

1

scale tone 1

V

3

scale tone 2

V1

scale tone 3

IV1

scale tone 4

V

fifthfret

fifthfret

fifthfret

Page 53: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 53

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Using option 2 for scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” presents another problem in reaching scale tone “3” with the little fi nger, which can also make it diffi cult to play through the scale quickly:

fifthfret

1

scale tone 1

V

3

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V1

scale tone 4

Vfifthfret

fifthfret

fifthfret

Using option 1 for scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” is best to play through the scale quickly. Remember, this choice has established your fi ngering as being in sixth position, with the index fi nger reaching out-of-position to the fi fth fret and with the little fi nger reaching out-of-position to the ninth fret.

fifthfret

1

scale tone 1

V

2

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V1

scale tone 4

Vfifthfret

fifthfret

fifthfret

Page 54: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 54

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 4: Constructing Major Scales

Continuing to construct the scale in sixth position would produce the fi ngering shown below.

1

scale tone 1

V

2

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V1

scale tone 4

V

2

scale tone 5

Vscale tone 6

V

1

scale tone 7

V

2

scale tone 1

V

4

4

scale tone 2

V

1

scale tone 3

V

2

scale tone 4

V

4

scale tone 5

Vscale tone 6

V

4

scale tone 7

V

2

1

scale tone 1

V1

useeitherone

2

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V

Since the lowest pitch fi ngered on the sixth string with the index fi nger is scale tone “1”, this is called major scale in-position fi ngering 1. You should now try to construct all seven of the major scale in-position fi ngerings, which were shown in the previous chapter.

Page 55: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

5ChordConstructionPrep

• The Intervals Necessary To Construct A Major Chord• Perfect Fifth Fingerings• Major Third Fingerings• Perfect Fourth Fingerings

Page 56: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 56

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 5: Chord Construction Prep

The Intervals Necessary To Construct A Major ChordA major chord contains tones 1, 3 and 5 of a major scale on its chord root. You will need to know how to fi nger the intervals from the root (“1”) to the each of the other chord tones. Play each of the major scale fi ngerings below. Next, isolate scale tones 1, 3 and 5 and play them in ascending and descending order. When you play major scale tones 1, 3 and 5, you are playing a major chord arpeggio named after the note on “1”.

Notice that the “1” after which each major chord arpeggio is named occurs in one of fi ve octave shapes. The octave shapes are shown by the circled notes below. Review Chapter 4: Octave Shapes.

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1 fingering 2 fingering 3 fingering 4 fingering 5 fingering 6 fingering 7

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6)

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7) 3

7

3

1

1 1

3

5

5

1

1 1

3

5

5

E form D form C form A form A Form G form E form3 31

3

5 1

3

5 1 2

3

1

1

5

5

3

3 3 1

5

5

3

5

3

1

1

1

5 5

5

1

1

5

5 5

3 3

3

3

3

2 31

2 3 41

3 2 3

1

E I A ID I G I

3

2

1

C I

2 2 3 4

A I

2 31

E I

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "E"s

below

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "C"s

below

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "A"s

below

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "E"s

below

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "A"s

below

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "D"s

below

the shape ofthe "1"s abovematches theshape of thecircled "G"s

below

Perfect Fifth FingeringsPerfect fi fth intervals are equal to the distance between major scale tones “1” and “5”. If you locate the lower-pitched note of any perfect fi fth fi ngering below as the number “1” in a major scale fi ngering, you should be able to locate “5” as the higher-pitched note in the fi ngering.

Page 57: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 57

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 5: Chord Construction Prep

3

1

4

1

1

3

1

3

Primary Perfect Fifth Fingerings(compensated versions are shown at the right).

This primary perfect fifth fingeringis compensated for tuning on the smallest two strings.Notes on the smallest two strings must relativelybe moved up one fret (higher in pitch),when combined with the larger four strings..

1

3

3

1 1

3

Secondary Perfect Fifth Fingerings(compensated versions are shown at the right)

These secondary perfect fifth fingeringsare compensated for the tuning on the smallest two stringsNotes on the smallest two strings must relativelybe moved up one fret (higher in pitch),when combined with the larger four strings.

1

4

1

4

Major Third FingeringsMajor third intervals are equal to the distance between major scale tones “1” and “3”. If you locate the lower-pitched note of any major third fi ngering below as the number “1” in a major scale fi ngering, you should be able

to locate “3” as the higher-pitched note in the fi ngering.

A Major Third Is Fingered The Same On Each String

4

1

4

1

4

1

4

1

4

1

4

1

Major Third Fretted On Adjacent Strings (note the unique fi ngering on the second and third string)

12

1

2

1

2

11 1

2

Page 58: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 58

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 5: Chord Construction Prep

Perfect Fourth FingeringsIn constructing a major chord, you’ll often need to know a perfect fourth fi ngering to locate the fi fth of the chord below the root. Perfect fourth intervals are equal to the distance between major scale tones “1” and “4”. If you locate the lower-pitched note of any major third fi ngering below as the number “1” in a major scale fi ngering, you should be able to locate “4” as the higher-pitched note in the fi ngering. Perfect four intervals also occur in major scale fi ngerings between scale tone “5” and the next higher-pitched scale tone “1”, where they demonstrate the relationship between the fi fth (“5”) and the root (“1”) of a chord.

Perfect Fourths Fretted On Adjacent Strings

11 11 11

1

1

11

Perfect Fourth Fingerings On Adjacent Open Strings

Page 59: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

6Chord Formulas

• What Are Chord Roots And Formulas?

• Chord Formulas By Family

Page 60: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 6: Chord Formulas

What Are Chord Roots And Formulas?

WHAT IS A CHORD ROOT?A chord root is the note after which a chord is named. It is the letter which begins the chord name and any sharp or fl at that may immediately follow it. “B” is the root of a Bm7b5 chord. “Bb” (B fl at) is the root of a Bbm7b5 chord. “F” is the root of a Fma7b5 chord. “F#” is the root of an F#ma7b5 chord.

Aurally (in terms of sound), a chord root can also be thought of as the lowest note a listener can imagine during the playing of a chord. If the listener is experienced in recognizing chord inversions (where notes other than the root may be the lowest pitch), they should imagine in terms of root position, where the root is in the bass.

WHAT IS A CHORD FORMULA?A chord formula expresses the notes of a chord in relation to a major scale based on its chord root. It may indicate

altered tones of the major scale. A fl at symbol ( ) placed before any number in a chord formula indicates a note

one half step lower than that numbered tone. A sharp symbol ( ) placed before any number in a chord formula

indicates a note one half step higher than that numbered tone. “ 3 ” (fl at three) would indicate a note one half

step lower than scale tone “3”.

Memorizing chord formulas may not be so diffi cult as it may seem. The chords in each group, organized by type

follows a pattern.

Chord Formulas By FamilyChord Name Formula

major

major ..................................................1 .........3 .........5

∆7 (major seventh) ...................................1 .........3 .........5 .........7

∆7b5 (major seventh fl at fi ve) .....................1 .........3 .........b5 .......7

∆7#5 (major seventh sharp fi ve)...................1 .........3 .........#5 .......7

∆9 (major ninth) ...................................................1 .........3 .........5 .........7 .........9(=2)

∆9#11 (major ninth sharp eleven) ......................1 .........3 .........5 .........7 .........9 (=2)...... #11 (#4)

∆13#11 (major thirteenth sharp eleven) ............1 .........3 .........5 .........7 .........9 (=2)...... #11 (#4) ...13

∆9b5 (major ninth fl at fi ve) ........................1 .........3 .........b5 .......7 .........9 (=2)

∆9#5 (major ninth sharp fi ve) ......................1 .........3 .........#5 .......7 .........9 (=2)

Page 61: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 6: Chord Formulas

dominant7 (dominant seventh)..................................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7

9 (dominant ninth).....................................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

11 (dominant eleventh)...............................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) ........ 11 (=4)

13 (dominant thirteenth) .............................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) ........ 11 (=4).......13 (=6)

9/6 (dominant ninth, add six) .......................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) .............................13 (=6)

13 n11 (dominant thirteenth, no eleven) .........1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) .............................13 (=6)

7b5 (seventh fl at fi ve) ................................1 .........3 .........b5 .......b7

7#5 (seventh sharp fi ve) .............................1 .........3 .........#5 .......b7

7b9 (seventh fl at nine) .........................................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......b9 (=b2)

7#9 (seventh sharp nine).............................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......#9 (=#2)

9b5 (ninth fl at fi ve)...................................1 .........3 .........b5 .......b7 .......9 (=2)

9#5 (ninth sharp fi ve) ................................1 .........3 .........#5 .......b7 .......9 (=2)

7b5b9 (seventh fl at fi ve, fl at nine).................1 .........3 .........b5 .......b7 .......b9 (=b2)

7b5#9 (seventh fl at fi ve, sharp nine) ..............1 .........3 .........b5 .......b7 .......#9 (=#2)

7#5b9 (seventh sharp fi ve, fl at nine) ..............1 .........3 .........#5 .......b7 .......b9 (=b2)

7#5#9 (seventh sharp fi ve, sharp nine) ...........1 .........3 .........#5 .......b7 .......#9 (=#2)

7 sus.4 (seventh suspended fourth) ...............1 .........4 .........5 .........b7

9 sus.4 (ninth suspended fourth) ..................1 .........4 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

11 n3 (11th, no third)................................1 .........4 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) ........ (11=4)

minorminor ..................................................1 .........b3 .......5

m7 (minor 7th) ........................................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7

m9 (minor 9th)........................................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

m11 (minor eleventh) ...............................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)...... 11 (=4)

m13 (minor thirteenth) ..............................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) ........ 11 (=4).......13 (=6)

m9/6 (minor ninth, add six) ........................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) .............................13 (=6)

m13 n11 (minor thirteenth, no eleven) ..........1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) .............................13 (=6)

m7b5 (Ø, Ø7 or half diminished) .................1 .........b3 .......b5 .......b7

m (ma7) (minor major seventh) ..................1 .........b3 .......5 .........7

m (ma7)b5 (minor major seventh, fl at fi ve)....1 .........b3 .......b5 .......7

m9b5 (minor ninth fl at fi ve)........................1 .........b3 .......b5 .......b7 .......9 (=2)

Page 62: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 62

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 6: Chord Formulas

diminisheddiminished..........................................1 .........b3 .......b5

°7 (diminished seventh)..............................1 .........b3 .......b5 .......bb7 (=6)

°7/9 (diminished seventh, add nine) ...............1 .........b3 .......b5 .......bb7 (=6)...9(=2)

augmentedaug. (augmented).....................................1 .........b3 .......b5

∆7+ (major seventh augmented) ...................1 .........3 .........#5 .......7

∆9+ (major ninth augmented) ......................1 .........3 .........#5 .......7 .........9 (=2)

7+ (seventh augmented)..............................1 .........3 .........#5 .......b7

9+ (ninth augmented) ................................1 .........3 .........#5 .......b7 .......9 (=2)

add tone/9 (add nine) ...........................................1 .........3 .........5 .........9 (=2)

m/9 (minor add nine) ................................1 .........b3 .......5 .........9 (=2)

6 (sixth or major sixth) ...............................1 .........3 .........5 .........6

m6 (minor sixth)......................................1 .........b3 .......5 .........6

6/9 ......................................................1 .........3 .........5 .........6 .........9 (=2)

m6/9 ...................................................1 .........b3 .......5 .........6 .........9 (=2)

7/6 (dominant seventh, add six) ....................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......6

9/6 (dominant ninth, add six) .......................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

m7/6 (minor seventh, add six) .....................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......6

m9/6 (minor ninth, add six) ........................1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

/11 (add eleven or major add eleven) ..............1 .........3 .........4 .........5

m/11 (minor add eleven)............................1 .........b3 .......4 .........5

m7/11 (minor seventh, add eleven) ...............1 .........b3 .......4 .........5 .........b7

7/11 (dominant seventh, add eleven) ..............1 .........3 .........4 .........5 .........b7

suspendedsus. 4 (suspended fourth)...........................1 .........4 .........5

sus. 2 (suspended second)..........................1 .........2 .........5

7 sus.4 (seventh suspended fourth) ...............1 .........4 .........5 .........b7

9 sus.4 (ninth suspended fourth) ..................1 .........4 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

∆7 sus. 4 (major seventh, suspended fourth) ...1 .........4 .........5 .........7

Page 63: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

7Constructing Major Chords

• Common Major Chords By Octave Shape

• Reference Roots And Octaves

• Constructing Major Chords From The Root

Page 64: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 64

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 7: Constructing Major Chords

Common Major Chords By Octave ShapeNumbers on the diagrams below indicate fi ngers, except on the large diagram at the right, where they indicate chord tones. Numbers below the diagrams below indicate scale tones.

The diagrams below illustrate most common major chord fi ngerings. Look at one of the diagrams and try to justify the numbered intervals you see, based on the interval fi ngerings you learned earlier. Here are some things to look for:

• The interval from “1” up to “3” (to “3”, higher in pitch) should be a major third.

• The interval from “1” up to “5” should be a perfect fi fth.

• The interval from “5” up to “1” should be a perfect fourth.

641 root 42 root

2 3

1

53 root

2 3 41

3 2

631 root

1

3 4

2

1 1 1

3 3 33

1

2

4

1

4

1 1

3

1

E I A ID I G I

3

2

1

52 root

4

3

1

2

C I

2 3

4

2

1 1

3

4

2

1

4

1

3

2 4

1

3

1 5 1 3 5 1 1 5 1 31 3 5 1 5 1 311 5 1 3

1 5 1 3 5 1 1 5 1 31 3 5 1 5 1 311 5 1 3 13

1 5 135 1 51 3 1

1 5 13 5 5 1 53

1

1

1

3

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

major

34

2

1 1

1 3 5 1

3 4

2

1

5 1 3 5

4

3

1

2

1 3 5 1

1

3

1

2

3 5 1

1

3

1

2 3 4

5 1 3 5

1

4

1

5 1 3 1

1

3

1

3 3 3

5 5 1 3

1

Page 65: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 65

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 7: Constructing Major Chords

Reference Roots and Octaves

REFERENCE ROOTS

In some cases, you have no knowledge of the interval relationship to the root and will need to generate a “reference” root an octave below or above the one used in the chord. In the example below, a reference root was added below the lowest root in the chord, to be able to calculate the third (“3”) on the sixth string.

3

5 1

5

1

3

5 1

5

1

reference root

e note in question

In the next example, a reference root was added in the octave above the chord root, to be able to calculate the third (“3”) on the fi rst string.

1

5reference root

3

1

5 3

e note in question

REFERENCE OCTAVES

Another way to calculate a major chord tone for which you have no knowledge of the interval relationship to the root is to generate an octave in close proximity to a chord root. In the example below, the note in question was generated just above one of the chord roots (“1”), so it could be recognized as a major third (“3”).

3

5 1

5

1

3

5 1

5

1

reference octave

the note in question

3

Page 66: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 66

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 7: Constructing Major Chords

In the next example, the note in question was generated just above the chord root (“1”), so it could be recognized as a major third (“3”).

1

5 3

1

5 3

the note in question

reference octave3

Constructing Major Chords From The RootIn each example below, you are given a note which will be a chords root. Then I’ll go through the thought process of constructing the rest of a major chord, one note at a time. In addition to the root (“1”), each chord will need a third (“3”) and a fi fth (“5”). Roots are circled. For the four examples below, numbers within the diagrams indicate the root, third and fi fth.

ROOT ON THE FOURTH STRING

Read the diagrams from left to right to see the chord accumulate. The root (“1”) appears on the fourth string. In the second diagram, the third appears on the third string, expressing the major third interval fi ngering shown earlier. In the third diagram, the interval from scale tone “5” up to scale tone “1” is a perfect fourth and the fi ngering for those two numbered tones matches what you where shown earlier in fi ngerings for a perfect fi fth.

1 1 1

3

5

3

Root On The Third StringRead the diagrams from left to right. The root (“1”) appears on the third string. In the second diagram, the third appears on the second string, using the unique major third fi ngering for adjacent strings found on the second and third strings. In the last diagram, the interval from scale tone “5” up to scale tone “1” is a perfect fourth, which justifi es the placement of the “5” in the last diagram.

1 1 13 5 3

Page 67: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 67

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 7: Constructing Major Chords

Root On The Fourth StringRead the six diagrams from left to right.

Diagram 1: the root (“1”) appears on the fourth string.

Diagram 2: the third (“3”) appears on the third string, using the major third fi ngering for adjacent strings.

Diagram 3: a perfect fi fth fi ngering locates the chords fi fth (“5”) on the second string.

Diagram 4: for another fi fth (“5”), a note is fi ngered a perfect fourth below the root on the (“5”) on the fi fth string

Diagram 5: for another root (“1”), a note is fi ngered an octave above the root on the fi rst string.

Diagram 6: for another root (“1”), a note is fi ngered an octave above the (fourth string) root on the sixth string

1 1 1

3 3

5

1

3

5

5 1

3

5

5

1

1

3

5

5

11

Page 68: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 68

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 7: Constructing Major Chords

Page 69: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

8The Root IDSystem

• What Is Strict Vertical Position?

• What Are Chord Roots, Tone Centers, Keys And Chord Progression?

• What Is A Root ID?

• Combining Root IDs

• Why Can’t I Just Use The Octave Shapes Instead Of The Root ID?

Page 70: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 70

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

Welcome To The Root ID SystemThe root identifi cation system becomes necessary when you begin to learn fi ngerings in-between the fi ve octave shapes on in-between the seven major scale fi ngerings.

Abbreviations used in this chapter:“Root identifi cation” will be abbreviated: “root ID”. “Strict vertical position” will be abbreviated: “SVP”

What Is Strict Vertical Position?In short, SVP defi nes where your fretting hand is located by specifying the fret at which your fi rst fi nger is hovering or fretting. It applies to single note playing, not chording. It may change as often as once per note. Here are more specifi c rules about SVP:

• Four consecutive frets are strictly fretted with the index through little fi ngers, one each fret.

• The index fi nger may reach one fret to a lower-pitched note (toward the head of the guitar).

• The little fi nger may reach one fret to a higher-pitched note (toward the bridge of the guitar).

The root ID system identifi es each of twelve unique SVPs in which to play any scale or other sequence of notes. The root ID system allows you to use the same fi ngering pattern in a new key. When changing a note sequence to another key, the SVP that occurred for each part of the sequence can be located in a new SVP, using the root ID as a reference.

What Are Chord Roots, Tone Centers. Keys and Chord Progression?

What Is A Chord Root?A chord root is the lowest note you can imagine in the sound of a chord. It is the letter after which a chord is named. The letter name of a chord may be followed by a sharp or fl at, such as G or G. The sharp symbol indicates a note is played a half step (one fret) higher and a fl at indicates it is played a half step lower.

Usually, the notes of a chord can be transposed by octaves to be arranged in consecutive thirds. When a chord is arranged entirely in thirds, the lowest note is usually the root. The fi rst chord below has a “C” note in the bass. When the notes are arranged in thirds, which would be all notes on lines or all on spaces, “F” is the root.

Page 71: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 71

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

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AAAAA0123

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A

Fma7

C

E CF

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In some cases, the root is not the lowest note in a series of thirds. Sixth chords have their root as the second-to-lowest tone in a series of thirds. With sixth chords, the lowest root you can imagine may indicate a different root. In the example below, the lowest imaginable root for the D6 chord could be heard as “B”, making the chord a Bm7.

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779

A!AAA5420

A!AAABF#

Bm7

DA

D

D6

AF#

B

What Is A Tone Center?A tone center is the root of the chord you would expect a piece to end on. You would expect a chord progression to end on a chord which gives a feeling of resolution. That chord would be the tonic chord, or main chord in the progression. If the tonic chord is Cm7, the tone center is “C.” If the tonic chord is “Ebm”, the tone center is “Eb.”

The tonic chord (or “main chord”) is the chord you would expect the piece of music to end on. It is the chord which sounds most resolved in a piece of music. A tonic chord is used to give the most fi nal sound at the end of a piece.

I said “you would expect” the piece of music to end on the tonic chord in the previous paragraph, because although the listener expects a song to end on the tonic chord, it doesn’t have to. A song can end with a deceptive cadence (chord sequence) where the fi nal chord is not the tonic chord. This type a ending is intended to “trick” the listener. Although a deceptive cadence does not produce as strong a feeling of resolution, it still can be stimulating. Likewise, songs often begin on the tonic chord, but they don’t have to.

Page 72: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 72

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

Many recorded pieces of music have a “fade- out” ending. No distinct ending chord is played with a fade-out. I have always hated fade-out endings. I much prefer hearing the ending the band or artist would play in a live performance. The only exception would be where there is some point to fading out, such as the main character in the lyric is walking off into the woods or something of that nature.

The tonic chord can be established by a number of elements in the chord progression, including:

• Long duration or frequent occurrence of the intended tonic chord.

• A progression of chord roots up or down a scale to the root of the intended tonic chord.

• Chord root movement to the intended tonic chord from a scale step above or below, from a perfect fourth below, or from a perfect fi fth above.

• Preceding the intended tonic chord by one or more dissonant, tension producing chords.

• Use of the root of the intended tonic chord as a repeating note through a series of chords. This is called a pedal tone and usually occurs in the bass.

• Progressions are typically built with groups of two or four bars. Ending with the desired tonic chord establishes stronger tonality than beginning with it, especially where the tonic chord begins the third or fi fth bar.

• Use a tonic chord built on the fi rst step of a historically established scale. The scales which are tradition-ally used more often produce a stronger tonality, because they are familiar to the listener.

a. The main chord usually has a strong tonality (is easy to establish as the main chord) in major, Dorian, Mixolydian or Aeolian mode (when major, Dorian, Mixolydian or Aeolian scales are used), in harmonic minor, or in Phrygian major mode (Phrygian scale with a major third).

b. The main chord has a passive tonality (somewhat diffi cult to establish as a main chord) in Phrygian or Lydian mode (when Phrygian or Lydian scales are used).

c. The main chord has a weak tonality (quite diffi cult to establish as the main chord) in Locrian mode (when Locrian scale is used).

• Use the root of the main chord in a low range of pitch.

KeyA song is said to be in a key named after the tone center. If the tone center is “A”, the song is said to be in the key of “A”. The key may be further qualifi ed by the scale or mode type, such as “A” major, “A” minor or “A” Mixolydian.

The term “minor” is often used loosely in key names where the song may be in any mode which has a minor chord built on the tone center (e.g., Aeolian or harmonic minor). Likewise, the term major is sometimes used in reference to any mode which has a major chord built on the tone center (e.g., Mixolydian or Phrygian major).

In the example below, the Am chord sounds resolved at the end. The piece is in the key of A minor.

Page 73: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 73

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

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Elsewhere, in the same piece of music, the section below appears. It has a sense of temporarily being in the key of E major (the specifi c scale it uses is E Mixolydian fl at six, but the tonic chord is E, and the primary sound of the scale is E major). The E major chord sounds somewhat resolved at the end of the example, but you might get the sense that the melody is going back to the key of A minor afterward (play the example below, then the example above).

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Chord ProgressionA chord progression is any sequence of chords. Typically, a chord progression is repeated during a piece of music. Each section of the piece of music (verse, chorus, etc.) may use a different chord progression. There may be different versions of each chord progression.

Page 74: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 74

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

What Is A Root ID?The root ID specifi es the string and fi nger which are involved in the fretting the chord root or tone center in its lowest octave for the current strict vertical position (SVP). The root ID consists of a number representing the string, followed by a hyphen and a number representing the fi nger. Sometimes, an “L” is added at the end to represent the index fi nger reaching one fret “low” (toward the head of the guitar).

1 1

2

4

1 1

3

2 2

4

3 3

4

1

4 4

1

1

2

4 4

1

3

2

1

4

1

3

4

4

2

4

1

3

1

4

octavesfrom thesixth string

octavesfrom thefifth string

octavesfrom thefourth string

6-1L 6-1 6-2 6-3 6-4

5-1L 5-1 5-2 5-3 5-4

4-1L 4-1

Root IDs are named after the lowest pitch in each octave shown above as follows:6-1L has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 6th string, with the 1st fi nger reaching one fret Low in pitch.

6-1 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 6th string, with the 1st fi nger.

6-2 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 6th string, with the 2nd fi nger.

6-3 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 6th string, with the 3rd fi nger.

6-4 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 6th string, with the 4th fi nger.

5-1L has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 5th string, with the 1st fi nger reaching one fret Low in pitch.

5-1 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 5th string, with the 1st fi nger.

5-2 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 5th string, with the 2nd fi nger.

Page 75: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 75

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

5-3 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 5th string, with the 3rd fi nger.

5-4 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 5th string, with the 4th fi nger.

4-1L has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 4th string, with the 1st fi nger reaching one fret Low in pitch.

4-1 has the lowest pitch fi ngered on the 4th string, with the 1st fi nger.

Playing In A Single Root ID in Strict Vertical PositionBy choosing a root ID for a scale or arpeggio and playing it in strict vertical position (SVP), you isolate one of the twelve possible fi ngerings.

A root ID played in a strict vertical position will be abbreviated “root ID/SVP”.

After studying each of the twelve root ID/SVPs you can begin combining them in ways described below.

Playing One Tone Center Or Chord Root In All Twelve Root ID/SVPsIt is benefi cial to explore each scale and arpeggio (an arpeggio is a chord played one note at a time) in all twelve SVPs (strict vertical positions), each defi ned by a root ID.

Study each root ID/SVP thoroughly, not combining it with adjacent positions. You’ll fi nd each root ID/SVP has certain advantages and disadvantages. The same notes can be slurred (slurs include hammer, pull-off, slide and bend) in one root ID/SVP and not in another. Shapes of some note sequences are easy to play in certain root ID’s.

By studying all twelve root ID fi ngerings for scales and arpeggios, it enables you to play one key in all twelve positions or all keys in one position. Freedom! Each root ID/SVP has advantages where certain notes can be more easily slurred, fretted or picked.

When an arpeggio involves one note on each string and proceeds across the strings in such a way that a lower-numbered fretting fi nger is used on each lower-numbered string, it is easy to coordinate the picking and fretting. When an arpeggio or scale involves the same fi ngering pattern on two or more consecutive strings, the brain has to do a lot less work.

In playing on quick chord changes, you may not have time to change position, and may have to improvise in a single position or at least a small area of the fretboard.

Page 76: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 76

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

Combining Root ID’sOnce you are familiar with a few consecutive root ID/SVPs for a particular arpeggio or scale, start combining them. The most useful combination is probably the major scale fi ngerings. Diagrams are shown below for major scale fi ngerings in all twelve root ID/SVPs, followed by “three note-per-string” versions which combine them. The three note-per-string fi ngerings are easy to pick with economy picking, where you pick in the direction of each new string you move to, causing the picking to be identical for each string.

Major Scale Fingerings in All Twelve Root ID/SVP’sNotice that for fi ve of the seven major scale fi ngerings, there are two alternate root ID versions. The top row of diagrams show the notes by major scale tone number. The bottom two rows of diagrams show the fretting hand fi ngers by number.

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4 1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1 fingering 2 fingering 3 fingering 4 fingering 5 fingering 6 fingering 7

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

27

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23

3

3

4

4 4

3

7

3

1

4

3

4

3 3

4

1

3

1

3

4

1

2

4 4

2

1

2

3 3

4

1

2

4

2

1

4

1 1

4

1 1

4

1

4

1

1 1

2

4

1

2

4

22

4

1

2 2

4

3 3

4

1

4

11

3

1

4

1

33 3

1

4 4

1

3

2

1

4 4

2

4 4

2

4

2

1

1 1

2

1

4

3

4

3

4

3 3

1 1

3

1

4

11

3

1

3

2

4

1

4 44

11 1

3

4

2 2

4

2

3

root ID: 6-1L

root ID: 4-1 root ID: 5-4 root ID: 5-2 root ID: 5-1 root ID: 6-4 root ID: 6-2

4

1

4

2

1 1

3

4

1

3

4

33

4

2

3 3

4

root ID: 6-1

2 2

4

1

3

11

2

1

4

1

22 2

1

3 3

root ID: 4-1L

2

1

2

1

3

1

3 3

4

1

2

3

1 1

root ID: 5-3

7

6

3

4 4

1

4

2

4

2

4

2 2

1 1

2

1

3

1

4

1

2

root ID: 5-1L

1

3

2

3

2 2

4

1

2

1

2

3

1

1

3

1

4

root ID: 6-3

3

Combining The In-Position Major Scale Fingerings To Make Three Note-Per-String Fin-gerings

Compare the fi ngerings below with the in-position fi ngerings above, by root ID. The top row of diagrams show the notes by major scale tone number. The bottom two rows of diagrams show the fretting hand fi ngers by number.

Page 77: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 77

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

4

6

7

2

3

41

7 3

1

5

4

1

2 5

63

4

7 3

1

2 5

2 15

6 2 53

4

67 3

44

6 2

1

53

67

2 5

3

15 4

6

7

3

4

67

2 5

3

6

7

315

4

7

5

6

4

6

7

3

4

1

72

15

15

6 2 5

67 3

4

7

1

2

6 2 15

67 2

5

3

1 4

6

7 3

6 2

15

3

6

7

2

3

2 15 4

7 3

2

4

1 4

2

41

7

fingering 1/2 fingering 2/3 fingering 3/4 fingering 4/5 fingering 5/6 fingering 6/7 fingering 7/1

root ID: 6-1Land 4-1

root ID: 4-1Land 5-4

root ID: 5-4and 5-3

root ID: 5-2and 5-1

root ID: 5-1Land 6-4

root ID: 6-3and 6-2

root ID: 6-2and 6-1

1

1

1

1

1

22

3 3

4

4

4

1

2 2

44

1

1 1

4 4

1 11

2 2 22

3

44 4

12

1 1

1

11

33

3 3

3

44 4

4

4

4

1

11

1 1

1

3

3

344

4

4

2

4

1

1

1

1

2

2

34

44

11

2 2 2

44 4

1

1

2

4

1 1 11

33 3

2

3

4 4

4

4 4

1 1

11

1

3

3

3

3

4 44 4

4 4

4

2

2 2

4

22

1

fingering 1/2 fingering 2/3 fingering 3/4 fingering 4/5 fingering 5/6 fingering 6/7 fingering 7/1

root ID: 6-1Land 4-1

root ID: 4-1Land 5-4

root ID: 5-4and 5-3

root ID: 5-2and 5-1

root ID: 5-1Land 6-4

root ID: 6-3and 6-2

root ID: 6-2and 6-1

2

Why Can’t I Just Use The Octave Shapes Instead Of The Root ID?

You should use the octave shapes fi rst. Once you learn arpeggios and scales in each of fi ve octave shapes, you should explore the remaining possibilities. That’s what the root ID system is all about.

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page 78

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 8: The Root ID System

Page 79: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

9PrinciplesOf Fingering

• General Rules• Changing Position• Out-Of-Position Notes

Page 80: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 80

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 9: Principles Of Fingering

General Rules• When one rule confl icts with another, weigh the advantages and disadvantages of each.

• Practice diffi cult fi ngerings such as:

reaching out of position with the fourth fi nger,

rapid use of the fourth fi nger,

spans leaving a fret between the second (middle) and third (ring) fi ngers,

consecutive use of the same fi nger on different strings

wide skips in position.

• Avoid diffi cult fi ngerings when speed or clarity is needed. Use smooth, easy fi ngerings for speed and clarity. This often involves avoiding use of the little fi nger.

• Avoid using the second and third fi ngers spanned apart to leave an empty fret between them Exception: Allan Holdsworth’s style incorporates this commonly avoided span.

• Avoid using the same fi nger for two different notes on the same string, unless to slide, change position, or reach out of position.

• Avoid using the same fi nger on different frets of two adjacent strings:

Changing Position.Avoid changing position until you have to when improvising diagonally across the fretboard. Continue using a convenient fi ngering area until it presents a diffi culty. This simplifi es your position changes.

SHIFTING AND SLIDING

Changing position by playing two consecutive notes on the same string with the same fi nger.. When this is done without applying pressure, it is a shift. When it is done with sustained pressure, it is a slide. This is usually done with the fi rst or fourth fi ngers, sometimes with the third fi nger.

When performing a shift, glide along the strings with some of your fi ngers to retain your orientation. Don’t use enough pressure to create a sound.

SKIPPING

Skipping from one position to another wastes time in movement, but can save time by using familiar fi ngering patterns which require little thought.

COMPRESSING

Compressing is changing position where two non-consecutive fi ngerings fret notes over fewer frets than the span of fi ngers involved.

Page 81: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 81

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 9: Principles Of Fingering

Out-Of- Position NotesReach out of position with the outside fi ngers. Out-of-position notes can usually be reached with the fi rst fi nger or with the little fi nger.

Guidelines for fi ngering out-of-position notes:

• First fi nger out-of-position reaches are better than those with the fourth fi nger, because of the wider span between the fi rst and second fi ngers.

• When playing intervals involving fi ve fret spans on two or more strings, choose a fi ngering option with a whole step between the fi rst and second fi nger. Otherwise, the whole step will probably occur between the third and fourth fi ngers.

• Identical fi ngering patterns on adjacent strings are desirable for ease of memorization and to conserve motion in the fretting hand.

• Hammers and pull-offs sometimes determine which out of position version of a note will be used.

Page 82: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 82

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 9: Principles Of Fingering

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10ConstructingArpeggios

• Overview• Memorize Reference Arpeggios• Choose A Position• Construct A Major Scale• Access The Chord Formula• Identify All Chord Tones• Major Arpeggios In All Twelve Positions• Deriving All Arpeggios From Major

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

OverviewTo be adept at constructing chords and improvising with arpeggio tones, you need an awareness of all arpeggio tones for a chord in each area of the fretboard where you intend to work. Here is an overview of effective procedure:

• Memorize major arpeggios in each of fi ve octave shapes, for reference.

• Choose an area of the fretboard, which will determine a strict vertical position (SVP).

• Construct a major scale for the complete range of the SVP.

• Access the chord formula.

• Identify the location of all chords tones in the SVP.

• Construct arpeggios in all twelve positions.

• Derive all other arpeggios from major arpeggios.

Memorize Reference Arpeggios

MEMORIZE F MAJOR CHORDS IN FIVE OCTAVE SHAPES

Fret each of the open string chords below (C, G, D, A and E) with the fi ngers shown. The numbers within the diagrams indicate fretting hand fi ngers. By not using the index fi nger, it can be reserved for barred versions of the same chords. Each of the “F” chords shown below is in the “form” of the chord above it. The “F” chord in fi rst position is in “E” form. The “F chord in III position is in “D” form, and so on.

Using The Index Finger As A CapoBy “saving” the fi rst fi nger for barreing the chords in the bottom row below, you are effectively using the index fi nger as a capo.

Notice The “Empty” FretThe fi rst fret is “empty”, or not fretted on the D, A and G chords. The barred versions of those chords should also have an “empty” fret above (toward the guitar body) the index fi nger.

3 4

2

3 3 332

4 4

3

2

3

2

4

E I D I C I A I G I

1

3 4

2

1 1 1

3 3 33

1

2

4

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

1 11

3

2

4

11

F I F III F V F VIII F X

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

MEMORIZE F MAJOR ARPEGGIOS IN FIVE OCTAVE SHAPES

Each of the arpeggios shown at the right below involves one or two notes added to the chord fi ngering (shown in the chord diagram to the left of each arpeggio diagram). The numbers in the diagrams are fretting fi ngers. Play the arpeggios in order of pitch. If you are not sure how to do this, refer to the sequence of diagrams on the next page.

1

3 4

2

1 1

1

3 3 3

3

1

2

4

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

1

1

1

3

2

4

1

1

F chord I

F chord III

F chord V

F chord VIII

F chord X

1

3 3

2

1 1

1

3 3 3

2

1

2

3

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

1

1

1

4

3

4

1

1

F arpeggio I

F arpeggio III

F arpeggio V

F arpeggio VIII

F arpeggio X

4 4

2

4

4 4

4

4

Add Tones To The E Form F ChordThe numbers in the diagrams are fretting fi ngers. Add the notes fretted with the little fi ngering to those of the F chord in fi rst position (shown in the oval). Also, fret the note on the fourth string with the

Add Tones To The D Form F ChordThe numbers in the diagrams are fretting fi ngers. Add the notes shown in the oval to those of the “F” chord in third position. Also, notice the change of fi ngering on the fi rst two strings.

Add Tones To The C Form F ChordAdd the little-fi nger notes shown in the ovals on the sixth and fi rst strings.

Add Tones To The C Form F ChordAdd the little-fi nger note shown in the ovas on the fi fth string.

Add Tones To The G` Form F ChordAdd the little-fi nger note shown in the ovas on the second string.

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Play Each Arpeggio In Order Of PitchHere is the F major arpeggio in fi rst position, shown in order of ascending pitch. By playing the diagrams from left to right below, you are playing the arpeggio tones in order from lowest to highest.

`

1

F I F I

4

3

F I

3

F I

2

F I1

F I1

F I F I

4

Play The Five F Major Arpeggios In Order

1

3 3

2

1 1 1

3 3 32

1

2

3

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

1 11

4

3

4

11

F I F III F V F VIII F X

4 4

2

4

4 4

4

4

MEMORIZE C MAJOR CHORDS IN FIVE OCTAVE SHAPES

As was done earlier for F chords, these C chords are compared to the open string chords after which they are formed.

3 4

2

3 3 332

4 4

3

2

3

2

4

E I D I C I A I G I

1

3 4

2

1 1 1

3 3 33

1

2

4

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

1 11

3

2

4

11

C VIII C X C XII C III C V

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

MEMORIZE C MAJOR ARPEGGIOS IN FIVE OCTAVE SHAPES

Notice C major in III position could also be played in XV position.

1

3 3

2

1 1 1

3 3 32

1

2

3

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

1 11

4

3

4

11

C VIII C X C XII C III C V

4 4

2

4

4 4

4

4

A SUMMARY OF THE ARPEGGIOS IN F AND C MAJOR

1

5 1

3

5 1

1

5 1 3

1

5

1

5 1 3

1

3

5

1

3

1

3

5

5

3

5

3

5

1

5 1

3

5 1

35

1

3

1

3

5 5

5 1 3

3

1

5 1

3

5 1

3 3

3

F major arpeggioF I

F III

F X

F VIII

F V

5

1

5 1

3

5 1

1

5 1 3

1

5

1

5 1 3

1

3

5

1

3

1

3

5

5

3

5

3

5

1

5 1

3

1

35

1

3

1

3

5 5

3 3

3

C major arpeggio

C VIII

C V

C V

C III

C XII

5

5 1 3

3

1

1

3

5 5

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Choose A Fretboard Area

DETERMINE THE CHORD ROOT

If you are constructing arpeggios for a particular chord progression, you can determine each root from the beginning of its chord name.

If you don’t know the name of a chord for which you want to form and arpeggio, be careful about making assumptions. The lowest tone of the chord is not necessarily the chord root. You should be certain which note of the chord is the root before proceeding. The root is the note after which the chord is named, as defi ned in Chapter 6. You will learn how to identify an unknown chord root in Chapter 15.

CHOOSE A LOCATION FOR THE ROOT

Once you determine the name of the chord root, choose a location for it on the guitar fretboard. The best locations are on the sixth, fi fth or fourth strings where the root is in its lowest octave. Choose the note “C” on the sixth string, for example.

Consider Which Finger Will Fret The RootYou may need to complete a few different arpeggios before fi nding the most practical one. Most arpeggios contain the notes of a major or minor chord (1, 3, 5 or 1, 3, 5). If you already know a major or minor arpeggio that occurs on the root you have determined, use the same fi nger. Here are three options for the sixth string, eighth fret ”C” note.

fi ngering options for C note

V

4

VII VIII1

6-4 6-2 6-1

1

2

34

1

2

3

2

3

4

fi rst fret

fi fth fret

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

DEFINE THE ROOT ID

Review Root ID

Review the root ID system in Chapter 8 to see the locations of the twelve root locations.

Guitar is pattern-based, more than note-based. It is important to memorize note names on the guitar. You will gain quicker access to the patterns of note names used in guitar parts by studying fretboard theory. Arpeggio fi ngerings can be categorized according to the string and fi nger used to fret the root in its lowest octave. The root ID provides these categories. Here are a number of arpeggios which share the same root ID:

3

71

5

Fma7 VII3

b71

5

F7 VII

3

11

b3

Fm7 VII Fm7b5 VIII F dim.7 VII

b5

11

b3

b5

6

1

b3

(left to right) each arpeggio lowers a tone by one fret

Consider The Root ID OptionsHere are three root ID options for the sixth string, “C” chord root:`

V

4

VII

2

VIII1

root ID6-4

root ID6-2

root ID6-1

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Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

DEFINE THE SVP (STRICT VERTICAL POSITION)Each of the options for sixth string, “C” chor root defi ne a different strict vertical position.

V

4

VII VIII1

V position

1

2

34

1

2

3

2

3

4

VII position VIII position

Construct A Major ScaleIf you don’t remember how to construct your own major scale, review Chapter 4. The major scale should be constructed with the same fi nger on the chord root as in the major scale.

Begin Constructing Arpeggios Based On Seven In-Position Major Scale FingeringsHere are the seven in-position major scale fi ngerings for C major:

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1 fingering 2 fingering 3 fingering 4 fingering 5 fingering 6 fingering 7

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6)

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7) 3

7

3

VIII X XII I or XIII III or XV V VII

Consider Major Scale Fingering Options Which Include “C” On The Sixth String

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1 fingering 6 fingering 7

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

VIII V VII

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Access The Chord FormulaReviewIf you don’t remember the formula for a chord, look it up in Chapter 6. You may want to review Chapter 6, in any case.

Formulas For Examples Using Sixth String, Eighth Fret “C”Here are examples for fi ve chord types: major, minor, major seventh, dominant seventh and minor seventh. The formulas are shown below.

chord type chord name in C formula (tones relative to a C major scale)

major C 1 3 5

minor Cm 1 b3 5

major seventh Cma7 1 3 5 7

dominant seventh C7 1 3 5 b7

minor seventh Cm7 1 b3 5 b7

Identify All Chord TonesAfter conceiving a major scale fi ngering which has its tone center on the note intended for the chord root, use the chord formula to fi nd every chord tone in relation to the major scale. It is usually best to go through the scale in ascending order of pitch. Choose the scale tones or altered scale tones (3, 4, etc.).

Fretting Altered Tones On Adjacent StringsIf an altered tone is our of reach on a particular string, it can probably be reached on an adjacent string. This requires knowledge of fi ngering half steps, which was covered in Chapter 3.

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

2 3

C major scale V1

1 15

5

b3

Cm V V1

4

a half step

Scale tone "3" in the C major scale (second string)was lowered to "b3" for the Cm chord,fingering a half step lower on the third string.

b3

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Building The Arpeggio Full-RangeTo have a complete awareness of the possibilites of chord tones in a particular fi ngering area, you need to inculde the full range of the chord tones. If there are chord tones below the root in pitch, include them. Once you learn where the chord tones are, you may want to exclude some of the notes to play the arpeggio from root to root.

Examples are shown below for C, Cm, Cma7, C7 and Cm7 arpeggios with the root ID’s 6-1, 6-2 and 6-4. In each of the examples, the arpeggios were constructed full-range. Each arpeggio was based on the major scale fi ngering shown at the far left of the row. Fingerings are shown for the major scale and arpeggios with scale tone numbers and with fi nger numbers. For each scale or chord, the scale tone numbers are shown in a diagram above and the fi nger numbers are shown in a diagram below.

Examples Using Root ID 6-1

fingering 1

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

C major scale VIII

major

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

3

C VIII

minor

1 b3 5 1

b3

5 1

b3

Cm VIII

major 7

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

3

Cma7 VIII

7

7

dominant 7

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

3

C7 VIIIb7

b7

minor 7

1 b3 5 1

b3

5 1

b3

Cm7 VIIIb7

b7

1

4

2

1 1

3

4

1

3

4

33

4

2

3 3

4

1

2

1 1

4

3 3

3

C VIII1 1 1 1

4

3 3

4

Cm VIII1

2

1 1

4

3 3

4

Cma7 VIII

2

4

1

2

1 1

4

3 3

4

C7 VIII1

4

1 1 1 1

4

3 3

4

Cm7 VIII1

4

Finger Numbers

Scale Tone Numbers

( 4 )

C major scale VIII

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Chapter10:ConstructingArpeggios

Examples Using Root ID 6-2

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

fingering 1

fingering 6

2 3

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

C major scale VIII

1

1 1

3

5

5

major

3

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

3

C VIII

C V1

1 1

b3

5

5

minor

b3

1 b3 5 1

b3

5 1

b3

Cm VIII

Cm V1

1 1

3

5

5

major 7

3

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

3

Cma7 VIII

Cma7 V

7

7

7

7

1

1 1

3

5

5

dominant 7

3

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

3

C7 VIII

C7 V

b7

b7

b7

b7b7

7

1

1 1

b3

5

5

minor 7

b3

1 b3 5 1

b3

5 1

b3

Cm7 VIII

Cm7 V

b7

b7

b7

b7b7

major minor major 7 dominant 7 minor 7

1

4

2

1 1

3

4

1

3

4

33

4

2

3 3

4

1

2

1 1

4

3 3

3

C VIII1 1 1 1

4

3 3

4

Cm VIII1

2

1 1

4

3 3

4

Cma7 VIII

2

4

1

2

1 1

4

3 3

4

C7 VIII1

4

1 1 1 1

4

3 3

4

Cm7 VIII1

4

Scale Tone Numbers

Finger Numbers

Scale Tone Numbers

Finger Numbers

1

4

3

4

3 3

4

1

3

1

3

4

1

2

4

( 4 )

1 1 1

4 4

3

4

1 1

C V1

4 4

2

4

1

4

Cm V1

4 4

3

4

1 1

Cma7 V

4

3

1

4 4

3

4

1 1

C7 V

4

22

3

1

4 4

2

4

1

4

Cm7 V

4

22

( 4 )

MORE BELOW

C major scale VIII

C major scale V

C major scale V

C major scale V

Examples Using Root ID 6-4NoticethatthefingeringsfortheC,CmandCm7arpeggiosalteredthepositionusedforthemajorscaleforeaseoffingering.

1

17

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 7

42

3 2

2 1

1 13

5

5

3

C VI

1

1 1b3 5

5

b3

Cm VI

1

1 1

3

5

5

3

Cma7 VII

7

7

1

1 13

5

5

3

C7 VI

b7

b77 b7

1

1 1b3 5

5

b3

Cm7 VI

b7

b7b7

major minor major 7 dominant 7 minor 7

Scale Tone Numbers

Finger Numbers

4

2

12

3 3

4

12

4

2

1

fingering 7

44

1 1

4 3

2 1

2

1

3

1

C VII

3

3 11 1

3

1

Cm VI

4

2 23

2

4

1

Cma7 VII

3

1

4

2 23

2

4

1

C7 VI

2

11 1

4

3 22 2

4

1

Cm7 VI

2

11

major minor major 7 dominant 7 minor 7

C major scale VII

C major scale VII

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Major Arpeggios In All Twelve PositionsNow we’ll eapand your capabilities of constructing arpeggios through knowledge of in-position fi ngerings in all twelve positions.

REFERENCE MAJOR SCALE FINGERINGS

All Twelve In-Position C Major Scale FingeringsHere are all twelve in-position major scale fi ngerings for C major:

3

2

1

4 4

1

2

4

scale tones

fingers

I

2

4 4

1

2

4

1

2

1

7

1

6

2 5

3

4

1

5

4 3

4

5

6

4

2

1

1 1

2 7

7

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

2 3

scale tones

fingers1

4 4

3 3

4

3

1

3

4

1

2

4

1 1

V

6

7

1

3

1

1 1

2 7

7

3

6

6

5

4

4

4

2

3

scale tones

fingers1

3 3

2 2

4

2

1

2

3

1

1

3

1

4

V

6

7

1

2

1

1 1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

42

3 2

scale tones

fingers

4

2

1

2

3 3

4

1

2

4

2

1

44

1 1

VII

1

12

6

5

4

3

7

scale tones

fingers

1

33

4

3

1

4

2

III

5

6

7 2

3

4

5

6

7

1

3

4

3

4

1

3

4

1

1

12

6

5

4

3

7

scale tones

fingers

1

22

4

2

1

4

1

III

5

3

4

5

6

7

4

2

3

2

6

7

4

2

1

4

2

1

7

6

1

1

52

3

4

scale tones

fingers

XII

3

4

5

6

7

2

3

4

5

1

3

2

4

11

3

4

1

2

4

1

3

4

1

2

4

6

1

1

5

7

2

3

4

scale tones

fingers

2

1

3

1

4

1

2

3

XII

3

4

5

6

7

1

1

3

1

3

4

52

1

1

3

7

1

1

5

3

6

2

4

scale tones

fingers

3

1

4

3

4

1

3

1

X

2

3

4

5

6

7

2

3

4

1 1 1

3 3 3

4

4

4

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1

scale tones

1

4

2

1 1

3

4

1

3

4

33

4

2

3 3

4

fingers

VIII

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1

scale tones

fingers1

4

1

1 1

2

4

1

2

4

22

4

1

2 2

4

VIII

7

1

1

5

3

6

2

4

scale tones

fingers

2

1

3

2

4

1

2

1

X

2

3

4

5

6

7

2

3

4

1 1 1

2 2 2

3

4

3

IX position

reaching tothe eighth fret

XI position

reaching tothe tenth fret

XIII position

reaching tothe twelfth fret

VI position

reaching tothe fifth fret

IV position

reaching tothe third fret

2

2

3

7

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Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

EXTRACTING MAJOR ARPEGGIOS FROM MAJOR SCALE FINGERINGS

By playing only tones “1, 3 and 5” of each major scale fi ngering, you create all possible major arpeggios. You can then learn to add to and modify those arpeggios to create arpeggios for all other chords.

All Twelve In-Position C Major Arpeggio FingeringsAll twelve in-position major arpeggio fi ngerings for C major are shown below. Notice that in many cases, there are optional ways to fi nger the same note. All twelve in-position major scale fi ngerings were shown earlier.

2

4

1

4

scale tones

fingers

II

2

4

2

1

5

3

1

5

3

52

1

1 1

3

5

5 3

scale tones

fingers1

4 4

3

4

1 1

V

1

1 1

3

5

4

3

scale tones

fingers1

3 3

2

3

1

4

V

1

1 1

3

5

5

3

scale tones

fingers

4

2 2

3

2

4

1

VII

1

15

3

scale tones

fingers

1

33

4

III

5

3

5

1

3

11

1

15

3

scale tones

fingers1

22

1

4

III

5

3

5

2

1 1

VI position

reaching tothe fifth fret

IV position

reaching tothe third fret

1

1

5

3

scale tones

fingers

XII

3

5

3

5

2

4

1

3

1

4

1

4

1

1

5

3

scale tones

fingers

1

3

1

2

XII

3

5

1

3

3

5

1

3

1

1

5

3

scale tones

fingers

1

4

3

4

X

3

5

3

1

3 3

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

scale tones

1

2

1 1

4

3 3

4

fingers

VIII

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

scale tones

fingers

1

1

1 1

4

2 2

4

VIII

1

1

5

3

scale tones

fingers

1

3

2

4

X

3

5

3

1

2 2

IX position

reaching tothe eighth fret

XI position

reaching tothe tenth fret

XIII position

reaching tothe twelfth fret

3

Page 96: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 96

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

CONCEIVING FULL-FRETBOARD MAJOR AND MINOR CHORD TONES

All major chord tones can be represented with three arpeggios.

Major Chord Tones In Three Arpeggios

1

1

35

55

3

1

1

1

3

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

j

3

5

5 1 3

1

3

15

5 1

3

3

1

33 5

PRACTICE MAJOR SCALE AND MAJOR ARPEGGIO EXERCISES

IN APPENDIX IThese exercises summarize the most practical major arpeggios when they are combined in melodic phrases with major scale fi ngerings in the same key (C major arpeggio with C major scale , for example).

Page 97: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 97

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Deriving All Arpeggios From MajorMODIFYING AND SUPPLEMENTING MAJOR ARPEGGIOS

By modifying or adding to major arpeggio fi ngerings you can create arpeggio fi ngerings for all other chords. From those arpeggios, you can create all chord fi ngerings.

The diagram below represents a single string. The vertical lines represent frets. The interval from the root up in pitch to the third of a major chord is two whole steps (four frets). From the third up to the fi fth is one and a half steps (three frets). From the fi fth up to the root(in the next octave) is two and one half steps. Any note you may need for a chord is within a whole step (two frets) of a major chord tone.

root third fifth root

up in pitchdown in pitch

whole step whole step whole step

Using Major Chord Tones As Reference Notes On The Same StringIf a chord requires a note which is reachable on the same string where the reference major chord tone occured, calculating its location is straightforward. I have provided some examples below where each of the desired chord tones were accessible on the same string as the major chord tone they were referenced to. A major chord contains the numbered tones “1, 3, and 5” of the major scale on its root. Each of these examples involves fl atting the third, changing it to “b3”, where the fl atted third is easily reachable on the same string.

A major V5

3

1

11

3 3

5

A minor V5b3

1

11

b3

5

b3

D major V5

31

1

3

5

D minor V5

b3

1

1

5

b3

F major V3

15

1

3

F minor IVb3

1

5

b3

1

5

5

referencetones

referencetones

referencetones

"3" loweredto "b3"

"3" loweredto "b3"

"3" loweredto "b3"

Using Major Chord Tones As Reference Notes On Adjacent StringsIn these next examples (below), the thirds are fl atted, making minor arpeggios (as was done above). Some of these thirds are more easily reached on an adjacent string. Fretting four frets higher on the next larger string descends a half step, except notes on the second string descend a half step by fretting three frets higher on the next larger string.

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page 98

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

A major II315

1 5 1

3

A minor II15

1 5 1

b3

b3

A minor I

15

1 5 1

b3

b3

D major IV

1

3

D minor III

5

5 1 3

1 5

5 1

D minor V1

b3

5

5 1

b3b3

b3

referencetones

"3" loweredto "b3"

"3" loweredto "b3"

referencetones

"3" loweredto "b3"

"3" loweredto "b3"

BRIDGING THE OCTAVE SHAPES

Once you learn one full-range major and minor arpeggio in each of the fi ve octave shapes (shown near the beginning of this chapter). you should begin conceiving pairs of adjacent octave shape areas. An effective way to do this is by summarizing the available chord tones in the adjoined area with a few chord fi ngerings.

Major Chords Summarizing The E Form and D Form Areas

2

1

A V

4

11

3

1

A VII

1

3

A VII

4

2

1

2

A VII

4

3

1

3

1

1

1

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

major

3

3

Page 99: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 99

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Minor Chords Summarizing The E Form and D Form Areas

1 1

Am V

4

11

3

1

Am VII1

2

Am VII

4

3

1

2

Am VII

4

3

1

2

1

1

1

b3

5

5

5 1

b3

1

1

b3b3

5

55

minor

b3

`

Summary Chord FingeringsTo conceive a chord fi ngering you should fi rst review a full-range arpeggio for it in the fretboard area where you want the chord. That will bring to mind every possible chord tone for the area. It is most effective to also bring some chord fi ngerings to mind that summarize the arpeggio tones.

Major Chord Fingerings That Summarize Full-Fretboard Major Chord Tones

2

1

A V

4

11

3

1

A VI

32

1

A VII1

3

A VII

4

2

1

2

A VII

4

3

1

3 3

A IX

4

2

11 1

3

A IX

4

2

1

3

A IX

4

2

1

A XII

3

11

3 3

A II

4

1

3

1

A XI1

2 3

A II

4

1 1 1

A II

4

1 1 1

Page 100: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 100

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 10: Constructing Arpeggios

Minor Chord Fingerings That Summarize Full-Fretboard Major Chord Tones

1 1

Am V

4

11

3

1

Am V

43

1

Am VII1

Am VII

4

3

1

2

Am VII

4

3

1

2

3

Am VIII

1

4

2

2

Am IX

4

3

1

Am XII

4

11

3

2

Am II

4

1

2

1

Am X1

3 4

Am II

1

4 4

Am II

4

1

2

3

Am VIII

1

4

2

2

Am IX

4

1

4

2

Arpeggios And Summary Chord Fingerings For Other ChordsA thorough preparation for chord construction includes a knowledge of many four-note chords in (1) arpeggios in all twelve strict vertical positions and (2) summary chord fi ngerings for those arpeggios. The four note chords should include: major 7, 7 (dominant seventh), m7, m7b5, diminished 7 (m6b5), 6 and m6.

Appendix B includes summary chords for fi ve seventh chord types

Page 101: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Spelling Major Scales Defi ned• Preparing To Determine Chord Roots• Key Signatures• The Cycle Of Fifths• Q & A On Key Signatures• Using Key Signatures To Spell Major Scales

11Spelling Major Scales

Page 102: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 102

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

“Spelling” Major Scales Defi ned“Spelling” major scales is naming the letter names of the notes in the scale. Here are a few examples:

major scale spelling

C C D E F G A B C

F F G A B C D E F

G G A B C D E F# G

Preparing To Determine Chord RootsTo be able to determine chord roots in the next chapter, you’ll need to be able to name the notes in any major scale. The fi fteen major scales are shown below.

FIFTEEN MAJOR SCALES (three of the keys have two versions)

Ä 44 tC

tD

tE

tF

tG

tA

tB

tC G

tA

tB

tC

tD

tE

tF#

!tG

tD

tE

tF#

!tG

tA

tB

tC#

!tD

tA

tB

tC#

!tD

tE

tF#

!tG#

!tA

t

ÄE

tF#

!tG#

!tA

tB

tC#

!tD#

!tE

tB

tC#

!tD#

!tE

tF#

!tG#

!tA#

! tB

tF#

!tG#

!tA#

!tB

tC#

!tD#

!tE#

!tF#

!tC#

! tD#

!tE#

!tF#

!tG#

!tA#

!tB#

!tC#

!t

ÄF

tG

tA

tBb

"tC

tD

tE

tF

tBb

"tC

tD

tEb

"tF

tG

tAb

tEb

" tEb

"tF

tG

tAb

"tBb

"tC

tD

tEb

"tAb

"tBb

"tC

tDb

"tEb

"tF

tG

tAb

" t

ÄDb

"tEb

"tF

tGb

"tAb

"tBb

"tC

tDb

"tGb

"tAb

"tBb

"tCb

"tDb

"tEb

"tF

tGb

"tCb

"tDb

"tEb

"tFb

"tGb

"tAb

" tBb

" tCb

" t

C major G major D major A major

E major B major F$ major C# major

F major Bb major Eb major Ab major

Db major Gb major Cb major

ENHARMONIC KEYS

Enharmonic notes have different names for the same pitch. C and B are the same note. F and G are the same note. Notice that major scales in three of the keys above have dual names.

Enharmonic keys have notes with the same pitches, but different note names. There are twelve different major scales, but three of them have two possible names:

1. F# and Gb major both have the same pitches, with different names.

2. Cb and B major scales both have the same pitches, with different names

3. C# and Db major scales both have the same pitches, with different names

Page 103: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 102

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales page 103

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

Key Signatures

KEY SIGNATURES SIMPLIFY MUSIC NOTATION

When a piece of music uses predominantly one major scale, it is simpler to indicate any sharped or flatted notes at the beginning of each section, rather than before every altered note. This system is called key signatures. All fifteen major scales are shown again below, with key signatures. There are patterns to the system of key signatures, which you will learn in the next few pages.

C

D

E

F

G

A

B

C

G

A

B

C

D

E

F#

G

D

E

F#

G

A

B

C#

D

A

B

C#

D

E

F#

G#

A

E

F#

G#

A

B

C#

D#

E

B

C#

D#

E

F#

G#

A#

B

F#

G#

A#

B

C#

D#

E#

F#

C#

D#

E#

F#

G#

A#

B#

C#

F

G

A

Bb

C

D

E

F

Bb

C

D

Eb

F

G

Ab

Eb

Eb

F

G

Ab

Bb

C

D

Eb

Ab

Bb

C

Db

Eb

F

G

Ab

Db

Eb

F

Gb

Ab

Bb

C

Db

Gb

Ab

Bb

Cb

Db

Eb

F

Gb

Cb

Db

Eb

Fb

Gb

Ab

Bb

Cb

C major G major D major A major

E major B major F# major C# major

F major Bb major Eb major Ab major

Db major Gb major Cb major

©2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TWELVE RULES FOR KEY SIGNATURES:1. Each key signature indicates the notes of one particular major scale.

2. A key signature applies throughout a piece of music or until another key signature is shown, at which point the new key signature applies (until another key signature may be shown).

3. Every major scale uses the same seven letters: A B C D E F G. These seven letters form an alphabetical cycle (below). Each major scale starts on the letter after which it is named and follows the alphabetical cycle around to the same letter

AB

C

DE

F

G

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page 104

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

4. Each major scale has one or more notes sharped or fl atted except C major, which has no sharps or fl ats.

5. Each key uses each letter once only (F and F, B and B are never used in the same major scale). Major scales never combine sharps and fl ats: they always use one or the other.

6. F major’s key signature has one fl at: B.7. There is a series of “sharp” keys which have one or more sharps in their key signature:

• If a key has one sharp (#), the sharp is .........................F. • If the key has two sharps, the sharps are ......................F C. • If the key has three sharps, the sharps are ....................F C G. • If the key has four sharps, the sharps are......................F C G D. • If the key has fi ve sharps, the sharps are ......................F C G D A. • If the key has six sharps, the sharps are........................F C G D A E. • If the key has seven sharps, the sharps are ...................F C G D A E B. If sharp keys are placed in order with one through seven sharps, they are in order of perfect fi fths:

F C G D A E B. So, sharps accumulate in the order F C G D A E B:

Fat Cats Get Down A t Ed’s Barbeque

8. There is a series of six fl at keys which have two or more fl ats in their key signatures:

• If a key has two fl ats, the fl ats are....................B E. • If a key has three fl ats, the fl ats are..................B E A. • If a key has four fl ats, the fl ats are...................Bb Eb Ab Db.

• If a key has fi ve fl ats, the fl ats are....................Bb Eb Ab Db Gb.

• If a key has six fl ats, the fl ats are.....................B E A D G C. • If a key has seven fl ats, the fl ats are.................B E A D G C F. If fl at keys are placed in order with 1 through 7 fl ats in their key signature, they are in order of perfect

fourths: B E A D G C F. So, fl ats accumulate in the order B E A D G C F:

Bug Eyes Are Darn Good Cat Fish

or

use a BEAD to G o Catch Fish

9. When reading the sharps as they appear in the key signature from left to right, raise the last sharp (on the right) in a key signature a half step to produce the name of the key. If the last sharp in the key signature is F#, raising it a half step would produce “G”, so the key is G.

Page 105: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 105

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

10. When reading the fl ats as they appear in the key signature from left to right, look at the next-to-last fl at. It is the literal name of the key. If the fl ats in the key signature are Bb Eb Ab Db, the name of the key is Ab major. If the fl ats in the key signature are Bb Eb Ab Db Gb, the name of the key is Db major.

11. All key signatures with fl ats in their key signature have a fl at in their name (such as Bb), except F major.

12. B, E. A, D and G major have no sharps in their name, but have sharps in their key signature.

A SHORTER LIST OF KEY SIGNATURE RULES:1. C major has no sharps nor fl ats.

2. F major has one fl at: B.3. In key signatures, sharps are written in the order FCGDAEB, fl ats in the reverse order: BEADGCF. If a

key has one sharp, the sharp is F. If it has two sharps, they are F and C. If a key has one fl at, the fl at is B. If it has two fl ats, they are B and E.

4. When reading the sharps as they appear in the key signature from left to right, raise the last sharp (on the right) in a key signature a half step to produce the name of the key.

5. When reading the fl ats as they appear in the key signature from left to right, look at the next-to-last fl at. It is the literal name of the key.

Page 106: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 106

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

The Cycle Of FifthsThis cycle shows the keys in order of increasing sharps (decreasing fl ats) clockwise and increasing fl ats (decreasing sharps) counter-clockwise.

Cycle of Fifths

perfect fi fths clockwise,

perfect fourths counter-clockwise

C major

page 1

G major

page 1

D major

page 1

A major

page 1

E major

page 1

B major

page 1

F major

page 1

G major

page 1

F major

page 1

B major

page 1

Eb major

page 1

A major

page 1

D major

page 1

page 1

C major

page 1

C major

Q & A On Key signaturesquestions (Q) and answers (A)

Q: What is the key signature for C major? A: no sharps nor fl ats

Q: What is the key signature for F major? A: Bb

Q: What is the order of sharps? A: F C G D A E B

Q What is the order of fl ats? A: B E A D G C F

Q: If you had two sharps in a key signature, what would they be? A: F# and C#

Page 107: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

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© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

Q: If you had two fl ats in a key signature, what would they be? A: Bb and Eb

Q: If you had three sharps in a key signature, what would they be? A: F#, C# and G#

Q: If you had three fl ats in a key signature, what would they be? A: Bb, Eb and Ab

Q: If you had four sharps in a key signature, what would they be? A: F#, C#, G# and D#

Q: If you had four fl ats in a key signature, what would they be? A: Bb, Eb, Ab, Db

Q: If you had fi ve sharps in a key signature, what would they be? A: F#, C#, G#, D#, A#

Q: If you had fi ve fl ats in a key signature, what would they be? A: Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb

Q:` If you had six sharps in a key signature, what would they be? A: F#, C#, G#, D#, A#, E#

Q: If you had six fl ats in a key signature, what would they be? A: Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb

Q: If you had seven sharps in a key signature, what would they be? A: F#, C#, G#, D#, A#, E#, B#

Q: If you had seven fl ats in a key signature, what would they be? A: Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb, Fb

Q: What is a natural letter name? A: One that has no fl at or sharp

Q: If a key has a sharp letter name, does it have sharps or fl ats it its key signature? A: Sharps.

Q: If a key has a fl at letter name, does it have sharps or fl ats it its key signature? A: Flats.

Q: If a key signature uses fl ats, is its name a letter with a fl at, sharp or natural? A: With a fl at or it is the key of F major (which has Bb in its key signature).

Q: If a key signature uses sharps, is its name a letter with a fl at, sharp or natural? A: With a natural, except F# major (FCGDAE sharped), C# major (FCGDAEB sharped).

Q: How do you name a key which has sharps in its key signature. A: Raise the last sharp a halfstep and make sure the letter has increased by one alphabetically as well.

Q: How do you name a key which has fl ats in its key signature. A: It is the literal name of the next-to-last fl at.

Using Key Signatures To Spell Major ScalesMemorize C Major and F majorYou must memorize the key signatures for C major and F major. The key signature for C major has no sharps nor fl ats, so the C major scale is C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. F major has one fl at: Bb. When you recite the F major scale

by alphabetically recalling the musical alphabet from “F” to “F”, fl at the B: F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F.

Using Key Signatures to Recall Flat KeysIf a key has a fl at in its name, you must visualize the key signature that would have the name of the key as the next to last fl at. Bb major would require the fl ats B, E. E major would require B, E, A. Recite the B major scale by alphabetically recalling the musical alphabet from “B” to “B”, and fl atting the B and E as you go: B, C, D, E, F G A B.

Page 108: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 108

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 11: Spelling Major Scales

Page 109: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Chords Are Usually Constructed In Thirds• Memorizing Major Scale With Key Signatures• Chord Types• Determining The Chord Root

12StructuralChord Types

Page 110: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 110

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

Chords Are Usually Constructed In Thirds

TENSION VERSUS RELAXATION

Music involves an interplay between tension and relaxation. Chords provide various degrees of relaxation or release of tension. Melodies weave around the tones of the current chord, generally emphasizing the chord tones and de-emphasizing non-chordal tones. Emphasis can be accomplished by frequent occurrence, sustain, placement on noticeable parts of the measure, or anything else that draws attention to a note.

Harmony is based on the series of every other note in the major scale system. By playing every other note in the major scale, you create a series of tones which create very little tension and are conducive to producing a state of agreement, concord and harmony.

THE TERTIAN CYCLE

The every-other-note series of tones in the major scale can be called the tertian cycle. Tertian is a Greek word implying made of threes. From each number in the cycle, counting the number on which you begin, it is three numbers to the next. Think of it as an every-other-number pattern, where after “7” you skip “1” and continue from “2”. After “6” you skip “7” and begin again at “1“.

13

5

72

4

6C

E

G

BD

F

Atertiancycle of

numbers

tertiancycle ofletters

In letters, this cycle represents the pattern of note names on “all lines” or “all spaces” in music notation:

Page 111: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 111

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

Ä 44 tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

tG

tB

tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

æt

G

t

B

t

D

t

F

======================Ä 44 tmmmmmmm

D

tmmmmmmF

tmmmmmA

tmmmmC

tmmmmE

tmmmmG

tmmmmB

tmmmmD

tmmmmF

tmmmmA

tmmmmmC

tmmmmmmE

ætmmmmmmmG

tmmmmmmmmB

tmmmmmmmmmD

tmmmmmmmmmmF

Ä 44 tE

tG

tB

tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

tG

tB

tD

t

F

æt

A

t

C

t

E

t

G

======================Ä 44 tmmmmmmE

tmmmmmG

tmmmmB

tmmmmD

tmmmmF

tmmmmA

tmmmmC

tmmmmE

tmmmmG

tmmmmB

tmmmmmD

tmmmmmmF

ætmmmmmmmA

tmmmmmmmmmC

tmmmmmmmmmmE

tmmmmmmmmmmmG

A “C” major chord consists of the notes “C, E, G”, which are three consecutive letters in the tertian cycle, beginning with “C”. Numerically, the “C” major chord uses tones “1, 3, 5” of a “C” major scale.

Thirds Are Pairs Of Notes In The Tertian CyclePlay the C major scale on the fi fth string, as shown in the fi rst two measures below. Notice that in the third and fourth measures, the C major scale is repeated on the fi fth string, but accompanied by notes on the fourth string. Each tone on the fourth string is a major scale tone third higher than the note it harmonizes on the fi fth string, and is one tone higher in the tertian cycle.

Ä 44

â 443

t

5

t

7

t

8

t æ

ææ10

t

12

t

14

t

15

t

32

tt

53

tt

75

tt

87

tt æ

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tt

1210

tt

1412

tt

1514

ttC D E F G A B C C

E FD

GE

AF

BG

CA

DB C

E

Page 112: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 112

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

Triads Are Three Note Groups From The Tertian CycleIn measures one and two below, the notes on the third string are each a major scale tone third above the cor-responding tone on the fourth string. These three note chords are called tertian triads.

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AF

CBG

DCA

EDB

F

CEG

CEGB

DFAC

EGBD

AF

CE

BG

DF

CA

EDB

GFA

CEGB

Quadrads (Scale Tone Sevenths) Are Four Note Groups From The Tertian CycleIn measures three and four above, the notes on the second string are each a major scale tone third above the cor-responding tone on the third string. While these four note chords are technically tertian quadrads, they are more commonly called scale tone seventh chords, which can be confusing.

The Term Seventh Chord Is Used Ambiguously And Must Be Defi ned From The Context In Which It Is Used. All of the four note chords which share “1, 3, 5, and 7” in their formulas are in the “family” of seventh chords, including major seventh (1, 3, 5, 7), dominant seventh (1, 3, 5, b7), minor seventh (1, b3, 5, b7), diminished seventh (1, b3, b5, bb7).

Scale tone seventh chords are each constructed with four consecutive tones from the tertian cycle. Here is a list of the qualities that occur from the major scale:

numbered tones letters in C chord quality chord name in C

1 3 5 7 C E G B major seventh Cma7

2 4 6 1 D F A C minor seventh Dm7

3 5 7 2 E G B D minor seventh Em7

4 6 1 3 F A C E major seventh Fma7

5 7 2 4 G B D F dominant seventh G7

6 1 3 5 A C E G major seventh Am7

7 2 4 6 B D F A minor seventh fl at fi ve Bm75Dominant seventh chords are often abbreviated with the term seventh chords. A dominant seventh chord has the specifi c formula “1, 3, 5, b7”.

Page 113: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 113

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

Chord TypesAll chord names and formulas are modeled after the types covered in this section.

TERTIAN THIRTEENTH CHORDS

Tertian thirteenth chords are constructed entirely in thirds. They use the series of odd numbers from one to thirteen: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13. There are three types: major, minor and dominant.

Major ThirteenthA complete major thirteenth chord would have the formula 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13. It occurs on the fi rst step of any major scale, by using every other note. However, the complete major thirteenth chord is virtually never used. The combination of the eleventh and third tones is dissonant and contrary to the nature of the rest of the chord. Therefore, parts of the major thirteenth chord are usually voiced without the eleventh. However, I personally think the major seventh suspended fourth chord is beautifully exotic and has many useful voicings.

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8

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t1

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t2

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8

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AAAAAAA

ææ101079

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AAAAACma13 arpeggio C major scale Cma13

this chord cannot be

played in its entirety

on the guitar

4

Cma13 VIII

3

4

1

2

1 7 3 6 2

this partial Cma13

chord contains the

essential chord tones

Minor 13thA complete major thirteenth chord would have the formula 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13. It occurs on the second step of any major scale, by using every other note. Using the second step of a major scale as a tone center is called Dorian mode.

A Dm13 chord is constructed on the second step of a C major scale with C major scale tones 2, 4, 6, 1, 3, 5, 7, using the letter names D, F, A, C, E, G, B. If you compared theses notes to the D major scale (D, E, F, G, A, B, C), you would need to fl at the third and seventh tones of the D major scale to match D Dorian (C major scale). Therefore, the formula for Dorian mode is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

A minor thirteenth chord can be constructed on the second step of any major scale. In each case, a major scale on its root would have to be altered by fl atting the third and seventh to match the notes produced by using the second step of the parent major scale as a tone center (C major is the parent major scale for D Dorian).

Page 114: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 114

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

Ä

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10

t5

12

t6

9

t7

10

t1

12

t2

9

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10

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8

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10

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12

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8

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10

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10

t1

12

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9

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12

t5

9

t6

11

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12

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9

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11

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10

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æ

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AAAAADm13 arpeggio C major scale from D to D (two octaves)

= D Dorian mode

D major scale Dm13

this chord cannot be

played in its entirety

on the guitar

4

Dm13 X3

4

2 3

1 b7 b3 6 2

this partial Dm13

chord contains the

essential chord tones

Dominant 13th

A complete dominant thirteenth chord would have the formula 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13. It occurs on the fi fth step of any major scale, by using every other note. Using the fi fth step of a major scale as a tone center is called Mixolydian mode. A dominant thirteenth chord is typically named with the ambiguous term “thirteenth chord”, which could also refer to one of the chords in the group: major thirteenth, minor thirteenth and dominant thirteenth.

A G13 chord is constructed on the fi fth step of a C major scale with C major scale tones 5, 7, 2, 4, 6, 1, 3, using the letter names G, B, D, F, A, C, E. If you compared theses notes to the G major scale (G, A, B, C, D, E, F), you would need to fl at the seventh tone of the G major scale to match G Mixolydian (C major scale). Therefore, the formula for Mixolydian mode is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

A dominant thirteenth chord can be constructed on the fi fth step of any major scale. A major scale on its root would require a fl atted seventh to match the notes produced by using the fi fth step of the parent major scale (C major is the parent major scale for G Mixolydian).

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2

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3

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5

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2

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4

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5

t1

3

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5

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6

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3

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3

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2

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2

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G13 arpeggio C major scale from G to G (two octaves)

= G Mixolydian mode

G major scale G13

this chord cannot be

played in its entirety

on the guitar

4

G13 III

2

4

1 2

1 b7 3 6 2

this partial G13chord contains the essential chord tones

Page 115: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 115

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

AUGMENTED AND DIMINISHED CHORDS

Diminished TriadsA diminished triad is like a minor chord with a fl atted fi fth. Compared to a major scale on its chord root, it has the formula “1, 3, 5”.

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"t cG diminished G major scale G diminished arpeggioG dim. I

4

2

1

Diminished Seventh ChordDiminished seventh chords should be called “minor sixth, fl at fi ve”. The formula for a diminished seventh chord is “1, b3, b5, 6”.

Within the diminished seventh chord, each tone to the next closest chord tone up or down is a minor third. This is very signifi cant. If you move any diminished seventh chord fi ngering up or down three frets (not counting the fret on which you begin), all tones are still in the chord and you have another fi ngering for it.

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4

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Half Diminished Seventh Chord Compared to a major scale on its chord root, it has the formula “1, 3, 5, 7”. It is like a diminished seventh chord

with a “7” instead of a “7” (double-fl at seven, or six). It is a minor seventh chord with a fl atted fi fth.

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4

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Page 116: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 116

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

Augmented TriadAn augmented triad is like a major chord with a sharped fi fth. Compared to a major scale on its chord root, it has the formula “1, 3, 5”.

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8

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9

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8

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G aug. VII

2

G major scaleG augmented arpeggio

Seventh AugmentedWhen chords of four or more different notes include the tones of a major chord and the fi fth is sharped, the chord is an augmented type. The most common of these is the dominant seventh chord with a sharped fi fth. Seventh sharp fi ve (75) can also be called “seventh augmented” (7 aug.).

The formula for a dominant seventh chord (such as G7) is “1, 3, 5, 7”, meaning it uses those tones of a major scale. A seventh augmented chord has the formula “1, 3, 5, 7”. It is a fairly dissonant and tension-producing chord, and is used in the more sophisticated and colorful styles like jazz.

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G seventh augmented= G7#5

G major scale G7#5 arpeggio

Page 117: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 117

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

ADD TONE CHORDS

Add tone chords contain a series of thirds, then one or more added tones which do not continue the series of thirds. The added tones may be a second, fourth or sixth in relation to the chord root. Added seconds are called ninths, to imply that they are in the upper range (in pitch) of the chord. Added fourths are called elevenths, again to imply that they are in the upper range.

Sixth ChordsBoth major and minor chords can have an added sixth. Major sixth would have the formula “1, 3, 5, 6” in relation to a major scale on the chord root. Minor sixth would have the formula “1, 3, 5, 6”.

6 (sixth or major sixth) ...................1 .........3 .........5 .........6

m6 (minor sixth)..........................1 .........b3 .......5 .........6

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10

t1

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9

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10

t4

7

t5

9

t6

7

!t7

8

t1

æ

ææ5

t1

4

t3

3

t5

0

t6

3

1

G6 III

2

G major scale G sixth arpeggio

Add Six ChordsSeventh and ninth chords can have an added sixth. Adding a sixth to a seventh chord implies a thirteenth chord with no ninth nor eleventh. Adding a sixth to a ninth chord implies a thirteenth chord with no eleventh.

In the chord name, a forward slash followed by a “6” is used to indicate the added sixth. Here are the formulas for a few seventh and ninth chords with added sixths:

7/6 (dominant seventh, add six) ........1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......6

9/6 (dominant ninth, add six) ...........1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

m7/6 (minor seventh, add six) .........1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......6

m9/6 (minor ninth, add six) ............1 .........b3 .......5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

Page 118: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 118

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

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G7/6 III1 2

G major scale G7/6 arpeggio

Add Nine ChordsTriads and sixth chords can have an added ninth.

/9 (add nine or major add nine) .........1 .........3 .........5 .........9 (=2)

m/9 (minor add nine) ....................1 .........b3 .......5 .........9 (=2)

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5

t1

7

t2

4

! t3

5

t4

7

t5

4

!t6

6

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7

t1

4

t2

6

!t3

7

t4

5

t5

7

!t6

4

!t7

5

|1

æ

ææ7

t1

6

!t3

5

t5

7

t2 (9)

3

1

A/9 V

2

4

A major scale A/9 arpeggio

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3

t4

5

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4

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5

|1

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t1

5

tb3

5

t5

7

t2 (9)

3

1

Am/9 V

1

4

A major scale Am/9 arpeggio

Page 119: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 119

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

6/9 (sixth, add nine) ......................1 .........3 .........5 .........6 .........9 (=2)

m6/9 (minor sixth, add nine) ...........1 .........b3 .......5 .........6 .........9 (=2)

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2 (9)

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3

1

A6/9 II

1 1

A major scale A6/9 arpeggio

Am6/9 V1

32

4

1

A major scale Am6/9 arpeggio

Add Eleven ChordsTriads and seventh chords can have an added eleventh.

m/11 (minor seventh, add eleven) .....1 .........b3 .......4 .........5

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5

t1

7

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9

! t3

5

t4

7

t5

9

!t6

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t1

9

t2

6

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5

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7

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9

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æ

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t1

8

tb3

7

t5

5

tb7

9

t9 (2)

7

t11 (4)

2

1

Am11 IX

3 4A major scale

Am11 arpeggio

Page 120: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 120

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

m7/11 (minor seventh, add eleven) ...1 .........b3 .......4 .........5 .........b7

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8

t5

7

tb7

5

t11 (4)

7

t1

Am11 V1 1 111

A major scale Am7/11 arpeggio

SUSPENDED CHORDS

Suspended chords contain one or more notes than replace the third. A suspended fourth chord has a fourth instead of a third. A suspended second chord has a second instead of a third. All chord types except diminished, augmented and eleventh chords can have a suspended fourth. All chord types except diminished, augmented and ninth chords can have a suspended second.

sus. 4 (suspended fourth)...1 .........4 .........5

sus. 2 (suspended second)..1 .........2 .........5

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æ

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3

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1

C sus. 4 I

C major scale C suspended fourth arpeggio

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scale tones:

3

t1

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t2

2

t3

3

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ææ3

t1

0

t2

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1

t1

3

1

C sus. 2 I

C major scale C suspended second arpeggio

Page 121: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 121

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

7 sus.4 (seventh suspended fourth) ...1 .........4 .........5 .........b7

9 sus.4 (ninth suspended fourth) ......1 .........4 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2)

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4C major scale C7 sus.4 arpeggio

1 1

2

C9 sus. 4 X1 1

C major scale C9 sus. 4 arpeggio

“NO” CHORDS

To indicate one or more tones to be omitted from a chord, the appendage “no root”, “no third”, “no fi fth”, etc. can appear at the end of the chord name. Abbreviations can be used:

no root ........................nr

no third .......................n3

no fi fth........................n5

no ninth ......................n9

no eleventh ................n11

Page 122: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 122

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types

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4

These “no chord” appendages present some ambiguity with chord synonyms:

“Major seventh, suspended second” has the same notes as “major ninth, no third”.

ma7 sus. 2 ........................1 .........2 .........5 .........7

ma9n3 .......................1 .....................5 .........7 .........9 (=2)

“Thirteenth, no eleven” has the same notes as “ninth add six”.

13n11 .................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) ....13

9/6 ..................1 .........3 .........5 .........b7 .......9 (=2) ....13

Page 123: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• The Root Is Usually The Lowest Tone In A Series of Thirds• Recognizing Scale Tone Chords• Incomplete Chords• Add-Tone and Suspended Chords• Synonyms

13Identifying The Chord Root

Page 124: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 124

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

The chord root is the note after which a chord is named. It is the letter name at the beginning of the chord name. It may include a sharp or fl at in its name, which would be written and spoken immediately after the letter name. If you want to check the validity of a chord name, or don’t know what it is, you will need a method of determining the root. In this chapter, you will learn effective methods to determine a chord root.

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The Root Is Usually The Lowest Note In A Series Of Thirds

13

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72

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6C

E

G

BD

F

Atertiancycle of

numbers

tertiancycle ofletters

Generally, the lowest-pitched note in a series of thirds is a chord root. You may need to review Chapter 12 on tertian harmony. When the tones of a chord can be arranged to produce an ever-other-note sequence of tones for a major scale, the lowest pitch in the series is usually the chord root. There are often problems with identifying the root in this manner. Chords are not always complete. Sixth chords, add nine chords and suspended chords (among others) do not have the lowest of a series of thirds as their root.

First, see if the letters representing the notes of the chord are unique. No letter should be used twice. Arrange the letter names in thirds (see the tertian cycle of letters above). The fi rst letter in the series of thirds is usually the root of the chord. In the tertian cycle of letters, this would be the letter that begins a clockwise series of letters.

In the Cma7 chord below, the letters can be arranged in the order of thirds: CEGB. C is the chord root of the Cma7 chord. The letters of the Am7 can be arranged in thirds: ACEG. A is the root of the Am7 chord.

The letters of the E7#9 chord do not form a series of thirds. It is an incomplete chord, missing a “B” note. Additionally, the “G” note would need to be spelled F double sharp (F ). The complete E7#9 chord would be spelled “E, G, B, D, F ”.

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

C

Cma7 III

B

G E

G

Am7 IXE

C G E

E7#9 VIG#

D

G

Each “series of thirds” referred to below should be conceived by arranging the notes in thirds as described above.

Recognizing Scale Tone ChordsYou should memorize the major scale tone triad pairs below. Some pairs are unique and others occur on multiple steps of the scale. In either case, it will be very useful to know the possibilities. Major scale tone pairs are a great resource in identifying major scale tone chords with missing tones. You may not realize the usefulness of major scale tone triads until you begin harmonic analysis.

Major Scale Tone Triad Pairsroot movement chord types chord pair between roots Key of C Key of A stepwise Major to minor I IIm 1 step (2 frets) C Dm A Bm V VIm 1 step G Am E F#m Major to Major IV V 1 step F G D E minor to minor IIm IIIm 1/2 step (1 fret) Dm Em Bm C#m minor to Major IIIm IV 1/2 step Em F C#m D dimin. to Major VIIdim I 1/2 step Bdim C G#dim A

thirds Major to minor I IIIm 2 steps (4 frets) C Em A C#m IV VIm 2 steps F Am D F#m Major to dimin. V VIIdim 2 steps G Bdim E G#dim minor to Major IIm IV 1 1/2 steps (3 frets) Dm F Bm D IIIm V 1 1/2 steps Em G C#m E VIm I 1 1/2 steps Am C F#m A dimin. to minor VIIdim IIm 1 1/2 steps Bdim Dm G#dim Bm

perfect fourths Major to Major I IV 2 1/2 steps (5 frets) C F A D V I 2 1/2 steps G C E A minor to Major IIm V 2 1/2 steps Dm G Bm E minor to minor IIIm VIm 2 1/2 steps Em Am C#m F#m VIm IIm 2 1/2 steps Am Dm F#m Bm dimin. to minor VIIdim IIIm 2 1/2 steps Bdim Em G#dim C#m

Triad pairs for other seven tone scales are shown in the Appendix D.

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

USABLE MAJOR SCALE-TONE CHORDS

The chart below lists all the practically usable chords that can be constructed on each step of the major scale. Major scale steps are numbered in Roman numerals across the top of the chart. The specifi c chord that would occur on any particular major scale step using only tones of the major scale is listed below the roman numeral and the chord type is indicated at the far left. The chord names in the left column (such as “triad” and “seventh”) indicate a general type of chord. The specifi c chord type that occurs on each scale step is shown beneath the respective roman numeral.

Usable Major Scale Tone Chords

type I II III IV V VI VIItriad . . . . . . . . .major . . . .minor . . . . . . . minor . . . . . major . . . . . . .major . . . . . . . minor . . . . . . . . .diminished

seventh . . . . . .ma7 . . . . .m7 . . . . . . . . . m7 . . . . . . . . ma7 . . . . . . . . .7 . . . . . . . . . . m7 . . . . . . . . . . . .m7b5

ninth . . . . . . . .9 . . . . . . .m9 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . ma9 . . . . . . . . .9 . . . . . . . . . . m9 . . . . . . . . . . . .—

eleventh . . . . . .— . . . . . .m11 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . ma9#11 . . . . . .11 . . . . . . . . . m11 . . . . . . . . . . .—

thirteenth . . . . .— . . . . . .m13 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . ma13#11 . . . . .13 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

11 no 3 . . . . . .— . . . . . .11n3 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .11n3 . . . . . . . 11n3 . . . . . . . . . .—

13 no 11 . . . . .13n11 . . .m13n11 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 13n11 . . . . . . .13n11 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sixth . . . . . . . .6 . . . . . . .m6 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . .6th . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

add 9 . . . . . . . ./9 . . . . . . .m/9 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . /9 . . . . . . . . . . . /9 . . . . . . . . . . m/9 . . . . . . . . . . .—

6/9 (pentatonic) . .6/9 . . . . . .m6/9 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 6/9 . . . . . . . . . .6/9 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.4 . . . . . . . .sus.4 . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.2 . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . . . .—

7 sus.4 . . . . . . .7sus.4 . . .7sus.4 . . . . . . 7sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .7sus.4 . . . . . . 7sus.4 . . . . . . . . .—

7/11 (pentatonic) .7/11 . . . . .m7/11 . . . . . . m7/11 . . . . . 7/#11 . . . . . . . .7/11 . . . . . . . . m7/11 . . . . . . . . .m7/11b5

13 sus. . . . . . . .— . . . . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 13#11sus2 . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

13 sus. . . . . . . .— . . . . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 13#11sus2 . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

Usuable chords for other seven tone scales are shown in Appendix D.

Incomplete ChordsWhen a chord is voiced without certain tones, its name can indicate the missing tones. If such an indication was not included in the chord name or if you weren’t given the chord name, you will need to determine which tone or tones is (are) missing.

SYMBOLS FOR MISSING CHORD TONES

symbol meaning symbol meaning

nr no root n9 no ninth

n5 no fi fth n11 no eleventh

n7 no seventh

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

“NO ROOT” CHORDS DETERMINED BY STYLE AND CONTEXT

When you are not given a chord name, you may often need to consider the possibility that the chord has a missing root. The missing root would usually be a third below the lowest tone in a series of thirds. Only consider the missing root when the larger chord it defi nes would be appropriate to the style of music in which it is involved. The missing root may be played by the bass on another instrument.

Tertian Chords Without a RootWhen the tones of a chord can be arranged into a series of thirds, also consider a “missing” chord root a major third or a minor third below the lowest tone in the series. The resultant chord may be more typical of the style in which it is used and/or may establish a more logical chord root progression.

Äâ 3

21

|||

5321

||||0123

||||

53210

|||||200

|||

3200

|||| æææ7

89

11

|||!|789

110

|||||

1

Dm7 nr I

3

2

1

Dm7 I

3

2

4

1

Dm9 nr I

3

2

1

Dm9 I

3

2

4

2

Cma7 nr I

2

Cma7 I

3

1

A9 nr IX

3

2

4

1

A9 IX

3

2

4

`

No root chords constructed in thirds are usually compete chords without the root under a different name. Dm7 no root is F major. Dm9 no root is F major seventh.

The Dm7 chord in the example above uses every other tone of a C major scale from “D” to “F” (D, F, A, C). Without the “D” note, it could be an F major chord or a Dm7 no root chord. The Dm9 chord in the example above uses every other tone of a C major scale from “D” to “E” (D, F, A, C, E). Without the “D” note, it could be an F major seventh chord or a Dm9 no root chord. In a chord progression where the Dm7 or Dm9 chord would be more typical, such as “Dm7(9) G7 Cma7”, you might suspect the “Dm7 no root” or “Dm9 no root” chord.

To be able to recognize no root chords constructed in thirds, you should memorize the following:

• the defi nition of tertian chords, which are chords constructed strictly in thirds, following the numbered scale tone cycle 1, 3, 5, 7, 2, 4 , 6, 1, etc.

• the seven major scale tone tertian triads: I major, II minor, III minor, IV major, V major, VI minor, VII diminished

• the tertian cycle of triads: I major, III minor, V major, VII diminished, II minor, IV major, VI minor, I major, etc.

• the seven major scale tone tertian seventh chords: Ima7, IIm7, IIIm7, IVma7, V7, VIm7, VIIm7b5

• the tertian cycle of seventh chords: Ima7, IIIm7, V7, VIIm7b5, IIm7, IVma7, VIm7, Ima7, etc.

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

Suspended Chords Without a Root“No root” chords with a suspended fourth or suspended second could not have their tones arranged in a continuous series of thirds. In place of thirds, suspended second and suspended fourth chords cause major second, perfect fourth and/or consecutive perfect fi fth intervals. Two consecutive perfect fi fths, would be an interval of a perfect fi fth occurring above the upper tone in a perfect fi fth, such as (C up to G, up to D).

Äâ 2

3

||223

|||222

||!|357

|||3577

||||3567

||!||20

||220

|||222

||!| æææ3

54

|||3547

||||3567

||!||A sus. 4 nr A sus. 4 A A7 sus. 4 nr A7 sus. 4 A7 A sus. 2 nr A sus. 2 A A7 sus. 2 nr A7 sus. 2 A7

MISSING TONES WITHIN A SERIES OF THIRDS

Two notes a fi fth apart can constitute a triad without a third. With an awareness of scale tone triad pairs covered earlier, the surrounding chords can suggest the quality of the completed triad. It can be useful to know what the completed chords would be for the purposes of improvisation and arranging. In improvising, you would typically emphasize the notes of the completed chord in your melody. In arranging, you may want to use a more complete chord in another instrument part.

No Third ChordsPower Chords. Perfect fi fths are often used in modern hard rock. They are typically referred to as “power chords”. Though you may not need to complete the chord in the accompaniment part (it may in fact be inap-propriate for the style), it would be useful to know what the completed triad.

In the example below, the G major scale tone chords are complete triads. Compare the chords in the power chord example to their counter parts in the G major scale-tone chords to fi nd that each chord is missing its highest note. These G major scale tone chords are voiced with their roots as the lowest pitch, their fi fths as the middle pitch, and their thirds as the highest pitch.

Ä ! 44â 44

1214

«t «t8

10

tIt d1012

tIt79

d tIt æææ

AA354

ttt575

ttt743

ttt355

ttt577

ttt798

ttt9

1010

ttt101212

tttpower chord example G major scale-tone chords

G Am Bm C D Em F#dim.

G

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

Ninth, No Third. The example below shows a major ninth chord without a third. It could also be named as a major triad on the fi fth, with its fourth in the bass (A major triad with D bass).

A/D VDma9 n3 V

5

7

91

1

3

54

No FifthChords with four or more different notes often have no fi fth. Like the root, it can be suggested in the context of the progression (imagined by the listener) or may be played by another instrument. In the example below, the fi rst three chords are missing their fi fths. In the last three chords, each chord has the same notes as the version to its left with the same name with the fi fth included. The fi ngerings had to be changed radically to allow fi ngering the notes.

D7#9 IV3

1 b7

#9

G13 IIIb71

3

13

Cma9 II3

1

7

2

D7#9 IX3

1 b7 #9

G13 IIIb71

3

13

Cma9 VII3

1

7

2

5

5

5

“No Seventh” Is Not Commonly UsedChords without a seventh are given add-tone names that exclude the seventh. This is done because the seventh is so important in the basic character of a seventh, ninth, eleventh or thirteenth chord (notice the odd number series). When the seventh is omitted, the chord is named regarding all of the notes below the seventh with an additional reference to the notes above the seventh. For example, “1, 3, 5, b7, 9” without the seventh is called “major (1, 3, 5) add nine”.

When the thirteenth is added without the seventh, the thirteenth is referred to as a sixth. For example, “1, 3, 5, 9, 13” would be called major sixth, add nine (rather than thirteenth, no seven, no eleven).

C6/9 II3 6

9 51

C13 n7, n11 II3 6

9 51

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

No NinthA missing ninth in a thirteenth chord is designated with “no ninth”. When an eleventh chord is missing its ninth, it is referred to as “seventh, add eleven”, usually written “7/11). There are various types of seven add eleven chords, including “7/11”, “m7/11” and “7/#11”.

Am11 n9 Vb7 b31

A13 n9 n11 Vb7

3

13

1

5

11 5 b7 b31 11 5

Am7/11 V

No EleventhA missing eleventh in a thirteenth chord is designated with “no eleventh”. No eleventh chords may also be referred to as seventh or ninth chords with an added sixth (the sixth is the same tone as the thirteenth).

A13 n9, n11 Vb7

3

13

1

5

A7/6 Vb7

3

13

1

5

A13 n5, n11 V

b7

3

13

1

b7

3

13

1

99

A9/6 V

Add-Tone And Suspended Chords

ADD TONE CHORDS

Sixth Chords When the bass part or chord name indicates that the next-to-lowest tone in a series of thirds is the chord root, it is a sixth chord. The series of thirds would be conceived by arranging the chord tones in thirds. Sixth chords can also be names after the lowest tone in the series of thirds, which would make it some type of seventh chord.

C6 IX

C

E

AG

Am7 IX Cm6 VIII Am7b5 IX

C6 IX

1

3

65

Am7 IX

b3

5

1b7

Cm6 VIII

1

b3

65

Am7b5 IX

b3

b5

1b7

C

E

AG

C

Eb

AG C

Eb

AG

thirds: A C E G thirds: A C Eb G

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

Add Nine ChordsNinths can be added to triads and to sixth chords. “/9” designates “add nine”.

A/9 V

1

3

5

9

A dim.7/9 IV

1

6

Am/9 V

1

b3 5

9

b3

b5

9

A dim.7/9 IV1

6

3

5

9

Multiple Added TonesUsually, when you indicate multiple added tones in a chord name, the alternate name would be complicated also. The alternate name usually would have to specify missing tones.

E7/6/#11 IX1

6

3 #11

b7

E13#11 n9 IX1

6

3 #11

b7

E13#11 n9 IX

1

2 3

4

fingers

2

SUSPENDED CHORDS

When you are unable to arrange the tones of a chord in thirds but instead have a series of three notes that are second and a fourth apart, suspect a suspended chord.

Suspended Fourth ChordsA suspended fourth triad has tones a perfect fourth and a perfect fi fth above the root. A seventh suspended fourth chord has tones a fourth, fi fth and seventh above the root.

A sixth suspended fourth chord is better named with its fourth as a root, where it would be a major add nine chord.

Suspended Second ChordsA suspended second chord has tones a major second and a perfect fi fth above the root. The notes of a suspended fourth chord may often be arranged so that the fi rst two intervals above the lowest tone are a second and a fourth, where the chord might be a suspended second type. A fourth tone must usually qualify as a seventh, but can be a sixth.

A sixth suspended second chord is better named with its second as a root, where it would be a seventh suspended fourth.

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

Synthetic Suspended Chords

Suspended Sharp Four. A suspended chord can include a sharp four, instead of a fourth. The sharp four would resolve to the major third.

Major Seventh Suspended Chords. A major seventh chord can have its third suspended by replacing it with a fourth or second.

Minor Major Seventh Suspended Chords. A minor major seventh chord is a minor chord with a major seventh (1 3, 5 7). Like the major seventh, it can have its third suspended by replacing it with a fourth or second.

Diminished Seventh Suspended Chords. A diminished seventh chord can have its third suspended by replacing it with a fourth. However, this produces a two synonyms which may be better names: m6 on the 3 of the dim. 7 sus. 4 or m75 on the 5 of the dim. 7 sus. 4.

COMBINED ADD TONE AND SUSPENDED CHORDS

These are usually better named with another chord tone as the root.

Sixth Suspended FourthThese types were mentioned earlier. A sixth suspended fourth chord is better named with its fourth as a root, where it would be a major add nine chord. A sixth suspended second chord is better named with its second as a root, where it would be a seventh suspended fourth.

Add Nine Suspended FourthThese could also be named suspended 2/4.

Seventh Or Ninth Add Tone With Suspended FourthSeven add 6 suspended fourth becomes a minor ninth no fi fth with its fourth in the bass.

Ninth add 6 suspended fourth becomes a minor ninth with its fourth in the bass.

Synonyms

INTERVAL NAME VERSUS TRIAD, NO FIFTH

A major triad without a fi fth is a major third. A minor triad without a fi fth is a minor third. A suspended fourth chord without a fi fth is a perfect fourth.

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

RELATIVE SIXTH AND SEVENTH

Relative Major Sixth and Minor SeventhA major sixth chord changes to a minor seventh by assigning the sixth as the root. Conversely, a minor seventh chord changes to a major sixth by assigning its third as the root.

Relative Minor Sixth And Minor Seventh Flat FiveA minor sixth chord changes to a minor seventh fl at fi ve by assigning the sixth as the root. Conversely, a minor

seventh fl at fi ve chord changes to a minor sixth by assigning its third as the root.

REPEATING INTERVAL CHORDS

Augmented TriadEach tone in an augmented triad is a major third above and below the next. It is a “stack” of major thirds. Fingerings may be inverted by moving up and down the fretboard in intervals of a major third (four frets, not counting the one you begin on).

Diminished SeventhEach tone in an diminished triad is a minor third above and below the next. It is a “stack” of minor thirds. Fingerings may be inverted by moving up and down the fretboard in intervals of a minor third (three frets, not

counting the one you begin on).

Seventh Flat FiveEach tone in 75 chord is a diminished fi fth (“5”) above and below the next. Fingerings major be inverted by moving up and down the fretboard in intervals of a diminished fi fth (six frets, not counting the one you begin on).

Ninth Flat Five, Sharp FiveEach tone in an 955 chord is a diminished fi fth (“ 5”) above and below the next. It is a “stack” of major seconds. Fingerings shouldn’t be, but can be inverted by moving up and down the fretboard in intervals of a major second

(every other fret). Inversions with the b7 and 9 in the bass should be avoided.

FLAT FIVE SUBSTITUTES

Many chords with altered fi fths and/or altered ninths which include a fl atted fi fth can also be named with the note on their fl atted fi fth as a root. The 7b5 and 9b5#5 chords mentioned above are fl at fi ve substitutes.

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Chapter 13: Identifying The Chord Root

INCOMPLETE VERSUS SUSPENDED CHORDS

Ninth No Third Versus Seventh Suspended SecondIf the second resolves to the third, use the suspended second name. Otherwise use ninth no third if the chord sounds resolved in context or use the seventh suspended second name if it sounds unresolved in context.

Eleventh No Third Versus Ninth Suspended FourthIf the second resolves to the third, use the suspended second name. Otherwise use eleventh no third if the chord

sounds resolved in context or use the ninth suspended second name if it sounds unresolved in context.

Thirteenth No Eleven Versus Ninth Add SixYou should usually use the thirteenth no eleven version of the name, since it is more common. However, the ninth add six name is more precise.

Thirteenth No Nine, No Eleven Versus Seventh Add SixAs with the chord above, usually use the thirteenth no nine, no eleven name, since it is more common, though the seventh add six name is more precise.

CHORD NAME DECISIONS MADE ACCORDING TO STYLE AND FAMILIARITY

Sixth chords are typical of swing music (early to mid twentieth century jazz dance music). In an ambiguous situation, where it is diffi cult to decide whether to name a chord as a minor seventh or as a major sixth, use the sixth version if the music has elements of swing.

Steely Dan music uses a lot a major ninth no third chords. They could be called major seventh, suspended second, but in context, they sound resolved, so they should use the major ninth no third version of the chord name.

If the music reader will be able to voice chords well, use specifi c versions of names like “7/6”, instead of the synonym 13 n9n11 (thirteenth, no nine no eleven).

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• The Third, Seventh & What’s In The Name• Implied Chord Tones• Essential Chord Tone Charts

14EssentialChord Tones

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

THE THIRD, THE SEVENTH & WHAT’S IN THE NAMETo summarize which tones need to be included in a chord, this phrase works: “The third, the seventh, and any note referred to in the chord name”.

OMITTED TONES

The Imagination Fills In For Omitted TonesExcept for an omitted root, there are usually options for what the omitted tone could have been. An omitted third could be a major third or a minor third. An omitted fi fth could have been a perfect fi fth, an augmented fi fth or a diminished fi fth. When the chord from which a note was omitted is part of a group of chords which derived from a seven tone scale (such as the major scale), the omitted tones tend to suggest the version implied by the harmonized seven tone scale. A thorough knowledge of the usable chords constructed from the major scale is very useful in determining the likely quality of an incomplete chord. See Chapter 13, Usable major Scale Tone Chords and Appendix G: Scale Tone Chords.

The Root And Fifth Can Be OmittedThe root and fi fth of a chord are so obvious that they can often be omitted. The listener will imagine them within the context of the music. This is more true for chords of four or more different notes. Triads sound better with all three notes included.

Twelve Bar Blues In C Example. In the rhythm guitar part of Twelve Bar Blues In C example below, no “C” note is ever played, yet most listeners can easily tell that the piece is in the key of “C”. Not only is the root of the C9 chord omitted, every occurrence of the “C” note was omitted. Each chord is played for one bar.

1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3 2 3 4

F9 n5 VII1 1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3

1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3 2 3 4

F9 n5 VII1

2 3 4

F9 n5 VII1

1

4

2

G7/6 n5 VIII

3 2 3 4

F9 n5 VII1 1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3

1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3

1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3 2 3

4

G7/6 n5 VIII1 1 2

4

C9 nr VII

3

Two Five One In C Example. In the rhythm guitar part of Two Five One In C example below, the fi fth of each chord is omitted, yet the chords sound relatively complete. Each chord is played for two beats.

2 2

4

Dm7 n5 V

2

1

4

G7 n5 IV

2

1

4

Cma7 n5 III11

4

Am7 n5 V2 2

4

Dm7 n5 V

2

1

4

G7 n5 IV

2

1

4

Cma7 n5 III

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

THE ESSENTIAL THIRD

In chords with a perfect fi fth (which most chords do), the third determines whether the chord is basically major or minor. A chord with a perfect fi fth and a major third (3) gives the chord a bright mood and make the chord major. A chord with a perfect fi fth and a minor third (3) gives the chord a dark mood and makes the chord minor.

When the third is missing (yet the chord has a perfect fi fth), the missing note may be present in neighboring chords, which would suggest that the chords quality, but not as distinctly.

THE ESSENTIAL SEVENTH

The seventh determines the upper coloring of the chord. A major seventh (7) chord tone creates a dissonance in being a half step below its root, and usually has a lower scale-tone neighbor is down a whole step (sometimes one and one half steps). A minor seventh (7) chord tone often has a lower scale-tone neighbor down a half step, with creates tension and suggests a downward resolution.

Two Perfect Fifth Intervals Within Major Seventh and Minor Seventh ChordsA major seventh chord has a major seventh (7), perfect and major third above the root. This constitutes two perfect fi fths: from the root to the fi fth and from the major third to the major seventh. Likewise, a minor seventh chord has two perfect fi fths: from the root to the fi fth and from the minor third (3) to the minor seventh (7).

A Dominant Seventh Chord’s Tritone Between Its Third And SeventhA tritone is a diminished fi fth interval, so called because it is three whole tones. A dominant seventh chord (1, 3, 5, 7) has a tritone between its third and seventh, which creates dual tensions. The third in a dominant seventh chord usually leads up a half step to a tone in the chord that follows it. The minor seventh (7) in a dominant seventh chord usually leads down a half step to a tone in the next chord.

The Sub-Triad Defi ned By The SeventhA sub-triad is a group of notes which can be extracted from a larger chord and which, by themselves, form a complete triad. The addition of a seventh to a triad defi nes the quality of a sub-triad created by the third, fi fth and seventh of the chord. Here are the sub-triads created by common seventh chord types:

seventh chord type formula sub-triad on root sub-triad on third major seventh 1, 3, 5, 7 major minor dominant seventh 1, 3, 5, 7 major diminished minor seventh 1, 3, 5, 7 minor major minor seventh fl at fi ve 1, 3, 5, 7 diminished minor diminished seventh 1, 3, 5, 7 diminished diminished dominant seventh fl at fi ve 1, 3, 5, 7 major 5 1, 2, 5 dominant seventh sharp fi ve 1, 3, 5, 7 augmented major 5 minor (major seventh) 1, 3, 5, 7 minor augmented

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

NUMBERED TONES INDICATED IN THE CHORD NAME

Odd-Numbers Or “6” Immediately After The Letter NameThe letter name part of a chord name may be followed by a fl at or sharp, such as “B” or “C”. When one of the odd numbers seven, nine, eleven or thirteen appears immediately after the letter name, they imply that the chord contains all odd numbers up through that number. A seventh chord contains a root (1), third (3), fi fth (5) and seventh (7). “9” implies 1, 3, 5, 7, 9. “11” implies 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11. “13” implies 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13.

Major Seventh Type Chords. If “ma”, “maj”, “major” or “∆” appears between the letter name and the odd number, the chord has a major seventh (“7”, as opposed to “7”). This constitutes a major seventh type chord, since it includes the numbered tones for a major seventh: 1, 3, 5 and 7. Examples: Cma7, Cma9, Bbmaj7, Bbma9#11.

Dominant Seventh Type Chords. If nothing appears between the letter name and the odd number, the chord has a fl atted seventh (7) and a major third (3). This constitutes a dominant seventh type chord, since it includes the numbered tones 1, 3, 5 and 7. Examples: C7, C9, Bb7, Bb9#11.

Minor Seventh Type and Half Diminished Chords. If “m” appears between the letter name and the odd number, the chord is minor and has a fl atted seventh. This constitutes a minor seventh type chord, with 1, 3, 5 and 7. If the chord also has a fl atted fi fth (containing 1, 3, 5, 7), it is a minor seventh fl at fi ve, sometimes called a half diminished chord (“full” diminished would be 1 3, 5 7 or 1 3, 5, 6). The symbol “ø” is used to indicate half diminished. Examples: Cm7, Cm9, Bbm7, Bbm7b5, Bbø7.

Minor, Major Seventh Type Chords. If “m(ma7)”, “m(maj7)”, “m(major 7)”, “m(7)”, “m(nat7) or “m(natural 7) appears immediately after the letter name, the chord is a “minor, major seventh” type with 1, 3, 5 and 7. Examples: Cm(ma7), Cm(7), Cm(maj7).

Likewise, if “m9(ma7)”, “m9(maj7)”, “m9(major 7)”, “m9(7)”, “m9(nat7) or “m9(natural 7) appears immediately after the letter name, the chord is a “minor ninth, major seventh” type with 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. Examples: Cm9(ma7), Cm9(7), Cm9(maj7).

Sixth Type Chords. If “6” appears immediately after the letter name, the chord is a sixth type with 1, 3, 5 and 6. Examples: C6, D6. If “m6” appears immediately after the letter name, the chord is a minor sixth type with 1, 3, 5 and 6. Examples: Cm6, Fm6.

Altered TonesAltered tones are shown at the end of a chord name. They are usually altered fi fths or ninths, but can also be sharped elevenths.

In the rare cases where a chord is altered and suspended, the altered tones are next-to-last in the chord name, followed by the indication of suspended fourth or suspended second. For example, 79 sus.4 (seventh fl at nine, suspended fourth) includes the altered tone “9” which is shown just before the “sus. 4” indication at the end.

Added TonesThe most typical added tones are sixths and ninths, but can also be elevenths or (rarely) fl atted sixths.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

Suspended TonesIn a suspended chord the third is replaced with a second or fourth (most commonly the fourth). The third it replaces could be a major third (“3”) or a minor third (“3”). Suspended chords imply, but do not demand resolution to (being followed by) the same chord with the third instead of the second or fourth.

Suspended Fourth Type. When “sus4” or “sus” is shown in a chord name, it indicates that the third of the chord has been replaced with the fourth. The “default” version of a suspended chord is the suspended fourth, although suspended second chords are becoming fairly common. “Csus4” would include “C”, “F” and “G” notes, expressing the chord formula “1, 4, 5.” “Cma7sus4” would include “C”, “F”, “G” and “B” notes (1, 4, 5, 7).

Theoretically, a suspended chord could replace the third with an augmented fourth (4). This would be called “sus4”. “C7sus4” would include “C”, “F#”, “G” and “B” notes, expressing the chord formula “1, 4, 5, 7”.

Suspended Second Type. When “sus2” is shown in a chord name, it indicates that the third (major or minor) of the chord has been replaced with the second. “Csus2” would include “C”, “D” and “G” notes (1, 2, 5). “Cma7sus2” would include “C”, “D”, “G” and “B” notes (1, 2, 5, 7).

CombinationsChords can have combinations of altered, added and suspended tones. Here are some examples:

chord name chord formula letter names in C

C7b9sus4 1, 4, 5, b7, b9 C, F, G, Bb, Db

C6/9sus4 1, 4, 5, 6, 9 C, F, G, A, D

C7/6#5 1, 3, 5, 6, b7 C. E. G. A. BImplied Chord Tones

A chord name can imply tones in the triad part of the chord. This includes “augmented”, “diminished” and “suspended” as part of a chord name.

AUGMENTED

Augmented chords imply a sharped fi fth (5) and a major third (3). An augmented triad may be indicated with either “aug” or “+” after the letter name of the chord,. C augmented (C, E, G#) could be written “Caug” or “C+”. Seventh, ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords can use the “aug” or “+” symbols (C13aug or C13+), but it is better to use “#5” after the chord name (C13#5).

DIMINISHED

Diminished Triads. Diminished chords imply a fl atted fi fth (5) and a minor third (3). A diminished triad may be indicated with “dim” after the letter name of the chord,. C diminished (C, E, G) should be written “Cdim”.

Diminished Seventh Chords. The formula for a diminished seventh chord is “1, 3, 5, 7”. Diminished seventh chords should be referred to verbally as “diminished seventh”, not “diminished”. A “Cdim7” chord would contain the notes “C”, E”, “G” and “B” (= A).

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

You may be wondering why the “B” note in the “Cdim7” chord is not called “A”. Me, too. A simpler name for the diminished seventh chord would be “m65” (minor sixth, fl at fi ve). The diminished seventh name was coined at a time in the evolution of music that four note chords (four different notes) were all to be some kind of seventh chords, since there were few fourth note chords in use.

Diminished seventh chords are diminished triads with an added double-fl at seventh (7), which is the interval of a diminished seventh above the chord root. A “diminished seventh” interval is a half step smaller that a minor seventh interval.

Half Diminished Seventh Chords. The formula for a half diminished seventh chord is “1, 3, 5, 7”. They can be written “m7b5” or “Ø7” (Cm7b5 or CØ7, for example). I prefer the name “m7b5. It is more explanatory. A “Cm75” chord would contain the notes “C”, E”, “G” and “B”.

Half diminished seventh chords have a diminished triad as their basis, but have a fl atted seventh (7) instead of a double fl at seventh. So, the tone added to the diminished triad is a minor seventh interval above the root, instead of a diminished seventh.

SUSPENDED

If a chord name uses the word suspended or the abbreviation “sus.” without a number following it (such as sus. 4), you should assume that it is a suspended fourth. See “Numbered Tones Indicated In The Chord Name/Suspended Tones” above.

Essential Chord Tone ChartsOn the following pages, each set of essential tones is shown with a fi lled circle (black dot). The options for tones added to those essential tones are shown with empty circles (white dots). Each diagram can generate many chord fi ngerings, sometimes over twenty!

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

1. Dominant 7th Type ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

2. Minor 7th Type ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

3. Major 7th (∆7)Type ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

4. Add 9 (/9), Minor Add 9 (M/9), 6, M6 6/9 & M6/9 Chords.Blackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

5. Suspended Type ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

6. Whole Tone Chords: 7#5, 7b5, 9#5, 9b5.Blackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

7. Other Altered Dominant ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

8. Diminished Type ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

9. Minor Major Seventh (Minor Natural Seventh) ChordsBlackened dots are essential chord tones, circles are optional chord tones.

Am(ma7) IV Am(ma7) V Dm(ma7) V Gm(ma7) V Cm(ma7) IV Fm(ma7)nr IV

Fm(ma7) V Am9(ma7) V Dm9(ma7) III Gm9(ma7) V Cm9(ma7) VI

Cm(ma7) V

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Chapter 14: Essential Chord Tones

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15ChordInversion

• What Is Chord Inversion?• Root Position• First Inversion• Second Inversion• Third Inversion

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Chapter 15: Chord Inversion

What Is Inversion?

HARMONY IN THIRDS

Before going into the specifi cs of chord inversion, you need to know the fundamentals of chord construction in a harmonic sense. The fundamental unit of harmony is the third. Chords are typically constructed with consecutive notes from a cycle of thirds. The cycle of thirds is shown below in numbers and in letters. If this is not familiar to you, review Chapter 12: Structural Chord Types.

13

5

72

4

6C

E

G

BD

F

Atertiancycle of

numbers

tertiancycle ofletters

CHANGING THE ORDER OF PITCH

The most notable tones of a chord are the usually the lowest and highest pitches. Most commonly, the lowest pitch in a chord is the note after which it is named and is called the chord root.

Root PositionIf the root of the chord is the lowest pitch, the chord is said to be in root position. When the root is not the lowest pitch, the chord is inverted. See the diagrams below.

First InversionIf the third of the chord is the lowest pitch, the chord is said to be in fi rst inversion. If the chord is a suspended fourth, with the fourth as the lowest pitch, the chord is in fi rst inversion. If the chord is a suspended second, the second as the lowest pitch would make it in fi rst inversion. See the diagrams below.

Second InversionIf the fi fth of the chord is the lowest pitch, the chord is said to be in second inversion. See the diagrams below.

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Chapter 15: Chord Inversion

1

C III

3 4

C X1 1

3

3

C V1

4

1

C VIII

2

1

C XII

3

1 2

C VIII

3

2

1

C XII

2

1

3

C V1 1 1

C V1 1

3

3

C XII1

4

C II

3

1

2

C IX

3

1

2

root position

first inversion

second inversion

1 3 5 1 3 5

1 3 5 1 3 5

3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1

5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 3

Third Inversion

SEVENTH AND SIXTH CHORDS

If the seventh or sixth of a chord is the lowest pitch, the chord is said to be in third inversion. The other inversions are numbered the same.

3

C7 III1

1 5 b7

1

4

3

3

C7 I

2

3 b7 1

1

4

5

1

C7 V1

5 1 3

1

2

b7

2

C7 VIII1

b7 3 5

1 1

1

3

C6 II

1

1 5 6

1

4

3

3

C6 I

2

3 6 1

1

4

5

1

C6 V1

5 1 3

1 1

6

4

C6 V1

6 3 5

2 3

1

root position first inversion second inversion third inversion

root position first inversion second inversion third inversion

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Chapter 15: Chord Inversion

SUSPENDED 2/4 CHORDS

Chords with a suspended second and fourth are not universally accepted. It is standard that the fi fth in the bass makes a chord second inversion, but the suspended 2/4 chord presents a problem. It is debatable how they should be treated in regards to inversion. Should the second in the bass make it fi rst inversion, or should the fourth. Probably the second, but if so, would the fourth in the bass make it second inversion or third inversion?

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16Using The CD Rom

• Search By Chord Name• Search By Chord Grid • Navigation And Keyboard Shortcuts• Advanced Searches

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Chapter 16: Using The CD Rom

Search By Chord Name• Click the “search by name” button. It is on the top center of the search view.

• Click a button for the chord root in the vertical column of letter buttons (A, A, A, B, B, B, C, etc.). Optionally, you can enter the chord’s letter name in the “root” fi eld (no spaces, slashes or periods).

• Click a button for the chord type from the larger block of buttons (the top horizontal row begins “major”, “minor”, “dim.”) . Optionally, you can enter the chord type in text.

• Option: type in a position (Arabic number). The position fi eld is immediately to the right of the grid search button.

• Click on the “column” or “page” view button to the right of the “search by name” button. Do not click the “fi nd” button, since it does not include some of the discrete criteria that the “search by name” button provides. Clicking the fi nd button will usually give you more results than you want.

• The chord fi ngerings will be shown.

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Chapter 16: Using The CD Rom

Search By Chord Grid• Click the “grid search” button. It is on the upper left of the search view.

• Type in a position number (Arabic). In this case, the position is not necessarily the same as the “strict vertical position” referred to in Chapter 8. This position number represents the lowest-numbered fret being fi ngered.

• Click the notes on grid. Only click one note per string. At least one note must be on the top fret.

• Click on the “column” or “page” view button between the grids. I prefer the page view.

• The chord fi ngerings will be shown. If you are using the page view, there may be more than one page of results. If so, click the lower book page icon on the top left of the screen to advance to the next page or click the upper book page icon to revert to the previous page.

Navigation And Keyboard ShortcutsThe Vertical Control AreaClicking on the show/hide button on the lower left of all screens (shown below) hides or shows the vertical control area on the left.

The viewing mode is shown just to the right of the show/hide icon. The view modes are “browse”, “fi nd”, and “preview”. During a search, the view mode button will say “fi nd”. When you have clicked “column”, it will say “browse”. When you have clicked “page”, it will say “preview”. When the vertical control area is in view, the following is possible:

• In the page view there may be more than one page of results. If so, click the lower book page icon on the top left of the screen to advance to the next page or click the upper book page icon to revert to the previous page.

popup menu to change views

book page icon to change pages

total records

found records

sorted/or unsorted condition

view magnification

click here to enlarge view magnification

click here to reduce view magnification

show/hide control area button

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Chapter 16: Using The CD Rom

popup menu to change views

book page icon to change pages

total records

found records

sorted/or unsorted condition

view magnification

click here to enlarge view magnification

click here to reduce view magnification

show/hide control area button

Keyboard Shortcuts

action Mac OS shortcut Windows shortcut

show search view command+1 control+1

show column view command+2 control+2

show page view command+2 control+2

browse (column view) command+B control+B

fi nd (advanced user) command+F control+F

preview (change column to page) command+U control+U

print command+P control+P

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Chapter 16: Using The CD Rom

Advanced SearchesGrid Search By Subset

• Click the “subset” button. It is below the grid search button.

• Follow the second through last steps in “Search By Chord Grid” at the beginning of this chapter.

What Is A Guitar Chord Serial Number?A guitar chord serial number identifi es the chord with a formula number for each string, in order from sixth string to fi rst string. If a string has no note on it, the number “0” is used for that string. No spaces are used between the formula numbers for each string. Here are a few examples.

1

2

1

3 4

1

1 5 1 3 5 1

3

1

2

1

3 b2 b5 b7

C VIII C7b5b9nr VI1 2

43

b7 3 6 1

C13 I

serial number:151351

serial number:030b2b5b7

serial number:0b73610

In a guitar chord serial number, each tone of the chord is expressed with a formula number. If you don’t know what a chord formula is, please review Chapter 6. The formula numbers are expressed with one digit numbers. An eleventh would be indicated as a fourth. A thirteenth would be indicated as a sixth. Remember, any string that is not to be played must be represented with a zero (0). No spaces are entered between characters.

In the C major chord (VIII position) above, the serial number is straightforward. Each number represents a string in order from sixth to fi rst string: 151351. In the C7b5b9nr chord (“nr” means “no root”), a zero must be entered for the sixth and fourth strings, so the serial number is 030b2b5b7. The C13 chord must be represented with zeros for the sixth and fi rst strings, so the serial number is 0b73610.

Specify A PositionWhen conducting a search by grid, chord name or subset, you can specify a position by typing in the position fi eld just to the right of the grid search button. Or, enter the position by clicking on any button in the column of Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc.). You can specify a range of positions by entering one number, two periods (“..”), then another number. If you do a search for a single position by clicking the “fi nd” button on the vertical control area (visible only in “search” view), you should enter the number, click the “=” button (explained below), then click the “fi nd” button. Using the fi nd button is generally not recommended, since any entry fi elds usually need to be specifi ed with the “=” button after entry. Use the grid search, text search or subset buttons instead.

How To Search For A Chord By Serial NumberClick on the “search by name” button or select “fi nd” in the “mode” menu (command+F for Mac, control+F for Windows). Enter the desired serial number in the serial number box, located on the upper right of the search screen. Click a page button, column button, or type return.

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Chapter 16: Using The CD Rom

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17• The Goal Is To Not Need The CD Rom• The Procedure

Figure Out AnyChord Fingering

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Chapter 17: Figure Out Any Chord Fingering

The Goal Is To Not Need The CD RomWho needs over 64,000 chords? Most guitarists can do fi ne with two or three hundred chord fi ngerings memorized for quick recall. However, in particular arrangements you may need any of the 64,000 to accommodate a chord melody or harmonization with some other instrument part. The important thing is to be able to fi gure out all of the options for any chord.

The ProcedureThe steps below will give you an awareness of the possible chords for any given area of the fretboard.

• To be prepared to construct any chord, you must have a thorough knowledge of the material covered in this book, including octave shapes, chord formulas, memorization of common fi ngerings (especially sum-mary chords in appendix B), and essential chord tones.

• Choose the area on the fretboard in which you want to fret the chord. Usually, this is determined by a combination of the range of pitch, the tone produced by the guitar in that area of the fretboard and practi-cality of fi ngering.

• Determine the octave shape for the chord root in the area of the fretboard you have chosen.

• Chose a minimal set of essential chord tones.

• Consider options of notes that can be included with the essential chord tones, including those omitted in determining the essential tones and doubling any of the essential tones. First consider the options on the smallest two or three strings. You may have anywhere from one to around ten possibilities so far.

• Consider the possibilities derived so far as being a set of chords. Then consider that set with the additional of any notes and combinations of notes that can be added on the largest three strings. There may be any where from one to around ten possibilities for notes on the largest three strings. In many cases, this will provide well over twenty possibilities.

• Tend to use larger intervals in the low range of pitch (on the larger strings) and smaller intervals on the smaller strings.

• Avoid voicing the seventh in the low range. Ninths, elevenths and thirteenths should almost never be voiced in the low range. Exceptions would include playing in ensembles where much lower instruments, such as bass violin are playing in a much lower range of pitch, making your lower range relatively not so low.

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AppendicesA COMMON CHORDS............................................................... ................................ 165

B EXERCISES ............................................................... ...................................................... 181

C SUMMARY CHORDS ............................................................... .............................. 193

D TWO NOTE CHORDS ............................................................... ............................. 197

E SCALE TONE CHORDS ............................................................... .......................... 203

F CHORDS BY TYPE ............................................................... ..................................... 211

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Page 165: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• First Chord Reference Charts

• Three Note Chords

• Essential Blues Chords

• Jazz Chords

ACommon ChordFingerings

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Appendix A: First Chords

First Chord Reference Charts

FIRST 19 CHORDS

2 3 4

A I

2 3

1

Am I

2 3 4

B7 I

2

3

1

C I

1

1

4

2

Bm II

3

21

D I

32

1

D7 I

1

2

3

Dm I

2

3

1

C7 I

4

2 3

E I

3

4

2

1

F I

1

1

4

G I

1

3

1

3

2

1

F I

1

4

1 1

Fm I

1

3

1

2

1

3 4

G I

2

2

E7 I

1

2 3

Em I

1

2 3

A7 I

1

3 3

B II

3

1

4

2

Cm III

34

2

1

G III

1

3

1

4

1 1

Gm III

1

3

1 1 1

3 3

C III

3

1

4

2

Dm V

34

2

1

A V

1

3

1

4

1 1

Am V

1

3

1 1 1

3 3

D V

3

The chords below are movable.Each chord is named after its circled note.

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Appendix A: First Chords

FIRST 35 CHORDS

G9nr II

1

3 4

2

2 3 4

A I

2 3

A7 I

1 1 1

A7 I

2 3

1

Am I

2

1

Am7 I

1

3 3

B II

1

3

1

B7 II

2 3 4

B7 I

3

2

3

1

C I

3 4

1 1

4

2

Bm II

3

1 1

2

Bm7 II

3

2 3 3

B9 I

1

3

21

D I

3

1

2

D II

32

1

D7 I

2 3

4

D/F# I

1

2

3

Dm I

2

3

1

C7 I

4

2 3

E I

3

1

4

2

Dm7 I

11

4

2

1

F I

1

1

4

G I

1

3

1

3

2

1

F I

1

4

1 1

Fm I

1

3

11

2

1

F7 I

1

3

1

2

1

3 4

G I

2

1

4

G/B I

2

1

G7 I

3

2 3

E7 I

1

4

2

E7 I

1

2 3

Em7 I

4

2

Em7 I

2 3

Em I

1

1 1

Fm7 I

3

111

1

Page 168: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 168

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

FIRST 53 CHORDS

2 3 4

Bm7 I

G9nr II

13 4

2

2 3 4

A I

1 1 1

A II

2 3

A7 I

1 1 1

A7 I

2 31

Am I

21

Am7 I

1

3 3

B II

1

3

1

B7 II

2 3 4

B7 I

43

2 31

Am7 I

4

13

2

E dim7 II

4

23

1

C I

1

3

Cm7 I

3 4

1 1

42

Bm II

3

1 12

Bm7 II

32 3 3

B9 I

13

21

D I

3

12

D II

321

D7 I

2 34

D/F# I

12

3

Dm I

32

4

Dm I

23

1

C7 I

4 24

2 3

E I

3

1

4

12

4

Dm/F I

12

Dm7 I

11

42

1

F I

1

14

G I

2 3

Gdim7 II

1

3

1

32

1

F I

1

4

1 1

Fm I

1

3

1

3

1 1

Fm I

1 1 1

Fm7 I

1

3

1 1 1

Fm7 I

1 112

1

F7 I

1

3

1

21

3 4

G I

21

4

G/B I

1

4

Gm/Bb I

1 12

1

G7 I

3

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

24

C dim7 II

1

3

1 12

Am/C II

4

2 3

E7 I

1

42

E7 I

12 3

Em7 I

42

Em7 I

1

42

Em7 II

32 3

Em I

1

1

3

1 1

Gm III

12

1 1

Gm(ma7) III

1 1 1

Gm7 III

1 13 3

C9 no root III

13

1

Page 169: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 169

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

FIRST 78 CHORDS

2 3 4

Bm7 I

G9nr II

13 4

2

2 3 4

A I

1 1 1

A II

2 3

A7 I

1 1 1

A7 I

2

1

3

Ama7 I

1 1 1

Ama7 I

2 3

1

Am I

2

1

Am7 I

1

3 3

B II

1

3

1

B7 II

2 3 4

B7 I

3 3 3

B7 II

1

2

Bma7 II

4

3

1 1

3

A/C# II

4 4

2 3

1

Am7 I

4

1

3

2

E dim7 II

4

2

3

1

C I

2

Cma7 I

1

3

Cm7 I

3 4

1 1

4

3 4

1

4

2

Bm II

3

1 1

2

Bm7 II

3

2 3 3

B9 I

1

3 2 3

B7#9 I

1

4

1 2

4

Bm7b5 II

3 2

4

Bm7b5 I

1

21

D I

3

1

2

D II

32

1

D7 I

2 3

4

D/F# I

1 1 1

Dma7 I

1

2

3

Dm I

3

2

4

Dm I

2

3

1

C7 I

4 3 2

4

1

3

Cm7 I

2

1 1

3

Cm9 I

2 3 3

2 3

E I

3

1

4

2

C aug. I

3

11

1

2

4

Dm/F I

1

2

Dm7 I

11 1

Dm7b5 I

11

4

2

1

F I

1

14

G I

2 3

Gdim7 II

1

3

1

3 42

Fma7 I

1

3

2

1 1

3

2

1

Fma7 I

4

1 1

Fm I

1

3

1

3

1 1

Fm I

1 1 1

Fm7 I

1

3

1 1 1

Fm7 I

11 11

2

1

F7 I

1

3

1 1

2

1

F7 I

1

3

1

4

21

3 4

G I

21

4

G/B I

1

4

Gm/Bb I

1

4

Gm7/Bb I

3

12

Gm7/Bb I

3

1 12

1

G7 I

32

4

1

G7 I

31

4

G7 I

2 3

2 3

F aug. I

1

4

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

2

4

C dim7 II

1

3

1 1

1

Am/C II

4

1

3

2

E7 II

2 3

E7 I

1

4

2

E7 I

1

2 3

Em7 I

4

2

Em7 I

4

1

4

2

Em7 II

3

1

3 3

Em7b5 II

32 3

Em I

1 1 1

A II

4

1

3

Cm7 I

4

1

3

1

1

4

Gma7 II

32

1

Ema7 II

3 3 3

3

1 1

Dma7 II

1

4

F I

1

Page 170: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 170

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

FIRST 93 CHORDS

1 5 1 4 51 5 b7 b3 5

2 3 4

Bm7 I

G9nr II

1

3 4

2

2 3 4

A I

1 1 1

A II

2 3

A7 I

1 1 1

A7 I

2

1

3

Ama7 I

1 1 1

Ama7 I

2 3

1

Am I

2

1

Am7 I

1

3 3

B II

1

3

1

B7 II

2 3 4

B7 I

3 3 3

B7 II

1

2

Bma7 II

4

3

1 1

3

A/C# II

4 4

2 3

1

Am7 I

4

1

3

2

4

2

3

1

C I

2

Cma7 I

1

3

Cm7 I

3 4

1 1

4

3 4

1

4

2

Bm II

3

1 1

2

Bm7 II

3

2 3 3

B9 I

1

3 2 3

B7#9 I

1

4

1 2

4

Bm7b5 II

3 2

4

Bm7b5 I

1

21

D I

3

1

2

D II

32

1

D7 I

2 3

4

D/F# I

1 1 1

Dma7 I

1

2

3

Dm I

3

2

4

Dm I

2

3

1

C7 I

4 3 2

4

1

4

Cm7 I

3

1 1

3

Cm9 I

2 3

2 3

E I

3

1

4

2

3

11

1

2

4

Dm/F I

1

2

Dm7 I

11 1

Dm7b5 I

11

4

2

1

F I

1

1

4

G I

2 3

dim7

1

3

1

3 42

Fma7 I

1

3

2

1 1

3

2

1

Fma7 I

4

1 1

Fm I

1

3

1

3

1 1

Fm I

1 1 1

Fm7 I

1

3

1 1 1

Fm7 I

11 11

2

1

F7 I

1

3

1 1

2

1

F7 I

1

3

1

4

2

1

3 4

G I

2

1

4

G/B I

1

4

Gm/Bb I

1

4

Gm7/Bb I

3

1

2

Gm7b5/Bb I

3

1 1

2

1

G7 I

3

2

4

1

G7 I

3

1

4

G7 I

2 3

2 3

augmented

1

4

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

either chord tonecan be the root

2

4

1

3

1 1

2

Am/C II

4

1

3

2

E7 II

2 3

E7 I

1

4

2

E7 I

1

2 3

Em7 I

4

2

Em7 I

4

1

4

2

Em7 II

3

1

3 3

Em7b5 II

32 3

Em I

1 1 1

A II

4

1

3

Cm7 I

4

1

3

1

1

4

Gma7 II

3

2

1

Ema7 II

3 3 3

3

1 1

Dma7 II

1

4

F I

2

4

A sus.4 I

2

3

A7sus.4 I

3

1

3

B sus.4 II

4

1

3

1

B7sus.4 II

4

3

43

1

C sus.4 I

32

1

C7sus.4 I

4

1

D sus.4 I

3 4 4

2

1

D7sus.4 I

2 3

E sus.4 I

4 2

E7 sus.4 I

3 2

E7 sus.4 I

3

4

3

1 1

F sus.4 I

4 3

1 1

F7 sus.4 I

4

1

1

4

G sus.4 I

2

1 1

G7 sus.4 I

2

dim7 dim7 augmented

1 5 1 31 5 1 3 15 1 3 53 5 1 1 5 b7 3 1 5 1 3 b7 1 5 7 3 551 1 1 5 1 3 7 1 5 1 b3 5 5b3 5 1 1 5 1 b3 b7 1 5 1 4 5

1 5 b7 3 1 b7 13 551 5 b7 3 1 5 1 3 b7 1 b7 23 5 1 b7 b33 5 1 5 7 3

1

5 1 5 1 b3 5 1 b7 1b3 5 1 5 b7 b3 1 b5b7 b3

1

5 1 b5b7 b3 1 45 1 1 45 b7

1 3 5 1 3 1 3 b7 1 1 3 5 7 3 1 b3 b7 b3 1 b3 b7 b3 1 b3 b7 b3 5 1 b3 b7 2 5

3

1 4 5 1 1 4 b7 1

1 5 1 3 1 3 5 1 3 1 3 5 7 3 1 5 b7 3 1 5 13 5 1 5 7 3 1 5 1 b3 b3 5 1 b3 1 5 1b3 5 1 5 b7b3 1 b5 b7b3 1 5 1 4 1 5 b7 4

1 5 1 3 5 1 1 5 1 3 b7 1 1 5 b7 3 5 1 1 5 b7 3 1 5 7 3 1 5 1 b3 5 1 1 5 1 b3 b7 1 1 5 b7 b3 5 1 1 5 b7 b3

1 b5

b7 b3

1 5 1 4 5 1

1

3

1 5 b7 4 5 1 1 5 b7 4 b7 1

1 5 1 3 5 1 1 3 5 1 1 5 b7 3 5 1 1 5 b7 3 b7 1 1 7 3 5 71 3 5 1 5 1 b3 5 1 1 b3 5 1 1 5 b7 b3 5 1 b7 b3 5 1 1 4 5 1 1 5 b7 4 5 1

1

1 3 5 1 3 1 1 3 5 1 3 1 3 5 1 3 1 3 5 1 3 b7 1 3 5 1 5 b7 1 3 b7 1 5 1 3 5 7 b3 5 1 5 b3 b7 1 5 b3 b7 1 b5 3 b7 2 5 1 5 1 4 1 1 5 1 4 b7

Page 171: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 171

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

COMMON CHORDS BY OCTAVE SHAPE

641 root 42 root

2 3

1

major

53 root

2 3 41

3 2

631 root

1

3 4

1 1 1

minor

1

3 4

1

2

1

2

3

1

2

1

4

1 2

4∆7

major 7th

1

3

1

4

1

3 3

1 1 1

3 2

3 3

1

3

2

1 17

dominant 7th

1

3

1

4

1

3 4

1 1 11 1

2 2

1

3

1 1 1

m71

3

1

2

1

4

3 2

11 1

2

3

2

3

1

m7b51

3 4

1

3 3

4

2

3

23

1

dim. 7

13 4

4

22

1 13

y psame octave shape down each column; same type across each row

4

any notecan be root

any notecan be root

any notecan be root

2 3 33

4

2

1

4

3

2 4

1

321

3

4

1

3 4

2

1 1 1

3 3 33

1

2

4

1

4

1 1

3

1

E I A ID I G I

2 3 2 3

11

2

3 4

1

Em I Am IDm I Gm I

3

2

1

52 root

2

1

3

4

1 1

3

1

3

21

4

3

1 1

4

1 1

2

3

4

3

1

2

C I

4

1

Cm I

2

4

2 3

4

2

1 1

3

4

2

1 1

3

4

D/F# I

1

3

4

Dm/F I

2

augmented

32

11

any notecan be root

42

13

any notecan be root

11

any notecan be root

23

4

42 root

1

2

43

1

4

1

3

1

2

43

1

2

4

3

2 4

1

G I

3

1 5 1 3 5 1

1 5 1 b3 5 1

1 5 1 b3

1 5 1 31 3 5 1

1 5 1 b3 5b3 5 1 5 b3 5 1 5

5 1 311 5 1 3

1 7 3 5

1 5 7 3 1 5 7 3 53 5 7 3 5 1 31 7 1 3 5 7

1 b7 3 55 1

1 5 b7 3 1 5 b7 3 53 b7 1 5 1 31 b7 b7 1 53 b7 1 53

1 b7b3 55 1

1 5 b7 b3 1 5 b7b3 5

b3 b7 1

b7 1 5

1

b3

b7 b3 51

b3b7 b31

1 b3 b5b5 1 b5 b7 b3 1 b5 b7 b3b3b7 1 b7 1 b5b5 b3 b7 b3 b51

1 5 1 3 5 1 1 5 1 31 3 5 1 5 1 311 5 1 3 13

1 5 1 b3 5 1 1 5 1 b35b3 5 1 5 1 51 5 1 b3 b35

1 5 13 5 1 51 3 1

1 5 13 5 5 1 53

11 5b3

1 5 1b3 5

2

1

4

3

1 3 b75

Page 172: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 172

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

Three Note Chords

INTRODUCTION TO THREE NOTE MAJOR CHORDS

Three Note Close-Voiced Major Triads

1

C III

3 4

C X1 1

3

3

C V1

4

1

C VIII

2

1

C XII

3

1 2

C VIII

3

2

1

C XII

2

1

3

C V1 1 1

C V1 1

3

3

C XII1

4

C II

3

1

2

C IX

3

1

2

root position

first inversion

second inversion

1 3 5 1 3 5

1 3 5 1 3 5

3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1

5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 3

Three Note Open-Voiced Major Triads

C X

4

1

3

3

C VIII

2

1

C X

3 4

1

C I

2

1

4

C V

C V

4

1

3

C III

C II

4

1

2

C IX

4

1

2

root position

first inversion

second inversion

3 4

1

1

4

2

1 5 3 1 5 3 1 5 3

3 1 5

3 1 5

3 1 5

5 3 1

5 3 1

5 3 1

Page 173: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 173

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

THREE NOTE CLOSE-VOICED TRIADS

Three Note Close-Voiced Major

1 3 5

43

1

A II

1 3 5

43

1

A IX

2

1

3

1 3 5

A V

4

51 3

1

3

A XIIroot position

third in bass

3 5 1

11

3

A VII

3 5 1

11

3

A II1

2

3

3 5 1

A IX

2

1 1

3 5 1

A V

fifth in bass1

3

1 3

2

5

A XI1

3

1 3

2

5

A VI1

5 1 3

1 1

A II

5 1 3

3

1 2

A IX

Three Note Close-Voiced Minor

1 b3 5

4

2

1

Am II

1 b3 5

4

2

1

Am IX1 1

3

1 b3 5

Am V

2

51 b3

1

3

Am XII

~

root position

third in bass

b3 5 1

11

2

Am VII

b3 5 1

11

2

Am II1

32

b3 5 1

Am IX1 1 1

b3 5 1

Am V

fifth in bass1

3

1 b3

2

5

Am X1

4

1 b3

3

5

Am V1

5 1 b3

2 3

Am I

5 1 b3

3

2

1

Am VIII

Page 174: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 174

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

THREE NOTE OPEN-VOICED TRIADS

1

5

3

1

5 3

1

5 3

1

5

b3 1

5

b3

1

5

b3

major, root position minor, root position

1

53

major, first inversion minor, first inversion

1

5

3

1

5

3

1

5

b3

1

5

b3

1

5

b3

1

b5

b3 1

b5 b3

1

5

b3

diminished, root position

diminished, first inversion

1

b5b3

1

b5

b3

1

b5

b3

1

3

5

major, second inversion minor, second inversion diminished, first inversion

1

35

1

3

5

1

3

5

1

3

5

1

b3

5

1

b3

5

1b3

5

1

b3

5

1b3

b5

1

5

1

3

1

5

1

3

1

5

1 b3 1

5

1

b3

1

5

1

b3

1

5

1

3

1

b5

1 b3 1

b5

1

b3

1

b5

1

b3

1

5

3

1

5

b3

1

5

3

1

5

3

1

5

3

5

1

3

5

1

b3

5

1

b3

1

5

b3

1

5

b3

1b3

b5

1

5

1

b3

1

5

1

b3

Page 175: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 175

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

Essential Blues Chords

1 1

2

3

641 root 42 root 53 root 631 root52 root

91 3 5 b7 9 (=2)

(nr = m7b5)

1

3

2

1 1

3

321

4 1 22

1

3 3 3

1 1

4

43

1

4

2

3

2

3

1131 3 5 b7 9 11 13(9 = 2, 11= 4, 13= 6)

dominant 13th

2

1

3

24

3

1 1

4

1 2

4

3

3

4

1 1

4

1

3

2

1 171 3 5 b7

dominant 7th

1

3

1

4

1

3 4

1 1 11 1

2 2

3

2

1

4 2

1

4

3

12

43

1

2

43

1 b7 3 55 1 1 5 3 1 5 3 53 1 5 1 31 1 35 1 53 1 53

b7 3 5 2

1 3 b7 2

3 21 5

5 23 5

3 2 5

1 3 6

3 5 6 3 6 1 1 3 61 3 2 6

additional fingerings

5 2 3

3 5 2

3

2

161 3 5 6

major 6th

2

3 4

1

3 4

1 1 111 1

42

1

3

2

1

43

1 3 6 1 1 5 6 3 1 5 6 33 6 1 5 1 31 6 1 3 65

4

12 3

6 13

4

5

2

1

4

3

6 3 51

3

2

1 3 6

4

b7 2 5

6th 9n3n5

1 3 6

6th

2

1

3

3 6 1

3 3 3

1 3 6

1 1 1

b7 2 5

3 3 3

1 3 6

2

1

3

2 5 b7

2

1

3

3 6 1

2

1

3 6 1

4

2

1

2 5 b7

4

2

1

3 6 1

4

21 1

3 61

2

1 1

2 5b7

21 1

3 61

12

43

b7 1 53

2

1

4

3

6 3 51

2

1

3 3 3

3 b7 25 5

I6

2

1

43

1 3 65

2

1

3 3 3

3 b7 21 5

1

3 4

2

1 5 b7 3

I71 1

2

3

5 2 3 b7

IV9 V7

1 2

43

3 b7 2 5

2

1

3 3 3

3 b7 21 5

I9

3

2

4

3

2

4

3

1

2

36 1

3

1

2

25 b7

12

3

36 1

1 1

3

1 36

1 1

3

b7 25

1 1

1 36

3

2

1

3 3 3

3 b7 21 5

I9

1 2

43

3 b7 2 5

IV9 andV9

IV9 andV9

IV9 andV9

I6 IV9 andV9

1

4

3

2 53

2

2

1

3 4

321

2

1

3 4

3b7 21

1 1

2

3

5 2 3 b7

I9 IV9

32

1

4

V9

b7 2 5

9n3n5

1 3 6

6th

1 1 1

b7 2 5

3 3 3

1 3 6

2

1

3

2 5 b7

2

1

3

3 6 1

2

1

2 5 b7

4

2

1

3 6 1

4

2

1 1

2 5b7

21 1

3 61

2

1

3

2

1

3

3

1

2

25 b7

12

3

36 1

1 1

3

b7 25

1 1

1 36

3

9nrn5

3

1

2

2 3 b7

133

3 b7 2

1

2

3 b7 2

3

12

3 b72

3

1

2

1

43

3

1

2 3b7

4

2 3 b7

3b7 2

4

b7 b7 b7 b7 b7 b7 b7

b7

b7

b7

b7

b7 b7 b7

b7

b7 b7 b7 b7

23 b71

Page 176: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 176

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

Jazz Chords1

1

Gm

III

4

1 5

1 b3

5

1

24

1

Gm

7b5

II

3

1

b7 b

3 b5

23

1

G d

im7

II1

1

6 b3

b5

1

Gm

(ma7

) I

II1

11

Gm

7 III

1

1 5

b7 b

3 5

1

33

3

Gm

6 *I

I1

1

6 b3

5

1

2

4

3

G6

II1

1

1

2

1

G

III

34

1

1 5

1 3

5 1

1

4

2

Gm

a7

III

3

1

7 3

5

1

4

3

G7

III2

1

b7 3

5

1

E

I

23

1 5

1 3

5 1

43

2

G9n

r II

1

3

b7 2

5

43

2

G7b

9 III

11

2

34

2

1

4

3

G7#

5 III

G7b

5 II

1

b7 3

#5

1

b7 3

b5

1

3

2

see

alte

rnat

e se

t bel

ow

3

11

Gm

9nr

III1

b7 b

3 5

2

1

3

63

5

3

Fm7b

5 III

1

33

1 b5

b7

b3

3

F di

m7

III

1

1 b5

6 b

3

2

4

3

Fm

III

1

1 5

1 b3

4

2

4

Fm(m

a7) III

1

1 5

7 b3

3

2

4

Fm7

III

1

1 5

b7 b

3

23

3

Fm6

III

1

1 5

6 b3

1

2

3

F6

III

1

1 5

6 3

1

4

1

3

F III

2

4

1 5

1 3

3

Fma7

III

1

1 5

7 3

33

3

F7

III

1

1 5

b7 3

2

4

2

D

I

1

3

1 5

1 3

1

F9

II

2

1 3

b7 2

4

3

1

F7b9

II

2

1 3

b7 b

2

4

11

2

3

2

F7b5

III

1 b5

b7

3

1

3

2

F7#5

III

1 #5

b7

3

4

3

Fm9n

r III

4

2

1

b35

b72

1

3

Ebm

7b5

IV

1

2

b3 b

7 1

b5

2

3

Eb

dim

7 IV

1

4

b3 6

1

b5

1

3

Eb6

IV

2

4

1

3 6

1

1

2

Eb

III

3

4

1 3

5 1

1

3

Ebm

a7

III

1

4

1 3

5 7

1

4

Eb7

IV

2

3

1

3 b7

1

1

C

I

2

3

1

3 5

1

1

2

11

1

3

1

Eb7

#5

IIIE

b7b5

II

1

3 b5

b7

4b7

1

4

Ebm

7 IV

1

3

1

b3 b

7 1

1

Ebm

III

2

b3 5

1

1

Ebm

(ma7

) III

23

1

b3 5

7

1

2

Ebm

6 IV

1

3

1

b3 6

1

3

Eb9

IV

1

23

3

1

3 b7

2

5

3

Ebm

9 IV

1

23

3

1

b3 b

7 2

5

3

Eb7

b9

IV

1

24

1

3 b7

b 2

5

1

3#5

1

1

2

3

Cm

III

4

1

5 1

b3 5

1

3

4

Cm

(ma7

) III

2

1

5 7

b3

1

2

3

Cm

7 III

11

1

5 b7

b3

5

1

2

3

4

Cm

6 II

1

1

5 6

b3

2

43

C6

II1

1

5 6

3

1

3

C

III

33

1

5 1

3

1

43

Cm

a7

III

2

1

5 7

3

1

43

C7

III1

1

1

3 b7

3

5

4

A

I

23

1

5 1

3

1

43

Cm

7b5

III2

1

b5 b

7 b3

2

43

C d

im7

II1

1

b5 6

b3

3

C7b

9 II

1

2

1

1

3 b7

b 2

1

4

3

21

2

3

1

C7#

5 III

C7b

5 III

1

b5 b

7 3

1

b7

3

#5

1

2

1

C9n

r III

11

3

1

Cm

9nr

III

4 b35

b72

1 54 3

5b7

25

1

Bbm

7b5

II 3

2

11

Bb

dim

7 II 4

3

21

Bbm

II

I 4

5 b3

5

1

44

Bbm

(ma7

) III

1

2

5 b3

5

7

34

2

Bbm

7 II 4

3

1

2

Bbm

6 II 4

3

11

Bb6

III 1

5 1

3 6

11

1

Bb

III 4

5

1 3

1

11

1

Bbm

a7 III 3

5 1

3 7

11

1

Bb7

III 2

5 1

3 b7

11

G

I 3

5 1

3 1

1

Bb9

nr

III 2

5 2

3 b7

11

3

1

Bb7

b9nr

III 4

5 b2

3 b

7

2

31

2

1

3

4

1

23

Bb7

#5

IIIB

b7b5

III

#5 1

3

b7

3 b7

1 b

5

1Bbm

9nr I

II 2

4

3

b32

5b7

1

31

3

b7 3

5

23

3

3

1

2

4

13

b7b3

7#9

(1)

#2 3

(5)

b7

1

2

4

1

35

b7b3

2

3

1

2

1

33

12

43

4

1

b7 3

6

b7

3

6 1

1

3 b7

2

6

1

2

43

11

23

11

Gm

III

3

1 b3

5

111

1

Gm

(ma7

) III

2

7 b3

5

111

11

Gm

7 III

1

b7 b

3 5

1

33

3

Gm

6 II

1

6 b3

5

1

3

2

1

G9n

r III

1

b7 3

5

2

1

2

1

G7

III1

1

3

1

1

23

1

34

1

2

1

43

2

5b7

35

1

b73

5b2

11

2

1 5

7 b3

5

11

3

1

5 1

b3 b

7

b5

1 b

3 b7

5 1

b3 6

5 1

b3 6

4

3

1

2

4

13

b7b3

13(1

) (2

) 3

(5)

6 b7

1

2

F III

3

4

31

15

dim

7di

m7

dim

7

4

3

Ebm

7 IV

1

3 1b3

b7b3

m7b

51

b3 b

5 b7

prac

tice

in s

ucce

ssio

n

°7 (

dim

7)

*1

b3 b

5 6

min

or1

b3 5

m(m

a7)

1 b3

5 7

m7

1 b3

5 b

7m

61

b3 5

66

1 3

5 6

Jazz

Cho

rds

maj

or13

5m

aj 7

1357

7 (d

om 7

)1

3 5

b7O

RIG

IN9

(dom

9)

1 2

3 5

b77

b91

b2 3

5 b

7

© 2

000

Jim

Gle

ason

. A

ll R

ight

s R

eser

ved.

augm

ente

d1

3 #5

eith

er n

ote

can

be th

e ro

ot

7#5

1 3

#5 b

77b

51

3 #5

b7

Ess

enti

al c

hord

ton

es a

re t

he t

hird

, the

sev

enth

(if

invo

lved

)an

d an

y no

te m

enti

oned

in t

he c

hord

nam

e.au

gmen

ted

= "+

" =

aug.

= m

ajor

#5

= 1

3 #5

°7 =

dim

inis

hed

seve

nth

= 1

b3 b

5 6

(bb7

7 =

m7b

5 =

half

dim

inis

hed

= 1

b3 b

5 b7

∆7 =

maj

or 7

= m

aj 7

= M

7 =

1 3

5 7

"-7"

= m

inor

7 =

m7

= m

in7

= 1

b3 5

b7

"alt

" =

any

com

bina

tion

of

#5, b

5, #

9, b

9 th

at s

ound

s ap

prop

riat

em

in(m

a7)

= m

(ma7

) =

m (

7) = m

inor

, maj

or s

even

th=

1 b3

5 7

prac

tice

in s

ucce

ssio

n

min

or1

b3 5

m(m

a7)

1 b3

5 7

m7

1 b3

5 b

7m

61

b3 5

6

m9

(min

or 9

)1

2 b3

5 b

7

* an

y no

te o

f a

dim

inis

hed

seve

nth

chor

d (°

7) c

an b

e th

e ro

ot

Page 177: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 177

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

2

4

3

C6 VII1

1

1

2

1

C VIII

3 4

1

1 5 1 3 5 1

1

4

2

Cma7 VIII

3

1 7 3 5

1

4

3

C7 VIII2

1 b7 3 5

1

E I

2 3

1 5 1 3 5 1 6 3 5

3

C6 X

1

1 5 6 3

1

4

1

3

C X

2

4

1 5 1 3

3

Cma7 X

1

1 5 7 3

3 3 3

C7 X

1

1 5 b7 3

2

4

2

D I

1

3

1 5 1 3

1

3

C6 XIII

2

4

1 3 6 1

1

2

C XII

3

4 1 3 5 1

1

3

Cma7 XII

1

4 1 3 5 7

1

4

C7 XIII

2

3

1 3 b7 1

1

C I

2

3

1 3 5 1

2

43

C6 II1

1 5 6 3

1

3

C III

3 3

1 5 1 3

1

43

Cma7 III

2

1 5 7 3

1

43

C7 III1 1

1 3 b7 3 5

4

A I

2 3

1 5 1 3

1

C6 V

1

5 1 3 6

1 11

C V

4 5 1 3 1

1 1 1

Cma7 V

3

5 1 3 7

1 1 1

C7 V

2

5 1 3 b7

1 1

G I

3

5 1 3 1

1

2

1

C7 VIII1

1

3

1

5 b7 3 5 1

1

2

C X

3

4

3 1 15

additionalfingerings

-

2

4 3

C aug. VI1

1 #5 3 #5

practice in succession

C aug. X

2

1 3 #5 3

1

4

1

11

C aug. XIII

2

3

1 3 #5 1

1

3

4

C aug. III

2

1 #5 1 3

4

C aug. IV

1

#5 1 3 #5

2 3

61 3 5 6

major135

maj 71357

7 (dom 7)1 3 5 b7

ORIGIN

Page 178: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 178

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

1 1

Cm VIII

4

1 5 1 b3 5 1

2 4

1

Cm7b5 VII

3

1 b7 b3 b5

2 3

1

C dim7 VII

1

1 6 b3 b5

1

Cm(ma7) VIII

11 1

Cm7 VIII1

1 5 b7 b3 5 1

33 3

Cm6 VII1

1 6 b3 5 1

1

3

2

1

3

3

Cm7b5 X

1

3 3

1 b5 b7 b3

3

C dim7 X

1

1 b5 6 b3

2

4

3

Cm X

1

1 5 1 b3

4

2

4

Cm(ma7) X

1

1 5 7 b3

3

2

4

Cm7 X

1

1 5 b7 b3

2 3

3

Cm6 X

1

1 5 6 b3

1

2

1

3

Cm7b5 I

1

2

b3 b7 1 b5

2

3

C dim7 I

1

4

b3 6 1 b5

1

4

Cm7 I

1

3

1 b3 b7 1

1

Cm XII

2

b3 5 1

1

Cm(ma7) XII

23

1

b3 5 7

1

2

Cm6 I

1

3

1 b3 6 1

1

2

3

Cm III

4

1 5 1 b3 5

1

3

4

Cm(ma7) III

2

1 5 7 b3

1

2

3

Cm7 III1 1

1 5 b7 b3 5

1

2

3

4

Cm6 II1

1 5 6 b3

1

43

Cm7b5 III2

1 b5 b7 b3

2

43

C dim7 II1

1 b5 6 b3

1

Cm7b5 IV

3

2

11

C dim7 IV

43

21

Cm V

4

5 b3 5 1

4 4

Cm(ma7) V

1

2

5 b3 5 7

3 4

2

Cm7 IV

4

3

1

2

Cm6 IV

43

1

1 1

Cm VIII

3

1 b3 5 1

1 1 1

Cm(ma7) VIII

2

7 b3 5 1

1 11 1

Cm7 VIII1

b7 b3 5 1

33 3

Cm6 VII=1

6 b3 5 1

1 1

2

1 5 7 b3 5 1

1

3

1

5 1 b3 b7 b5 1 b3 b7 5 1 b3 6 5 1 b3 6

43

2

Cdim7 VII1

6 b3 b5 1

43

2

Cdim7 VII

1

b7 b3 b5 1

*any note of a diminished 7 chord can be the root

m7b51 b3 b5 b7

°7 (dim 7)*1 b3 b5 6

minor1 b3 5

m(ma7)1 b3 5 7

m71 b3 5 b7

m61 b3 5 6

practice in succession

Page 179: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 179

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

7#51 3 #5 b7

7b51 3 #5 b7

1 2

3 42

1

4

3

C7#5 VIIIC7b5 VII

1 b7 3 #51 b7 3 b5

1

2

3

2

C7b5 X

1 b5 b7 3

1

3

2

C7#5 X

1 #5 b7 3

4

1

2

111

3

1

C7#5 IC7b5 XI

1 3 b5 b7

4 b7 3 #5 1

1

4

3

21

2

3

1

C7#5 IIIC7b5 III

1 b5 b7 3 1 b7 3 #5

1

2

1

3

4

1

2 3

C7#5 VC7b5 V

#5 1 3 b7 3 b7 1 b5

9 (dom 9)1 2 3 5 b7

7 b91 b2 3 5 b7

43

2

C7b9 VIII1

1

C7b9 IX

2

1 3 b7 b2

4

1

3

C7b9 I

1

2 4

1 3 b7 b 2 5

1

3

C7b9 II

1

2

1

1 3 b7 b 2

1

C7b9nr V

4

5 b2 3 b7

2

3

1

31 3 b7 3 5

2 3 3

2

1

4

3

1 3 b7 b3

7#9(1) #2 3 (5) b7

1

2

4

1

3 5 b7 b3

2

3

1

2

1

33

1 2

43

4

1 b7 3 6

b7 3 6 1

1 3 b7 2 6

b7 3 5 b2

4

13(1) (2) 3 (5) 6 b7

C13 II

C13 VIII

C13 XIII

C7#9 nr II

C7#9 V

C7#9 IXC13 nr IX

2

3

11

4

43

2

C9nr VII1

3 b7 2 5

1

C9 IX

2

1 3 b7 2

4

3

3

C9 XIV

1

2 3 3

1 3 b7 2 5

1

2

1

C9nr III

1

4

3 5 b7 2 5

1

C9nr V

2

5 2 3 b7

1 1

3

3

2

1

C9nr VIII1

b7 3 5 2

m9 (minor 9)1 2 b3 5 b7

3

1 1

Cm9nr VIII1

b7 b3 5 2

3

Cm9nr X

4

2

1

b3 5 b7 2

3

Cm9 XIII

1

2 3 3

1 b3 b7 2 5

1

3

1

Cm9nr III

4

b3 5 b7 2

1

5

1

Cm9nr V

2

4

3

b3 2 5 b7

The essential chord tones are the third, the seventh (if involved) and any note mentioned in the chordname.augmented = "+" = aug. = major #5 = 1 3 #5°7 = diminished seventh = 1 b3 b5 6 (bb7)Ø7 = m7b5 = half diminished = 1 b3 b5 b7min(ma7) = m(ma7) = m ( 7) = minor, major seventh= 1 b3 5 7

13

2

1 b7 2 3 6

C13 V

3 4

2

1

1 5 3 b7 #2

4

C7#9 VIII

3

4

3

1

2

4

1 3 b7 b3

C7#9 II

∆7 = major 7 = maj 7 = M7 = 1 3 5 7"-7" = minor 7 = m7 = min7 = 1 b3 5 b7"alt" = combinations of #5, b5, #9, b9 that sound well

Page 180: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 180

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix A: First Chords

Page 181: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Major Scale And Arpeggio Exercises• 30 Most Important Seventh Chords Exercise

BExercises

Page 182: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 182

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

MAJOR SCALE AND MAJOR ARPEGGIO EXERCISES

These exercises summarize the most practical major arpeggios when they are combined in melodic phrases with major scale fi ngerings in the same key (C major arpeggio with C major scale , for example).

Fingering 1

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

9

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

9

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

æø

ææø10

t2↓

12

t4↑

8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

10

t2↑

8

t1↓

8

t1↑

9

t2↑

10

t3↑

10

t3↑

12

t4↑

æ

ææ8

«|1↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û

8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

Û

8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

Û9

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

Û9

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

æø

ææøÛ

10

t2↓

12

t4↑

8

t1↓

Û10

t2↑

12

t4↓

10

t2↑

Û8

t1↓

8

t1↑

9

t2↑

Û10

t3↑

10

t3↑

12

t4↑

æ

ææ8

A1↓

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 8

t1↑

12

t4↓

10

t3↓

10

t3↓

9

t2↓

8

t1↓

8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

10

t2↑

8

t1↓

12

t4↑

æø

ææø10

t2↓

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

9

t1↑

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

9

t1↑

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

8

t1↑

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

æ

ææ8

«|1↑

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û

8

t1↑

12

t4↓

10

t3↓

Û10

t3↓

9

t2↓

8

t1↓

Û8

t1↓

10

t2↑

12

t4↓

Û10

t2↑

8

t1↓

12

t4↑

æø

ææøÛ

10

t2↓

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

Û9

t1↑

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

Û9

t1↑

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

Û

8

t1↑

12

t4↑

10

t2↓

æ

ææ8

A1↑

Page 183: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 183

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Fingering 2

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1↓

10

t3↑

12

t4↓

13

t1↓

10

t3↑

12

t4↓

14

t1↓

10

t1↑

12

t3↓

14

t4↑

15

t1↓

12

t3↑

14

t æø

ææø1↓

12

t2↑

13

t4↓

15

t1↓12

t4↑15

t

1↓12

t2↑

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t1↓

10

t1↑

10

t3↑

12

t æ

ææ1

10

«|↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û1↓

10

t3↑

12

t4↓

13

t Û1↓

10

t3↑

12

t4↓

14

t Û1↓

10

t1↑

12

t3↓

14

t Û4↑

15

t1↓

12

t3↑

14

t æø

ææøÛ

1↓

12

t2↑

13

t4↓

15

t Û1↓12

t4↑15

t

1↓12

2↑

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t Û1↓

10

t1↑

10

t3↑

12

t æ

ææ1↓

10

A

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1↓

10

t3↑

12

t1↓

10

t1↓

10

t3↑

14

t1↓

12

t2↓

13

t1↓12

t4↑15

t

2↓13

t1↑12

t4↑

15

tæø

ææø2↓

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t1↓

12

t4↑

15

t3↓

14

t1↑

12

t1↓

10

t4↑

14

t3↓

12

t1↑

10

t3↑

12

t æ

ææ1↓

10

«|

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û1↓

10

t3↑

12

t1↓

10

t Û1↓

10

t3↑

14

t1↓

12

t Û2↓

13

t1↓12

t4↑15

2↓13

t

1↑12

t4↑

15

tæø

ææøÛ

2↓

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t Û1↓

12

t4↑

15

t3↓

14

t Û1↑

12

t1↓

10

t4↑

14

t Û3↓

12

t1↑

10

t3↑

12

t æ

ææ1↓

10

A

Page 184: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 184

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Fingering 3

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø15

t4↓

12

t1↑

13

t2↓

15

t4↑

12

t1↓

14

t3↑

15

t4↓

12

t1↓

14

t3↑

15

t4↓

12

t1↓

14

t3↑

æø

ææø12

t1↓

13

t2↑

15

t4↓

12

t1↓

15

t

4↑

12

t1↓

13

t2↑

12

t1↑

14

t3↑

15

t4↑

15

t4↑

12

t1↓

æ

ææ15

«|4↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û4↓

15

t1↑

12

t2↓

13

t Û4↑

15

t1↑

12

t3↓

14

t Û4↓

15

t1↑

12

t3↓

14

t Û4↓

15

t1↑

12

t3↓

14

t æø

ææøÛ

1↑

12

t2↓

13

t4↓

15

t Û1↑12

t4↓15

t

1↑12

2↑

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t Û4↑

15

t4↑

15

t1↓

12

t æ

ææ15

A4↓

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø4↓

15

t1↑

12

t4↓

15

t4↓

15

t3↓

14

t1↓

12

t2↓

13

t1↓12

t4↑15

t

2↓13

t1↑12

t4↑

15

tæø

ææø2↓

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t1↓

12

t4↑

15

t3↓

14

t1↑

12

t4↑

15

t3↓

14

t1↑

12

t4↑

15

t1↓

12

t æ

ææ4↓

15

«|

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û4↓

15

t1↑

12

t4↓

15

t Û4↓

15

t3↓

14

t1↓

12

t Û2↓

13

t1↓12

t4↑15

2↓13

t

1↑12

t4↑

15

tæø

ææøÛ

2↓

13

t1↑

12

t3↑

14

t Û1↓

12

t4↑

15

t3↓

14

t Û1↑

12

t4↑

15

t3↓

14

t Û1↑

12

t4↑

15

t1↓

12

t æ

ææ4↓

15

A

Page 185: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 185

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Fingering 4

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 3

t2↑

3

t2↑

5

t4↓

2

t1↓

3

t2↑

5

t4↓

2

t1↓

3

t2↑

5

t4↓

2

t1↓

4

t3↑

5

t4↓

æø

ææø3

t1↓

5

t3↑

6

t4↓

3

t1↓

5

t1↑

7

t3↓

8

t4↑

3

t1↓

5

t3↑

5

t3↑

5

t3↑

2

t1↓

æ

ææ3

«|2↑

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û

3

t2↑

3

t2↑

5

t4↓

Û

2

t1↓

3

t2↑

5

t4↓

Û

2

t1↓

3

t2↑

5

t4↓

Û

2

t1↓

4

t3↑

5

t4↓

æø

ææøÛ

3

t1↓

5

t3↑

6

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Û3

t1↓

5

t1↑

7

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Û8

t4↑

8

t1↓

5

t3↑

Û5

t3↑

5

t3↑

2

t1↓

æ

ææ3

A2↑

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 3

t2↓

2

t1↓

5

t3↑

5

t3↓

5

t3↓

3

t1↓

8

t4↑

7

t3↓

5

t1↑

3

t1↓

6

t4↑

5

t3↓

æø

ææø3

t1↑

5

t3↑

4

t2↓

2

t1↑

5

t4↑

3

t2↓

2

t1↑

5

t4↑

3

t2↓

2

t1↑

5

t4↑

3

t2↓

æ

ææ3

«|2↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û

3

t2↓

2

t1↓

5

t3↑

Û5

t3↓

5

t3↓

3

t1↓

Û8

t4↑

7

t3↓

5

t1↑

Û3

t1↓

6

t4↑

5

t3↓

æø

ææøÛ

3

t1↑

5

t3↑

4

t2↓

Û2

t1↑

5

t4↑

3

t2↓

Û2

t1↑

5

t4↑

3

t2↓

Û

2

t1↑

5

t4↑

3

t2↓

æ

ææ3

A2↓

Page 186: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 186

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Fingering 5

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 3

t1↓

3

t1↑

5

t2↓

7

t4↑

3

t1↓

5

t2↑

7

t4↓

3

t1↓

5

t2↑

7

t4↓

4

t1↓

5

t2↑

æø

ææø7

t4↓

5

t1↓

6

t2↑

8

t4↓

5

t1↓

7

t3↑

8

t4↓

3

t4↑

5

t1↑

5

t1↑

5

t1↑

7

t3↑

æ

ææ3

«|1↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û

3

t1↓

3

t1↑

5

t2↓

Û

7

t4↑

3

t1↓

5

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7

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3

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7

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4

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5

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ææøÛ

4

7

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1

5

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2

6

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8

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1

5

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3

7

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8

t

↓4

8

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1

5

t↑

Û1

5

t↑

1

5

t↑

3

7

t↑

æ

ææ3

A1↓

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

3

t↓

3

7

t↑

1

5

t↓

1

5

t↓

1

5

t↓

4

8

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4

8

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↓3

7

t

↑1

5

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4

8

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2

6

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1

5

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ææø4

7

t↑

2

5

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1

4

t↑

4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

3

t↑

4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

3

t↑

4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

3

t↑

æ

ææ3

«|1↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û1

3

t↓

3

7

t↑

1

5

t↓

Û1

5

t↓

1

5

t↓

4

8

t↑

Û4

8

t

↓3

7

t

↑1

5

t↓

Û4

8

t↑

2

6

t↓

1

5

t↑

æø

ææøÛ

4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

4

t↑

Û4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

3

t↑

Û4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

3

t↑

Û4

7

t↑

2

5

t↓

1

3

t↑

æ

ææ1

3

A↓

Page 187: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 187

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Fingering 6

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø4

8

t↓

1

3

t↑

1

5

t↓

3

7

t↑

4

8

t↓

1

5

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3

7

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4

8

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1

5

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3

7

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4

9

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1

5

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7

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1

5

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2

6

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4

8

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5

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7

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4

8

t

↓4

8

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1

5

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1

5

t↑

1

5

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3

7

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æ

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«|4↓

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û4

8

t↓

1

3

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1

5

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7

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4

8

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1

5

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7

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4

8

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5

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7

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4

9

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5

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7

t3↑

5

t1↓

6

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t4↓

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t1↓

7

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t4↓

8

t4↑

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t1↑

5

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7

t3↑

æ

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A4↓

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø4

8

t↑

3

7

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1

5

t↓

1

5

t↓

1

5

t↓

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8

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8

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↓3

7

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↑1

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8

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6

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9

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7

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5

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4

8

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7

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1

5

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4

8

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3

7

t↓

1

5

t↑

1

3

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ææ4

8

«|↑

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û4

8

t↑

3

7

t↓

1

5

t↓

Û1

5

t↓

1

5

t↓

4

8

t↑

Û4

8

t

↓3

7

t

↑1

5

t↓

Û4

8

t↑

2

6

t↓

1

5

t↑

æø

ææøÛ

3

7

t↑

1

5

t↓

4

9

t↑

Û3

7

t↓

1

5

t↑

4

8

t↑

Û3

7

t↓

1

5

t↑

4

8

t↑

Û3

7

t↓

1

5

t↑

1

3

t↓

æ

ææ4

8

A↑

Page 188: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 188

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Fingering 7

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 8

t↑2

10

t↓4

7

t↓1

8

t↑2

10

t↓4

7

t↓1

9

t↑2

10

t↓3

7

t↓1

9

t↑2

10

t↓3

8

t↓1

æø

ææø10

t↑3

12

t↓4

8

t

↓1

10

t

↑3

12

t

↓4

10

t

↑3

8

t

↓1

8

t↑1

9

t↑2

10

t↑3

10

t↑3

7

t↓1

æ

ææ8

«|↑2

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û↑

8

t2

10

t4

7

t1

Û↑

8

t2

10

t4

7

t1

Û↑

9

t2

10

t3

7

t1

Û↑

9

t2

10

t3

8

t1

æø

ææøÛ

10

t↑3

12

t↓4

8

t

↓1

Û10

t

↑3

12

t

↓4

10

t

↑3

Û8

t

↓1

8

t↑1

9

t↑2

Û10

t↑3

10

t↑3

7

t↓1

æ

ææ8

A↑2

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 8

t↓2

7

t↓1

10

t↑3

10

t↓3

9

t↓2

8

t↓1

8

t

↓1

10

t

↑3

12

t

↓4

10

t

↑3

8

t

↓1

12

t

↑4

æø

ææø10

t↓3

8

t↑1

10

t↑3

9

t↓2

7

t↑1

10

t↑3

9

t↓2

7

t↑1

10

t↑4

8

t↓2

7

t↑1

10

t↑4

æ

ææ8

«|↓2

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û↓

8

t2

7

t1

10

t3

Û↓

10

t3

9

t2

8

t1

Û↓8

t1

↑10

t3

↓12

t4

Û↑10

t3

↓8

t1

12

t4

æø

ææøÛ

10

t3

8

t1

10

t3

Û↓

9

t2

7

t1

10

t3

Û↓

9

t2

7

t1

10

t4

Û↓

8

t2

7

t1

10

t4

æ

ææ8

A↓2

Page 189: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 189

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Five Basic Major And Minor Arpeggios ExerciseProcedures For The Exercise

• Using the Five Basic Major And Minor Arpeggios page (the next page), memorize the fi ve major barré chords and note their adjoining structure on the full fretboard major arpeggio diagram at the top right.

• Notice that each barré chord was made up by fi ngering an open-position major chord without the index fi nger, then using the index fi nger to barré. Four of the fi ve fi ngerings use a six string barré (the D form chord in the column below the fi rst position D chord does not).

• It is very important to memorize the relative location of the circled chord roots, which make up an octave shape in each chord and arpeggio. These fi ve octave shapes make up a system that puts each scale, arpeg-gio, chord and melodic phrase in one of fi ve categories in regard to the location of the chord root or tone center after which it is named.

• Each arpeggio is diagrammed twice. In the row labeled “major arpeggio”, each arpeggio is shown with formula numbers, comparing the notes in the arpeggio to a major scale on its root. Directly below each major arpeggio fi ngering (in the row labeled “fi nger numbers”) the fi nger numbers for your fretting hand are shown.

• After playing all fi ve barré chords, play the arpeggio for each.

• To see the logic in the numbered chord tones in the arpeggio, play the major scale fi ngering for each, which is shown directly below in the row labeled “major scale”.

• Each major scale fi ngering is diagrammed twice. In the “major scale” row, each scale fi ngering is shown with numbered major scale tones. Directly below each major scale fi ngering (in the row labeled “fi nger numbers”) the fi nger numbers for your fretting hand are shown.

Using What You Learned To Construct Major and Minor Arpeggios

• Identify the octave shape for the chord roots

• Play the barréd version of the major chord on the chord roots.

• Using a reference page with the seven “in-position” major scale fi ngerings, fi nd the major scale fi ngering which has “1” in the same octave shape as your chord roots.

• Play the major scale and think the numbered scale tones.

• Play the complete major arpeggio, which is all the “1, 3, 5’s”. You will be adding one or two notes to the barréd chord fi ngering you played earlier.

• If you want a minor arpeggio, fl at the thirds.

Page 190: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 190

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

FIVE BASIC MAJOR AND MINOR ARPEGGIOS

majorarpeggio

1

5 1

3

5 1 1

5 1 33

1

5

1

5 1 3

1

3

5

1

3 53

1

3

1

55

35 5

3

5

1

5 13

5 1

351

3

13

5 5

5 1 3

31

5 13

5 1

3 3 3

minorarpeggio

1

5 1

b3 5 1 1

5 1

b3b3

1

5

1

5 1

b3

1

b3

5

1

b3 5b3

1

b3

1

55

b3

5 5b3 5b3 b3 b3

1

5 1

b3 5 1

b35

1

b3

1

b3

5 5

5 1b3

b3

1

5 1

b3 5 1

major arpeggio

minor arpeggio

fingernumbers

1

3 3

2

1 1

2

1

2

3

1 1 1

4

3

1

2

11

4

3

4

1

24 4 4

4 4 4

1

3 3

1 1 1 1

3 3

21

1

2

3

1 1

4

4

2

1

2

1 11

4

2

4

11

2

4 44 44 4 3

fingernumbers

majorchord

1

5 1

3

5 1 1

5 1 33

1

5

1

5 1 3

1

3

5

1

3 53

1

3

1

55

minorchord

1

5 1

b3 5 1 1

5 1

b3b3

1

5

1

5 1

b3

5

1

b3 5b3

55

5

majorscale

1

5 1

3

5 1 1

5 1 33

1

5

1

5 1 3

1

3

5

1

3 53

1

3

1

55

35 5

3

5

3 3 3

fingernumbers

1

2 2

1

1 1 1

3 3 32

1

2

3

1 1 1

43

1

2

1 11

4

3

4

11

24 4

4

4

4 4 4

2

4

6

7

2

4 6 2

7

2

4 4

1

1

2 2

4

2

1

2 4 6

7

2

4

6 2

7

4

4 4

6 2 7

7 6

4 2

1 1 1

2 2

4

3 3

2

1 1 1

2 2

3 344

6 2

7

4

7

6

2

4

6

7

6

7

4

2 6

6 2

4

7

7

1

3 3

4 4

4

3

4

21 1 1 1

2

3 3 3

4

4

open positionmajor chord

1

5 13

5 1 1

5 1 33

1

51

5 1 3

13

51

3 53

13

1

55

E I D I C I A I G I

E

D

C

A

G

E

E

D

C

A

G

E

1

1

1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

641, E form"F" notes Ioctaves of F

("1" represents "F" the firstnote of the F major scale)

42, D form"F" notes III

52, C form"F" notes VI

53, A form"F" notes VIII

631, G form"F" notes X

F I F III F V F VIII F X

Fm I Fm III Fm IV Fm VIII Fm X

4

1

3 3 3

11

4

4

1

4

Page 191: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 191

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

30 Most Important Seventh Chords ExerciseUse the proceedure described below to test your self on the formulas of the thirty seventh chords shown below.

• Cover up the formula numbers below one row of diagrams on the next page.

• Memorize the root location for one of the major seventh chords at the far left. The root is the circlued note.

• Using your knowledge of intervals, identify the formula numbers for the other tones in the chord. Peek at the numbers below the major seventh chord to confi rm the formula numbers.

• Cover the formula numbers again.

• Finger the major seventh chord (ma7). Flat the seventh of the major seventh chord to produce the domi-nant seventh chord (7).

• Flat the third of the dominant seventh chord to produce the minor seventh chord (m7).

• Flat the fi fth of the minor sevenh chord to produce the minor seventh fl at fi ve chord (m75)

• Flat the seventh again (making a double fl at) to produce the diminished seventh chord (dim.7).

Repeat this proceedure for each row.

Page 192: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 192

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix B: Exercises

Thirty Most Important Seventh Chords

Page 193: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Major• Minor• Major Seventh• Dominant Seventh• Minor Seventh• Minor Seventh Flat Five• Diminished Seventh

CSummary Chords

Page 194: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 194

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix C: Summary Chords

MAJOR SUMMARY CHORDS

2

1

A V

4

11

3

1

A VI

32

1

A VII1

3

A VII

4

2

1

2

A VII

4

3

1

3 3

A IX

4

2

11 1

3

A IX

4

2

1

3

A IX

4

2

1

A XII

3

11

3 3

A II

4

1

3

1

A XI1

2 3

A II

4

1 1 1

A II

4

1 1 1

MINOR SUMMARY CHORDS

1 1

Am V

4

11

3

1

Am V

43

1

Am VII1

Am VII

4

3

1

2

Am VII

4

3

1

2

3

Am VIII

1

4

2

2

Am IX

4

3

1

Am XII

4

11

3

2

Am II

4

1

2

1

Am X1

3 4

Am II

1

4 4

Am II

4

1

2

3

Am VIII

1

4

2

2

Am IX

4

1

4

2

MAJOR SEVENTH SUMMARY CHORDS

Ama7 V5

3

11

5

7

Ama7 VI3

5

Ama7 VII

75 3

1

Ama7 IX

1

5 3

7

Ama7 X1

7

1

31

7

Ama7 VII

753

1

Ama7 X1

7

5

3

Ama7 X1

7

5

3

Ama7 XI

7

51

3

Ama7 XI

7

15

3

Ama7 XII

7

51

5 3

Ama7 XII

7

1

5 31

Ama7 II

7

5 31

Ama7 IV

7

51

3

Ama7 V5

3

1

7

Page 195: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 195

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix C: Summary Chords

DOMINANT SEVENTH SUMMARY CHORDS

A7 V5

3

11

5

b7

A7 VI3

5

A7 VII

b7

5 3

1

A7 IX

1

5 3

b7

A7 X1

b71

31

b7

A7 VII

b7

53

1

A7 X1

b75

3

A7 X1

b7 5

3

A7 XI

b7 51

3

A7 XI

b715

3

A7 XIIb7 51

5 3

A7 XII

b7

1

5 31

A7 II

b7

5 31

A7 II

b7

5 31

A7 IV

b7 51

3

A7 II

b7 5

1

3

MINOR SEVENTH SUMMARY CHORDS

Am7 V5b3 11

5

b7

Am7 Vb3

5

Am7 VII

b7

5

b3

1

Am7 VIII

1

5

b3

b7

Am7 X1

b71

b3

1

b7

Am7 VII

b7

5

b3

1

Am7 X1

b75

b3

Am X1

b7 5

b3

Am7 X

b7 51

b3

Am7 X

b715

b3

Am7 XIIb7 51

5

b3

Am7 I

b7

5

b3

1

Am7 I

b7

5

b3

1

Am7 III

b7 51

b3

Am7 II

b7 5

1

b3

Am7 X

b3

b71

b3

MINOR SEVENTH FLAT FIVE SUMMARY CHORDS

Am7b5 Vb3 11

b5

b7

Am7b5 Vb3

b5

Am7b5 VII

b7b5 b3

1

Am7b5 VIII

1

b3

b7

Am7b5 X1

b71

b3

1

b7

Am7b5 VII

b7b3

1

Am7 XIIb71

b5 b3

Am7 I

b7

b3

1

Am7 I

b7

b3

1

Am7 III

b71

b3

Am7 II

b7

1

b3

b7

b5

b5

b5

Am7b5 X1

b71

b3

b5

Am7 XII

b7

1

b5 b3

b5 b5

b5

b5

Am7 IV

b31 b7

b5

Am7 IV

b3 1b7

b5

Page 196: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 196

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix C: Summary Chords

DIMINISHED SEVENTH SUMMARY CHORDS

A dim. 7 Vb3 11

b5

A dim. 7 VII6

b5 b3

1

A dim. 7 VIII

1

b3

6

A dim. 7 X1

6

b3

A dim. 7 VII6

b3

1

6

b5

b5

b5

A dim. 7 X1

6

b3

b5

1

b3

b3

A dim. 7 XI6b5

1

A dim. 7 Ib3

1 6

b5

A dim. 7 II

b5

6

b3

A dim. 7 IVb5

b3

6

A dim. 7 Ib3

6

b5

b3

1

1

1

A dim. 7 IVb5

b3

6

1

6

6

b5

b5

Page 197: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Major Scale Tone Fifths• Major Scale Tone Fourths• Major Scale Tone Thirds• Major Scale Tone Sixths

DTwo - No te C h ord s

Page 198: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 198

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix D: Two-Note Chords

Major Scale-Tone FifthsThink of the lower-pitched note in each fi fth as being the “chord root”. Inverted perfect fi fths (P5) become perfect fourths (P4). Inverted augmented fourths (aug. 4) become diminished fi fths (dim. 5) .

Ä 44

â 44scale tones:

3

t1

5

t2

7

t3

8

t4

10

t5

12

t6

14

!t7

15

t1 scale tones:

scale tones:51

35

tt62

57

tt73

79

t!t14

810

tt æ

ææ25

1012

tt36

1214

tt47

1415

!tt51

1517

tt

Ä

âscale tones:

3

t1

5

t2

7

t3

8

t4

10

t5

12

t6

14

t7

15

t1 scale tones:

scale tones:51

35

tt62

57

tt73

79

tt14

810

tt æ

ææ25

1012

tt36

1214

tt47

1415

tt51

1517

tt

Ä

â1scale tones:

2

t2

4

!t3

6

!t4

7

t5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

tscale tones:scale tones:

51

24

tt62

46

! t!t73

68

!t! t14

79

tt æ

ææ25

911

!tt36

1113

!t! t47

1314

t!t51

1416

tt

Ä

â1scale tones:

2

t2

4

t3

6

!t4

7

t5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

tscale tones:scale tones:

51

52

tt62

74

!tt73

96

!t! t14

107

tt æ

ææ25

129

tt36

1411

! t! t47

1513

t!t51

1714

tt

Ä

â1scale tones:

3

t2

5

t3

7

!t4

8

t5

10

t6

12

t7

14

! t1

15

tscale tones:scale tones:

51

53

tt62

75

tt73

97

! t! t14

108

tt æ

ææ25

1210

tt36

1412

! tt47

1514

t! t51

1715

tt

G major scale P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 dim. 5 P5

C major scale P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 dim. 5 P5

E major scale P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 dim. 5 P5

A major scaleP5 P5 P5 P5 P5 P5 dim. 5 P5

D major scaleP5 P5 P5 P5

P5 P5 dim. 5 P5

Page 199: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 199

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix D: Two-Note Chords

Major Scale-Tone FourthsThink of the upper-pitched note in each fourth as being the “chord root”. Inverted perfect fourths (P4) become perfect fi fths (P5). Inverted augmented fourths (aug. 4) become diminished fi fths (dim. 5).

Ä 44

â 443

t1

5

t2

7

t3

8

t4

10

t5

12

t6

14

t7

15

t1 1

5

33

tt26

55

tt37

77

tt41

88

tt æ

ææ52

1010

tt63

1212

tt74

1314

tt15

1515

tt

Ä

â 3

t1

5

t2

7

t3

8

"t4

10

t5

12

t6

14

t7

15

t1 1

5

33

tt26

55

tt37

77

tt41

88

t"t æ

ææ52

1010

tt63

1212

tt74

1314

t"t15

1515

tt

Ä

â 2

t1

4

t2

6

!t3

7

t4 5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

t15

22

tt26

44

!tt37

66

! t!t41

77

tt æ

ææ52

99

tt63

1111

!t! t74

1213

!tt15

1414

tt

Ä

â 3

t1

5

t2

7

!t3

8

t4 5

10

t6

12

t7

14

! t1

15

t15

32

tt26

54

tt37

76

!t! t41

87

tt æ

ææ52

109

tt63

1211

t!t74

1412

! tt15

1514

tt

Ä

â 3

t1

5

t2

7

t3

8

t4 5

10

t6

12

t7

14

! t1

15

t15

33

tt26

55

tt37

77

t!t41

88

tt æ

ææ52

1010

tt63

1212

tt74

1413

! tt15

1515

tt

C major scaleP4 P4 P4 P4 P4 P4 aug. 4 P4

F major scaleP4 P4 P4 P4 P4 P4 aug. 4 P4

A major scaleP4 P4 P4 P4 P4 P4 aug. 4 P4

D major scaleP4 P4 P4 P4 P4 P4

aug. 4 P4

G major scale P4 P4 P4 P4 P4P4 aug. 4 P4

Page 200: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 200

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix D: Two-Note Chords

Major Scale-Tone ThirdsThink of the lower-pitched note in each third as being the “chord root”. Inverted major thirds (M3) become minor sixths (m6). Inverted minor thirds (m3) become major sixths (M6) .

Ä

â1

3

t2

5

t3

7

t4

8

t5

10

t6

12

t7

14

!t1

15

t31

32

tt42

53

tt53

75

tt64

87

tt æ

ææ75

109

t!t16

1210

tt27

1412

tt31

1514

tt

Ä

â1

3

t2

5

t3

7

t4

8

t5

10

t6

12

t7

14

t1

15

t31

32

tt42

53

tt53

75

tt64

87

tt æ

ææ75

109

tt16

1210

tt27

1412

tt31

1514

tt

Ä

â1

2

t2

4

!t3

6

!t4

7

t5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

t31

21

t!t42

42

!tt53

64

tt64

76

!tt æ

ææ75

98

!tt16

119

t!t27

1311

!tt31

1413

!tt

Ä

â1

2

t2

4

t3

6

!t4

7

t5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

t31

22

!tt42

34

tt53

56

tt64

77

!tt æ

ææ75

99

!tt16

1011

t!t27

1213

tt31

1414

! tt

Ä

â1

3

t2

5

t3

7

!t4

8

t5

10

t6

12

t7

14

! t1

15

t31

23

!tt42

35

tt53

57

tt64

78

tt æ

ææ75

910

! tt16

1012

tt27

1214

tt31

1415

! tt

G major scaleM3 m3 m3 M3 M3 m3 m3 M3

C major scaleM3 m3 m3 M3 M3 m3 m3 M3

E major scale M3 m3 m3 M3 M3 m3 m3 M3

A major scale M3 m3 m3 M3 M3m3 m3 M3

D major scaleM3 m3 m3 M3 M3 m3 m3 M3

Page 201: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 201

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix D: Two-Note Chords

Major Scale-Tone SixthsThink of the upper-pitched note in each sixth as being the “chord root”. Inverted major sixths (M6) become minor thirds (m3). Inverted minor sixths (m6) become major thirds (M3) .

Ä 44

â 441scale tones:

2

t2

4

!t3

6

!t4

7

t5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

tscale tones:scale tones:

13

42

! tt24

54

t!t35

76

t!t46

97

! tt æ

ææ57

119

!tt61

1211

t!t72

1413

! t!t13

1614

t!t

Ä

â1scale tones:

2

t2

4

t3

6

!t4

7

t5

9

t6

11

!t7

13

!t1

14

tscale tones:scale tones: 1

3

42

! tt24

54

tt35

76

t!t46

97

!tt æ

ææ57

119

t!t61

1211

!tt72

1413

!tt13

1614

t!t

Ä

â1scale tones:

3

t2

5

t3

7

!t4

8

t5

10

t6

12

t7

14

! t1

15

tscale tones:scale tones: 1

3

43

!tt24

55

tt35

77

!tt46

89

tt æ

ææ57

1011

t!t61

1212

tt72

1414

! tt13

1516

t!t

Ä

â1scale tones:

1

t2

3

t3

5

t4

6

" t5

8

t6

10

t7

12

t1

13

tscale tones:scale tones: 1

3

12

tt24

33

t"t35

55

tt46

67

" tt æ

ææ57

89

tt61

1010

tt72

1212

tt13

1314

tt

E major scale m6 M6 M6 m6 m6 M6 M6 m6

A major scale m6 M6 M6 m6 m6 M6 M6 m6

D major scale m6 M6 M6 m6 m6 M6 M6 m6

F major scale m6 M6 M6 m6 m6 M6 M6 m6

Page 202: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 202

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix D: Two-Note Chords

Page 203: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• Usuable Scale-Tone Chords• Scale Tone Triad Pairs• Scale Tone 9th, 11th and 13th Chords• Scale Tone Altered Dominant Chords• Scale Tone Add Tone Chords

EScale-Tone Chords

Page 204: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 204

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Usuable Scale-Tone ChordsEach of the charts below lists all the practically usable chords that can be constructed on each step

of a seven tone scale. Sscale steps are numbered in Roman numerals across the top of the chart. The specifi c chord that would occur on any particular scale step using only tones of the scale is listed below the roman numeral and the chord type is indicated at the far left. The chord names in the left column (such as “triad” and “seventh”) indicate a general type of chord. The specifi c chord type that occurs on each scale step is shown beneath the respective roman numeral.

Usuable Major Scale-Tone Chords

type I II III IV V VI VIItriad . . . . . . . . .major . . . .minor . . . . . . . minor . . . . . major . . . . . . .major . . . . . . . minor . . . . . . . . .diminished

seventh . . . . . .ma7 . . . . .m7 . . . . . . . . . m7 . . . . . . . . ma7 . . . . . . . . .7 . . . . . . . . . . m7 . . . . . . . . . . . .m7b5

ninth . . . . . . . .ma9 . . . . .m9 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . ma9 . . . . . . . . .9 . . . . . . . . . . m9 . . . . . . . . . . . .—

eleventh . . . . . .— . . . . . .m11 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . ma9#11 . . . . . .11 . . . . . . . . . m11 . . . . . . . . . . .—

thirteenth . . . . .— . . . . . .m13 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . ma13#11 . . . . .13 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

11 no 3 . . . . . .— . . . . . .11n3 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .11n3 . . . . . . . 11n3 . . . . . . . . . .—

13 no 11 . . . . .13n11 . . . .m13n11 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 13n11 . . . . . . .13n11 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sixth . . . . . . . .6 . . . . . . .m6 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . .6th . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

add 9 . . . . . . . ./9 . . . . . . .m/9 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . /9 . . . . . . . . . . . /9 . . . . . . . . . . m/9 . . . . . . . . . . .—

6/9 (pentatonic) . .6/9 . . . . . .m6/9 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 6/9 . . . . . . . . . .6/9 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.4 . . . . . . . .sus.4 . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.2 . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . . . .—

7 sus.4 . . . . . . .7sus.4 . . .7sus.4 . . . . . . 7sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .7sus.4 . . . . . . 7sus.4 . . . . . . . . .—

7/11 (pentatonic) .7/11 . . . . .m7/11 . . . . . . m7/11 . . . . . 7/#11 . . . . . . . .7/11 . . . . . . . . m7/11 . . . . . . . . .m7/11b5

13 sus. . . . . . . .— . . . . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 13#11sus2 . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

13 sus. . . . . . . .— . . . . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . 13#11sus2 . . .13sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . .—

Usuable Harmonic Minor Scale-Tone Chords

type I II III IV V VI VIItriad . . . . . . . . . .minor . . . . .diminished . . . augmented . . .minor . . . . . . . . .maj. or aug. . . . major . . . . . . . . . . .dim. or aug.

seventh . . . . . . . .min.(ma7) .m7b5 or dim.7 ma7#5 . . . . . .m7,°7 . . . . . . . . .7,7#5 . . . . . . . . ma7 or dim.7 . . . . .dim. 7

ninth . . . . . . . . . .m9(ma7) . .— . . . . . . . . . . ma9#5 . . . . . .m7 . . . . . . . . . . .7b9,7#5b9 . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

eleventh . . . . . . .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . .11b9(rare) . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

thirteenth . . . . . .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sixth . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .m6 . . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

add 9 . . . . . . . . .m/9 . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .m/9 . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

6/9 (pentatonic) .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .m6/9 . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.4 . . . . . . . . . .sus.4 . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.2 . . . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

7sus.4 . . . . . . . . .∆7sus.4 . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . .7sus.4 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

7/11 (pentatonic) m(ma7)/11 .m7/11b5 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . .m7/#11 . . . . . . .7/11 . . . . . . . . . ∆7/#11 . . . . . . . . . .—

13sus. . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . .13sus.4 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . .ma13#11sus.2 . .13sus.4 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—-

Page 205: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 205

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Usuable Melodic Minor Scale-Tone Chords

type I II III IV V VI VIItriad . . . . . . . . . . minor . . . . . . . . minor . . . . . . aug.or maj.b5 . . . . . maj., majb5 . . . . maj, or aug. . . . . . dim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . dim. or aug.

seventh . . . . . . . . min.(ma7) . . . . m7 . . . . . . . .ma7#5, ma7b5 . . . . 7 or 7b5 . . . . . . 7 or 7#5 . . . . . . . . m7b5 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7b5,7#5

ninth . . . . . . . . . . m9(ma7) . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . .ma9#5, ma9b5 . . . . 9,9b5 . . . . . . . . 9,9#5 . . . . . . . . . . m9b5 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7+5+9

eleventh . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . ma9#11 . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . 11,11#5 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . —

thirteenth . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . ma13#11n5 . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

sixth . . . . . . . . . . m6 . . . . . . . . . m6 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

add 9 . . . . . . . . . m/9 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . /9 n5 . . . . . . . . . . ./9 . . . . . . . . . . /9 . . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

6/9 (pentatonic) . . m6/9 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . 6/9 n5 . . . . . . . . . .6/9 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

sus. 4 . . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

sus. 2 . . . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . . . . sus.2 . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

7sus. 4 . . . . . . . . ma7sus.4 . . . . 7sus.4 . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . 7sus.4 . . . . . . . . 7sus.4 n5 . . . . . . . —

7/11 (pentatonic) . m(ma7)/11 . . . m7/11 . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .7/#11 . . . . . . . 7/11 . . . . . . . . . m7/11b5 . . . . . . . . —

Usuable Harmonic Minor Scale-Tone Chords

type I II III IV V VI VIItriad . . . . . . . . . .minor . . . . .diminished . . . augmented . . .minor . . . . . . . . .maj. or aug. . . . major . . . . . . . . . . .dim. or aug.

seventh . . . . . . . .min.(ma7) .m7b5 or dim.7 ma7#5 . . . . . .m7,°7 . . . . . . . . .7,7#5 . . . . . . . . ma7 or dim.7 . . . . .dim. 7

ninth . . . . . . . . . .m9(ma7) . .— . . . . . . . . . . ma9#5 . . . . . .m7 . . . . . . . . . . .7b9,7#5b9 . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

eleventh . . . . . . .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . .11b9(rare) . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

thirteenth . . . . . .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sixth . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .m6 . . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

add 9 . . . . . . . . .m/9 . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .m/9 . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

6/9 (pentatonic) .— . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .m6/9 . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.4 . . . . . . . . . .sus.4 . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . . sus.4 . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

sus.2 . . . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .sus.2 . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

7sus.4 . . . . . . . . .∆7sus.4 . . .— . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . . . . . .7sus.4 . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—

7/11 (pentatonic) m(ma7)/11 .m7/11b5 . . . . . — . . . . . . . . .m7/#11 . . . . . . .7/11 . . . . . . . . . ∆7/#11 . . . . . . . . . .—

13sus. . . . . . . . . .— . . . . . . .13sus.4 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . .ma13#11sus.2 . .13sus.4 . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . .—-

Page 206: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 206

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Scale-Tone Chord PairsMajor Scale-Tone Triad Pairsroot movement chord types chord pair between roots Key of C Key of A stepwise Major to minor I IIm 1 step (2 frets) C Dm A Bm V VIm 1 step G Am E F#m Major to Major IV V 1 step F G D E minor to minor IIm IIIm 1/2 step (1fret) Dm Em Bm C#m minor to Major IIIm IV 1/2 step Em F C#m D dimin. to Major VIIdim I 1/2 step Bdim C G#dim A

thirds Major to minor I IIIm 2 steps (4 frets) C Em A C#m IV VIm 2 steps F Am D F#m Major to dimin. V VIIdim 2 steps G Bdim E G#dim minor to Major IIm IV 1 1/2 steps (3 frets) Dm F Bm D IIIm V 1 1/2 steps Em G C#m E VIm I 1 1/2 steps Am C F#m A dimin. to minor VIIdim IIm 1 1/2 steps Bdim Dm G#dim Bm

perfect fourths Major to Major I IV 2 1/2 steps (5 frets) C F A D V I 2 1/2 steps G C E A minor to Major IIm V 2 1/2 steps Dm G Bm E minor to minor IIIm VIm 2 1/2 steps Em Am C#m F#m VIm IIm 2 1/2 steps Am Dm F#m Bm dimin. to minor VIIdim IIIm 2 1/2 steps Bdim Em G#dim C#m

Harmonic Minor Scale Tone Chord Pairsroot movement chord types chord pair between roots Key of C Key of Astepwise Major to Major V bVI 1/2 step G Ab E F dim.7 to minor VII°7 Im 1/2 step B°7 Cm G#°7 Am minor to Major IVm V 1 step Fm G Dm E

thirds Major to minor bVI Im 2 steps Ab Cm F Am minor to Major IVm bVI 1 1/2 steps Fm Ab Dm F dim.7 to dim.7 II°7 to IV°7 1 1/2 steps D°7 F°7 B°7 D°7 or IV°7 to bVI°7 1 1/2 steps F°7 Ab°7 D°7 F°7 or bVI°7 to VII°7 1 1/2 steps Ab°7 B°7 F°7 G#°7 or VII°7 to II°7 1 1/2 steps B°7 D°7 G#°7 D°7

perfect fourths m7b5 to 7 IIm7b5 V7 2 1/2 steps Dm7b5 G7 Bm7b5 E7 7 to minor V7 Im 2 1/2 steps G7 Cm E7 Am minor to minor Im IVm 2 1/2 steps Cm Fm Am Dm aug. to Major bIII+ bVI 2 1/2 steps Eb+ Ab C+ F

Page 207: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 207

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Scale-Tone 9th, 11th and 13th ChordsThe graph on the left of the chart below shows the scales in which the chords are contained.

4

2

1

3 3 3

1 1 1

2

3

T

641 root 42 root 53 root 631 root

same octave shape down each column; same type across each row

52 root

m9(nr = maj7)

3

4

33 1

3 32

1

4

1

1

2

1

3 3 3

1 1

4

2

3

1

4

2

3

1

3

2

44

3

2

1

4

1

2

1 1

2

4

1

327#9m7

superimposedover 7

3

4

13 3 2

1

34

9(nr = m7b5)

1

3

2

1 1

3

321

4 1 22

1

3 3 3

1 1

4

43

1

4

2

3

∆9(nr = m7)

1

4

3

1

3

11

2 4

1 1 1

2

1

4

32

1

4

432

2

3

1

13 2

1

3

24

3

1 1

4

1 2

4

3

3

4

3

1 1

4

T 2∆9#11(nr = m9)

1

4

3

11

3 4 2

1

4

32

1

∆7#11(nr=m/9)

T 21

4

3

1

3 4

1 1

3

1

432

T

2

1

3

2

4

1

4 2

maj

or s

cale

∆7246

Mix

olyd

ian

7246

Dor

ian

m7246

Aeo

lian

m72 4 b6

∆72 #4 6

Lyd

ian

Dor

ian

#4

m72#46

Mix

olyd

ian

#4

7246

m13(nr = ∆9#11)

4 4

11 1

32

1

3 3 3

1 1

4

1

4

1

2

T

∆7246

7/11246

m7246

m72 4 b6

∆72 #4 6

m72#46

7/11246

3

b7 3 5 2

1 3 b7 2

1 3 b7 2 5

3 5 b7 2 5

3 2 5b7

3 5 b7 2

5 2 3 b7

1 b7 3 6b7 2 63 b7 6 13 1 b7 23 6 1 3b7 6

1 5 b7 b73 #2

3 b75 #2

1 b73 #2

3 b75 #2

3 #2b7 51

3 1b7 #2

1 7 53 2 3 1 75 2 1 3 27

3 5 27 5

5 32 7

1 5 37 #43 #41 7

1

5

75 #43

375 #4

153 7 #4

1 37 #4 2

3 #41 7 2

1 73 2 #4 3 25 #4 7

1 b3b7 5 2

5b3 b7 2

1 b7b3 2 5 b3 b75 2 5

25 b3 b7 b31 b7 2

1 b3b7 6 2

b7 5b3 6 2 1 b7b3 2 6

b3 b7 2 6

3

Page 208: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 208

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Scale-Tone Altered Dominant ChordsThe graph on the left of the chart below shows the scales in which the chords are contained.

2

1

34

9#5(9#5nr

= III7b5= bVIIb5)

1

2 2

3

1

3

2

4

11

34

1

2

3

4

1

3

2

4

641 root 42 root 53 root 631 root52 root

1 2

3 4

7#5b9(7#5b9nr=bVIIm7b5

7#5b9= bV9#11nr=bVIIm9b5))

1

4

3

21

2

4

1

2

1

3

2

1

4

1

2

3

1

2

3

4

1

2

3

1

2

3

9b5(=bV7b5/#5)

Altered Dominant Chords By Octave Shape

1

3

2

4 2

3

1

4

4

1

3

2 12

1

2

1

4

4

1

3

1

11

32

3

7b9(nr=°7 )

7#5

7b5(=bV7b5)

T 1

3 3 3 1 23 4

3

1

3 4

1

12

3 43 2

1

3

4

2

42

11 3

1

4

2

1 1

2

4

3

1 2

3 4

1

2

4

3

1 1 1

2

4

2

1

3

7/6b5(7/6b5nr

= bV7#9n5)

1

31

2

1

32

4

3

1 1

3

1 2

4

3

3

4

3

1 1

4

2

13 b9 #9 #11 = half/whole diminished scale ••• melodic minor IV = 13#11 ••• melodic minor V = 11b13

T

1

4

mel

odic

min

or V

7b5#9 (7b5#9

= bV7/6b5)

2

1

43

1 111

3

4

mmV7

2 4 b6

Phry

gian

maj

orha

rmon

ic m

inor

V

who

le to

ne

mel

odic

min

or I

V

PM7

b2 4 b6

WT9+5

mmIV7

2 #4 6

mel

odic

min

or V

II

mmVII7+5+9

dim

inis

hed

half

/who

le

Dhw13

+9#11

1

3 3 2

1 1

3 2

34

1 1

21

4

13b5b9(13b5b9nrn11

= bV7#9)4

2

1

3

1

4

1

4

1

2

3

7#5#9 (7#5#9

= bV9/6nrn5)

T 1

2 2

4

2

1

3

4 443

1

2 1

24

2

4

3

2

1 1

mmV7/112 b6

PM7/11b2 b6

WT9+5

mmIV7#112 6

mmVII7+5+9

Dhw13

+9#11

7b5b9 (7b5b9

= bV7 / I= bV7#11)

1

3 3

3

221 1 1

2

1

3

1 1 1

43

2 2

T

3

4

1

2 3

4

1

b7 3 5 b2 b2 5 b7 3 1 3 b7 b2 b2 5 b7 3 b7 5 b2 3

b7 3 #5 b21

1 3 b7 b2#5

13 #5 b2b7 3 b7 b2 #51

b7b2#53 1 3 b7#5 b2

b7 #5 b2 3

b7 3 #51 1 b7 3#5 #5 1 3b7 b7 3 #51 1 3 b7#5 3 #5 1b7 b7 1 #53

b7 3 b51 b5 b7 313 b5 b71

1 b5 b7 3 3 b7 1 b5 b5 1 3 b7 3 b7 1 b5

3 b7 2b5 1 2 b53 b73 b7b5 2

2 b53 b7

b5 2b7 3

3 #5 2b7#5 b7 23

3 #5 2b7

#5 b7 23 b7 2 #53

b5 b71 3 6

3 b5b7 6

4

3 6b7 1b5 3 b71 2b5 6 b7 1b5 3 6

3 b2b5 b7

3 b7b2b5 1

b2 b53 b71 3 b7b5 b2 b7 b21 3 b5

3 b3b5 1 b7

3 b2b5 b7 6 3 b2b5 1 b7 6

1

3 332

3 b2b5 b7 6

b7 3b5 b2 6

b5 b31 3 b7

3 b3b7 #51

3 b3b7#5 #5 b3b71 3

b7 b3#51 3

b3#53 b7

T

1

3 4

2

b7 b51 3 #2

Page 209: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 209

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Scale-Tone Add-Tone and Suspended ChordsThe graph on the left of the chart below shows the scales in which the chords are contained.

641

root

42 r

oot

53 r

oot

631

root

Add

Ton

e an

d Su

spen

ded

Cho

rds

By

Oct

ave

Shap

esa

me

octa

ve s

hape

dow

n ea

ch c

olum

n; s

ame

type

acr

oss

each

row

52 r

oot

6(m

ajor

add

6)

4

2

33

34

2

11

major scale

∆7 246

Mixolydian

7 246

Dorian

m7

246

Aeolian

m7

2 4

b6∆7

2 #4

6Lydian

Dorian #4

m7

2#46

Mixolydian #4 7 246

3 13

61

15

63

1

36

11

35

11

35

61

1

m/9

(min

or a

dd 9

)

1

4

1

2

3

34

1

2

4

33

4

2

1

4

2

3 1b3

52

b35

12

1

b35

12

b35

12

b35

12

1

5

1

/9(m

ajor

add

9)

1

3

2

32

3

4

1

2

4

3

34

2

1

4

1

3 13

52

35

12

1

35

12

35

12

35

12

1

3

1

35

2

1

4 1

24

11

35

12

1

4

11

3

4

1

3 13

652

4

2

1

36

51

3

33

43

2

35

161

m6

(min

or a

dd 6

)4

1

1

23

33

1

2

3 1b3

62

15

6b3

1

b36

11

b35

61

5b3

111

21

1

2

4

1

3 1b3

652

4

11

b36

51

2

34

3

4

2

b35

161

11

4

6

sus.

4(s

uspe

nded

4)

1

4

4

3

44

34

11

3 14

51

15

14

1

45

11

45

14

51

1

11

4

3

2

3 1

21

1

43 1

45

52

4

2

1

45

5

3 1

7 su

s. 4

(dom

inan

t 7th

susp

ende

d 4)

1

4

4

3

2

4

23

1

3

1 b74

51

15

b74

4b7

11

45

14

b71

1

11

4

3

1

b7

21

3

1 15

3

1 b74

b711

2

1 15

44

2 4b7

511

3

11

34

4b7

11

21

9 su

s. 4

(dom

inan

t 9th

susp

ende

d 4)

1

4

1

2

3

23

1

4

1 b74

52

14

b72

4b7

12

24

14

b71

2

11

b7

2

1

3

1 15

4

11

Phrygian Ma3

7b2

4 b

6

Phrygian

m7

b2 4

b6

4

11

1 5

1

5

43

4b7

122

1

56 5

4

Page 210: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 210

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix E: Scale-Tone Chords

Page 211: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

• 101 Chord Types

(contents begin on the next page)

FChordsBy Type

Page 212: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 212

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

Two Note Chords

major third..................................................... 214

minor third .................................................... 214

perfect fi fth.................................................... 214

Triads

major ............................................................. 215

minor ............................................................. 219

diminished..................................................... 223

augmented ..................................................... 226

majhor fl at fi ve .............................................. 229

suspended fourth ........................................... 233

suspended second.......................................... 234

Major Type Chords

major seventh ................................................ 235

major seventh no third .................................. 239

major seventh add six.................................... 240

major seventh add sharp eleven .................... 241

major seventh add six add sharp eleven........ 242

major seventh add six fl at fi ve ...................... 242

major seventh suspended fourth.................... 243

major seventh suspended second .................. 245

major seventh fl at fi ve................................... 248

major seventh sharp fi ve ............................... 251

major ninth .................................................... 252

major ninth no third ...................................... 253

major ninth add six........................................ 256

major ninth sharp eleven............................... 257

major ninth fl at fi ve....................................... 258

major ninth sharp fi ve ................................... 259

major thirteenth sharp eleven........................ 260

sixth............................................................... 261

sixth add nine ................................................ 263

sixth add nine add sharp eleven .................... 267

sixth add nine fl at fi ve ................................... 269

add nine (major add nine) ............................. 270

Dominant Seventh Type Chords(no altered fi fths)

dominant seventh .......................................... 271

dominant seventh no third............................. 275

doninant seventh add six............................... 276

dominant seventh add six suspended fourth..... 278

dominant seventh add six fl at nine................ 280

dominant seventh add six add sharp eleven ... 281

dominant seventh add sharp eleven .............. 282

dominant seventh suspended fourth.............. 284

dominant seventh suspended second ............ 286

dominant seventh fl at nine ............................ 290

dominant seventh fl at nine suspended fourth ... 292

dominant seventh fl at nine sharp nine........... 293

dominant seventh fl at nine sharp eleven ....... 295

dominant seventh sharp nine......................... 296

dominant seventh sharp nine sharp eleven.... 297

Dominant Type Chords With Flat Five(includes those with 5 and 5)

dominant seventh fl at fi ve ............................. 299

dominant seventh add six fl at fi ve................. 301

dominant seventh add six fl at fi ve fl at nine... 302

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp fi ve ............ 303

domiant seventh fl at fi ve fl at nine ................. 304

dominant seventh fl at fi ve fl at nine sharp nine... 306

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp nine............ 307

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp fi ve fl at nine.... 308

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp fi ve sharp nine.. 308

Page 213: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 213

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

Dominant Type Chords With Sharp Five (no 5)

dominant seventh sharp fi ve.......................... 309

dominant seventh sharp fi ve fl at nine............ 310

dominant seventh sharp fi ve fl at nine sharp nine . 310

dominant seventh sharp fi ve sharp nine ........ 311

Dominant Ninth Type Chords (no altered 5ths)

dominant ninth .............................................. 313

dominant ninth no third................................. 315

dominant ninth suspended fourth.................. 319

dominant ninth add six.................................. 320

dominant ninth add six suspended fourth ..... 321

dominant ninth add six add sharp eleven...... 321

dominant ninth add sharp eleven .................. 322

Dominant Ninth Type Chords With Altered Fifths

dominant ninth fl at fi ve ................................. 323

dominant ninth sharp fi ve.............................. 324

dominant ninth fl at fi ve sharp fi ve ................ 324

dominant ninth add six fl at fi ve..................... 325

Dominant Eleventh & Thirteenth Chords

dominant eleventh no third ........................... 325

dominant thirteenth ....................................... 326

dominant thirteenth suspended fourth........... 329

dominant thirteenth sharp eleven .................. 331

dominant thirteenth fl at nine ......................... 332

dominant thirteenth fl at fi ve fl at nine ............ 333

dominant thirteenth fl at fi ve sharp nine ........ 333

dominant thirteenth fl at nine suspended fourth.. 334

Minor Add Nine.....................................335

Minor Seventh Type Chords(includes m9, m11, m13 types)

minor seventh................................................ 336

minor seventh add six ................................... 340

minor seventh add eleven.............................. 342

minor ninth.................................................... 346

minor ninth add six ....................................... 349

minor eleventh .............................................. 350

minor thirteenth............................................. 356

Minor Sixth Type Chords

minor sixth .................................................... 359

minor sixth add nine...................................... 361

Minor (major seventh) Type Chords(includes m9(major 7) types)

minor (major seventh)................................... 362

minor (major seventh) add six ...................... 363

minor ninth (major seventh).......................... 365

minor ninth (major seventh) add six ............. 366

Minor Seventh Flat Five Type Chords(includes m9b5 and m11b5 types)

minor seventh fl at fi ve................................... 367

minor add eleven fl at fi ve.............................. 369

minor ninth fl at fi ve....................................... 371

minor eleventh fl at fi ve ................................. 373

Minor (major seventh) Flat Five Type Chords

minor (major seventh) fl at fi ve...................... 376

minor ninth (major seventh) fl at fi ve ............ 377

Diminished Seventh Type Chords

diminished seventh........................................ 378

diminished seventh add nine......................... 379

Page 214: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 214

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major third

minor third

3

b31

1

C mi3 I

2

b31

1

C mi3 IV

3

b31

1

C mi3 VI

3

b31

1

C mi3 VIII

3

b31

1

C mi3 XI

3

b31

1

C mi3 I

2

b31

1

C mi3 IV

3

b31

1

C mi3 VI

3

b31

1

C mi3 VIII

3

b31

1

C mi3 XI

perfect fi fth

4

1

51

C 5 V

4

1

51

C 5 V

3

1

51

C 5 VIII

3

1

51

C 5 VIII

1 5 1

1

43

1

5

C 5 X

4

1

51

C 5 I

3

1

51

C 5 III

3

1

51

C 5 III

5 1

1 1

C 5 V

1 5 5

1

44

1

1

C 5 V

3

1

51

C 5 X

1 5 1 5

1

2

43

C 5 XII

4

1

51

C 5 XII

Page 215: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 215

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major

5 3 1

1

2

3

C major I

3 1 5

1

4

2

C major I

3 1 5

1

2

4

C major I

1

2

3

11 3

C major I

2 4

1 3 5

1

C major II

4

2

13 5

1

C major II

1

3

1 3

2

5

C major II

5 3 1 3

2

1

3 4

C major II

5 3 1

2

4

1

C major II

1

4

2

31 3

C major II

3

2

13 5

1

43

C major II

5 1 3

2

1

3

41

C major II

1

3

1

3 3

5 1 5 1 3 5

1

C major III

1

3

1

3 3

1 5 1 3 5

C major III

1

33 3

1 5 1 35

1

C major III

1

33

551 3

1

C major III

1

3

5 1 3

1

C major III

1

33 3

1 5 1 3

C major III

1

33 3

5 5 1 3

C major III

1

33 3

55 1 3

C major III

4

51 3

1

3

C major III

1 5 3

1

3 4

C major III

1

5

3

3

4

1

C major III

1

5 1 3 5

1

3 4

C major III

1

2

435 1

C major III

Page 216: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 216

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 1 3 5

1

43

1

C major III

1

5 1 3

1 1

C major V

1

4 5 1 3 1

1 1

C major V

1 1 1

4

1 5 1 3

C major V

1 1

3

4

53 5 1

C major V

3 5 1

11

3

C major V

1 3 5

43

1

C major V

1 5 3

11

4

C major V

3 1 5

3

1

4

C major V

3 5 1 3

1 1 1

3

C major V

5 3 1

11

4

C major V

5 31

1

34

C major V

1 3 1

4

11

C major V

1

43

53 1

C major V

5 3 1

1

34

C major V

1 1

3

4

1 3 5 1

C major V

3 5 1

11

3

1

4

3 1

C major V

3 1 5

1

4

2

C major VII

3 1 5

2

4

3

3

1

C major VII

1 3 1

2

4

1

C major VII

3 3 5 1

1

42 3

C major VII

1

2

1

3 4

1

1 5 1 3 5 1

C major VIII

2

1

4

1

1 3 5 1

3

5

C major VIII

2

1

4

1 3 51

3

5

1

C major VIII

2

1

3

1 3 5 1

1

C major VIII

Page 217: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 217

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

4

1 3 5

3

5

C major VIII

2

1

4

1 31

3

5

C major VIII

2

1

31

3

5

C major VIII

2

1

3 1

3

5

C major VIII

2

1 1

3 5 1

C major VIII

2

1

3

1 3 5

C major VIII

1

4

2

513

C major VIII

1

4

2

51 3

C major VIII

1

4

2

51 3

C major VIII

1 1 3 5

1 2

3

4

C major VIII

3

5 3 5 1

1

2

1

C major VIII

3 1 3 5

2

1

4

3

C major VIII

1 3 5 1

T 1

2

1

C major VIII

1

3

1 3

2

5

C major IX

5 3 1

4

1

2

C major IX

3

4

3 1 3

1

5

2

C major IX

1

32

4

1 5 1 3

C major X

1 5 1

1

432

3

1

5

C major X

3 5 1

11

3

C major X

1

4

51 3

3

C major X

1 5 1

1

432

3

C major X

3 1 5

1

3 4

C major X

5 3 1

1

43

C major X

1

4

1

15 3

C major X1

3

3 1 5

4

5

1

C major X

Page 218: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 218

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

432

3 1 5 3

C major X

5 5 1 3

1

24

3

C major X

5 1 5

11

32

4

1 3

C major X

1

2

3

41 3 5 1

C major XII

1

2

3

3 5 1

C major XII

5 1 3

3

1 2

C major XII

1 3 5

43

1

C major XII

1 5 3

11

4

C major XII

1

3

51 3

2

1

4

C major XII

3 1 5

4

1 1

C major XII

5 3 5 1

4

1

3

2

C major XII

3 5 1 5

1

2

34

C major XII

3 5 1 3

1

3

3

1

4

1

C major XII1

3

3

1

4

5

C major XII

1 5 1 3

4

1 1

2

C major XII

1

3 5 1 3

32

4

C major XII

3 3 5 1

1

2

1

3

C major XII

4

2

1

3

1

3 1 3 5 1 3

1

C major XII

4

11

2

5 5 1 3

C major XII1

33

4

1 5

1

3

C major XII

2

3 5 13

4

1

1 1

3

C major XII

5 1 3 5

3

1

24

C major XII

Page 219: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 219

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor

31

4

11 b3

C minor I

b3 11

1

4

2

C minor I

5 b3 1

21

4

C minor I

b3 1 5

1

2

4

C minor I

b3 15

1

2

4

C minor I

b3 15

1

2

4

3

b3

C minor I

1

4

1 b3

3

5

C minor I

2 4

1 b3 5

1

C minor I

b3 1 5

2

4

1

C minor I

5 1 b3 1

2

1

3

4

C minor I

1

2

3 4

1 5 1 b3 5

1

C minor III

1

2

3 4

b31 5 1

C minor III

2

3 4

1

51 b35

C minor III

1

2

3

b31 5

C minor III

2

3

1

51 b3

C minor III

4

3

1

51b3

C minor III

1

2

1

3 4

5 1 5 1 b3 5

1

C minor III

1

2

3

b31 5

1

5

C minor III

1

2

5 1 b3

1

C minor III

1

2

3 4

5 1 5 1 b3

1

C minor III

1 1 b3 5

1

2

3

1

C minor III

1

2

3 4

5 5 1 b3

C minor III

1

2 3

b35 1

C minor IV

2 3

4

1

b3b3 5 1

C minor IV

1

1

2

4

1

5 b3

C minor IV

Page 220: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 220

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

1

2

5 b3 1

C minor IV

1

4

5 b3 5 1

4 4

C minor V

1 1

2

4

5b3 5 1

C minor V

2

4

1

51b3

C minor V

1 b3 5

4

1

2

C minor V

1b3 5

11

2

C minor V

1

435 b3 1

C minor V

3

1 1

41 b3 5 b3

C minor V

1 b3 5

4

1

2

1

1

C minor V

1 5 b3

1

43

C minor V

b3 1 5

1

4

2

C minor VI

b3 11

1

4

2

C minor VI

3 b3 5 1

1

3 3 3

C minor VI1

4

1

1 b3 5 1

3

5

11

1

C minor VIII1

4

1

1 b3 5 1

3

5

1

C minor VIII

1

4

1 b3 51

3

5

1 1

C minor VIII1

3

1 5 1

1

b3

1

C minor VIII1

4

1 5

3

5

1

b3

C minor VIII1

4

11

3

5 b3

1

C minor VIII1

1

3

5

1

b3

C minor VIII

1

1

3

5

1

b3

C minor VIII1 1

5 1b3

1

C minor VIII1

3

1 5

1

b3

C minor VIII

4

1

3

5

1

b3

C minor VIII

1

4

3

51b3

C minor VIII

Page 221: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 221

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

3

51 b3

C minor VIII

1

4

2

51 b3

C minor VIII

b3 b31

1

3

1

45

C minor VIII

3

5 b3 5 1

11 1

C minor VIII

1 1 b3 5

1 11

3

C minor VIII

3

4

b3 1

1

5

2

b3

C minor VIII

1 b3 5 1

T 11 1

C minor VIII

4

1

2

5 b3 1

C minor VIII

3

1

1 5 1 b3

4

2

C minor X

2

1 1

3

4

1 5 1b3 5

C minor X

2

1

3

4

1 5 1b3

C minor X

5 b3 5 1

1

32

4

C minor X

5 5 1 b3

1

34

2

C minor X

1 5 b3

1

3

2

C minor X

b3 5 1

11

2

C minor X

3 4

1

1b35

C minor X

b3 1 5

1

2

4

C minor X1

2

b3 1 5

4

5

1

C minor X

1

34

2

b3 1 5 b3

C minor X

3

2

4

1

b3 5 1 b3

C minor XI

1

b3

3

1

4

5

C minor XI

5 1 b3

3

2

1

C minor XI

1

b3 5 1 b3

2

3

4

C minor XI

4

2

1

b3 1 5

C minor XI

1 5 b3

1

2

4

1

C minor XI

Page 222: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 222

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

b3 5 1

3

C minor XII

1

2

45 11 b3

3

C minor XII

1

2

451 b3

C minor XII

b3 5 1 5

1

32

4

C minor XII

5 b3 5 1

4

1

2 3

C minor XII

5 1 b3 5

3

1

2

4

C minor XII

1 5 b3

1

1

3

4

C minor XII

Page 223: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 223

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

diminished

1

3

1 b3

2

b5

C dim I

b3 1 b5

2

3

1

C dim I

5 b3 1

21

3

C dim I

b3 1b5

1

2

4

C dim I

b3 1 b5

1

2

4

C dim I

b5 1 b3 1

2

1

3

4

C dim I

3

4

1

b51 b3

C dim II

32

4

1

1 b3b5 b5

C dim II

1 1 b3 b5

2

3

4

1

C dim II

1

32

4

b5 1 b3b5

C dim II

3

4

b5 1

1

2

1 b3

C dim III

1

32

b31 b5

C dim III

b5 1

1

3

2

b3

C dim IV

1

2

3

4

b5b3b5 1

C dim IV

1 b3 b5

4

1

2

C dim IV

1b3 b5

2

1

3

C dim IV1

2

3

4

1 b3 b5 1

C dim IV

1

2

3

1

b3b3 5 1

C dim IV

1

1

3 4

b3b51

C dim IV

2

4

1

b51b3

C dim V

b3 1 b5

1

4

2

C dim VI

3 b3 b5 1

1

3

24

C dim VI

b3 b5 1

12 3

C dim VII

1

3

b7b3

T

1

2

4

b5 b5

C dim VII1

3

1 b5

2

b3

C dim VII

Page 224: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 224

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

1 b5 1

3

b3

2

C dim VII1

4

1

3

b5

2

b3 b5

C dim VII

1 1 b3 b5

T

1

2

4

C dim VII

1 b3 b5 1

T

1

2 3

C dim VII

1

1

3

4

1 b3b5

C dim VII

2

b5 b3 1

11

C dim VIII

3

1

2

b5

1

b3

C dim VIII1

1

2

b5

1

b3

C dim VIII

3

4

b3 1

1

b5

2

b3

C dim VIII1

3

11

2

b5 b3

1

C dim VIII

b3 b5 1

2

1

3

C dim IX

1

3

b3

4

b5 1

C dim IX

2

3

b3 1 b5

4

b5

1

C dim IX

b5 b5 1 b3

1

2

4

3

C dim IX

2

1

1

4

3

b5 1 b3

C dim X

1 b5 b3

1

2 3

C dim X

b3 1 b5

1

2 3

C dim X

2

1

3

4

1 b5 1b3

C dim X

1

432

b3 1 b5 b3

C dim X

3

1

4

1

b3 1 b3b5

C dim XI

1 b3 b5

4

1

2

C dim XI

1

2

4b5 11 b3

3

C dim XI

b3 1 b5

1

324

b5

C dim XI

b5 1 b3

3

1

2

4

b5

C dim XI

1

b3 b5 1 b3

32

4

C dim XI

Page 225: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 225

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

b5 b3 b5 1

4

1

2 3

C dim XI

4

11

2

b5 1 b3b5

C dim XI

b5

21

4

1 b3

C dim XI

1

1

3

4

1 b3b5

C dim XI

Page 226: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 226

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

augmented

2

1 1

3

1 3 #5 1

C aug I

1 3#5

2

43

1

#5

C aug I

1 3#5

2

43

1

#5

1

1

C aug I

1 3 #5

2

4

3

1

#5

1

1

C aug I

3#5

2

4

1

#5

1

1

C aug I

3 #5

2

4

1

#5

1

1

C aug I

1 3#5

2

43

1

1

C aug I

1

3

2

1 3#5

C aug II

2

1 1 3#5

3 4

1

C aug III

2

1 1 3 #5

3 4

1

C aug III

#5 1 31

2 34

1

C aug III

43

1 #5

1

3

C aug III

2

3

1 #5

1

3

C aug III

2 31

4

#5 1 3 #5

C aug IV

2 3

1

4

#5 1 3#5

C aug IV

1

#51 3#5

3 4

2

C aug IV

2 31

4

#5 1 3 #5

T

#5

C aug IV

2

4

3

3 #5 1

1

#5

C aug IV

2

1 1

3

3 #5 1 3

C aug V

2

43

3 #51

1

1

C aug V

2

43

3 #51

1

1

1

3

C aug V

2

43

3 #5 1

1

1

1

3

C aug V

2

4

#51

1

1

1

3

C aug V

2

4

#5 1

1

1

1

3

C aug V

2

43

3 #51

1

3

C aug V

Page 227: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 227

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

32

3 #51

C aug VI

3 4

2

1

3 3 #51

C aug VII

3 4

2

1

3 3 #5 1

C aug VII

2 34

3 1 3

1

#5

C aug VII

43

3 1

1

#5

C aug VII

23

3 1

1

#5

C aug VII

2 31

4

1 3 #5 1

C aug VIII

2 3

1

4

1 3 #51

C aug VIII

2 3

1

4

1 3 #51

C aug VIII

3 4

1 2

13 #51

C aug VIII

2 31

4

1 3 #5 1

T

1

C aug VIII

2

4

3

#5 1 3

1

1

C aug VIII

2

1 1

3

#5 1 3 #5

C aug IX

#5 13

2

43

1

3

C aug IX

#5 13

2

43

1

3

1

#5

C aug IX

#5 1 3

2

43

1

3

1

#5

C aug IX

13

2

4

1

3

1

#5

C aug IX

1 3

2

4

1

3

1

#5

C aug IX

#5 13

2

43

1

#5

C aug IX

1

3

2

#5 13

C aug X

2

#5 #5 13

3 4

1

C aug XI

2

#5 #5 1 3

3 4

1

C aug XI

3 #5 1#5

2 34

1

C aug XI

43

#5 3

1

1

C aug XI

3

#5 3

1

1

2

C aug XI

Page 228: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 228

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2 31

4

3 #5 1 3

C aug XII

2 3

1

4

3 #5 13

C aug XII

1

3#5 13

3 4

2

C aug XII

2 31

4

3 #5 1 3

T

3

C aug XII

2

4

3

1 3 #5

1

3

C aug XII

Page 229: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 229

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major fl at fi ve

1

4

2

3

3 1 b5 3

C majb5

3 1 b5

1

32

C majb5 I

b5 3 1

1

23

C majb5 I

2 3

4

1

3 7 1b5

C majb5 I

b5 3 1 3

1 1

4 4

C majb5 II

b5 3 1

1

4

1

C majb5 II

3

1

13 b5

1

43

C majb5 II

b5 1 3

1 1

2

41

C majb5 II

1 1 3 b5

2

43

1

C majb5 II

4

1

13 b5

1

C majb5 II

3

1

1 3 b5

2

C majb5 II

2

4

3

b51 3

1

b5

C majb5 II

2

4

b5 1 3

1

C majb5 II

1

4

2

3

b5 1 3b5

C majb5 II

1

4

2

3

b5 1 3 b5

C majb5 II

4

b51 3

1

3

C majb5 II

2

3

1 3

1

b5

C majb5 II

1

32

4

1 b5 3

1

b57

C majb5 II

1

2

4

1

7 3 b51

C majb5 II

b5 1 3 7

3

2

11

C majb5 II

1 b5 3

1

2

4

C majb5 III

1

3

2

3

1 b5 1 3

C majb5 III

1

4

3

1 b5 3

2

7

C majb5 III

1 b5 3 7

12

4

33

1

C majb5 III

b5 3 1

2

1

4

C majb5 IV

Page 230: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 230

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

43

b53 1

C majb5 IV

2

b5 1 3

1

2

C majb5 IV

1

4

2 2

b5 1 3 1

C majb5 IV

3 b5 1

2

1

4

C majb5 IV

1 3 b5

43

1

C majb5 IV

1

4

1

1 3 b5

3

7

C majb5 IV

3 1 b5

3

1

4

C majb5 V

2 4

1

3

1 b5 73

C majb5 V

2

4

1

3

3 7 1 b5

C majb5 V

3

1

4

1 3 b5 1

2

C majb5 VII

3

1

4

1 3 b5

2

b5

C majb5 VII

3

b5 3 1

2

4

1

b5

C majb5 VII

3 1 b5

1

4

3

3

1

C majb5 VII

2

1 3 b5 1

3

4

1

C majb5 VII

3 3 b5 1

1

3

1

2

C majb5 VII

3

1

4

1 3 b5

C majb5 VII

3

1

2

3 b5 1

C majb5 VII

3 1 b5

1

4

1

C majb5 VII

1 1 3 b5

2

1

3

4

C majb5 VII

2

4

1

3

1 7 3 b5

C majb5 VII

4

3

1

71 3 b5

1

C majb5 VII

4

1

3

2

7 3 b5 1

C majb5 VII

11

b5 73

23

1

C majb5 VII

3 4

T

1 7 3

1

b5

1

7

C majb5 VII

1 1

4

3

3

1

1 3 b5 7

C majb5 VII

Page 231: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 231

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

2

b51 3

C majb5 VIII

3

1

3 1

2

b5

C majb5 VIII

3

1

31

2

b5

C majb5 VIII

1

1 b5 7 3

4

3

4

C majb5 VIII

1 b5 7

2

1

3

3

4

3

4

C majb5 VIII

1 b5 7

2

1

3

3

4

C majb5 VIII

2 2

1

2

1 b5 7 3

C majb5 VIII

2

4

3 1 3

1

b5

1

C majb5 IX

2

3

1 3

1

b5

C majb5 IX

3 b5 1

2

1

4

C majb5 IX

1

4

2

3

b5 1 3 7

C majb5 IX

2

4

b5 1 3 7 3

1 1

4

C majb5 IX

4

3

4

2

1 b5 7 3

1

b5

C majb5 IX

3 1 b5

1

3

2

C majb5 X

1

3

2

4

1 b5 1 3

C majb5 X

1

4

b51 3

2

C majb5 X

1 b5 1

1

4

2

3

3

C majb5 X

4

2

3

1

1 b5 7 3

C majb5 X

3 b5 1

1

2

3 4

b5

C majb5 XI

2

3 b5 1 3

3

1

4

C majb5 XI

3 3 b5 1

2

3

1

4

C majb5 XI

1

2

3

4

1 3 b5 1

C majb5 XI

1

3

43 b5 1

C majb5 XI

b5 1 3

3

1

2

C majb5 XI

b5 3 b5 1

4

1

3

2

C majb5 XI

Page 232: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 232

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

22

4

b5 1 3 7

C majb5 XI

b51

4

1 1

3

C majb5 XII

1

3

4

1

3

b5

C majb5 XII

b5 1

3

2

7

4

3

1

C majb5 XII

Page 233: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 233

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

suspended fourth

4

2

1

45 5

3

1

C sus4 III

4

3

1

451

3

1

C sus4 III

3

1

4

1

1

1

5 1

C sus4 III

3

1

4

1

1

1

5 1 4

4

C sus4 III

3

1

4

1

1

1

5 1 4

4

1

5

C sus4 III

3

1

4 1

1

1 4

4

1

5

C sus4 III

3

1

4 1 4

4

1

5

C sus4 III

3

1

1

1 4

4

1

5

C sus4 III

4

1

45 11

21

C sus4 V

2

1

45

1

1

C sus4 V

2

1

1

5 4

1

4

4

C sus4 V

1

43

1 4 55

2

C sus4 VIII

43

1 451

1

2

C sus4 VIII

1

43

1 4 55

2

1

1

C sus4 VIII

1

43

1 4 55

2

1

1

1

1

C sus4 VIII

1

43

1 4 5 1

1

C sus4 IX

4

1 5 1 4

1

4

3

C sus4 X

11

1 45

1

C sus4 X

3

5

1

1 1

4

4

4

1

5

C sus4 X

3 4

1

4 51 1

2

C sus4 XII

1

5 1

3

4

3

C sus4 XII

Page 234: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 234

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

suspended second

1 5 2

1

4

2

C sus2 III

1

43

5 1 2 5

1

C sus2 III

1

43

5 1 22

2

C sus2 III

43

5 125

1

2

C sus2 III

1

43

5 1 22

2

1

5

C sus2 III

4

5 2 5 1

1

4

3

C sus2 V

11

5 12

1

C sus2 V

1 5 2

1

2

4

C sus2 VII

3 4

1

1 25 5

2

C sus2 VII

1

2 5

3

1

3

C sus2 VII

1

43

5 1 22

2

1

5

C sus2 VIII

1

43

5 1 22

2

1

5

1

5

C sus2 VIII

4

2

1

12 2

3

5

C sus2 X

4

3

1

125

3

5

C sus2 X

3

1

1 5

1

5 1

4

1

2

C sus2 X

3

1

1 5 1

4

1

2

C sus2 X

3

5

1

5 1

4

1

2

C sus2 X

4

1

12 55

21

C sus2 XII

2

1

12

1

5

C sus2 XII

2

5

1

2 1

1

4

1

C sus2 XII

Page 235: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 235

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh

1

2

3

4

7 1 53

C ma7 I

3

2

4

1

3 7 15

C ma7 I

1 3 7 1

12

4

3

C ma7 I

5 1 3 7

4

3

1

2

C ma7 II

3

1

4

2

33 57

C ma7 nr II

2

1

3

4

3 7 35

C ma7 nr II

3 7 5

1

3

2

C ma7 nr II

5 7 3

11

2

C ma7 nr II

5 3 7

1

2

4

C ma7 nr II

1

34

2

5 3 7 5

C ma7 nr II

3

2

4

1 375

1

C ma7 III

1

2

3 4

1 5 7 3

1

5

C ma7 III

1 7 3 5

1

2

4

1

C ma7 III

3

2

7 31

1

C ma7 III

1

2

3 4

1 5 7 3

1

5

C ma7 III

1

4

3

1 5 3

2

7

C ma7 III

5 1 5 3 7

1 1

3

4

33

1

C ma7 III

1 5 3 7

1

3

4

33

1

C ma7 III

7 3 5

3

2

1

C ma7 nr III

1

5 7 3 5

2

3

4

C ma7 nr III

1

4

2

1 3 5

3

7

C ma7 IV

1

2 3

35 7

C ma7 nr IV

2

3 4

35 7 5

1

C ma7 nr IV

1

2

47 33 5

3

C ma7 nr IV

1

2

473 5

C ma7 nr IV

Page 236: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 236

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 11

3

5 1 3 7

C ma7 V

2 3

1

4

3 1 5 7

C ma7 V

3

4

1 1

1 7 1 3

C ma7 V

2

4

1

3

3 7 1 5

C ma7 V

1 5 3 7

1 1

24

1

1

C ma7 V

5 3 7

1

2

4

C ma7 nr V

2 4

3 5 7

1

C ma7 nr V

5 3 7

2

4

1

C ma7 nr V

4

3

2

71 3 5

1

C ma7 VII

1

2

4

3

3

1

1 3 5 7

C ma7 VII

1

3

5 73

24

1

C ma7 VII

3 4

T

1 7 3

2

5

1

7

C ma7 VII

3

21

1 73

C ma7 VII

2

3

1

73 5

C ma7 nr VII

4

3

1

735

C ma7 nr VII

1

2

3

1

3 7 5 7

C ma7 nr VII

3 3 5 7

1

2

3

1

C ma7 nr VII

1

4

2

3

1 7 3 5

C ma7 VIII

3

1

2

1

7 3 5 1

C ma7 VIII

5 3 7 1

3

4

21

C ma7 VIII

1

1 5 7 3

44 4

C ma7 VIII

43

7 31

1

C ma7 VIII

2 3

1

4

1 5 7 3

C ma7 VIII

2 3

1

4

1 5 7 3

1

5

C ma7 VIII

2 3

1

4

1 5 7 3

1

5

1

1

C ma7 VIII

Page 237: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 237

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 5 7

3

1

3

2

4

C ma7 VIII

1 5 7

3

1

3

2

4

3

4

C ma7 VIII

1 7

3

1

3

2

4

1

C ma7 VIII

2

4

1

3

5 1 3 7

C ma7 IX

3

4

5 1 3 7 3

2

1

4

C ma7 IX

2

4

1

735

C ma7 nr IX

3 5 7

4

1

2

C ma7 nr IX

35 7

11

2

C ma7 nr IX

3 5 7

4

1

2

1

3

C ma7 nr IX

33 3

1

1 5 7 3

C ma7 X

3

1

2 3

3 1 5 7

C ma7 X

43

7 31

1

C ma7 X

1

2 3

3 1 7

C ma7 X

3

1

2 3

3 1 5 7

3

3

C ma7 X

33 3

1

1 5 7 3

1

5

C ma7 X

2 3 3

1

1 5 73

1

5

C ma7 X

5 3 7

1

4

2

C ma7 nr X

2 3

4

1

57 35

C ma7 nr X

5 5 7 3

1

3 3 3

C ma7 nr X

1 3 5 7

1

3

1

4

C ma7 XII

3

1 1 1

4

1 3 5 7 3

C ma7 XII

1 1 1

1 5 7 3

4

C ma7 XII

5 1 3 5 7

3 42

1 1

C ma7 XII1

3 5 73

4

1

1 1

3

C ma7 XII

1 7

2

1

5

1

3

1

5

3 43

C ma7 XII

Page 238: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 238

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 1

3

2

7

4

3

1

C ma7 XII

5 1

3

2

7

4

3

1

C ma7 XII1

3

3 7 3

1

5

1

C ma7 nr XII1 1

7 35

1

C ma7 nr XII1

3

3 7

1

5

C ma7 nr XII

1

4

3

735

C ma7 nr XII

1

4

3

73 5

C ma7 nr XII

3

1 1

43 5 7 5

C ma7 nr XII

3 5 7 3

11 11

C ma7 nr XII

3 3 5 7

1 11

3

C ma7 nr XII

3

4

5 3

1

7

2

5

C ma7 nr XII

Page 239: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 239

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh no third

7 1 5

4

3

1

C ma7n3 I

1 5 7

3

2

1

C ma7n3 III

7 5

1

3

2

1

C ma7n3 III

1

5

2

1

4

7

C ma7n3 III

1

4

2

51 7

C ma7n3 III

4

1

3

71 5

C ma7n3 V

5 1 7

1

4

1

C ma7n3 V

3

1 1

41 5 7 5

C ma7n3 V

21

51 7

3

C ma7n3 VIII

1 5 7

1

3 3

C ma7n3 X

1

4

715

1

C ma7n3 X

5 53

1

3

1

47

C ma7n3 nr XII

Page 240: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 240

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh add six

1

3

4

3

1 7 3 6

C ma7/6 VIII

Page 241: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 241

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh add sharp eleven

1

3

2

4

1 375 #4

1

C ma7#11 II

1

3

2

4

375 #4

C ma7#11 nr II

#4

1

7

2

4

3

3

6

C ma7/6#11 IV

1 1

432

153 7 #4

C ma7#11 V

T1

4

32

T

1 5 37 #4

C ma7#11 VII

76 #4

1

3

1 1 1

3

32

1

C ma7/6#11 VII

7 6

1

#4

2

3

3

4

C ma7/6#11 VII

7#4

3

36

1 11

C ma7/6#11 VII

7#4

3

36

1 11

2

1

C ma7/6#11 VII

6

1

#4

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6#11 IX

6

1

#4

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6#11 IX

21

3 4

3 #41 7

C ma7#11 X

21

3 4

3 #41 7

1

5

C ma7#11 X

3

1 1

4

75 #43

C ma7#11 nr XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

C ma7/6#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

5

C ma7/6#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

1

C ma7/6#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

1

C ma7/6#11 XII

#47

3

63

1

2 4

C ma7/6#11 XII

Page 242: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 242

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

#4

1

7

2

4

3

3

6

C ma7/6#11 IV

76 #4

1

3

1 1 1

3

32

1

C ma7/6#11 VII

7 6

1

#4

2

3

3

4

C ma7/6#11 VII

7#4

3

36

1 11

C ma7/6#11 VII

7#4

3

36

1 11

2

1

C ma7/6#11 VII

6

1

#4

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6#11 IX

6

1

#4

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6#11 IX

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

C ma7/6#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

5

C ma7/6#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

1

C ma7/6#11 XII

major seventh add six add sharp eleven

major seventh add six fl at fi ve

b5

1

7

2

4

3

3

6

C ma7/6b5 IV

76 b5

1

3

1 1 1

3

32

1

C ma7/6b5 VII

7 6

1

b5

2

3

3

4

C ma7/6b5 VII

7b5

3

36

1 11

C ma7/6b5 VII

7b5

3

36

1 11

2

1

C ma7/6b5 VII

6

1

b5

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6b5 IX

6

1

b5

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6b5 IX

3

1

7

2

6

4

b5

1

C ma7/6b5 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

b5

1

3

1

C ma7/6b5 XII

b57

3

63

1

2 4

C ma7/6b5 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

1

C ma7/6#11 XII

#47

3

63

1

2 4

C ma7/6#11 XII

Page 243: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 243

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh suspended fourth

1

2 3

4

7 1 54

C ma7sus4 I

2 3

4

1

4 7 15

C ma7sus4 I

1 4 7 1

1

3

4

2

C ma7sus4 I

4

2

7 41

1

C ma7sus4 III

5 1 4 7

4

2 31

C ma7sus4 III

1

2

3

4

1 5 7 4

1

5

C ma7sus4 III

1

4

3

1 5 4

2

7

C ma7sus4 III

1

2

1

3

5 1 4 7

C ma7sus4 V

3

2

1

4

4 1 5 7

C ma7sus4 V

3

4

1

2

1 7 1 4

C ma7sus4 V

2

4

1

3

4 7 1 5

C ma7sus4 V

3 4

2

71 4 5

1

C ma7sus4 VII

1 2

3 4

4

1

1 4 5 7

C ma7sus4 VII

1

2

5 74

T

4

1

C ma7sus4 VII

3

4

T

1 7 4

2

5

1

7

C ma7sus4 VII

3

1 1

1 74

C ma7sus4 VII

5

2

4

3

1

4 7 1

C ma7sus4 VIII

4

3

7 41

1

C ma7sus4 VIII

2

4

1

3

1 5 7 4

C ma7sus4 VIII

2

4

1

3

1 5 7 4

1

5

C ma7sus4 VIII

2

4

1

3

1 5 7 4

1

5

1

1

C ma7sus4 VIII

1 5 7

2

1

4

3

4

C ma7sus4 VIII

1 7

2

1

4

3

4

1

C ma7sus4 VIII

1

4

11

5 1 4 7

C ma7sus4 IX

2

1

43

4 1 5 7

C ma7sus4 X

Page 244: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 244

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

3

7 41

1

C ma7sus4 X

1

3

5 1 4 7 4

1 1

4

C ma7sus4 X

1

4

3

4 1 7

C ma7sus4 X

1 4 5 7

1

4

1

3

C ma7sus4 XII

5 1 4 5 7

2 3 4

1 1

C ma7sus4 XII

1

4 5 74

3

1

2

1

4

C ma7sus4 XII

Page 245: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 245

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

27

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27 5

1

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27

3

5

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

C ma7sus2 III

3

2

27

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

4

2

27 5

31

1

C ma7sus2 III

3

2

27

4

5

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

3

2

27

1

5

C ma7sus2 III

4

2

27 5

31

5

C ma7sus2 III

3

2

27

4

5

1

5

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

1

5

C ma7sus2 III

3

2

27

1

5

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27 5

11

5

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27

3

5

1

5

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

1

5

1

1

C ma7sus2 III

4

7

3

2

1

5

C ma7sus2 V

4

7

2

2

1

3

5 5

C ma7sus2 V

3

7

2

2

1

5

4

1

C ma7sus2 V

1 1

72

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

721

4

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

2

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

721

43

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

5

C ma7sus2 VII

major seventh suspended second

Page 246: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 246

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

3

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72

2

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

721

4

2

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

32

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

T

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72

4

5

2

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

721

43

5

2

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

5

T

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

3

5

T

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

4

3

1

2

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

34

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

4

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

4

5

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

4

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

4

51

T

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

4

5

T

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

51

T

C ma7sus2 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

T

1

C ma7sus2 VII

3

2

27

1

5

C ma7sus2 VIII

4

2

27

1

5

3

5

C ma7sus2 VIII

4

2

27

1

5

3

5

T

1

C ma7sus2 VIII

Page 247: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 247

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

27

C ma7sus2 IX

1

7

4

2

25

C ma7sus2 IX

1

7

4

3

25

2

5

C ma7sus2 IX

3

1

27

C ma7sus2 X

3

1

27

2

5

C ma7sus2 X

3

1

27

2

5

1

1

C ma7sus2 X

4

2

27

1

5

C ma7sus2 X

3

1

27

2

5

1

C ma7sus2 X

3

1

27

2

5

1

1

1

5

C ma7sus2 X

1

72

11

5

C ma7sus2 XII

4

1

72

11

1 5

C ma7sus2 XII

1

72

11

5

4

5

C ma7sus2 XII

4

1

72

11

1 5

3

5

C ma7sus2 XII

Page 248: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 248

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh fl at fi ve

4

1

1 b5 3

2 3

7

C ma7b5 III

21

3 4

3 b51 7

C ma7b5 X

Page 249: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 249

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh sharp fi ve

1

2

43

7 1 #53

C ma7#5 I

#5 1 3 7

4

2

1

3

C ma7#5 II

3

2

4

1 37#5

1

C ma7#5 III

1

2

4

1 7 3

3

#5

C ma7#5 III

1

4

2

1 #5 3

3

7

C ma7#5 III

1

4

2

1 3 #5

3

7

C ma7#5 IV

2

11

3

#5 1 3 7

C ma7#5 V

2 3

1

43 1 #5 7

C ma7#5 V

2

3

1

4

3 7 1 #51

C ma7#5 V

1 #5 3 7

12

4

1

1

3

C ma7#5 V

4

2 3

71 3 #5

1

C ma7#5 VII

1

3

4

2

3

1

1 3 #5 7

C ma7#5 VII

1

4

#5 73

23

1

C ma7#5 VII

2 3

T

1 7 3

4

#5

1

7

C ma7#5 VII

1

3 33

1 7 3 #5

C ma7#5 VIII

#5

3

4

2

1

3 7 1

C ma7#5 VIII

3 42

1

7 3 #5 1

C ma7#5 VIII

2 3

1

41 #5 7 3

C ma7#5 VIII

1 #5 7

3

1

3

2

4

C ma7#5 VIII

1 #5 7

3

1

3

2

4

3

C ma7#5 VIII

2

4

1

3

#5 1 3 7

C ma7#5 IX

4

1

2 3

3 1 #5 7

C ma7#5 X

3

4

2

1

1 #5 7 3

C ma7#5 X

1 3 #5 7

1

32

4

C ma7#5 XII

1 3 #5 7

1

32

4

1

3

C ma7#5 XII

Page 250: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 250

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1 1

1

4

#5 7 3

C ma7#5 XII

1

3 #5 73

4

1

1

2

3

C ma7#5 XII

Page 251: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 251

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major seventh add six fl at 5

b5

1

7

2

4

3

3

6

C ma7/6b5 IV

76 b5

1

3

1 1 1

3

32

1

C ma7/6b5 VII

7 6

1

b5

2

3

3

4

C ma7/6b5 VII

7b5

3

36

1 11

C ma7/6b5 VII

7b5

3

36

1 11

2

1

C ma7/6b5 VII

6

1

b5

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6b5 IX

6

1

b5

2

3

7

4

3

C ma7/6b5 IX

3

1

7

2

6

4

b5

1

C ma7/6b5 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

b5

1

3

1

C ma7/6b5 XII

b57

3

63

1

2 4

C ma7/6b5 XII

Page 252: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 252

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major ninth

2

1

4

3

5 2 53

C ma9 nr I

2

1

4

3

1 3 27

C ma9 II

2

1

4

3

5 3 27

C ma9 nr II

3

4

21

3 7 2 5

C ma9 nr II

5 1 3 7

4

2

1

2 3

2

C ma9 II

1

3

2

1

4

3 5 27 5

C ma9 nr III

1

3

2

4

3 5 27

C ma9 nr III

1 1

43

5 32 7

C ma9 nr V

1

4

1

3

3 5 2 3

C ma9 nr V

1

3 4

1

3 5 2 5 7

2

C ma9 nr V

1 2 3 7

4

1

2 3

1

5

C ma9 V

1 2 3

34

2

1

7

C ma9 V

1 7 2 5

2

1

43

1

3

C ma9 VII

3

21

1 73

1

2

C ma9 VII

1

2

3

1

3 7 2 5 7

1

C ma9 nr VII

1

2

3

1

3 7 2 5

C ma9 nr VII

3

1 1

2

1

2 5 7

C ma9 nr VII

1

4

32

1 7 53 2

T

C ma9 VIII

2 3

1

4

7 3 5 2

C ma9 nr VIII

1 7

1

2

3

4

2

3

C ma9 IX

5 7

1

2

3

4

2

3

C ma9 nr IX

2

1

3 4

2 3 75

C ma9 nr IX

3

11

2 4

3 1 75 2

C ma9 X

1 2 3

24

3

1

7

C ma9 XII

Page 253: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 253

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major ninth no third

2

1

27

C ma9n3 nr III

2

1

27 5

1

C ma9n3 nr III

2

1

27

3

5

C ma9n3 nr III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

C ma9n3 nr III

3

2

27

1

1

C ma9n3 III

4

2

27 5

31

1

C ma9n3 III

3

2

27

4

5

1

1

C ma9n3 III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

1

1

C ma9n3 III

3

2

27

1

5

C ma9n3 nr III

4

2

27 5

31

5

C ma9n3 nr III

3

2

27

4

5

1

5

C ma9n3 nr III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

1

5

C ma9n3 nr III

3

2

27

1

5

1

1

C ma9n3 III

2

1

27 5

11

5

1

1

C ma9n3 III

2

1

27

3

5

1

5

1

1

C ma9n3 III

2

1

27 5

1

5

3

1

5

1

1

C ma9n3 III

4

7

3

2

1

5

C ma9n3 nr V

4

7

2

2

1

3

5 5

C ma9n3 nr V

3

7

2

2

1

5

4

1

C ma9n3 V

1 1

72

C ma9n3 nr VII

1 1

721

4

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72 5

2

C ma9n3 nr VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

721

43

5

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

5

C ma9n3 nr VII

Page 254: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 254

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

3

5

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72

2

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

721

4

2

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72 5

32

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

T

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72

4

5

2

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

721

43

5

2

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

5

T

1

C ma9n3 VII

1 1

72 5

2

4

1

3

5

T

1

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

C ma9n3 nr VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

C ma9n3 nr VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

4

3

1

2

5

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

34

5

C ma9n3 nr VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

4

5

C ma9n3 nr VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

4

5

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

4

1

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

2

5

4

51

T

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

4

5

T

1

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

2

51

T

C ma9n3 VII

1

7 2

3

2

1

T

1

C ma9n3 VII

3

2

27

1

5

C ma9n3 nr VIII

4

2

27

1

5

3

5

C ma9n3 nr VIII

4

2

27

1

5

3

5

T

1

C ma9n3 VIII

Page 255: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 255

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

27

C ma9n3 nr IX

1

7

4

2

25

C ma9n3 nr IX

1

7

4

3

25

2

5

C ma9n3 nr IX

3

1

27

C ma9n3 nr X

3

1

27

2

5

C ma9n3 nr X

3

1

27

2

5

1

1

C ma9n3 X

4

2

27

1

5

C ma9n3 nr X

3

1

27

2

5

1

C ma9n3 nr X

3

1

27

2

5

1

1

1

5

C ma9n3 X

1

72

11

5

C ma9n3 nr XII

4

1

72

11

1 5

C ma9n3 XII

1

72

11

5

4

5

C ma9n3 nr XII

4

1

72

11

1 5

3

5

C ma9n3 XII

Page 256: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 256

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major ninth add six

2

11

7 63 2

1

C ma9/6 nr II

3

11

7 63 2

1

3

5

C ma9/6 nr II

1

3

3 6 52 7

21 1 1

1

C ma9/6 VII

1

2

3 6 52 7

1 1 1

C ma9/6 nr VII

1

2

3 6 527

1 11

C ma9/6 nr VII

4

32

1 7 63 2

4

T

C ma9/6 VIII

1

2

3 6 527

1 11

2

1

C ma9/6 VIII

1 1

3 6 52 7

1 1 1

C ma9/6 nr XII

Page 257: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 257

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major ninth sharp eleven

1

4

3 7 2 #41

1

32

C ma9#11 II

1

4

3 7 2 #4

1

3

C ma9#11 nr II

2

1

3 3 3

3 25 #4 7

C ma9#11 nr V

37 3

2

2#4

1

4

C ma9#11 nr V

4

1 1

3

2

1

3 5 7 2 #4 7

C ma9#11 nr VII

4

1 1

3

2

3 5 7 2 #4

C ma9#11 nr VII

4

1 1

3

3 5 2 #4

1

7

C ma9#11 nr VII

4

1 1

2

3 7 2 #4

1

7

C ma9#11 nr VII

4

1 1

2

3 7 2 #4

C ma9#11 nr VII

1

4

2

7 3 #4 2

3

C ma9#11 nr VII

1

4

2

7 3 #4 2

3

T

1

C ma9#11 VII

1

4

2

7 3 #4 2

2

35

C ma9#11 nr VII

1

2

7 2 #4 7

2

3

1 1 1

1

C ma9#11 VII

1

2

7 2 #4

2

3

1 1

1

C ma9#11 VII

1

2

7 2 #43

1 1

C ma9#11 nr VII

1

2

7 2 #4 73

1 1 1

C ma9#11 nr VII

3

7 #4

2

25

11

4

3

C ma9#11 nr VII

7 #4

2

2

11

4

3

C ma9#11 nr VII

1

4

3 #4 7 2

2

3

C ma9#11 nr X

4

3

2 5 7 #4

3 32

3

1

5

C ma9#11 nr X

4

3

2 5 7 #4

3 32

3

C ma9#11 nr XII

4

2

2 7 #4

31

3

C ma9#11 nr XII

Page 258: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 258

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major ninth fl at fi ve

2

1

4

3

1 3 27

1

b5

C ma9b5 II

1

4

32

1 7 b53 2

T

C ma9b5 VII

1 7 2 b5

2

1

4

11

3

C ma9b5 VII

1 7

1

2

3

4

2

3

1

b5

C ma9b5 IX

2

11

3 4

3 1 7b5 2

C ma9b5 X

Page 259: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 259

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

3

2

4

3 #5 27

C ma9#5 nr III

2

#5 7 2 #5

43

1

C ma9#5 nr III

2

1

43

#5 32 7

C ma9#5 nr V

1 7 2 #5

2

1

3 4

1

3

C ma9#5 VII

1

3

1

4

3 7 2 #5

1

7

C ma9#5 nr VII

3 3 3

1

4

3 7 3 #5 2

C ma9#5 nr VII

3

1 1

4

1

7#52

C ma9#5 nr VII

3

4

33

1 7 #53 2

T

C ma9#5 VIII

#5 7

1

3

3

4

2

2

C ma9#5 nr IX

1

2

43

2 3 7#5

C ma9#5 nr IX

1

3

43 #5 2

2

7

C ma9#5 nr X

1

3

7 2#5

24

3

C ma9#5 nr X

1

4

32

3 2 #5 7

C ma9#5 nr XII

1

2

1

3

3 7 2 #5

C ma9#5 nr XII

1

2 #5 73

3

7

1

2

1

C ma9#5 nr XII

major ninth sharp fi ve

Page 260: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 260

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

major thirteenth sharp eleven

#4

1

7

2

4

3

3

6

C ma13#11 IV

76 #4

1

2

1 1 1

3

1

C ma13#11 VII

76 #4

1

2

1 1 1

3

1

2

1

C ma13#11 VII

76 #4

1

3

1 1 1

3

32

1

C ma13#11 VII

7 6

1

#4

2

3

3

4

C ma13#11 VII

7#4

3

36

1 11

C ma13#11 VII

7#4

3

36

1 11

2

1

C ma13#11 VII

6

1

#4

2

3

7

4

3

C ma13#11 IX

6

1

#4

2

3

7

4

3

C ma13#11 IX

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

C ma13#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

5

C ma13#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

1

C ma13#11 XII

3

1

7

2

6

4

#4

1

3

1

C ma13#11 XII

#47

3

63

1

2 4

C ma13#11 XII

Page 261: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 261

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

sixth

1

32

4

1 3 6 1

C 6 I

4

2

1

3 61 1

3

C 6 I

4

2

1

3 6 51

3

C 6 I

2

1

3

3 6 1

C 6 I

5 3 6 1

1

2 3

4

C 6 I

2

43

1

1 5 6 3

C 6 II

21 1

3 61

C 6 II

43

1

35 6

C 6 nr II

1

433 1 6

C 6 II

1 6 3

2

1

4

C 6 II

33

1

351 1

3 3

5 6

C 6 III

1 1 1 1

5 1 3 6

C 6 V

1 1 1

1 3 6

C 6 V

1 1

3

1 36

C 6 V

6 5 1 3

3 3 32

C 6 V

6 3 3 6

111

3

C 6 V

1 6 1 3

11

34

C 6 V

6 3 5

1 1

3

C 6 nr V

12

b36 5

3

C 6 nr V

3 6 1 5

4

1

2 3

C 6 V

3 1 6

11

3

C 6 V

3

3 16

1

4

C 6 V

2

4

3

1

1 6 3 5

C 6 VII

6 3 5 1

1

4

2 3

C 6 VII

6 3 1

1

3

2

C 6 VII

Page 262: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 262

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

3

4

6 3 61

C 6 VII

2

1

3 6 1

4

C 6 VIII

6 1 3 5

1

2

3

4

C 6 VIII

5 3 6 1

1

3 4

2

C 6 VIII

2

1

43

1 3 65

C 6 IX

32

1 3 6

4

C 6 IX

6 3 6 3

1

2

43

C 6 nr IX

1 3 3

32

1

4

6

C 6 IX

3

1

1 5 6 3

1

4

C 6 X

2

1

3

3 5 6

C 6 nr X

2

1

3

1 5 63

4

C 6 X

3

1

4

1

1 5 63

C 6 X

3

1

2

36 1

C 6 XII

32

6 5 1 3

4

1

C 6 XII

1 3

6 5 13

4

2

C 6 XII

2

3

1

16 3

C 6 XII

1

3

56 3

1

C 6 nr XII

1 6 3

1

24

C 6 XII

Page 263: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 263

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

sixth add nine

3

3 6 2

11

C 6/9 II

3

3 6 2

11

4

5

C 6/9 nr II

3

3 6 2

11

4

5

2

1

C 6/9 II

3

3 6 2

11

2

5

C 6/9 nr II

4

3 6 2

11

2

5

3

1

C 6/9 II

3

3 6 2

11

2

5

2

1

4

5

C 6/9 II

2

3 2

4

1

6

C 6/9 nr II

2

3 2

4

1

6

3

1

C 6/9 II

3

3 2

4

1

61

2

C 6/9 II

6 2

1

4

3

3

C 6/9 nr III

6 2 5

1

4

1

3

3

C 6/9 nr III

6 2 5

1

4

1

3

3

2

1

C 6/9 III

6 2

1

4

3

3

2

1

C 6/9 III

6 2

1

4

3

3

2

15

1

C 6/9 III

5

1

6 2 5

1

4

1

3

3

2

1

1

C 6/9 III

2 6

1

3

4

3

C 6/9 nr III

2 6

1

3

4

32

1

C 6/9 III

2 6

1

3

4

32

1

5 1

C 6/9 III

6

11

4

32

C 6/9 nr V

6

11

4

32

1

5

C 6/9 nr V

6

11

4

32

1

5

3

3

C 6/9 nr V

6

11

3

32

1

5

2

3

4

1

C 6/9 V

6

11

3

32

4

1

C 6/9 V

6

11

3

32

1

5

4

1

C 6/9 V

1

4

326

3

C 6/9 nr V

Page 264: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 264

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

326

3

1

6

C 6/9 nr V

1

3

326

2

4

1

C 6/9 V

1

4

326

32

5

C 6/9 nr V

1

3

326

22

5

4

1

C 6/9 V

1

3

326

2

4

1

C 6/9 V

1

3

326

2

4

1

1

6

C 6/9 V

2 3 41

1 3 6 5

1 1

2 1

C 6/9 VII

2 31

1 3 6 5

1 1

2

C 6/9 VII

3 41

3 6 5

1 1

2 1

C 6/9 VII

21

3 6 5

1 1

2

C 6/9 nr VII

1

3 6

1 1

2

C 6/9 nr VII

1

3 6

1 1

2

2

1

C 6/9 VII

T

4

2

3

1 3 6 5

1 1

3 2

C 6/9 VII

4

2

3

3 6 5

1 1

3 2

C 6/9 nr VII

4

2

3

6 5

1

3 2

C 6/9 nr VII

4

2

3

6 5

1

3 2

T

1

C 6/9 VII

3

1

4

3 1 6

1 1

2

2

1

C 6/9 VII

3

1

4

3 1 6

1 1

2

C 6/9 VII

3

1

4

3 1 6

1 1

2

2

1

C 6/9 VII

2

4

1

3 6 5

1 1

2 2

C 6/9 nr VII

3

4

1

3 6 5

1

2

2

1

C 6/9 VII

432

6 5

1

3 2

C 6/9 nr VII

4

3 2

1

6

1

C 6/9 nr VII

4

3 2

1

6

1

3

1

C 6/9 VII

4

3 2

1

6

1

3

11

2

C 6/9 VII

Page 265: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 265

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

3 2

1

6

1

61

2

1

C 6/9 VII

4

3 2

1

6

1

6

1

C 6/9 nr VII

4

3 2

1

6

1

3

1 1

2

C 6/9 VII

1

3

1 1 63

4

2

2

T

C 6/9 VIII

1

3

1 5 63

4

2

2

T

C 6/9 VIII

3

3 3

1

6

2

4

2

C 6/9 nr VIII

3

1 3

T

6

1

4

2

2

1

C 6/9 VIII

3

1 3

T

6

1

4

2

C 6/9 VIII

3

1 3

T

6

1

4

2

2

5

C 6/9 VIII

3

1 3 6

1

4

2

2

5

2

C 6/9 VIII

3

2 3 6

2

4

1

1

C 6/9 VIII

3

2 3 6

2

4

1

1

C 6/9 VIII

1

3

1 63

4

2

2

C 6/9 IX

1

3

5 63

4

2

2

C 6/9 nr IX

2

3 6

1

3

2

C 6/9 nr IX

2

2 3 6

1

4

C 6/9 IX

3

2 3 6

1

4

2

5

C 6/9 nr IX

6 2

1

3

4

1

C 6/9 nr X

6 2

1

3

4

1

5

2

C 6/9 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

1

5

2

4

1

C 6/9 X

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

1

C 6/9 X

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

5

2

5

C 6/9 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

5

C 6/9 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

1

C 6/9 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

5

C 6/9 nr X

Page 266: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 266

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

5

1

1

C 6/9 X

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

5

1

1

1

5

C 6/9 X

2

1

3

3

6

4

C 6/9 nr X

2

1

3

3

6

4

2

1

C 6/9 X

2

1

3

3

6

4

2

1

1

5

C 6/9 X

3

26

1

3

4

C 6/9 nr XII

3

26

1

3

4

2

3

C 6/9 nr XII

2

26

1

3

4

1

3

C 6/9 XII

2

26

1

3

4

5

3

C 6/9 nr XII

Page 267: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 267

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

sixth add nine sharp eleven

3

3 6 2

11 4

#4

2

1

C 6/9#11 II

3

3 6 2

11 1

#4

C 6/9#11 nr II

4

3 6 2

11

2

5

3

1

1

#4

C 6/9#11 II

3

3 2

4

1

61

2

#4

1

C 6/9#11 II

6

32

4

32

1

#4

C 6/9#11 nr IV

3

2

6

4

1

#4

3

2

C 6/9#11 nr V

3

2

6

4

1

#4

3

2

1

6

C 6/9#11 nr V

1

4

1

3 6 #4

1 1

2 2

C 6/9#11 nr VII

1

4

1

3 6 #4

1

2

2

1

1

2

C 6/9#11 VII

21

41

1 3 6 #4

1 1

2 1

C 6/9#11 VII

211

1 3 6 #4

1 1

2

C 6/9#11 VII

14

1

3 6 #4

1 1

2 1

C 6/9#11 VII

11

3 6 #4

1 1

2

C 6/9#11 nr VII

4

5 2

1

#4

1

61

2

1

C 6/9#11 VII

4

5 2

1

#4

1

6

1

C 6/9#11 nr VII

2

4

1

3

1 3 6 #4

1 1

3 2

C 6/9#11 VII

4

1

3

3 6 #4

1 1

3 2

C 6/9#11 nr VII

4

1

3

1 6 #4

1

3 2

2

C 6/9#11 VII

4

1

3

6 #4

1

3 2

C 6/9#11 nr VII

3

3 6 2

11 1

#4

2

5

C 6/9#11 nr VII

4

3 3

1

6

3

4

2

2

#4

C 6/9#11 nr VIII

2

3

#4 6

1

3

T

1

4

2

C 6/9#11 VIII

3

#4 3 6

1

4

2

2

1

1

C 6/9#11 IX

3

2 3 6

1

4

#4

1

C 6/9#11 nr IX

6 2

1

3

4

12

#4

C 6/9#11 nr X

Page 268: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 268

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

6 2

1

3

4

12

#4

1

5

C 6/9#11 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

1

#4

2

4

1

C 6/9#11 X

6 2

1

3

3

1

4

5

2

#4

C 6/9#11 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

1

2

#4

C 6/9#11 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

12

#4

1

1

C 6/9#11 X

6 23

3

12

#4

1

1

1

5

C 6/9#11 X

2

1

3

3

6

2

#4

1

C 6/9#11 nr X

3

2

6

4

1

#4

3

2

C 6/9#11 nr XII

Page 269: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 269

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

sixth add nine fl at fi ve

3

3 6 2

11 4

#4

2

1

C 6/9b5 II

3

3 6 2

11 1

#4

C 6/9b5 nr II

4

3 6 2

11

2

5

3

1

1

#4

C 6/9b5 II

3

3 2

4

1

61

2

#4

1

C 6/9b5 II

6

32

4

32

1

#4

C 6/9b5 nr IV

1

4

1

3 6 #4

1 1

2 2

C 6/9b5 nr VII

1

4

1

3 6 #4

1

2

2

1

1

2

C 6/9b5 VII

21

41

1 3 6 #4

1 1

2 1

C 6/9b5 VII

211

1 3 6 #4

1 1

2

C 6/9b5 VII

14

1

3 6 #4

1 1

2 1

C 6/9b5 VII

11

3 6 #4

1 1

2

C 6/9b5 nr VII

4

5 2

1

#4

1

61

2

1

C 6/9b5 VII

4

5 2

1

#4

1

6

1

C 6/9b5 nr VII

2

4

1

3

1 3 6 #4

1 1

3 2

C 6/9b5 VII

4

1

3

3 6 #4

1 1

3 2

C 6/9b5 nr VII

4

1

3

1 6 #4

1

3 2

2

C 6/9b5 VII

4

1

3

6 #4

1

3 2

C 6/9b5 nr VII

3

3 6 2

11 1

#4

2

5

C 6/9b5 nr VII

4

3 3

1

6

3

4

2

2

#4

C 6/9b5 nr VIII

3

#4 3 6

1

4

2

2

1

1

C 6/9b5 IX

3

2 3 6

1

4

#4

1

C 6/9b5 nr IX

6 2

1

3

3

1

2

#4

C 6/9b5 nr X

6 2

1

3

3

12

#4

1

1

C 6/9b5 X

6 23

3

12

#4

1

1

1

5

C 6/9b5 X

Page 270: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 270

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

add nine

4

1

3

1 3 2 5

2

C /9 II

32

1

4

351 2

C /9 III

4

2

1

3

253 1

C /9 III

4

3

1

35 12

1

C /9 V

3

1

35 2

1

4

1

C /9 V

4

13

1 2 5 1

2

C /9 VII

1

3

2

3

1 3 5 2

C /9 VIII

3

2

3

1 5 3 2

1

C /9 VIII

3

4

12

2 3 5 1

1

1 5

1

C /9 VIII

3

4

12

2 3 5 1

1

5

C /9 VIII

3

4

2

2 3 5

1

1 5

1

C /9 VIII

3

4

2

2 31 5

1

C /9 VIII

4

12

2 3 5 1

1

C /9 VIII

4

1

3

1 35 2

2

C /9 IX

3

4

1

2

3 5 1 2

C /9 X

4

1

3

3 5 1 2

2

C /9 X

3 42

1

3 51 2

C /9 XII

2 4

11

351 2

C /9 XII

Page 271: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 271

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh

1

4

2

3

1 3 b7 1

C 7 I

1

2

43

b7 1 53

C 7 I1

5 b7 3

2

3

C 7 nr I

b7 5 3

3 4

1

C 7 nr I

5 3 b7 1

3 4

2

1

C 7 I

3 b7 1

1

2

3

C 7 I

b7 3 1

13

2

C 7 I

3 b7 5

1

2 3

C 7 nr II

3 b75

1

32

C 7 nr II

1 b73

3

1

2

C 7 II

5 1 3 b7

43

1

2

C 7 II

1

3

1

4

1 5 b7 3

C 7 III

1

3

1

4

1 5 b7 3 5

1

C 7 III

3 3 3

1

4

1 5 1 3 b7

C 7 III

1

b7 3 5

1

3

C 7 nr III

3

b7 35

1

4

C 7 nr III

1

3 5 b7

2

4

C 7 nr III

3 b7 5

1 1

3

C 7 nr III

5 b7 3 5

1 1

33

C 7 nr III

1 b7 b3 5

1 1

4

1

C 7 III

1

43

1

5 5 b7 3

C 7 nr III

1

33

1

1 5 b7 35

1

C 7 III

4

2

b7 31

1

C 7 III

1 11

2

5 1 3 b7

C 7 V

1

2

43

b7 1 53

C 7 V

Page 272: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 272

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 1 12

5 1 3b7

C 7 V1

3 5 b7

3

4

C 7 nr V

2

3 5b7

1

3

C 7 nr V

5 3 b7

1 23

C 7 nr V

5 3b7

1 1

2

C 7 nr V

3

21

43 1 5 b7

C 7 V

3 b7 1 3

1 1

34

C 7 V

1 b7 1 3

3

1 1

4

C 7 V

1

4

b7

1

1 3

C 7 V

14

3

53 b7

C 7 nr V

1 b7 3

1

43

C 7 V

5 b7 3

4

1

3

1

1

C 7 V

3

11

b7 1 3 1

4

C 7 V

2

4

3

1

3 3 b7 1

C 7 V

5 3 b7

4

3

1

C 7 nr VI

5 3b7

4

3

1

C 7 nr VI

1

4

32

b7 b7 3 5

C 7 nr VI1

b7

3

3

4

1

C 7 VI

1

3

41 3 b7

2

5

C 7 VI

1

3

5 b73

24

1

C 7 VI

53 b7

1

43

C 7 nr VII

4

3 b7

3

1

1

C 7 VII

3 b7 5

324

3

1

C 7 nr VII

1

4

32

1 b7 3 5

C 7 VIII

1

2

11

1

3

1

5 b7 3 5 1

C 7 VIII

Page 273: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 273

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

11

3

1

4

1 5 b7 3 b7 1

C 7 VIII

1

2

1 1

b7 3 5 1

C 7 VIII

2

b7 3 5

1

3

C 7 nr VIII

3

b7 35

1

2

C 7 nr VIII

1

3 5 b7

2

4

C 7 nr VIII

b7 5 3

1 1

4

C 7 nr VIII

3 b7 5

1 1

3

C 7 nr VIII

b7 5 3

1

3 4

C 7 nr VIII

3 b7 5

1

43

C 7 nr VIII

1

3

1

2

5 b7 3 5

C 7 nr VIII

3

2

4

5 3 b7 1

1

C 7 VIII

1 b7 3

3

21

C 7 VIII

b7 31

1

2

4

b7

1

C 7 VIII

2

4

1

3 b7 1

C 7 VIII

2

1

41 3 b7

3

1

C 7 VIII

3

2

3b7

1

1

C 7 VIII

2

1

3b7

1

1

3

1

5 5

C 7 VIII

1

2

1

3

1 5 b7 3

C 7 VIII1

b7 3 51

3

5

1

2

1

C 7 VIII

2 3

1

4

5 1 3 b7

C 7 IX

b75 3

21

4

C 7 nr IX

1

4

2

3 b71

C 7 IX

4

1

2

3

b73 51

C 7 X

5 3 b7

1

4

2

C 7 nr X

1

4

b71 3

2

C 7 X

Page 274: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 274

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3 b7 1

1

43

C 7 X

1

5 b7 3

32

C 7 nr XI

1

5 b73

4

2

C 7 nr XI

3 b7 5

43

1

C 7 nr XI

3 b5

1

4

3

C 7 nr XI

1

3

2

4b7531

C 7 XI

2

3 5 b7 3

43

1

C 7 nr XI

3

1

2

1

b7 5 1 3

C 7 XII

2

5b7 3

3

1

C 7 nr XII

b7 5 3

11

2

C 7 nr XII

b7 53

1 2

3

C 7 nr XII

5 b7 1 3

1

3 4

2

C 7 XII

3

1

41 b7 3

C 7 XII

3 b7 1 3

1

4

2

1

C 7 XII

Page 275: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 275

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh no third

5 b7 1

1

2

4

C 7n3 I

51

1

3

b7

4

C 7n3 I

2

1

4

1 b7 1 5

3

C 7n3 I

1 5 b7

1

3

1

C 7n3 III

1

1 5

4

b7

3

C 7n3 III

5 1 b7

2 3 4

C 7n3 III

1

42

51 b7

C 7n3 III

b7 5

1

3 4

1

C 7n3 V

b75

1

4

1

2

C 7n3 V

5 b7 1

4

3

1

C 7n3 V

5 1 b7

4

32

C 7n3 V

5 b7 1

1

3

4

C 7n3 VIII

1 1

3

5 b71

C 7n3 VIII

1 b7 5

432

C 7n3 VIII

2

1 5 b7

1

3

C 7n3 X

b7 1 5

3

1

4

C 7n3 X

5 b7 1

4

3

1

C 7n3 X

5 1 b7

4

32

C 7n3 X

1 5 1

1

42

3

b7

C 7n3 X

b7 5 1

32

1

C 7n3 XII

1 b7 5

432

C 7n3 XII

Page 276: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 276

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add six

1 2

43

b7 3 6 1

C 7/6 I

22

1

b7 3 6

C 7/6 nr I

22

1

4

b7 3 6 3

C 7/6 nr I

1 2

43

b7 3 6 1

C 7/6 I

22

1

4

b7 3 6 3

C 7/6 nr I

22

1

b7 3 6

C 7/6 nr I

32

b73 6

4

1

b7

C 7/6 nr I

1 2

33

1b7 63

4

5

C 7/6 I

22

1

3

b7 3 6 2

3

5

C 7/6 I

1

3

4

3 b7 6

C 7/6 nr II

2

1

3

4

3 b7 61

C 7/6 II

2

1

3

4

3 b7 65

C 7/6 nr II

2

1

3

4

3 b7 65

2

1

C 7/6 II

32

1

b73 1 6

4

C 7/6 II

4

1

2

b73 6

C 7/6 nr II

32

1

b73 1 6

4

1

b7

C 7/6 II

1

2

4

3 b7 3 6

4

C 7/6 nr II

2

1

3

44

3 b7 61 3

C 7/6 II

1

4

1 1

1 3 6b7

C 7/6 V

24

1 1

2 3 6b7

3

1

C 7/6 V

1

4

1 1

1 3 6b7

C 7/6 V

24

1 1

2 3 6b7

3

1

C 7/6 V

4

1 1

3 6b7

C 7/6 nr V

4

1 1

1 3 6b7

3

C 7/6 V

43

1

3 6b7

C 7/6 nr V

Page 277: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 277

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

32

1

3 6b7 5

4

C 7/6 nr V

32

1

3 6b7 5

4

1

1

C 7/6 V

2

1

3 6b7

1

C 7/6 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

2

3

4

b73

C 7/6 V

2

1

3 6b7

11

1

C 7/6 V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

1b7

1

C 7/6 V

2

1

3 6b7

11

1

1

5

C 7/6 V

2

1

3 6b7

11

1

3

53

1

C 7/6 V

2

6

1

3

4

3 b7 3

C 7/6 nr VII

2

6

1

3

4

3 b7 3

C 7/6 nr VII

2

6

1

3

4

3 b7 31

T

C 7/6 VII

2

3

1

1 b7 3 6

4

C 7/6 VIII

1

3

4

3b7 6

C 7/6 nr VIII

2

3

1

1 b7 3 6

4

C 7/6 VIII

1

3

4

3b7 6

C 7/6 nr VIII

1

2

4

3b7 65

3

C 7/6 nr VIII

1

2

1

43

1 b7 3 65

C 7/6 VIII

1

2

3

3b7 6

1

1

C 7/6 VIII

1

2

4

3b7 6

1

1

3

5

C 7/6 VIII

1 b7 3 6 1

T 1

2

3

1

C 7/6 VIII

1

2

1

43

1 b7 3 65

1

1

C 7/6 VIII

2

1

34

b7 5 63

C 7/6 nr X

2

1

34

b7 5 63

C 7/6 nr X

1

34

b7 63

C 7/6 nr X

1 2

33

1b7 63

4

3

1

C 7/6 XII

Page 278: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 278

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add six suspended fourth

3

4

1

b7 6

1

C 7/6sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

C 7/6sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

11

1

C 7/6sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

1

1

C 7/6sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1T

5

C 7/6sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

11

5 1

1

C 7/6sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

1

5

1

1

C 7/6sus4 III

3

1

b7 64

4

C 7/6sus4 nr III

3

1

b7 64

4

1

1

C 7/6sus4 III

3

1

b7 64

4

1

5

C 7/6sus4 nr III

1

b7 64

2

4

C 7/6sus4 nr V

1

b7 64

2

4

1

1

C 7/6sus4 V

1

b7 64

2

4

1

1

3

1

C 7/6sus4 V

1

2

43

b7 641

C 7/6sus4 V

4

b7 6

1

4

3

C 7/6sus4 nr VIII

4

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

C 7/6sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

32

5

C 7/6sus4 nr VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

32

5

1

1

C 7/6sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

C 7/6sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

T 1

1

C 7/6sus4 VIII

4

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

2

5

C 7/6sus4 VIII

4

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

2

15

1

C 7/6sus4 VIII

3

1

b7 46

4

C 7/6sus4 nr X

3

1

b7 46

4

1

4

C 7/6sus4 nr X

3

1

b7 46

4

2

5

C 7/6sus4 nr X

Page 279: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 279

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

b7 46

4

1

1

2

5

C 7/6sus4 X

4

1

b7 64

1

C 7/6sus4 nr X

4

1

b7 64

1

1

1

C 7/6sus4 X

3

1

b7 64

1

1

1

4

4

C 7/6sus4 X

Page 280: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 280

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add six fl at nine

33

1

3

b7 3 6 b2

C 7/6b9 nr I

3 b7 b2 6

1 1

2

4

C 7/6b9 nr II

3 b7 b2 6

1 1

2

4

C 7/6b9 nr II

2

1 1

3

4

1 3 b7 b26

C 7/6b9 II

2

1 1

3

4

3 b7 65 b2

C 7/6b9 nr II

b7 b2 3 6

1

2

3

1

C 7/6b9 nr V

b7 b2 3 6

1

2

3

1

C 7/6b9 nr V

4

1 1

b2 3 6b7

3

1

2

C 7/6b9 V

4

3

1

3 6b7

2

b2

C 7/6b9 nr V

4

3

1

3 6b7

2

b2

1

3

C 7/6b9 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

3

b2

C 7/6b9 nr V

T

1

3 6b7

1

4

b2b7

1

2

C 7/6b9 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

3

b2

1

5

C 7/6b9 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

b2

4

53

13

C 7/6b9 nr V

3 b7 b2 6

1

23

4

C 7/6b9 nr VI

3 b7 b2 6

1

23

4

C 7/6b9 nr VI

1

2

1

4

3 b7 b2 6

C 7/6b9 nr VII

1

3 3

4

3 b2b7 6

C 7/6b9 nr VIII

b2 b7 3 6

2

1

2

3

C 7/6b9 nr VIII

1

3 3

4

3 b2b7 6

C 7/6b9 nr VIII

b2 b7 3 6

2

1

2

3

C 7/6b9 nr VIII

1 b7 3 6 b2

T 1

2

4

3

C 7/6b9 VIII

Page 281: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 281

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add six add sharp eleven

1

3

43

b7 6

2

#4

C 7/6#11 nr I

b7 3 6

4

1

3

2

#4

C 7/6#11 nr III

b7 3 6

4

1

3

2

#4

1

1

C 7/6#11 III

b7 3 6

4

1

3

2

#4

1

1

1

5

C 7/6#11 III

b7 6

4

1

2

#4

4

3

C 7/6#11 nr III

#4

4

3

b7 6

1

2

3

C 7/6#11 nr V

#4

4

3

b7 6

1

2

3

1

1

C 7/6#11 V

#4

3

2

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

C 7/6#11 V

#4

3

2

b7 6

1

4

3

C 7/6#11 nr V

#4

3 2

b7 6

1

2

1

3 1

C 7/6#11 V

#4

3 2

b7 6

1

2

11

3 5 1

C 7/6#11 V

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

C 7/6#11 nr VIII

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

1

1

C 7/6#11 VIII

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

1

1

C 7/6#11 VIII

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

1

1

1

C 7/6#11 VIII

1

#4b7 36

4

3

2

C 7/6#11 nr VIII

1

#4b73 6

4

3

2

C 7/6#11 nr VIII

#4

4

1

2

3b7 6

3

C 7/6#11 nr X

2

3

1

3

b7 6

4

#4

C 7/6#11 nr XII

Page 282: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 282

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add sharp eleven

T

3

4

1

5 b7 1 #43

2

C 7/#11 I

3

1

4

2

3 b7 1 b5

C 7/#11 I

2

1

4

3

b5 3 b71

C 7/#11 I

3

4b7 1

2

b5

1

3

C 7/#11 I

2 3

b7 1

1

b5

1

3

C 7/#11 I

43

b7 1

2

b5

1

3

C 7/#11 I

2

1

4

2

1 b7 3 #45

3

C 7/#11 II

4

1

32

b7 3 b51

C 7/#11 II

21

43

b73b5 1

C 7/#11 II

2 1

43

b73 b51

C 7/#11 II

1

2

3

1

1 b5 b7 3

C 7/#11 III

1

2

3

4

1 b5 b73

C 7/#11 III

1

2

3

4

1 b5 b73

3

1

C 7/#11 III

2

3

b7 b5 3

3

1

4

C 7/#11 IV

3

2

4

1

3 1 #4 b75

1

C 7/#11 V

4

1

2 3

3 b7 1 b5

C 7/#11 V

3

1

2 4

3 b71 b5

C 7/#11 V

2

1

3 4

3b7 1 b5

C 7/#11 V

4

1

2b5 b7 1 3

1

C 7/#11 V

T

43

b7 3 b5

2

1

1

b7

C 7/#11 nr VI

3

43 b5

2

1

1

b7

C 7/#11 VI

T

1

3

2

1 b7 3 #45

4

C 7/#11 VII

2

1

4

3

1 b7 3 b5

C 7/#11 VII

3

1

4

2

b7 3 b5 1

C 7/#11 VII

2 3

3 b5

1

1

1

b7

C 7/#11 VII

Page 283: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 283

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

43

3 b5

2

1

1

b7

C 7/#11 VII

4

1

32

3 b71 b5

C 7/#11 VIII

4

1

32

3 b7 1b5

C 7/#11 VIII

21

43

3b71 b5

C 7/#11 VIII

2 1

43

3b7 1b5

C 7/#11 VIII

2

3

1

4

b5 1 3 b7

C 7/#11 IX

1

2

3

4

b5 1 3b7

C 7/#11 IX

1

2

3

4

b5 1 3b7

3

b5

C 7/#11 IX

1

2

3

2

b5 b7 31

C 7/#11 X

2

3

3 1 b7

3

b5

4

C 7/#11 X

3

1

2 4

b7 3b5 1

C 7/#11 XI

2

1

3 4

b73 b5 1

C 7/#11 XI

4

1

2 3

b7 3 b5 1

C 7/#11 XI

3

1

41 3 b5 b7

1

C 7/#11 XI

T

43

3 b7 1

2

b5

1

3

C 7/#11 XII

Page 284: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 284

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh suspended fourth

32

1

4

1 4 b7 1

C 7sus4 I

42

4 b7 51

1

3

C 7sus4 I

4 1b7

1

1

2 3 4

1

4

C 7sus4 I

4 1b7

1

1

2 3 4

5

2

1

4

C 7sus4 I

4 1b7

1

1

2 3 4

5

2

C 7sus4 I

4

3

1

451 b7

1 1

5

C 7sus4 III

4

3

1

451 b7

1

C 7sus4 III

1 b7 4

4

1 1

54

1 1

C 7sus4 III

1 b7 4

4

1 1

54

1 11

5

C 7sus4 III

434b7 11

21

C 7sus4 V

3 44b71 1

21

C 7sus4 V

5 4

1

1

3

1

b7

2

C 7sus4 V

5 4

1

1

3

1

b7

3

C 7sus4 V

4 1b7

1

1

2 3 4

C 7sus4 V

1

4

1

b7 4 5 1

1

3

1

1 5

C 7sus4 VIII

3

1

b7 4 b7 1

1

2

1

1 5

4

C 7sus4 VIII

1

b7 4 5

3

1

1 1

C 7sus4 VIII

1 4 b7

3

1

1

4

2

C 7sus4 VIII

5 4 b7

3

1

4

2

1

C 7sus4 VIII

5 4 b7

3

1

4

3

1

3

1

C 7sus4 VIII

5 4 b7

3

1

4

2

1

2

1

C 7sus4 VIII

5 4 b7

3

1

4

2

1

C 7sus4 VIII

2

1 5 b7 4

1

4

3

C 7sus4 X

1 5 b7

3

4

4

2

11

5

C 7sus4 X

b7 4

4

1

1

1

3

1

C 7sus4 X

Page 285: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 285

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

5 1

1

4

33

b7

2

C 7sus4 XII

Page 286: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 286

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh suspended second

2

11

b7

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

3

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

11

b7

1

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

11

b7

4

b7

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

11

b7

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

11

b7

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

3

5

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

1

C 7sus2 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

1

5

1

1 2

11

b7

1

5

C 7sus2 III

1

5 2

11

b7

4

b7

1

1

C 7sus2 III

1

5 2

11

b7

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

1

5 2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

1

5 2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

C 7sus2 nr III

Page 287: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 287

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

4

b7

3

1

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

1

4

b7

2

5

3

1

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

2

5

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

1

4

b7

3

1

1

5

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

1

5

C 7sus2 nr III

2

1

4

b7

2

5

3

1

1

5

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

1

5

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

1

5

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

1

1

1

5

C 7sus2 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

2

5

1

5

C 7sus2 III

3

5

2

2 b7

1

C 7sus2 nr V

3

5

2

2 b7

1

4

5

C 7sus2 nr V

3

5

2

2 b7

1

41

C 7sus2 V

2

1

2 b7

C 7sus2 nr VI

2

1

1

2 b7

3 4

5

C 7sus2 VI

2

b7 2 b7

1

1

3T

C 7sus2 VI

2

b7

4

2 b7

1

1

3T5

C 7sus2 VI

2

2

b7

1

C 7sus2 nr VII

2

3

b7

1

4

5

C 7sus2 nr VII

2

3

b7

1

4

1

C 7sus2 VII

Page 288: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 288

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

2

b7

1

4

1

3

5

C 7sus2 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

2

3

5

C 7sus2 nr VII

2

2

b7

1

4

5

C 7sus2 nr VII

2

2

b7

1

3

55

4

C 7sus2 nr VII

2

2

b7

1

3

1

4

5

C 7sus2 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

2

3

5

C 7sus2 nr VII

2

3

b7

1

2

1

C 7sus2 VII

2

3

b7

1

4

5

2

1

C 7sus2 VII

2

3

b7

1

4

1

2

1

C 7sus2 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

1

3

51

T

C 7sus2 VII

2

2

b7

1

T

1

4

C 7sus2 VII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

2

5

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

2

2

3

1

1

4

5

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

2

1 5

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

2

1 5

2

1

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

2

1

C 7sus2 VIII

b7

2

2

3

1

5

C 7sus2 nr X

b7

2

2

3

1

5

4

5

C 7sus2 nr X

b7

1

2

2

C 7sus2 nr X

b7

1

2

2

5

3

C 7sus2 nr X

b7

1

2

2

5

3

1

1

C 7sus2 X

b7

2

2

3

1

1

C 7sus2 X

2

1

2b7

C 7sus2 nr X

Page 289: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 289

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

2b7

3

5

C 7sus2 nr X

2

1

2b7

1

1

C 7sus2 X

2

1

2b7

3

5

1

1

C 7sus2 X

2

32b7

4

1

1 2

C 7sus2 X

2

1

2b7

1

5

C 7sus2 nr X

2

1

2b7

3

5

1

5

C 7sus2 nr X

2

1

2b7

1

1

1

5

C 7sus2 X

2

1

2b7

3

5

1

1

1

5

C 7sus2 X

2

32b7

24

1

5 1 2

C 7sus2 X

b7

1

2

2

C 7sus2 nr XI

1

2

2b7

C 7sus2 nr XII

1

3

2b7

1

5

C 7sus2 nr XII

1

2

2b7

1

5 1

3

C 7sus2 XII

Page 290: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 290

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at nine

432

1

3 b2 5b7

C 7b9 nr I

3

1

2

1

1 3 b7 b 2 5

4

C 7b9 II

3

1

2

1

1 3 b7 b2

C 7b9 II

2 3

11

5 3 b7 b2

C 7b9 nr II

3 b7 b2 5

1

3

2

4

C 7b9 nr II

2

3

1

4

b2 5 b7 3

C 7b9 nr III

432

1

b2 3 b71

C 7b9 III

432

1

b2 3 b75

C 7b9 nr III

4

32

1

b2 3 5b7

C 7b9 nr III

432

1

5 3 b7b2

C 7b9 nr IV

1

4

5 b2 3 b7

2

3

C 7b9 nr V

12

13

b7 5 b2 3

C 7b9 nr V

b7 b2 3 1

1

2

43

C 7b9 V

5 b2 b7

1

2 3

C 7b9 nr V

1

43

1 b7b2 3

2

C 7b9 V

3 b7 b2 5

1

4

2

3

C 7b9 nr VI

3 b7 b2

1

32

C 7b9 nr VI

4

32

1

3 5 b7b2

C 7b9 nr VI

4

12T

b731 b2

3

5

C 7b9 VII

4

132

b731 b2

C 7b9 VII

4

12

b73 b2

3

5

C 7b9 nr VII

43

21

b7 3 5 b2

C 7b9 nr VIII

43

21T

b7 3 51 b2

C 7b9 VIII

3

11

b7 3 5b2

2

C 7b9 nr VIII

1

2

1 3 b7 b2

4

1

C 7b9 IX

Page 291: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 291

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

5 b2 3 b7

2

1

3 4

C 7b9 nr IX

4

32

1

5 b7b23

C 7b9 nr IX

4

321

b2 b7 35

C 7b9 nr X

4

1

3

2

b2 5 b7 3

C 7b9 nr XI

2 3

11

3 b2 5 b7

C 7b9 nr XI

b7 3 5 b2

1

3 42

C 7b9 nr XII

4

32

1

b7 b2 35

C 7b9 nr XII

Page 292: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 292

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at nine suspended fourth

2 3

4b71 b2

1

4

C 7b9sus4 I

32

b241 b7

4

1

C 7b9sus4 II

2

b24 b7

3 4

1

5

C 7b9sus4 II

2

b24 b7

3

1

C 7b9sus4 II

43

4b7 1b2

1 1

C 7b9sus4 VI

43

11

1 b7 b2 4

C 7b9sus4 VI

1

4

1

b7 4 5 b2

3

1

1 5

2

C 7b9sus4 VIII

1

4

1

b7 4 5 b2

2

C 7b9sus4 VIII

1

4

1

b7 4 5 b2

2

3

5

C 7b9sus4 VIII

1

3

1

b7 4 5 b2

T

1

2

C 7b9sus4 VIII

4

1 4 b7 b2

2

1

31

5

C 7b9sus4 IX

b2 b7 4

2 3

4

21

5

C 7b9sus4 X

b2 b7 4

1 2

4

5

3

C 7b9sus4 XI

Page 293: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 293

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at nine sharp nine

432

1

3 b2 5b7

C 7b9 nr I

3

1

2

1

1 3 b7 b 2 5

4

C 7b9 II

3

1

2

1

1 3 b7 b2

C 7b9 II

2 3

11

5 3 b7 b2

C 7b9 nr II

3 b7 b2 5

1

3

2

4

C 7b9 nr II

2

3

1

4

b2 5 b7 3

C 7b9 nr III

432

1

b2 3 b71

C 7b9 III

432

1

b2 3 b75

C 7b9 nr III

4

32

1

b2 3 5b7

C 7b9 nr III

432

1

5 3 b7b2

C 7b9 nr IV

1

4

5 b2 3 b7

2

3

C 7b9 nr V

12

13

b7 5 b2 3

C 7b9 nr V

b7 b2 3 1

1

2

43

C 7b9 V

5 b2 b7

1

2 3

C 7b9 nr V

1

43

1 b7b2 3

2

C 7b9 V

3 b7 b2 5

1

4

2

3

C 7b9 nr VI

3 b7 b2

1

32

C 7b9 nr VI

4

32

1

3 5 b7b2

C 7b9 nr VI

4

12T

b731 b2

3

5

C 7b9 VII

4

132

b731 b2

C 7b9 VII

4

12

b73 b2

3

5

C 7b9 nr VII

43

21

b7 3 5 b2

C 7b9 nr VIII

43

21T

b7 3 51 b2

C 7b9 VIII

3

11

b7 3 5b2

2

C 7b9 nr VIII

1

2

1 3 b7 b2

4

1

C 7b9 IX

Page 294: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 294

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

5 b2 3 b7

2

1

3 4

C 7b9 nr IX

4

32

1

5 b7b23

C 7b9 nr IX

4

321

b2 b7 35

C 7b9 nr X

4

1

3

2

b2 5 b7 3

C 7b9 nr XI

2 3

11

3 b2 5 b7

C 7b9 nr XI

b7 3 5 b2

1

3 42

C 7b9 nr XII

4

32

1

b7 b2 35

C 7b9 nr XII

Page 295: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 295

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at nine sharp eleven

2

1

3

1 1

b2 b53 b71

C 7b9#11 II

1

2

11

b5

3

1

b2 3 b7b2 b5

C 7b9#11 nr II

1

2

1

3

1

4

b5b2 3 b7 3 b5

C 7b9#11 nr II

1

2

1 1

3 b7b2 b5

C 7b9#11 nr II

3

2

4

b2

1

b53b7

C 7b9#11 nr II

2

1

b73

1

b5

3

1

b2 b2

C 7b9#11 nr II

1

2

1

3

b5 b2 3 b7

C 7b9#11 nr II

3

1

2

4

b2 3b5 b7

C 7b9#11 nr III

2 3

1

4

b2 b5 b7 3

C 7b9#11 nr III

4

1

2

3

33 b2b5

C 7b9#11 nr IV

2

T

3

4

1

b7 b21 3 b5

C 7b9#11 V

1

3

2

43b2b7b5

C 7b9#11 nr V

3

1

2

1

3 b2 b5 b7

C 7b9#11 nr VI

43

1

2T

b7 3 b51 b2

C 7b9#11 VII

43

1

2

b7 3 b5 b2

C 7b9#11 nr VII

1

3 32

3 b2b5 b7

C 7b9#11 nr VIII

2

T

4

1

3

b7 31 b5 b2

C 7b9#11 VIII

1

4

32

b5 3 b7 b2

C 7b9#11 nr VIII

1 1

2

1

3 b7b5 1 b2

4

C 7b9#11 IX

1

3

1

4

b5 b2 3 b7

C 7b9#11 nr IX

1

3

1

4

b5 b2 3 b7

1

b2

C 7b9#11 nr IX

3 3 3

1

4b5 b2 b5 b7 3

C 7b9#11 nr IX

b5

1 3

4

1

3 b7 b2

C 7b9#11 nr IX

1 1 12

b2b5 b73

C 7b9#11 nr X

11

2

b5b7b2 3

1

C 7b9#11 nr XI

Page 296: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 296

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

43

3 b5 b2b7

C 7b9#11 nr XI

3

21

4b7 b5 b2 3

C 7b9#11 nr XI

b2 3 b7

4

1

2

1

b5

C 7b9#11 nr XI

1

3

4b5 b7 3

2

b2

C 7b9#11 nr XII

1

3

b2 3b7

24

b5

C 7b9#11 nr XII

dominant seventh sharp nine

2

#2

1

3

4

b7 3 b7

C 7#9 nr I

3

1

2

4

1 3 b7 #2

C 7#9 II

2

1

3

3 b7 #2

C 7#9 nr II

3

1

2

4

5 3 b7 #2

C 7#9 nr II

2

1

3

4

53 b7 #2

C 7#9 nr II

4

3

2

1

3 b75 #2

C 7#9 nr III

4

2

1

3 b7#2

C 7#9 nr III

2

1

34

3 1b7 #2

C 7#9 IV

1

32 3 3

1 3 b7 #2 5

C 7#9 VII

1

32 3 3

1 3 b7 #2 5

3

1

C 7#9 VII

1

33 3

3 b7 #2 5

3

1

C 7#9 VII

1

33 3

3 b7 #2 5

C 7#9 nr VII

22

1

4

3 b7 #2 b7

C 7#9 nr VII

22

1

3 b7 #2

C 7#9 nr VII

1

3

2

4 4

1

1 5 b7 b73 #2

C 7#9 VIII

3

2

4 4

1

1 5 b73 #2

C 7#9 VIII

2

1

4 43

15 b73 #2

C 7#9 IX

1

4 42

1 b73 #2

C 7#9 IX

1

4 42

5 b73 #2

C 7#9 nr IX

1

2

4

1

3 5 b7 #2

C 7#9 nr XI

Page 297: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 297

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh sharp nine sharp eleven

3

4

2

b7 b531 #2

1 1

C 7#9#11 II

3

4

b7 b53 #2

1 1

C 7#9#11 nr II

2

b5 #23 b7

1 1 1

C 7#9#11 nr III

4

3

#2 b73 b5

2

1

C 7#9#11 nr VI

T

1

3 4

2

b7 b51 3 #2

C 7#9#11 VII

1

3 4

2

b7 b53 #2

C 7#9#11 nr VII

3

44

2

3 #2b51 b7

1

C 7#9#11 VIII

1

43

1

3 #2b5 1 b7

2

C 7#9#11 IX

2

44

1

3 #2b5 b7

C 7#9#11 nr IX

3

4b5 #231 b7

1 1 1

C 7#9#11 XI

11

2

3

45 #21 3 b7

C 7#9#11 XI

3

b5 #23 b7

1 1 1

C 7#9#11 nr XI

Page 298: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 298

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh sharp nine sharp eleven

3

4

2

b7 b531 #2

1 1

C 7#9#11 II

3

4

b7 b53 #2

1 1

C 7#9#11 nr II

2

b5 #23 b7

1 1 1

C 7#9#11 nr III

4

3

#2 b73 b5

2

1

C 7#9#11 nr VI

T

1

3 4

2

b7 b51 3 #2

C 7#9#11 VII

1

3 4

2

b7 b53 #2

C 7#9#11 nr VII

3

44

2

3 #2b51 b7

1

C 7#9#11 VIII

1

43

1

3 #2b5 1 b7

2

C 7#9#11 IX

2

44

1

3 #2b5 b7

C 7#9#11 nr IX

3

4b5 #231 b7

1 1 1

C 7#9#11 XI

11

2

3

45 #21 3 b7

C 7#9#11 XI

3

b5 #23 b7

1 1 1

C 7#9#11 nr XI

Page 299: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 299

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at fi ve

3

1

4

2

3 b7 1 b5

C 7b5 I

2

1

4

3

b5 3 b71

C 7b5 I

3

4b7 1

2

b5

1

3

C 7b5 I

2 3

b7 1

1

b5

1

3

C 7b5 I

43

b7 1

2

b5

1

3

C 7b5 I

4

1

32

b7 3 b51

C 7b5 II

21

43

b73b5 1

C 7b5 II

2 1

43

b73 b51

C 7b5 II

1

2

3

1

1 b5 b7 3

C 7b5 III

1

2

3

4

1 b5 b73

C 7b5 III

1

2

3

4

1 b5 b73

3

1

C 7b5 III

2

3

b7 b5 3

3

1

4

C 7b5 IV

4

1

2 3

3 b7 1 b5

C 7b5 V

3

1

2 4

3 b71 b5

C 7b5 V

2

1

3 4

3b7 1 b5

C 7b5 V

4

1

2b5 b7 1 3

1

C 7b5 V

T

43

b7 3 b5

2

1

1

b7

C 7b5 nr VI

3

43 b5

2

1

1

b7

C 7b5 VI

2

1

4

3

1 b7 3 b5

C 7b5 VII

3

1

4

2

b7 3 b5 1

C 7b5 VII

2 3

3 b5

1

1

1

b7

C 7b5 VII

43

3 b5

2

1

1

b7

C 7b5 VII

4

1

32

3 b71 b5

C 7b5 VIII

4

1

32

3 b7 1b5

C 7b5 VIII

21

43

3b71 b5

C 7b5 VIII

Page 300: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 300

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2 1

43

3b7 1b5

C 7b5 VIII

2

3

1

4

b5 1 3 b7

C 7b5 IX

1

2

3

4

b5 1 3b7

C 7b5 IX

1

2

3

4

b5 1 3b7

3

b5

C 7b5 IX

1

2

3

2

b5 b7 31

C 7b5 X

2

3

3 1 b7

3

b5

4

C 7b5 X

3

1

2 4

b7 3b5 1

C 7b5 XI

2

1

3 4

b73 b5 1

C 7b5 XI

4

1

2 3

b7 3 b5 1

C 7b5 XI

3

1

41 3 b5 b7

1

C 7b5 XI

T

43

3 b7 1

2

b5

1

3

C 7b5 XII

Page 301: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 301

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add six fl at fi ve

1 2

43T

3 6b7 1b5

C 7/6b5 I

b7 3 6

21

4 4

b5

C 7/6b5 nr III

1 2

4

3

1 b5b7 3

4

6

4

C 7/6b5 III

2

4

3 b7 b5

1

6

1

1

3

C 7/6b5 III

2

4

3 b7 b5 6

1

3

C 7/6b5 nr V

1

31

4

2

b5 b71 3 6

4

C 7/6b5 VIII

1

3

4

2

b5 b7 3 6

4

C 7/6b5 nr VIII

1

3

1

4

2

b5 b71 3 6

4 4

2

C 7/6b5 VIII

1

3

1

4

2

b5 b7 3 6

4

1

C 7/6b5 VIII

2

1

34

3 b5b7 6

C 7/6b5 nr X

2

4

3 b7 b5

1

6

1

1

2

C 7/6b5 X

Page 302: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 302

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh add six fl at fi ve fl at nine

1

3 332

3 b2b5 b7 6

C 7/6b5b9 nr I

2

1 1

3

4

1

3 b2b5 1 b7 6

C 7/6b5b9 II

2

3

1 1

4b7 3b5 b2 6

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 7/6b5b9 nr V

1

3 32

4

3 b2b5 b7 6

C 7/6b5b9 nr VIII

Page 303: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 303

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp fi ve

4

3

1

2T

3 b7 1b5 #5

C 7b5#5 I

3

21

4

T

3b71b5 #5

C 7b5#5 II

4

321T

3 b71b5 #5

C 7b5#5 II

1 1

2

4

3

b7 3 #51 b5

C 7b5#5 III

1

2

4

3

b5 b7 3 #5

C 7b5#5 nr III

1

2

4

1

b7 b5 1 3

3

#5

C 7b5#5 IV

b5 3

1

3 4

1

2

1#5b7

C 7b5#5 VIII

b5 3 #5

1

3 4

1

2

1 b7

C 7b5#5 VIII

b5 3 #5

1

3 4

1

2

1

1

1b7

C 7b5#5 VIII

3

1

2 3

b5 b7 3 #5

C 7b5#5 nr VIII

1

43

b5 3#5 b7

2

C 7b5#5 nr XI

Page 304: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 304

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at fi ve fl at nine

2

1

3

1 1

b2 b53 b71

C 7b5b9 II

1

2

11

b5

3

1

b2 3 b7b2 b5

C 7b5b9 nr II

1

2

1

3

1

4

b5b2 3 b7 3 b5

C 7b5b9 nr II

1

2

1 1

3 b7b2 b5

C 7b5b9 nr II

3

2

4

b2

1

b53b7

C 7b5b9 nr II

2

1

b73

1

b5

3

1

b2 b2

C 7b5b9 nr II

1

2

1

3

b5 b2 3 b7

C 7b5b9 nr II

3

1

2

4

b2 3b5 b7

C 7b5b9 nr III

2 3

1

4

b2 b5 b7 3

C 7b5b9 nr III

4

1

2

3

33 b2b5

C 7b5b9 nr IV

2

T

3

4

1

b7 b21 3 b5

C 7b5b9 V

1

3

2

43b2b7b5

C 7b5b9 nr V

3

1

2

1

3 b2 b5 b7

C 7b5b9 nr VI

43

1

2T

b7 3 b51 b2

C 7b5b9 VII

43

1

2

b7 3 b5 b2

C 7b5b9 nr VII

1

3 32

3 b2b5 b7

C 7b5b9 nr VIII

2

T

4

1

3

b7 31 b5 b2

C 7b5b9 VIII

1

4

32

b5 3 b7 b2

C 7b5b9 nr VIII

1 1

2

1

3 b7b5 1 b2

4

C 7b5b9 IX

1

3

1

4

b5 b2 3 b7

C 7b5b9 nr IX

1

3

1

4

b5 b2 3 b7

1

b2

C 7b5b9 nr IX

3 3 3

1

4b5 b2 b5 b7 3

C 7b5b9 nr IX

b5

1 3

4

1

3 b7 b2

C 7b5b9 nr IX

1 1 12

b2b5 b73

C 7b5b9 nr X

11

2

b5b7b2 3

1

C 7b5b9 nr XI

Page 305: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 305

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

43

3 b5 b2b7

C 7b5b9 nr XI

3

21

4b7 b5 b2 3

C 7b5b9 nr XI

b2 3 b7

4

1

2

1

b5

C 7b5b9 nr XI

1

3

4b5 b7 3

2

b2

C 7b5b9 nr XII

1

3

b2 3b7

24

b5

C 7b5b9 nr XII

Page 306: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 306

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at fi ve fl at nine sharp nine

1

2

1

b5

3

1

b2 3 b7#2 b5

4

C 7b5b9#9 II

1

2

1

b5

3

b2 3 b7#2

4

C 7b5b9#9 II

1

2

1

3

b5 b2 3 b7 #2

4

C 7b5b9#9 IX

1 1 1 1

b2 b5 b7 #2

2

3

C 7b5b9#9 XI

3

21

4b7 b5 b23

1

#2

C 7b5b9#9 XI

2

3

1

4b7 b5 b23

1

#2

C 7b5b9#9 XI

b2 3 b7

4

1

2

1

b5

1

#2

C 7b5b9#9 XI

2 3

b23 b7

T4

b5

1

#2

C 7b5b9#9 XI

Page 307: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 307

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp nine

3

4

2

b7 b531 #2

1 1

C 7b5#9 II

3

4

b7 b53 #2

1 1

C 7b5#9 nr II

2

b5 #23 b7

1 1 1

C 7b5#9 nr III

4

3

#2 b73 b5

2

1

C 7b5#9 nr VI

T

1

3 4

2

b7 b51 3 #2

C 7b5#9 VII

1

3 4

2

b7 b53 #2

C 7b5#9 nr VII

3

44

2

3 #2b51 b7

1

C 7b5#9 VIII

1

43

1

3 #2b5 1 b7

2

C 7b5#9 IX

2

44

1

3 #2b5 b7

C 7b5#9 nr IX

3

4b5 #231 b7

1 1 1

C 7b5#9 XI

11

2

3

45 #21 3 b7

C 7b5#9 XI

3

b5 #23 b7

1 1 1

C 7b5#9 nr XI

Page 308: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 308

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp fi ve fl at nine

4

2

31T

3 b7b2b5 #5

C 7b5#5b9 II

4

321T

3 b71b5 #5

1

b2

C 7b5#5b9 II

1

34

1

b7 b5 b2 3

2

#5

C 7b5#5b9 IV

b5 3 #5

1

3 32

b7 b2

3

C 7b5#5b9 VIII

b5 3 #5

1

3 3

T

2

1 b7 b2

3

C 7b5#5b9 VIII

dominant seventh fl at fi ve sharp fi ve sharp nine

4

2

1T

3 b7#2b5 #5

3

C 7b5#5#9 II

4

3

1T

3 b7#2b5 #5

4

2

1

C 7b5#5#9 II

b5 3

1

3 4

4

2

#9#5b7

C 7b5#5#9 VIII

b5 3

1

3 4

4

2

#9#5b7

1

1

C 7b5#5#9 VIII

1

43

b5 3#5 b7

2

1

#2

C 7b5#5#9 XI

Page 309: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 309

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant seventh sharp fi ve

1

2

11

b7 3 #5 1

C 7#5 I

2

1

3

4

b7 1 #53

C 7#5 I

2

1

3

4

b7 1#5 3

C 7#5 I

1

3

4b7 1 #53

2

C 7#5 I

1

4

32

b73 #51

C 7#5 II

1

4

3

2

b7 3 #51

C 7#5 III

1 #5 b7 3

1

4

1

3

C 7#5 III

1 2

4

3

1 3 b7 #5

C 7#5 III

1

3

2

4

1 3 b7#5

C 7#5 III

1

3

4

1 3 b7#5

2

C 7#5 IV

1

2

1

3

1 3 b7#5

C 7#5 V

1

3

1

2

1 3#5b7

C 7#5 V

1

4

2

3

3 1b7 #5

C 7#5 V

1

41 #5

2

b73

3

C 7#5 VI

1 3 #5b7

4

12 3

C 7#5 VII

13 #5b7

4

132

C 7#5 VII

1 2

3 4

b7 3 #51

C 7#5 VIII

21

3 4

3 #5 1b7

C 7#5 VIII

1

3 4

3b7 #5

C 7#5 nr VIII

1

2

3 43#5 1b7

C 7#5 VIII

1

2

3 43#51 b7

C 7#5 VIII

12

4

3b7 1 #5

1

C 7#5 IX

1

3 4

2

1 3 b7#5

C 7#5 IX

1

3

2

1 #5 b7 3

4

C 7#5 X

1

2

4

3

1 b7 3#5

C 7#5 X

Page 310: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 310

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

3

2

4

3 1 #5 b7

C 7#5 X

4

3

2

1

#5b71 3

C 7#5 XI

2

1

43

#5 1 3b7

C 7#5 XII

2

1

43

#5 13 b7

C 7#5 XII

dominant seventh sharp fi ve fl at nine

1 2

3 4

13 #5 b2b7

C 7#5b9 nr I

2

1

3

1

4

3 b7 b2 #51

C 7#5b9 II

3 b b2 #5

1

2

1

4

C 7#5b9 nr II

2

3

1

4

b7b2 #53

C 7#5b9 nr VI

1

2

1

3

#5 b2#5 b7

1 1

4

1 3

C 7#5b9 VI

T 1

3 3 3

b7 3 #5 b21

C 7#5b9 VIII

1

3 4

1

2

1 3 b7#5 b2

C 7#5b9 IX

2

4

1

3

b7 3#5 b2

C 7#5b9 nr XII

dominant seventh sharp fi ve fl at nine sharp nine

T 2

4

3

13 #5 b2b7

1

#2

C 7#5b9#9 IV

1 2

3 4

13 #5 b2b7

1

#2

C 7#5b9#9 XI

Page 311: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 311

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

1

4

b7 3 #5#2

C 7#5#9 nr I

3

4

2

b2 #53

1

b7

C 7#5#9 nr I

4 4

2

#2 #53

1

b7

C 7#5#9 nr I

2

1

3

4 4

b7 #2#51 3

C 7#5#9 II

1 3 b7#2 #5

2

1

3

4 4

C 7#5#9 II

12

3 4

b7 #2#53

C 7#5#9 nr II

1

23 4

3 b7 #2 #5

C 7#5#9 nr II

21

3

4

#5 b7 3b2

C 7#5#9 nr III

2 3

1

4

b7 3b2 #5

C 7#5#9 nr III

b7 b2 3 #5

1

3 4

2

C 7#5#9 nr IV

4

3

2

#5b7 b2 3

1

C 7#5#9 nr IV

#53 b7 1 #2

1

3

2

4

1

C 7#5#9 IV

2 4

1

3

b7 #5 b2 3

C 7#5#9 nr V

2 31

4

#5 b2 3 b7

C 7#5#9 nr V

b2 #53 b7

2

1

4

1

C 7#5#9 nr VI

1

#5b7

2

3 b2

11

C 7#5#9 nr VI

2

3

1

4

1

b7b2 #53 b7

C 7#5#9 nr VI

2

3

1

4

b7b2 #53

1

b7

C 7#5#9 nr VI

43

4 4

b7

2

3 #5 b23

1

b7

C 7#5#9 nr VI

#2 #53 b7

2

3

4

1

C 7#5#9 nr VI

2

3 3

4

b7#2 #53

1

b7

C 7#5#9 nr VI

1

#5b7

2

3 #2

4

1

C 7#5#9 nr VI

1 3 b7#2 #5

2

1

3 3

4

C 7#5#9 VII

1

23

2

b3#53 b7

C 7#5#9 nr VII

32

3 3

b7

1

3 #5b23

C 7#5#9 nr VII

dominant seventh sharp fi ve sharp nine

Page 312: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 312

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

13 b7#2 #5

3

1

2 2

4

C 7#5#9 VII

32

3

4

b7

1

3 #5 #23

C 7#5#9 nr VII

T 1

2 2

4

3 #2b7 #51

C 7#5#9 VIII

1

2 2

4

3 #2b7 #5

C 7#5#9 nr VIII

3

1

3 3

b7 3 #5 b2

C 7#5#9 nr VIII

43

1

2

3 #2b7#5

C 7#5#9 IX

3

1

4

1

3 b7#5 b2

C 7#5#9 nr IX

b7 b2 #5

4

1

2

1

3

C 7#5#9 nr IX

3 b7 b2 #5

43

1

2

C 7#5#9 nr IX

2

1

4

1

#5 3 b7b2b2

3

C 7#5#9 nr IX

2

1

3 4

3 b7#5 #2

C 7#5#9 nr IX

4

3

2

1 1

#5 #2b71 3

C 7#5#9 XI

3

2

1 1

#5 #2b73

C 7#5#9 nr XI

1

3

12

b2 #5 b7 3

C 7#5#9 nr XI

1

2

4

3 b2 #5 b7

1

C 7#5#9 nr XI

3

2

4

3 #2 #5 b7

1

C 7#5#9 nr XI

#53 b71 #2

1

2

4

3

4

C 7#5#9 XII

3 b7 #2 #5

32

4

1

C 7#5#9 nr XII

Page 313: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 313

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth

b7 3 b 2

1

23 3

C 9 nr I

1

4

23b7

2

C 9 nr I

1 3 b7 2

13 3 32

5

C 9 II

3

1

2 3

1 3 b7 2

C 9 II

3

1

2 3

5 3 b7 2

C 9 nr II

3

1

2 3

5 3 b7 2 5

3

C 9 nr II

3 b7 2

1

3 3

C 9 nr II

3 b7 2

1

3 3 3

5

C 9 nr II

b7 2 3

1

4

3

C 9 nr II

1

2

1 1

4

3 5 b7 2 5

C 9 nr III

1

2

1

4

3 5 b7 2

C 9 nr III

b7 3 5 b7 2

3

4

2

1 1

C 9 nr III

1

2

5 2 3 b7

1 1

3

C 9 nr V

1

43

1 b7 2 3

2

C 9 V

2

1

3

5 2 3b7

4

C 9 nr V

2 3 b7

3

2

1

C 9 nr V

2 b7

2 3

1

3

C 9 nr VI

1

b7

2

3

4

2

C 9 nr VI

24

1

3 2 5

3

b7

C 9 nr VI

3 b7 21 5

43

21

T

C 9 VII

1

4

3 b7 2

2

C 9 nr VII

43

21

3 b7 2 5

C 9 nr VIII

3

2

11

b7 3 5 2

C 9 nr VIII

4

2

11T

b7 3 51 2

C 9 VIII

b7 3 2

1

4

2

C 9 nr VIII

Page 314: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 314

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

1 3 b7 2

4

3

C 9 IX

5 2 3 b7

2

1

43

C 9 nr IX

3

1

2

23 b7

C 9 nr IX

3

4

1

b72 3

C 9 nr IX1

4

2

3

3 5 b7 2

C 9 nr X

1

43

1

3 1 5 b7

2

2

C 9 X

32

1

4

3 2 5 b7

C 9 nr XI

4

2

1

3

5 2b7 3

C 9 nr XII

3 b7 2

4 4

1

C 9 nr XII

3 3 b7 2

1

23 4

C 9 nr XII

3 b7 2 5 1

1 1 1 1

2 2

C 9 XII

Page 315: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 315

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth no third

2

11

b7

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

3

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

11

b7

1

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

11

b7

4

b7

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

11

b7

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

11

b7

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

3

5

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

1

C 9n3 nr III

2

11

b7

1

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

1

5

1

1 2

11

b7

1

5

C 9n3 III

1

5 2

11

b7

4

b7

1

1

C 9n3 III

1

5 2

11

b7

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

1

5 2

11

b7

1

5

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

1

5 2

11

b7

4

b7

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

C 9n3 nr III

Page 316: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 316

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

4

b7

3

1

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

1

4

b7

2

5

3

1

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

2

5

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

1

4

b7

3

1

1

5

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

1

5

C 9n3 nr III

2

1

4

b7

2

5

3

1

1

5

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

1

5

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

1

5

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

3

5

1

1

1

5

C 9n3 III

2

1

4

b7

1

1

3

1

2

5

1

5

C 9n3 III

3

5

2

2 b7

1

C 9n3 nr V

3

5

2

2 b7

1

4

5

C 9n3 nr V

3

5

2

2 b7

1

41

C 9n3 V

2

1

2 b7

C 9n3 nr VI

2

1

1

2 b7

3 4

5

C 9n3 VI

2

b7 2 b7

1

1

3T

C 9n3 VI

2

b7

4

2 b7

1

1

3T5

C 9n3 VI

2

2

b7

1

C 9n3 nr VII

2

3

b7

1

4

5

C 9n3 nr VII

2

3

b7

1

4

1

C 9n3 VII

Page 317: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 317

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

2

b7

1

4

1

3

5

C 9n3 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

2

3

5

C 9n3 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

5

C 9n3 nr VII

2

2

b7

1

3

55

4

C 9n3 nr VII

2

2

b7

1

3

1

4

5

C 9n3 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

2

3

5

C 9n3 nr VII

2

3

b7

1

2

1

C 9n3 VII

2

3

b7

1

4

5

2

1

C 9n3 VII

2

3

b7

1

4

1

2

1

C 9n3 VII

2

2

b7

1

4

1

3

51

T

C 9n3 VII

2

2

b7

1

T

1

4

C 9n3 VII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

C 9n3 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

C 9n3 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

2

5

C 9n3 VIII

b7

2

2

3

1

1

4

5

C 9n3 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

2

1 5

C 9n3 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

2

1 5

2

1

C 9n3 VIII

b7

3

2

4

1

1

2

1

C 9n3 VIII

b7

2

2

3

1

5

C 9n3 nr X

b7

2

2

3

1

5

4

5

C 9n3 nr X

b7

1

2

2

C 9n3 nr X

b7

1

2

2

5

3

C 9n3 nr X

b7

1

2

2

5

3

1

1

C 9n3 X

b7

2

2

3

1

1

C 9n3 X

2

1

2b7

C 9n3 nr X

Page 318: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 318

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

1

2b7

3

5

C 9n3 nr X

2

1

2b7

1

1

C 9n3 X

2

1

2b7

3

5

1

1

C 9n3 X

2

32b7

4

1

1 2

C 9n3 X

2

1

2b7

1

5

C 9n3 nr X

2

1

2b7

3

5

1

5

C 9n3 nr X

2

1

2b7

1

1

1

5

C 9n3 X

2

1

2b7

3

5

1

1

1

5

C 9n3 X

2

32b7

24

1

5 1 2

C 9n3 X

b7

1

2

2

C 9n3 nr XI

1

2

2b7

C 9n3 nr XII

1

3

2b7

1

5

C 9n3 nr XII

1

2

2b7

1

5 1

3

C 9n3 XII

Page 319: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 319

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth suspended fourth

2 3

4b71 2

1

4

C 9sus4 I

11

241 b7

1 11

5

C 9sus4 III

11

241 b7

1 1

C 9sus4 III

1

24 b7

1 11

5

C 9sus4 nr III

1

24 b7

1 1

C 9sus4 nr III

43

1

2

1 b7 2 5

C 9sus4 VI

43

4b7 12

2

1

C 9sus4 VI

43

1

2

1 b7 2 5

C 9sus4 VI

1

4

1

b7 4 5 2

3

1

1 5

4

C 9sus4 VIII

2

1 4 b7 2

1 111

5

C 9sus4 X

Page 320: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 320

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth add six

22

1

3

b7 3 6 2

C 9/6 nr I

2

1

33

4

1 3 b7 2 6

C 9/6 II

1

33

4

3 b7 2 6

C 9/6 nr II

2

1

33

4

3 b7 65 2

C 9/6 nr II

2

1

33

4

3 b7 65 2

2

1

C 9/6 II

4

1

2

b73 6

1

2

C 9/6 nr II

4

1

3

b73 6

1

2

2

5

C 9/6 nr III

4

1 1

2 3 6b7

3

1

2

C 9/6 V

4

2

1

3 6b7

3

2

C 9/6 nr V

4

2

1

3 6b7

3

2

1

3

C 9/6 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

2

C 9/6 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

2b7

1

3

C 9/6 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

2

1

5

C 9/6 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

2

3

53

1

4

C 9/6 nr V

1

2

1

4

3 b7 2 6

C 9/6 nr VII

1

2

1

4

3 b7 2 6

T

1

C 9/6 VII

1 b7 3 6 2

1 2

3

4 4

C 9/6 VIII

b7 3 6 2

1

2

3 4

C 9/6 nr VIII

1

34

b7 63

1

2

C 9/6 nr X

2

1

34

b7 5 63

1

2

C 9/6 nr X

Page 321: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 321

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth add six suspended fourth

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

1

C 9/6sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

11

1

C 9/6sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

1T

5

C 9/6sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

T

5

C 9/6sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

11

5

1

1

C 9/6sus4 III

1

b7 64

2

4

3

2

C 9/6sus4 nr V

3

b7 6

1

4

3

2

3

C 9/6sus4 nr VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

32

5

3

2

C 9/6sus4 nr VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

T

3

2

C 9/6sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

T

2

15

3

C 9/6sus4 VIII

3

1

b7 46

42

2

2

5

C 9/6sus4 nr X

4

1

b7 64

1

2

3

C 9/6sus4 nr X

2

1

b7 64

1

2

3

4

4

C 9/6sus4 nr X

1

3

42

b7 6

2

3

#42

C 9/6#11 nr I

#4 2

4

1

2

3b7 6

3

1

C 9/6#11 nr X

dominant ninth add six add sharp eleven

Page 322: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 322

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth sharp eleven

13T

5 3 b7 2

42

#4

T

1

C 9#11 II

13T

5 3 b7 2

42

#4

C 9#11 nr II

1 2

3 4

2 b53 b7

C 9#11 nr II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 4

1

2

b5

C 9#11 II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 4

1

2

b5

C 9#11 II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 4

1

2

b5

1

b5

C 9#11 II

1

2

1

4

3 b7 2b5

C 9#11 nr III

1

2

4

3

3 b7b5 2

C 9#11 nr IV

32

1

3 2 b5

4

b7

C 9#11 nr VI

1 1 1

2

2 b53 b7

C 9#11 nr VII

4

3

1

2T

b7 3 b51 2

C 9#11 VII

3

21

4

T

b73b51 2

C 9#11 VIII

4

321T

b7 3b51 2

C 9#11 VIII

1 1

2

4

3

3 b7 2b5 1

C 9#11 IX

3 4

1

1 #4 b7

2

2

1

5

C 9#11 X

3 4

1

#4 b7

2

25

C 9#11 nr X

1

2

4

1

3 1 b5b7

3

2

C 9#11 X

4

2

1

3

b5 2b7 3

C 9#11 nr XI

31

1

1 b7 2

4

3

2

b5

C 9#11 nr XII

Page 323: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 323

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth fl at fi ve

1 2

3 4

2 b53 b7

C 9b5 nr II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 4

1

2

b5

C 9b5 II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 4

1

2

b5

C 9b5 II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 4

1

2

b5

1

b5

C 9b5 II

1

2

1

4

3 b7 2b5

C 9b5 nr III

1

2

4

3

3 b7b5 2

C 9b5 nr IV

32

1

3 2 b5

4

b7

C 9b5 nr VI

1 1 1

2

2 b53 b7

C 9b5 nr VII

4

3

1

2T

b7 3 b51 2

C 9b5 VII

3

21

4

T

b73b51 2

C 9b5 VIII

4

321T

b7 3b51 2

C 9b5 VIII

1 1

2

4

3

3 b7 2b5 1

C 9b5 IX

1

2

4

1

3 1 b5b7

3

2

C 9b5 X

4

2

1

3

b5 2b7 3

C 9b5 nr XI

31

1

1 b7 2

4

3

2

b5

C 9b5 nr XII

Page 324: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 324

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

3

2

4

3 #5 2b7

C 9#5 nr I

14

12

3

#5

2

b7

1

3

C 9#5 I

14

12

3

#5

2

b7

1

3

C 9#5 I

14

12

3

#5

2

b7

1

3 3

1

C 9#5 I

3

1

4

1 2 #53

2 3

b7

C 9#5 II

11

34

#5 b7 23

C 9#5 nr III

1 1

3

2

41 3 #5 b7 2

C 9#5 III

b7 3 1#5

T

3

2

1

2

4

C 9#5 V

1

3

2

4

b7 2 #53

C 9#5 nr VII

1

32

4

31 #5b7

1

3

C 9#5 VII

1

2 3

4

3 1#5b7

1

3

C 9#5 VII

1

2 2

3

3 #5 2b7

C 9#5 nr VIII

T 1

4

3

1 2#5b7

2

3

C 9#5 VIII

1

2

3

4#5 b7 23

C 9#5 nr X

3

1

b7 21

2

4#5

1

C 9#5 X

dominant ninth sharp fi ve

dominant ninth fl at fi ve sharp fi ve

32

1

3 2 b5

4

b7

1

#5

C 9b5#5 nr I

1 1

2 3

2 b53 b7

3

#5

C 9b5#5 nr II

1 3 b7 2

1

3 3

1

2

b5

4

#5

C 9b5#5 II

4

321T

b7 3b51 2

3

#5

C 9b5#5 VIII

Page 325: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 325

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant ninth add six fl at fi ve

1

3

42

b7 6

2

3

b52

C 9/6b5 nr I

2

1

33

4

3

1

3 b71 2b5 6

C 9/6b5 II

b5 2

4

1

2

3b7 6

3

1

C 9/6b5 nr X

2 3

4b71 2

1

4

C 11n3 I

11

241 b7

1 11

5

C 11n3 III

11

241 b7

1 1

C 11n3 III

43

1

2

1 b7 2 5

C 11n3 VI

43

4b7 12

2

1

C 11n3 VI

43

1

2

1 b7 2 5

C 11n3 VI

1

4

1

b7 4 5 2

3

1

1 5

4

C 11n3 VIII

2

1 4 b7 2

1 111

5

C 11n3 X

dominant eleventh no third

Page 326: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 326

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant thirteenth

1 2

43

b7 3 6 1

C 13 I

22

1

4

b7 3 6 3

C 13 nr I

22

1

3

b7 3 6 2

C 13 nr I

22

1

b7 3 6

C 13 nr I

32

b73 6

4

1

b7

C 13 nr I

1 2

33

1b7 63

4

5

C 13 I

22

1

3

b7 3 6 2

3

5

C 13 nr I

2

1

33

4

1 3 b7 2 6

C 13 II

1

33

4

3 b7 2 6

C 13 nr II

1

3

4

3 b7 6

C 13 nr II

2

1

3

4

3 b7 61

C 13 II

2

1

3

4

3 b7 65

C 13 nr II

2

1

3

4

3 b7 65

2

1

C 13 II

32

1

b73 1 6

4

C 13 II

4

1

2

b73 6

C 13 nr II

2

1

33

4

3 b7 65 2

C 13 nr II

2

1

33

4

3 b7 65 2

2

1

C 13 II

32

1

b73 1 6

4

1

b7

C 13 II

4

1

2

b73 6

1

2

C 13 nr II

1

2

4

3 b7 3 6

4

C 13 nr II

2

1

3

44

3 b7 61 3

C 13 II

4

1

3

b73 6

1

2

2

5

C 13 nr III

1

4

1 1

1 3 6b7

C 13 V

24

1 1

2 3 6b7

3

1

C 13 V

4

1 1

1 3 6b7

3

1

1

C 13 V

Page 327: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 327

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

1 1

3 6b7

C 13 nr V

4

1 1

1 3 6b7

3

C 13 V

43

1

3 6b7

C 13 nr V

32

1

3 6b7 5

4

C 13 nr V

32

1

3 6b7 5

4

1

1

C 13 V

4

2

1

3 6b7

3

2

C 13 nr V

4

2

1

3 6b7

3

2

1

3

C 13 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

C 13 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

2

C 13 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

2

3

4

b73

C 13 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

1

C 13 V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

1b7

1

C 13 V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

2b7

1

3

C 13 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

1

1

5

C 13 V

2

1

3 6b7

1

4

2

1

5

C 13 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

1

3

53

1

C 13 V

2

1

3 6b7

11

2

3

53

1

4

C 13 nr V

1

2

1

4

3 b7 2 6

C 13 nr VII

2

6

1

3

4

3 b7 3

C 13 nr VII

2

6

1

3

4

3 b7 31

T

C 13 VII

1

2

1

4

3 b7 2 6

T

1

C 13 VII

2

3

1

1 b7 3 6

4

C 13 VIII

1

3

4

3b7 6

C 13 nr VIII

1 b7 3 6 2

1 2

3

4 4

C 13 VIII

1

2

4

3b7 65

3

C 13 nr VIII

Page 328: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 328

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

2

1

43

1 b7 3 65

C 13 VIII

1

2

3

3b7 6

1

1

C 13 VIII

1

2

4

3b7 6

1

1

3

5

C 13 VIII

1 b7 3 6 1

T 1

2

3

1

C 13 VIII

1

2

1

43

1 b7 3 65

1

1

C 13 VIII

b7 3 6 2

1

2

3 4

C 13 nr VIII

2

1

34

b7 5 63

C 13 nr X

1

34

b7 63

C 13 nr X

1

34

b7 63

1

2

C 13 nr X

2

1

34

b7 5 63

1

2

C 13 nr X

1 2

33

1b7 63

4

3

1

C 13 XII

Page 329: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 329

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant thirteenth suspended fourth

3

4

1

b7 6

1

C 13sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

1

C 13sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

C 13sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

11

1

C 13sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

11

1

C 13sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

1

1

C 13sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1T

5

C 13sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

1T

5

C 13sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

T

5

C 13sus4 nr III

3

4

1

b7 6

11

5 1

1

C 13sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

2

11

5

1

1

C 13sus4 III

3

4

1

b7 6

1

4

4

1

5

1

1

C 13sus4 III

3

1

b7 64

4

C 13sus4 nr III

3

1

b7 64

4

1

1

C 13sus4 III

3

1

b7 64

4

1

5

C 13sus4 nr III

1

b7 64

2

4

C 13sus4 nr V

1

b7 64

2

4

1

1

C 13sus4 V

1

b7 64

2

4

3

2

C 13sus4 nr V

1

b7 64

2

4

1

1

3

1

C 13sus4 V

1

2

43

b7 641

C 13sus4 V

4

b7 6

1

4

3

C 13sus4 nr VIII

4

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

C 13sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

2

3

C 13sus4 nr VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

32

5

C 13sus4 nr VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

32

5

1

1

C 13sus4 VIII

Page 330: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 330

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

b7 6

1

4

32

5

3

2

C 13sus4 nr VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

C 13sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

T 1

1

C 13sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

T

3

2

C 13sus4 VIII

4

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

2

5

C 13sus4 VIII

4

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

2

15

1

C 13sus4 VIII

3

b7 6

1

4

3

1

T

2

15

3

C 13sus4 VIII

3

1

b7 46

4

C 13sus4 nr X

3

1

b7 46

4

1

4

C 13sus4 nr X

3

1

b7 46

4

2

5

C 13sus4 nr X

3

1

b7 46

4

1

1

2

5

C 13sus4 X

3

1

b7 46

42

2

2

5

C 13sus4 nr X

4

1

b7 64

1

C 13sus4 nr X

4

1

b7 64

1

1

1

C 13sus4 X

4

1

b7 64

1

2

3

C 13sus4 nr X

3

1

b7 64

1

1

1

4

4

C 13sus4 X

2

1

b7 64

1

2

3

4

4

C 13sus4 nr X

Page 331: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 331

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

3

43

b7 6

2

#4

C 13#11 nr I

1

3

42

b7 6

2

3

#42

C 13#11 nr I

b7 3 6

4

1

3

2

#4

C 13#11 nr III

b7 3 6

4

1

3

2

#4

1

1

C 13#11 III

b7 3 6

4

1

3

2

#4

1

1

1

5

C 13#11 III

b7 6

4

1

2

#4

4

3

C 13#11 nr III

#4

4

3

b7 6

1

2

3

C 13#11 nr V

#4

4

3

b7 6

1

2

3

1

1

C 13#11 V

#4

3

2

b7 6

1

4

3

1

1

C 13#11 V

#4

3

2

b7 6

1

4

3

C 13#11 nr V

#4

3 2

b7 6

1

2

1

3 1

C 13#11 V

#4

3 2

b7 6

1

2

11

3 5 1

C 13#11 V

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

C 13#11 nr VIII

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

1

1

C 13#11 VIII

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

1

1

C 13#11 VIII

1

#4 b7 3 6

3

4

2

1

1

1

C 13#11 VIII

1

#4b7 36

4

3

2

C 13#11 nr VIII

1

#4b73 6

4

3

2

C 13#11 nr VIII

#4

4

1

2

3b7 6

3

C 13#11 nr X

#4 2

4

1

2

3b7 6

3

1

C 13#11 nr X

2

3

1

3

b7 6

4

#4

C 13#11 nr XII

dominant thirteenth sharp eleventh

Page 332: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 332

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant thirteenth fl at nine

33

1

3

b7 3 6 b2

C 13b9 nr I

3 b7 b2 6

1 1

2

4

C 13b9 nr II

2

1 1

3

4

1 3 b7 b26

C 13b9 II

2

1 1

3

4

3 b7 65 b2

C 13b9 nr II

b7 b2 3 6

1

2

3

1

C 13b9 nr V

4

1 1

b2 3 6b7

3

1

2

C 13b9 V

4

3

1

3 6b7

2

b2

C 13b9 nr V

4

3

1

3 6b7

2

b2

1

3

C 13b9 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

3

b2

C 13b9 nr V

T

1

3 6b7

1

4

b2b7

1

2

C 13b9 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

1

3

b2

1

5

C 13b9 nr V

2

1

3 6b7

11

b2

4

53

13

C 13b9 nr V

3 b7 b2 6

1

23

4

C 13b9 nr VI

1

3 3

4

3 b2b7 6

C 13b9 nr VIII

b2 b7 3 6

2

1

2

3

C 13b9 nr VIII

1 b7 3 6 b2

T 1

2

4

3

C 13b9 VIII

Page 333: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 333

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant thirteenth fl at fi ve fl at nine

1

3 332

3 b2b5 b7 6

C 13b5b9 nr I

2

1 1

3

4

1

3 b2b5 1 b7 6

C 13b5b9 II

2

3

1 1

4b7 3b5 b2 6

C 13b5b9 nr V

b7 b5 6

4

2

3T

b2

1

3

C 13b5b9 nr V

1

3 32

4

3 b2b5 b7 6

C 13b5b9 nr VIII

dominant thirteenth fl at fi ve sharp nine

3

4

3

3 #26

1

b5

2

b7

C 13b5#9 nr I

1

32

43 #2b7 6

T

b5

C 13b5#9 nr II

1

32

4b7 63 #2

T

b5

C 13b5#9 nr VIII

Page 334: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 334

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

dominant thirteenth fl at nine suspended fourth

2

4

1

3

b7 4 6 b2

C 13b9sus4 I

3 b7 b2 6

2

1

3

4

C 13b9sus4 II

2 2

1

3

4

1 4 b7 b26

C 13b9sus4 II

2 3

1

3

4

4 b7 65 b2

C 13b9sus4 II

b7 b2 4 6

32

4

1

C 13b9sus4 V

43

1

4 6b7

2

b2

C 13b9sus4 V

2

1

4 6b7

43

b2

C 13b9sus4 V

T

1

4 6b7

3

4

b2b7

2

C 13b9sus4 V

2

1

4 6b7

43

b2

1

5

C 13b9sus4 V

4 b7 b2 6

1

2 3

4

C 13b9sus4 VI

1

3

2

4

4 b2b7 6

C 13b9sus4 VIII

b2 b7 4 6

2

1

3 4

C 13b9sus4 VIII

1 b7 4 6 b2

T 1

3 4

2

C 13b9sus4 VIII

Page 335: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 335

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor add nine

4

1

3

1 b3 2 5

2

C m/9 I

2

3

1

4

b351 2 5

1

C m/9 III

4

2

1

3

25b3 1

C m/9 III

1

4

2

b351

3

2

C m/9 IV

4

3

2

b35 12

1

C m/9 V

1 5 2 b3 5 1

1

3

4

1 1 1

C m/9 VIII

1 5 2 b3 5

1

3

4

1 1

C m/9 VIII

3

4

11

2 b3 5 1

1

5

C m/9 VIII

3

4

1 1

2 b31 5

C m/9 VIII

4

11

2 b3 1

1

5

C m/9 VIII

4

1

3

1 b35 2

2

C m/9 VIII

1

4

1

3

1 b3 5 2

C m/9 IX

34

1

2

b3 5 1 2

C m/9 X

3 4

2

1

b3 51 2

C m/9 XII

Page 336: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 336

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor seventh

1

4

1

3

1 b3 b7 1

C m7 I

1

3 4

1

1 b3 b7 b3 5

2

C m7 I

2

1

4

3

b3b7 b31

C m7 I

1

3

1

4

b3 b7 1 5

C m7 I

432

1b7 b3

C m7 I

1

3

1

b3 b7 1

C m7 I

5 b3 b71

11

43

C m7 I

b3 b71

1

43

C m7 I

5 b3 b7

4

1

3

C m7 nr I

b3 b7 5

1

43

C m7 nr I

b3 15

1

2 3

4

b3

C m7 nr I

1

4

b7b3 5

1

C m7 nr I

1

4

b7 b3

3

5

1

C m7 nr I

5 1 b3 b7

43

1

2

C m7 I

1

2

3

1

1 5 b7 b3 5

1

C m7 III

1

2

3

1

1 5 b7 b3

C m7 III

2

3

1 1

5b7 b35

C m7 nr III

2

3

1

b35 b7

C m7 nr III

3

1 2

5b7 b3

C m7 nr III

4

1 1

5b7b3

C m7 nr III

b3 5 b7

3

1

4

C m7 nr III

55 b3

1

2

43

b7

C m7 nr III

5 b3

1

2

4

b7

C m7 nr III

1

1 1

2

1

b7 b3 5

C m7 III

3

2

b7 b31

1

C m7 III

Page 337: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 337

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2 3

1

4

5 1 b3 b7

C m7 IV

4

1

2 3

b3b7 5 1

C m7 IV

1

3

b3b7 5

2

C m7 nr IV

b7 1 b3

4

1

2

C m7 IV

b3 b7 1 b7

2

1

3

4

C m7 IV

2

1

3 4

b7 1 5b3

C m7 V

b7 b3 5

2

1

3

C m7 nr V

2 31

4

b3 1 5 b7

C m7 V

1 1 1

4b7 b3 5 b3

C m7 nr V

1b3 b7

1

4

2

C m7 V

1

4

5b7b3

3

C m7 nr VI1

b7

4

5

2

b3

C m7 nr VI

1

b7

3

5

4

b3

C m7 nr VI

3

1

b7b3

4

5

C m7 nr VI

b3 b71

1

43

C m7 VI

1

b7 b3 5 1

33 3

C m7 VI

1

4

5 b7b3

2 3

1

C m7 VI

4

2 3

b71 b3 5

1

C m7 VI

11 11

1 5 b7 b3 5 1

1

3

C m7 VIII

1 1 11

b7 b3 5 1

C m7 VIII

2 3 33

b7 b3 51

C m7 VIII

4

1

2

1 b3 b75

3

C m7 VIII

11 111

3

41 5 b7 b3 b7 1

C m7 VIII

3

4

1 1

5 b3 b7 1

C m7 VIII

2 3 33

b7 b3 51

3

1

C m7 VIII

Page 338: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 338

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 b3

1

3

4 4b7 b3

C m7 VIII

1 5 b7 b3b7

1

3

1 1

4

C m7 VIII

1 5 1 b3 b7

1

3

1

4

3

C m7 VIII

5 b7 b3 5

1

3

1 1

C m7 nr VIII

4

b7

3

5

1

b3

C m7 nr VIII

1

4

1

5b7 b3

C m7 nr VIII

5 b7 b3

3

1 1

C m7 nr VIII

1

4

1

5b7b3

C m7 nr VIII

11

b7 5

1

b3

C m7 nr VIII

b3 b3b7

1 1

45

1

C m7 nr VIII

b3 5 b7

1

3

4

C m7 nr VIII1 1

b7 b3 5 1

3

5

11

C m7 VIII1

b71

3

5 b3

11

C m7 VIII1

b7b3 51

3

5

1 11

C m7 VIII

43

b7 b31

2

C m7 VIII

1 b7 b7

1 1

4

1

b3

C m7 VIII

3

4

21

1 5 b7 b3

C m7 X

2

1

4

3

1 5 b7b3

C m7 X

43

b7 b31

1

C m7 X

1

2

b7 5 1 b3

43

C m7 XI

1

2

b7 5 1b3

43

C m7 XI

2

1

3

1 5 b7b3

4

C m7 XI

2

1

3

b3 5 b7

C m7 nr XI

3

2

4

1

b7 5 1 b3

C m7 XI

b3 5 b7 b3

11

2

3

C m7 nr XI

Page 339: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 339

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

5 b3

3

2

1

b7

C m7 nr XI

1

b3

3

b7

4

5

C m7 nr XI

5 b7 b3

2

11

C m7 nr XI

42

1

3

b7 5b3 1

C m7 XII

1

3

5b7 b3

2

C m7 nr XII

Page 340: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 340

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor seventh add six

6b3 b7

1

3

4

C m7/6 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

1

1

C m7/6 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

1

2

C m7/6 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

1

2

1

1

C m7/6 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

C m7/6 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

1

1

C m7/6 I

6b3 b7

1

2

4

b3

3

C m7/6 nr I

1

b3b7 6

3 4

C m7/6 nr II

1

b3b7 65

3 42

C m7/6 nr II

1

b3b7 6

3

2

C m7/6 nr III

2

b3b7 6

4

31

1

C m7/6 III

2

b3b7 6

4

31

5

C m7/6 nr III

2

b3b7 6

4

31

5

1

1

C m7/6 III

1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

C m7/6 nr III

1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

1

1

C m7/6 III

1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

1

1

1

5

C m7/6 III

1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

T

5

C m7/6 nr III

6

3

b7 b3

1

4

C m7/6 nr V

6

2

b7 b3

1

3

5

4

C m7/6 nr V

6

3

b7 b3

1

4

b3

2

C m7/6 nr V

6

3

b7 b3

1

4

1

2

C m7/6 V

6

3

b7 b3

1

3

1

2 4

5

C m7/6 V

4

332

b3b7 61

C m7/6 VIII

3

11T

1 b3b7 6 1

1

C m7/6 VIII

3

11T

1 b3b7 6 b3

4

C m7/6 VIII

Page 341: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 341

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

11T

1 b3b7 6

3

5

C m7/6 VIII

4

11

b3b7 6

1

1

3

51

1

C m7/6 VIII

3

4

111

1 b3b7 6 2

2

5

C m7/6 VIII

3

11

4

b3 b3b7 6

C m7/6 nr VIII

3

11

4

b3 b3b7 6

1

1

C m7/6 VIII

2

1

4

b3 b7 6

C m7/6 nr VIII

2

1

4

b3 b7 6

1

1

C m7/6 VIII

3

1

4

b3 b7 6

2

5

1

b3

C m7/6 nr VIII

4

11

b3b7 6

3

5

C m7/6 nr VIII

4

11

b3b7 6

1

1

3

5

C m7/6 VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

b3

2

5

C m7/6 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

C m7/6 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

1

1

C m7/6 VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

b3

C m7/6 nr VIII

1

6

43

b3b7

C m7/6 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

2

5

C m7/6 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

2

b3

C m7/6 nr X

1

4

2

6b7b3

C m7/6 nr X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

3

5

1

1

C m7/6 X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

1

1

C m7/6 X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

3

5

C m7/6 nr X

Page 342: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 342

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

1

3

1 b3 b7 1

1

4

C m7/11 I

4

3

1

3

1 b3 b7b3

1

4

C m7/11 I

1

3

1

b3 b7 1 4

1

C m7/11 I

5 b3 b7

4

1

3

1

4

C m7/11 nr I

b3 15

1

2 3

4

b3

1

4

C m7/11 nr I

1

3

b7 b3

2

5

1 11

4

b7 1 4

C m7/11 I

1

4

1

b3 b7 1 4

1

3

5

C m7/11 I

321

1b7 b3

4

4

C m7/11 I

2

b7 b3 1 4

1 33

C m7/11 I

3

b7 b3 5 b7 4

32

4

1

C m7/11 nr I

1

2

1

1 4 b7 b3 5

11

C m7/11 III

1

2

1

1 4 b7 b3 b7

4

1

C m7/11 III

2

1 1

5b7 b34

1

C m7/11 nr III

2

1

b7 b34

1

C m7/11 nr III

3

1 1

5b7b3

4

4

C m7/11 nr III

45 b3

1

3

4

b7

2

C m7/11 nr III

3

1

4

4 1 b3 b7

1 4

1

C m7/11 III

4

1

b7

3

2

5

4

5

1 1

5 b3

C m7/11 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

5

4

5

1

b3

C m7/11 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

5

4

5

1

b3

C m7/11 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

4

5b3

C m7/11 nr III

4

1

b7

3 3

b3

4

b7

C m7/11 nr III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1 5

11 1

5 4

C m7/11 III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1

1

45

1

C m7/11 III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1

1

4

C m7/11 III

minor seventh add eleven

Page 343: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 343

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

b3

1

b7

1

2

1

1

4

4

b7

1

5

C m7/11 III

b3

1

b7

2

1

4

4

b7

C m7/11 nr III

3

1

b7b3

4

4

C m7/11 nr III

b3 b7 1 4

132

4

C m7/11 V

b7 b3 5

2

1

3

1

4

1 4

C m7/11 V

1 1 1

4

b7 b3 5 4

C m7/11 nr V

b7 b3 5

2

1

3 4

4

C m7/11 nr V

b7b3 5

2

1

43

41

1

C m7/11 V

b7b3 5

2

1

43

4

C m7/11 nr V

b3 1

3

1

4

b7

C m7/11 nr VI

1

4

b3 4b7 5

1

3

C m7/11 nr VI

1 1

4b7b3

3 4

b3

C m7/11 nr VI

3

1

b7b3

1

4

C m7/11 nr VI

b3 b71

1

32 4

1

b3 4

C m7/11 VI

1

b7 b3 4 1

43

1

C m7/11 VI

1

4 b7b3

2 3

1

1

C m7/11 VI

32T

1

1 1b7b3 4

4

C m7/11 VI

1 1

4b7b3

3

C m7/11 nr VI

3

5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m7/11 VI

3

5

2

b3

4

11

b7 41

C m7/11 VI

b3 b71

1

32 4

1

b3 4

C m7/11 VI

b3 b71

1

32 4

1

b3 4

1

b7

C m7/11 VI

b3 b7 1

1

2 43

1

b3 4

C m7/11 VI

1

b7 b3 4 1

43

1

2

b7

C m7/11 VI

1

b7

3

5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m7/11 VI

Page 344: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 344

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

2

b71 b3 4

11

C m7/11 VII

3

1

42

b7 b3 4 1

C m7/11 VII

5 b7 b3 4

1

4

2 3

C m7/11 nr VII

4 b7 b3 5 1

1 1 1 1 1

C m7/11 VIII

1

b7

2

5

4

b3

3

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

11 11

1

1 1

4 b7 b3 5 1

C m7/11 VIII

3

1

1 b3 b7 4

2

4

C m7/11 VIII

1111

41 4 b7b3 b7 1

1

C m7/11 VIII

1

4

1

5b7 b3

3

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

1

4

1

5b7b3

3

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

b3 5 b7

1

2

4

11

3

4 5 1

C m7/11 VIII

111

55 b7

4

b3

2 3

1 4

C m7/11 VIII

11

55 b7

4

b3

2 3

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

1

b7

4

b3

3

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

1

4

b3

3

4

1

3 3

4

1 5 b7

C m7/11 VIII

11

5b7

4

b3

3

4

T

1

C m7/11 VIII

1

b75 b7

4

b3

2 3

4

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

1

b75 b7

4

b3

2 3

4

4

1

1

C m7/11 VIII

1

5b7

4

1

3

4

1

b3

1

C m7/11 VIII

b7b7

3

2

4

1

b3

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

b7b7

3

2

4

1

b3

4

1

1

C m7/11 VIII

1 11

1

1 1

4 b7 b3 5

C m7/11 VIII

11

1

1 1

4 b7 b3

C m7/11 VIII

3

1

5 b3 b7 4

2

4

C m7/11 nr VIII

111

41 4 b7b3 b7

1

C m7/11 VIII

Page 345: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 345

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

32T

1

1 b7b3 4

C m7/11 VIII

4

2

5 b3 4 b7

11

C m7/11 nr IX

4

2

1 b3 4 b7

11

3

1

C m7/11 IX

2

1

3

1 4 b7b3

1

C m7/11 X

4321b7 b3

1

4

C m7/11 X

1

3

b3

1

4

1 1

3

5 b7

C m7/11 X

1

3

b3

1

4

1

3

b7

C m7/11 X

b71

2

1

4b3

3

1

5

1

C m7/11 X

b7

2

1

4b3

3 4

b3

1 1

5 1

C m7/11 X

32b7 b3

1

4

C m7/11 nr X

1

2

4

5 b3 4 b7

1

C m7/11 nr X

b3 5 b7 4

1

2

3 4

C m7/11 nr XI

1 2

45 b7b3

4

3

C m7/11 nr XI

4 5 b7

3

2

4

1 1

b3 b7

C m7/11 nr XI

1

b3

3

b7

4

4

2

5

C m7/11 nr XI

5 b7 b3

2

11

4

4

C m7/11 nr XI

2

1

3

b3 5 b7

4

4

T

b3

C m7/11 nr XI

2

1

5 b7

4

4

T

b3

C m7/11 nr XI

4 5 b7

3

2

4

1 1

b3 b7

1

b3

C m7/11 nr XI

T

b3

2

b7

4

4

1

5

3

1

C m7/11 XI

322

1b7 b3

4

4

1

5

C m7/11 XII

1

3

5b7 b3

2 4

4

C m7/11 nr XII

2

b7 b3 5 1 4

21

43

C m7/11 XII

2

b7 b3 5 1 4

21

43

C m7/11 XII

Page 346: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 346

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor ninth

2

1

3 3 3

1 b7b3 2 5

C m9 I

1

32 3

1 b3 b7 2

C m9 I

b3 b7 2

1

3 3

C m9 nr I

5 b3 b7 2

1

2 3 3

C m9 nr I

33 3

1

b3 b7 2 5

C m9 nr I

3

1

2 3

5 b3 b7 2

3

5

C m9 nr I

3 3 3

1

b3 b7 25

1

b7

C m9 nr I

3

2

4

1

5 2 b3b7

C m9 nr II

1

3

1 1

4

b3 b75 2 5

C m9 nr III

b3 5 b7 2

1

3

1

4

C m9 nr III

b7 b3 5 b7 2

3 42

1 1

C m9 nr III

b3 2

2

1

b7

1

b3

1

b7

3 45

C m9 nr III

b3 2

3

1

b7

1

5

1

45

C m9 nr III

b7 b3

3

2

2

4

5

1

C m9 nr III

2

1

3

4

25 b3 b7

C m9 nr IV

1

3

2b7 b3 1

42

C m9 IV

2

1

b3 2b71

3 4

C m9 V

2

1

b3 2b7 1

43

C m9 V

b7b3 5 2

4

3

1

2

C m9 nr V

1 2

4

3

b3 2 5 b7

C m9 nr VI

3

4

33

1

1 b3b7 5 2b3

C m9 VI

3

2

4

b3 52b7

1

C m9 nr VI

3

2

4

b3 52b7

1

b7

1

C m9 nr VI1

2

3 4

b3 b7 2 5

1

b7

C m9 nr VI

1

4

3

b3 b7 5

2

2

C m9 nr VI

Page 347: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 347

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

b7b3 b7 5 2

1 1

3

4

33

b3

C m9 nr VI

b3 b7 5 2

1

3

4

33

b3

C m9 nr VI

1

4

2

b3 5 b7

3

2

C m9 nr VII

3

4

332

1 b3b7 5 2

C m9 VIII

32

1

4

b31 b7 2

C m9 VIII

1

4

111

1 b3b7 5 2

3

5

C m9 VIII

3

1

4

b32 b7 1

1

C m9 VIII

3

1

4

b32 b7 1

1

2

5

C m9 VIII

11

3

b32 5 1

1

4

b7

C m9 VIII

1 11

3

b7 b3 5 2

C m9 nr VIII

b3 b7 5 2

1 1

24

b3

1

C m9 nr VIII1

4

2

3

5b3 b7 2

C m9 nr X

3

11

2

b3 51 b7 2

4

C m9 X

2

1

4b7 5b3 1 2

3 3

C m9 X

1

2

4

3

5

1

b3 5 b7 2

C m9 nr X

1

3

b7 25

24

b3

C m9 nr X

4

1

3

b7 2 b31

2

C m9 XI

1

4

2

3

b3 2 5 b7

C m9 nr XI

1

b3 b7 2 5

44 4

C m9 nr XI

b3b7 2

3

1

5

2

4

5

4

C m9 nr XI

b7

3

4

21

5 2 b3

C m9 nr XI

2 3

1

4

b3 b7 2 5

1

b7

C m9 nr XI

2 3

1

4

b3 b7 2 5

C m9 nr XI

2 3

1

4

b3 b7 2 5

1

b7

1

b3

C m9 nr XI

b3 b7 2

3

1

5

2

4

C m9 nr XI

Page 348: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 348

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2

4

1

3

b7 b3 5 2

C m9 nr XII

3

4

b7 b3 5 2 5

2

1

4

C m9 nr XII

Page 349: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 349

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor ninth add six

4

2

1

3 3 3

1 b7b3 2 6

C m9/6 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

2

3

C m9/6 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

2

3

C m9/6 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

2

3

1

2

C m9/6 I

1

b3b7 6 2

3 4

2

C m9/6 nr II

1

3

1 1

4

b3 b7 2 6

C m9/6 nr III

4 4

11T

1 b3b7 6 2

C m9/6 VIII

4 4

11T

1 b3b7 6 2

2

5

C m9/6 VIII

2

11

4

b3 b3b7 6

3

2

C m9/6 VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

2

2

5

C m9/6 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

2

C m9/6 nr VIII

1

4

1

2

3

b7 5b3 6 2

C m9/6 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

1

2

C m9/6 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

2

b3

1

2

C m9/6 nr X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

1

2

C m9/6 nr X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

3

5

1

1

1

2

C m9/6 X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

1

2

3

5

C m9/6 nr X

Page 350: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 350

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor eleventh

2

1

3 3

1 b7b3 2 4

1

C m11 I

1

4

1

3

1 b3 b7 1

1

4

C m11 I

4

3

1

3

1 b3 b7b3

1

4

C m11 I

1

3

1

b3 b7 1 4

1

C m11 I

5 b3 b7

4

1

3

1

4

C m11 nr I

b3 15

1

2 3

4

b3

1

4

C m11 nr I

1

3

b7 b3

2

5

1 11

4

b7 1 4

C m11 I

b3 b7 2

1

3 32

1

1 4

C m11 I

5 b3 b7 2

1

2 3 3

1

4

C m11 nr I

1

4

1

b3 b7 1 4

1

3

5

C m11 I

321

1b7 b3

4

4

C m11 I

2

b7 b3 1 4

1 33

C m11 I

3

b7 b3 5 b7 4

32

4

1

C m11 nr I

3 3

1

b3 b7 2

1

4

C m11 nr I

1

2

1

1 4 b7 b3 5

11

C m11 III

1

2

1

1 4 b7 b3 b7

4

1

C m11 III

2

1 1

5b7 b34

1

C m11 nr III

2

1

b7 b34

1

C m11 nr III

3

1 1

5b7b3

4

4

C m11 nr III

45 b3

1

3

4

b7

2

C m11 nr III

3

1

4

4 1 b3 b7

1 4

1

C m11 III

3

4

2

4 2 b3b7

1

C m11 nr III

2

3

2

1

4

b3 b75 2 4

C m11 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

5

4

5

1 1

5 b3

C m11 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

5

4

5

1

b3

C m11 nr III

Page 351: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 351

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

4

1

b7

3

2

5

4

5

1

b3

C m11 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

4

5b3

C m11 nr III

4

1

b7

3 3

b3

4

b7

C m11 nr III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1 5

11 1

5 4

C m11 III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1

1

45

1

C m11 III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1

1

4

C m11 III

b3

1

b7

1

2

1

1

4

4

b7

1

5

C m11 III

b3

1

b7

2

1

4

4

b7

C m11 nr III

2

1

b7

11

4

4

5

1

b3

1

5

C m11 nr III

2

1

b7

11

4

4

5

1

b3

C m11 nr III

2

1

b7

11

4

4

5

1

b3

C m11 nr III

2

1

b7

11

4

4

b3

C m11 nr III

3

1

b7b3

4

4

C m11 nr III

3

4

2

4 2 b3b7

1 1

5

C m11 nr III

b3 b7 1 4

132

4

C m11 V

b7 b3 5

2

1

3

1

4

1 4

C m11 V

1 1 1

4

b7 b3 5 4

C m11 nr V

b7b3 5 2

4

2

1

2 3

4

C m11 nr V

b7 b3 5

2

1

3 4

4

C m11 nr V

b7b3 5

2

1

43

41

1

C m11 V

b7b3 5

2

1

43

4

C m11 nr V

b7b3 5 2

4

2

1

33

4

C m11 nr V

1

4

b3 4b7 5

1

3

C m11 nr VI

1 1

4b7b3

3 4

b3

C m11 nr VI

1

b7

3

5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m11 VI

Page 352: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 352

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

b7b3

1

4

C m11 nr VI

b3 b71

1

32 4

1

b3 4

C m11 VI

1

b7 b3 4 1

43

1

C m11 VI

1

4 b7b3

2 3

1

1

C m11 VI

32T

1

1 1b7b3 4

4

C m11 VI

2

b3 42

1

b7

11

C m11 nr VI

4

32

1

b3b7 4 2b3

1

C m11 nr VI

3

2

b3 42b7

1

b7

11

C m11 nr VI

1

2

3

b3 b7 2 4

1

b7

1

C m11 nr VI

1

43

b3 b7 4

2

2

C m11 nr VI

1

43

b3 b7 4

2

2

1

b7

C m11 nr VI

1 1

4b7b3

3

C m11 nr VI

3

5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m11 VI

3

5

2

b3

4

11

b7 41

C m11 VI

b3 b71

1

32 4

1

b3 4

C m11 VI

b3 b71

1

32 4

1

b3 4

1

b7

C m11 VI

b3 b7 1

1

2 43

1

b3 4

C m11 VI

1

b7 b3 4 1

43

1

2

b7

C m11 VI

4

2

b3 42b7

1

b7

11

3

1

C m11 VI

4

2

b3 42b7

1

b7

11

3

1

C m11 VI

4

2

b3 42b7

1 1

3

1

C m11 VI

b3 b7 4 2

1

2

4

1

3

b3

1

b7

C m11 nr VI

b7 4 2

2

4

1

3

b3

C m11 nr VI

4

2

b71 b3 4

11

C m11 VII

3

1

42

b7 b3 4 1

C m11 VII

Page 353: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 353

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

5 b7 b3 4

1

4

2 3

C m11 nr VII

1

4

2

b3 4 b7 2

2

C m11 nr VII

1

b7

2

5

4

b3

3

4

C m11 nr VIII

11 11

1

1 1

4 b7 b3 5 1

C m11 VIII

3

1

1 b3 b7 4

2

4

C m11 VIII

1111

41 4 b7b3 b7 1

1

C m11 VIII

1

4

1

5b7 b3

3

4

C m11 nr VIII

1

4

1

5b7b3

3

4

C m11 nr VIII

b3 5 b7

1

2

4

11

3

4 5 1

C m11 VIII

1

4

111

1 b3b7 5 24

1

C m11 VIII

111

55 b7

4

b3

2 3

1 4

C m11 VIII

11

55 b7

4

b3

2 3

4

C m11 nr VIII

1

b7

4

b3

3

4

C m11 nr VIII

1

4

b3

3

4

1

3 3

4

1 5 b7

C m11 VIII

11

5b7

4

b3

3

4

T

1

C m11 VIII

1

b75 b7

4

b3

2 3

4

4

C m11 nr VIII

1

b75 b7

4

b3

2 3

4

4

1

1

C m11 VIII

1

5b7

4

1

3

4

1

b3

1

C m11 VIII

5b7

4

2

3

4

1

b3

1

2

C m11 nr VIII

b7b7

3

2

4

1

b3

4

C m11 nr VIII

b7b7

3

2

4

1

b3

4

1

1

C m11 VIII

1 11

1

1 1

4 b7 b3 5

C m11 VIII

11

1

1 1

4 b7 b3

C m11 VIII

3

1

5 b3 b7 4

2

4

C m11 nr VIII

111

41 4 b7b3 b7

1

C m11 VIII

Page 354: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 354

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

32T

1

1 b7b3 4

C m11 VIII

4

2

5 b3 4 b7

11

C m11 nr IX

4

2

1 b3 4 b7

11

3

1

C m11 IX

2

1

3

1 4 b7b3

1

C m11 X1

4

2

4b3 b7 2

1

C m11 nr X

1

4b7 4b3 1 2

2 3

1

C m11 X

1

2

4

5

1

b3 4 b7 2

1

C m11 nr X

2

1

3

4

b3 2 4 b7

C m11 nr X

3

1

2

4b3 b7 2 4

C m11 nr X

2

4

1

3

b7 b3 4 2

C m11 nr X

4321b7 b3

1

4

C m11 X

1

3

b3

1

4

1 1

3

5 b7

C m11 X

1

3

b3

1

4

1

3

b7

C m11 X

b71

2

1

4b3

3

2

11 1

5

C m11 X

b71

2

1

4b3

3

2

11

C m11 X

b71

2

1

4b3

3

1

5

1

C m11 X

b7

2

1

4b3

3

1

2

C m11 nr X

b7

2

1

4b3

3 4

b3

1 1

5 1

C m11 X

32b7 b3

1

4

C m11 nr X

1

2

4

5 b3 4 b7

1

C m11 nr X

3

1

T

4b3 b7 2 4

2

b7

C m11 nr X

b3 5 b7 4

1

2

3 4

C m11 nr XI

1 2

45 b7b3

4

3

C m11 nr XI

4 5 b7

3

2

4

1 1

b3 b7

C m11 nr XI

1

b3

3

b7

4

4

2

5

C m11 nr XI

Page 355: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 355

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

5 b7 b3

2

11

4

4

C m11 nr XI

4

1

3

b7 2 b31

2 3

4

C m11 XI

1

b3 b7 2 4

2

3 4

C m11 nr XI

b7

2

43

1

4 2 b3

C m11 nr XI

2 2

1

3

b3 b7 2 5

1

b7 4

4

C m11 nr XI

2

1

3

b3 5 b7

4

4

T

b3

C m11 nr XI

2

1

5 b7

4

4

T

b3

C m11 nr XI

4 5 b7

3

2

4

1 1

b3 b7

1

b3

C m11 nr XI

T

b3

2

b7

4

4

1

5

3

1

C m11 XI

322

1b7 b3

4

4

1

5

C m11 XII

1

3

5b7 b3

2 4

4

C m11 nr XII

2

b7 b3 5 1 4

21

43

C m11 XII

2 3 3

1

b3 b7 25

1

b7

1

4

C m11 nr XII

2

b7 b3 5 1 4

21

43

C m11 XII

3 3

1

b3 b7 2

1

b7

1

4

C m11 nr XII

Page 356: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 356

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor thirteenth

4

2

1

3 3 3

1 b7b3 2 6

C m13 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

C m13 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

1

1

C m13 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

2

3

C m13 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

1

2

C m13 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

1

2

1

1

C m13 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

C m13 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

1

1

C m13 I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

2

3

C m13 nr I

6b3 b7

1

3

4

5

2

2

3

1

2

C m13 I

6b3 b7

1

2

4

b3

3

C m13 nr I

1

b3b7 6

3 4

C m13 nr II

1

b3b7 65

3 42

C m13 nr II

1

b3b7 6 2

3 4

2

C m13 nr II

1

3

1 1

4

b3 b7 2 6

C m13 nr III

1

b3b7 6

3

2

C m13 nr III

2

b3b7 6

4

31

1

C m13 III

2

b3b7 6

4

31

5

C m13 nr III

2

b3b7 6

4

31

5

1

1

C m13 III

1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

C m13 nr III

1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

1

1

C m13 III1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

1

1

1

5

C m13 III1

b3b7 6

4

2

3

5

T

5

C m13 nr III

6

3

b7 b3

1

4

C m13 nr V

6

2

b7 b3

1

3

5

4

C m13 nr V

Page 357: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 357

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

6

3

b7 b3

1

4

b3

2

C m13 nr V

6

3

b7 b3

1

4

1

2

C m13 V

6

3

b7 b3

1

3

1

2 4

5

C m13 V

4 4

11T

1 b3b7 6 2

C m13 VIII

4

332

b3b7 61

C m13 VIII

3

11T

1 b3b7 6 2

1

C m13 VIII

3

11T

1 b3b7 6 b3

4

C m13 VIII

4

11T

1 b3b7 6

3

5

C m13 VIII

4

11

b3b7 6

1

1

3

51

1

C m13 VIII

4 4

11T

1 b3b7 6 2

2

5

C m13 VIII

3

4

111

1 b3b7 6 2

2

5

C m13 VIII

3

11

4

b3 b3b7 6

C m13 nr VIII

3

11

4

b3 b3b7 6

1

1

C m13 VIII

2

11

4

b3 b3b7 6

3

2

C m13 VIII

2

1

4

b3 b7 6

C m13 nr VIII

2

1

4

b3 b7 6

1

1

C m13 VIII

3

1

4

b3 b7 6

2

5

1

b3

C m13 nr VIII

4

11

b3b7 6

3

5

C m13 nr VIII

4

11

b3b7 6

1

1

3

5

C m13 VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

2

2

5

C m13 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

b3

2

5

C m13 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

C m13 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

1

1

C m13 VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

2

C m13 nr VIII

3

11

b3b7 6

4

b3

C m13 nr VIII

Page 358: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 358

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

1

2

3

b7 5b3 6 2

C m13 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

C m13 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

1

2

C m13 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

2

5

C m13 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

2

b3

C m13 nr X

1

6

43

b3b7

2

b3

1

2

C m13 nr X

1

4

2

C m13 nr X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

1

2

C m13 nr X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

3

5

1

1

C m13 X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

1

1

C m13 X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

3

5

1

1

1

2

C m13 X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

3

5

C m13 nr X

1

6

4

b7

2

b3

1

2

3

5

C m13 nr X

Page 359: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 359

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor sixth

3

1 1

b3 61 1

2

C m6 I

4

1 1

b3 6 51

2

C m6 I

1 2

3

b3 6 1

C m6 I

3

1

2

b3 61

C m6 I

2

3

4

1

1 5 6 b3

C m6 II

3

4

1

2

56 b35

C m6 nr II

3

4

1

b35 6

C m6 nr II

3

1

2

56 b3

C m6 nr II

b3 5 6

3

1

4

C m6 nr II

3

4

1

56b3

C m6 nr III

55 b3

1 1

436

C m6 nr III

5 b3

1 1

4

6

C m6 nr III

6 1 b3 5

1

2

3

4

C m6 III

2 43

1

5 1 b3 6

C m6 IV

21

3 4

b36 5 1

C m6 IV

1

2

b36 5

3

C m6 nr IV

3

2

5b3 1

1

4

6

C m6 V

6 b3 5

1 1

2

C m6 nr V

1

4

56b3

2

C m6 nr VI

33 3

1

1 6 b3 5 1

2

C m6 VII

33 3

1

6 b3 5 1

C m6 VII

1 6 b3 5

2 331

C m6 VII

4

1

3

1 b3 65

2

1

1

C m6 VIII

4

1

3

1 b3 6 2

1

C m6 IX

4

1

3

1 b3 65

2

C m6 IX

Page 360: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 360

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

1 5 6 b3

1

2

C m6 X

2

1

4

1

1 5 6b3

C m6 X

2

1

3

b3 5 6

C m6 nr X

2

1

3

1 5 6b3

4

C m6 X

1

3

6 5 1 b3

4

2

C m6 XI

1

3

6 5 1b3

4

2

C m6 XI

3

1

2

b36 1

C m6 XI

2

3

56 b3

1

C m6 nr XII

43

1

16 b3

C m6 XII

6 b3 5 1

1

3

24

C m6 XII

Page 361: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 361

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor sixth add nine

4 4

1

b3 6 5

2 3

2 1

C m6/9 VI

4T

1

b3 6 5

2 3

21

C m6/9 VI

4

1

b3 6 5

2 3

2

C m6/9 nr VI

1

b3 6

2 3

2

C m6/9 nr VI

1

b3 6

2 3

2

4

1

C m6/9 VI

1

b3 5

2 2

2

4

6

C m6/9 nr VII

1

b3 5

2 2

2

4

6

T

1

C m6/9 VII

2

2 6

1

3

4

1b3

C m6/9 VII

1

3

1 1 6b3

4

2

2

T

C m6/9 VIII

1

3

1 6b3

4

2

2

C m6/9 VIII

1

3

5 6b3

4

2

2

C m6/9 nr VIII

1

3

5 6b3

4

2

2

T

1

C m6/9 VIII

Page 362: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 362

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor (major seventh)

31

3

17 b3

C m(ma7) I

1

2

3 4

b37 5 1

C m(ma7) II

1

2

3

b37 5

C m(ma7) nr II

1

3

4

2

1 5 7 b3

C m(ma7) III

3

4

2

1

57 b35

C m(ma7) nr III

32

1

57 b3

C m(ma7) nr III

4

2

1

57b3

C m(ma7) nr III

1

2

1

b35 7

C m(ma7) nr IV

3

4

1

57b3

C m(ma7) nr IV

7b3 5

1

2

3

C m(ma7) nr IV

2

1

3

4

5b3 5 7

C m(ma7) nr IV

1

2

5 b3 5 7

3 4

C m(ma7) nr V

7 b3 5

4

1

2

C m(ma7) nr V

1

3

4

5 b3 7

C m(ma7) nr V

1 1

2

1 5 7 b3 5 1

1

3

1

C m(ma7) VIII

1 1

2

7 b3 5 1

1

C m(ma7) VIII

1 3 3

2

7 b3 51

C m(ma7) VIII

2

1

3

7 5 1 b3

4

C m(ma7) IX

2

1

3

7 5 1b3

4

C m(ma7) IX

4

1

1 5 7 b3

3

2

C m(ma7) X

2

1

3 4

1 5 7b3

C m(ma7) X

1

2

1

b3 5 7

C m(ma7) nr XII

1

2

45 7 5b3

1

C m(ma7) nr XII

1

2

45 71 b3

1

C m(ma7) XII

1

2

57 b3

3

C m(ma7) nr XII

Page 363: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 363

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor (major seventh) add six

6b3 7

1

3

4

C m(ma7)/6 I

6b3 7

1

3

4

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 I

6b3 7

1

3

4

1

2

C m(ma7)/6 I

6b3 7

1

3

4

1

2

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 I

6b3 7

1

3

4

5

2

C m(ma7)/6 I

6b3 7

1

3

4

5

2

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 I

6b3 7

1

2

4

b3

3

C m(ma7)/6 I

3

b37 6

4

31

1

C m(ma7)/6 III

3

b37 6

4

31

5

C m(ma7)/6 III

3

b37 6

4

31

5

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 III

2

b37 6

4

2

3

5

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 III

2

b37 6

4

2

3

5

1

1

1

5

C m(ma7)/6 III

2

b37 6

4

2

3

5

T

5

C m(ma7)/6 III

1

b37 6

21

C m(ma7)/6 IV

1

b37 6

31

2

5

C m(ma7)/6 IV

6

4

7 b3

1

3

C m(ma7)/6 V

6

4

7 b3

1

2 3

5

C m(ma7)/6 V

6

4

7 b3

1

3

b3

2

C m(ma7)/6 V

6

4

7 b3

1

3

1

2

C m(ma7)/6 V

4

2

31

b37 61

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

4

1

2T

1 b37 6 1

1

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

3

1

2T

1 b37 6 b3

4

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

4

1

2T

1 b37 6

3

5

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

4

1

2

b37 6

1

1

3

51

1

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

3

1

2

4

b3 b37 6

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

Page 364: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 364

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

2

4

b3 b37 6

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

3

2

4

b3 7 6

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

4

1

2

b37 6

3

5

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

4

1

2

b37 6

1

1

3

5

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

3

1

2

b37 6

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

3

1

2

b37 6

1

1

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

3

1

2

b37 6

4

b3

C m(ma7)/6 VIII

2

1

3

b3 7 6

C m(ma7)/6 IX

1

6

3

4

b37

C m(ma7)/6 X

1

6

3

4

b37

2

5

C m(ma7)/6 X

1

6

3

4

b37

2

b3

C m(ma7)/6 X

1

4

2

67b3

C m(ma7)/6 X

1

6

4

7

2

b3

3

5

C m(ma7)/6 X

1

6

4

17

2

b3

3

1

5

C m(ma7)/6 X

1

6

4

17

2

b3

1

C m(ma7)/6 X

Page 365: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 365

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor ninth (major seventh)

1

42

7 2

3

b31

C m9(ma7) I

1

43

7 2

2

b3 5

C m9(ma7) I

1

4

7 2

2

b3

C m9(ma7) I

4

1

2 3

5 b3 7 2

C m9(ma7) I

b3 5 7 2

1

32

4

C m9(ma7) III

b3 5 7 2

1

3

2

4

1

5

C m9(ma7) III

2

1 1

b3

4

7 2 5

C m9(ma7) III

1

5 7 25

4

b3

1

2

3

C m9(ma7) III

3

2

4

b3 527

1

C m9(ma7) VI

1

2

4

b3 2 5

3

7

C m9(ma7) VI

1

4

2

b3 7 5

3

2

C m9(ma7) VI

1

4

2

b3 5 7

3

2

C m9(ma7) VII

1

2

1

3

7 b3 5 2

1

4

51

C m9(ma7) VIII

2

1

3

7 b3 5 2

1

4

5

C m9(ma7) VIII

2

11

3

7 5 2b3

C m9(ma7) VIII

2 3

1

4

5 b3 7 2

C m9(ma7) VIII

2

3

1

4

5 2 1 7b3

C m9(ma7) VIII

b3 7 5 2

12

4

b3

1

3

C m9(ma7) VIII

12

7 2

4

1

1

b3

C m9(ma7) X

1

2

7 2

3

b3

4

5

C m9(ma7) X

3

4

2

1

b3 7 2 5

C m9(ma7) X

1

3

4

2

5

1

b3 5 7 2

C m9(ma7) X

1

4

7 25

23

b3

C m9(ma7) X

2 3

T

b3 2 5

4

7

1

2

C m9(ma7) X

1

3 33

b3 2 5 7

C m9(ma7) XI

Page 366: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 366

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

2 3

1

4b3 7 2 5

C m9(ma7) XI

b3 2

3

1

5

2

4

7

C m9(ma7) XI

6b3 7

1

3

4

2

2

C m9(ma7)/6 I

3

1

2T

b37 61

4

2

C m9(ma7)/6 VIII

3

1

2

b37 6

4

2

C m9(ma7)/6 VIII

4

1

1

b37 6

3

5

2

2

C m9(ma7)/6 VIII

2

1

4

b3 27 6

3

C m9(ma7)/6 IX

1

4

2

67b3

1

2

C m9(ma7)/6 X

1

4

2

67b3

1

2

1

1

C m9(ma7)/6 X

1

4

2

67b3

1

2

3

5

C m9(ma7)/6 X

1

4

2

67b3

1

2

1

1

3

5

C m9(ma7)/6 X

1

6

3

b37

2

5

1

2

4

C m9(ma7)/6 X

1

6

3

4

b37

2

b3

1

2

C m9(ma7)/6 X

minor ninth (major seventh) add six

Page 367: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 367

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor seventh fl at fi ve

1

3

1

2

b3 b7 1 b5

C m7b5 I

1

2

1

4

b5 b3 b7 1

1

C m7b5 I

b5 1 b3 b7

43

1

2

C m7b5 I

2

4

1

3

1 b5b7 b3

C m7b5 II

1

43

2

1 b5 b7 b3

C m7b5 III

3

4

2

b3 b7b5

1

1

C m7b5 III

12

1

4

b5 1 b3 b7

C m7b5 IV

1

3

1

2

b7 b5 1 b3

1

C m7b5 IV

21

3

4

b7 1 b5b3

C m7b5 V

2 3

1

4

b3 1 b5 b7

C m7b5 V

1 b3 b5 b7

1

3 4

2

C m7b5 VI

4

3

2

b71 b3 b5

1

C m7b5 VI

2 4

1

3

1 b7 b3 b5

C m7b5 VII

2 3

1

4

b7 b3 b5 1

C m7b5 VII

2

3

1

4

1 b3 b7b5

C m7b5 VIII

2

3

1

4

1 b3 b7b5

11

1 1

C m7b5 VIII

2

1

4

b5 b3 b7 1

1

C m7b5 VIII1

b71

2

b5 b3

11

C m7b5 VIII

2

3

1

4

1 b3 b7b5

1

1

C m7b5 VIII

2

3

1

4

1 b3 b7b5

1

1

C m7b5 VIII

43

4 4

1

2

b5 b7b3b5

1

1

C m7b5 VIII

32

3 3

1

1

b5 b7b3b5

C m7b5 IX

3

1

3 3

1 b5 b7 b3

C m7b5 X

3

1

3

b3 1 b5 b7

2

C m7b5 X

3

1

3

b3 1 b5 b7

2 3

b3

C m7b5 X

Page 368: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 368

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

3

1

4

1

b7 b5 1 b3

C m7b5 XI

b3b5 b7

111

3

b3

C m7b5 nr XI

1 b3 b7

4

1

2

1

b5

C m7b5 XI

2 3

1

4

b3 b5 1b7

C m7b5 XI

2

1

4

1

b7 b5 1 b3b3

3

C m7b5 XI

Page 369: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 369

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

b5 b3 b7

4

1

2

1

4

C m7/11b5 I

b3 1b5

1

23

4

b3

1

4

C m7/11b5 I

1

3

b7 b3

2

b5

1 11

4

b7 1 4

C m7/11b5 I

1

4

1

b3 b7 1 4

12

b5

C m7/11b5 I

3

b7 b3 b5b7 4

3

1

4

1

C m7/11b5 I

b3

2

b7

2

3

1

2

4b5

1

C m7/11b5 II

b3

2

b7

2

3

1

2

4

4

b7

1

b5

C m7/11b5 II

2

4

2

1 4 b7 b3 b5

1

2

C m7/11b5 III

4

2

b5 b3 4 b7

11

C m7/11b5 III

4

1

b7

3

2

4

b5b3

C m7/11b5 III

b3

3

b7

2

4

1 b5

1T

3

b5 4

C m7/11b5 III

b7 b3 b5

3

1

3

2

4

1 4

C m7/11b5 IV

b7 b3 b5

2

1

3 4

4

C m7/11b5 IV

b7b3 b5

3

1

43

41

2

C m7/11b5 IV

b7b3 b5

2

1

43

4

C m7/11b5 V

1

4

b3 4b7 b5

1

3

C m7/11b5 VI

1

b7

3

b5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m7/11b5 VI

3

b5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m7/11b5 VI

3

b5

2

b3

4

11

b7 41

C m7/11b5 VI

43

1

3

1

2 2

4 b7 b3 b5 1

C m7/11b5 VII

b5 b7 b3 4

1

4

2 3

C m7/11b5 VII

1

4

2

b5b7 b3

3

4

C m7/11b5 VII

4

1

3

1

2 2

4 b7 b3 b5

C m7/11b5 VII

1

b7

2

b5

4

b3

3

4

C m7/11b5 VIII

1

4

2

b5b7b3

3

4

C m7/11b5 VIII

minor seventh add eleven fl at fi ve

Page 370: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 370

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1

4

b3

3

4

1

2

3

4

1 b5 b7

C m7/11b5 VIII

1

b7b5 b7

4

b3

2

3

4

4

C m7/11b5 VIII

1

b7b5 b7

4

b3

2

3

4

4

1

1

C m7/11b5 VIII

3

1

b5 b3 b7 4

2

4

C m7/11b5 VIII

b71

T

3

4b3

4

2

b5

1

C m7/11b5 IX

b7

3

4

4 4

b3

1

2

b5 1

C m7/11b5 X

1

3

4

b5 b3 4 b7

2

C m7/11b5 X

b3b5 b7 4

11

3 4

C m7/11b5 XI

1 3

4b5b7b3

4

3

C m7/11b5 XI

4 b5 b7

3

1

4

1 1

b3 b7

C m7/11b5 XI

1

b3

3

b7

4

4

1

b5

C m7/11b5 XI

b5b7 b3

1 11

4

4

C m7/11b5 XI

1

3

b5b7 b3

2 4

4

C m7/11b5 XI

2

b7 b3 b5 1 4

2

1

43

C m7/11b5 XI

1

3

b3

1

4

1

1

3

b5 b7

C m7/11b5 XI

1 1

3

b3 b5b7

4

4

T

b3

C m7/11b5 XI

1 1

b5 b7

4

4

T

b3

C m7/11b5 XI

4 b5b7

3

1

4

1 1

b3 b7

1

b3

C m7/11b5 XI

T

b3

2

b7

4

4

1

b5

3

1

C m7/11b5 XI

2

b7 b3 b5 1 4

2

1

43

C m7/11b5 XI

322

1b7 b3

4

4

1

b5

C m7/11b5 XII

Page 371: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 371

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor ninth fl at fi ve

b5 b3 b7 2

1

2

3 3

C m9b5 nr I

2

3 4

1

b3 b7 2 b5

C m9b5 nr I

2

3 3

1

b3 b7 2b5

1

b7

C m9b5 nr I

3

1

4

1

b5 2 b3b7

C m9b5 nr II

b3 b5 b7 2

12

1

4

C m9b5 nr III

b7 b3 b5 b7 2

3 4

2

1 1

C m9b5 nr III

b3 2

2

1

b7

1

b3

1

b7

3 4b5

C m9b5 nr III

b3 2

2

1

b7

1

5

1

4b5

C m9b5 nr III

b7 b3

3

2

2

4

b5

1

C m9b5 nr III

1 1

3

4

2b5 b3 b7

C m9b5 nr IV

b7 b3 b5 2

4

3

1

2

C m9b5 nr V

1 2

43

b3 2 b5 b7

C m9b5 nr VI

4

2 3

b3 b52b7

1

C m9b5 nr VI

4

2 3

b3 b52b7

1

b7

1

C m9b5 nr VI

4

2 3

b3 b52b7

1

b7

1

C m9b5 nr VI

1

4

2

b3 b7 b5

3

2

C m9b5 nr VI

b3 b7 b5 2

1

3

4

2

3

b3

C m9b5 nr VI

1

4

2

b3b5 b7

3

2

C m9b5 nr VII

1

4

332

1 b3b7 b5 2

C m9b5 VIII

3

1

4

b32 b7 1

1

2

b5

C m9b5 VIII

2

1

3

4

b7 b3 b5 2

C m9b5 nr VIII

1

4

32

b5b3 b7 2

C m9b5 nr X

4

11

2

b3 b51 b7 2

3

C m9b5 X

2

1

4b7 b5b3 1 2

3 3

C m9b5 X

1

4

b7 2b5

2 3

b3

C m9b5 nr X

Page 372: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 372

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

1 2 3

4

b3 2 b5 b7

C m9b5 nr XI

b7

3

4

1 1

b5 2 b3

C m9b5 nr XI

2

11

3

b3 b7 2 b5

1

b7

C m9b5 nr XI

2

11

3

b3 b7 2 b5

C m9b5 nr XI

2

11

3

b3 b7 2 b5

1

b7

1

b3

C m9b5 nr XI

b3 b7 2

3

1

b5

1

4

C m9b5 nr XI

2

4

1

3

b7 b3 b52

C m9b5 nr XI

Page 373: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 373

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

b5 b3 b7

4

1

2

1

4

C m11b5 nr I

b3 1b5

1

23

4

b3

1

4

C m11b5 nr I

1

3

b7 b3

2

b5

1 11

4

b7 1 4

C m11b5 I

b5 b3 b7 2

1

2

3 3

1

4

C m11b5 nr I

1

4

1

b3 b7 1 4

12

b5

C m11b5 I

3

b7 b3 b5b7 4

3

1

4

1

C m11b5 nr I

b3

2

b7

2

3

1

2

4b5

1

C m11b5 II

b3

2

b7

2

3

1

2

4

4

b7

1

b5

C m11b5 II

2

2

b7

22

4

4

b5

1

b3

C m11b5 nr II

2

4

2

1 4 b7 b3 b5

1

2

C m11b5 III

4

2

b5 b3 4 b7

11

C m11b5 nr III

2

3

2

1

4

b3 b7b5 2 4

C m11b5 nr III

4

1

b7

3

2

4

b5b3

C m11b5 nr III

b3

3

b7

2

4

1 b5

1T

3

b5 4

C m11b5 III

b7 b3 b5

3

1

3

2

4

1 4

C m11b5 IV

b7 b3 b5 2

4

2

1

2 3

4

C m11b5 nr IV

b7 b3 b5

2

1

3 4

4

C m11b5 nr IV

b7b3 b5

3

1

43

41

2

C m11b5 IV

b7b3 b5 2

4

2

1

33

4

C m11b5 nr IV

b7b3 b5

2

1

43

4

C m11b5 nr V

1

4

b3 4b7 b5

1

3

C m11b5 nr VI

1

b7

3

b5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m11b5 VI

3

b5

2

b3

4

1 1

b741

C m11b5 VI

3

b5

2

b3

4

11

b7 41

C m11b5 VI

43

1

3

1

2 2

4 b7 b3 b5 1

C m11b5 VII

minor eleventh fl at fi ve

Page 374: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 374

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

b5 b7 b3 4

1

4

2 3

C m11b5 nr VII

1

4

2

b5b7 b3

3

4

C m11b5 nr VII

1

4

332

1 b3b7 b5 24

2

C m11b5 VII

4

1

3

1

2 2

4 b7 b3 b5

C m11b5 VII

1

b7

2

b5

4

b3

3

4

C m11b5 nr VIII

1

4

2

b5b7b3

3

4

C m11b5 nr VIII

1

4

b3

3

4

1

2

3

4

1 b5 b7

C m11b5 VIII

1

b7b5 b7

4

b3

2

3

4

4

C m11b5 nr VIII

1

b7b5 b7

4

b3

2

3

4

4

1

1

C m11b5 VIII

3

1

b5 b3 b7 4

2

4

C m11b5 nr VIII

b71

T

3

4b3

4

2

b5

1

C m11b5 IX

b7

3

4

4 4

b3

1

2

b5 1

C m11b5 X

1

3

4

b5 b3 4 b7

2

C m11b5 nr X

b3b5 b7 4

11

3 4

C m11b5 nr XI

1 3

4b5b7b3

4

3

C m11b5 nr XI

4 b5 b7

3

1

4

1 1

b3 b7

C m11b5 nr XI

1

b3

3

b7

4

4

1

b5

C m11b5 nr XI

b5b7 b3

1 11

4

4

C m11b5 nr XI

1

3

b5b7 b3

2 4

4

C m11b5 nr XI

2

11

3

b3 b7 2 b5

1

b7 4

4

C m11b5 nr XI

2

b7 b3 b5 1 4

2

1

43

C m11b5 XI

1

3

b3

1

4

1

1

3

b5 b7

C m11b5 XI

1 1

3

b3 b5b7

4

4

T

b3

C m11b5 nr XI

1 1

b5 b7

4

4

T

b3

C m11b5 nr XI

4 b5b7

3

1

4

1 1

b3 b7

1

b3

C m11b5 nr XI

Page 375: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 375

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

T

b3

2

b7

4

4

1

b5

3

1

C m11b5 XI

2

b7 b3 b5 1 4

2

1

43

C m11b5 XI

322

1b7 b3

4

4

1

b5

C m11b5 XII

2

3 3

1

b3 b7 2b5

1

b7

1

4

C m11b5 nr XII

Page 376: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 376

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor (major seventh) fl at fi ve

1

32

4

b37 b5 1

C m(ma7)b5 II

1

43

b37 b5

C m(ma7)b5 II

42 3

1

b57 b3b5

C m(ma7)b5 II

32

1

b57 b3

C m(ma7)b5 II

4

2

1

b57b3

C m(ma7)b5 II

11 1

b3b5 7

C m(ma7)b5 IV

3

4

1

b57b3

C m(ma7)b5 IV

7b3 b5

11

3

C m(ma7)b5 IV

1 1

3

4

b5b3 b5 7

C m(ma7)b5 IV

7 b3 b5

4

1

3

C m(ma7)b5 IV

1

3

4

2

75 b3 b5

C m(ma7)b5 V

3

1

2

b5 b3 7

C m(ma7)b5 VII

2

1

4

3

17 b3 b5

C m(ma7)b5 VII

1 3

2

4

7 b3 b51

C m(ma7)b5 VII

7b5b31

1

2

4

1

C m(ma7)b5 VII

7b5b31

1

2

4

1

T

1

C m(ma7)b5 VII

3

1

2

7 b5 1 b3

4

C m(ma7)b5 IX

2

1

3

7 b5 1b3

4

C m(ma7)b5 IX

2

1

4

3

1 b5 7 b3

C m(ma7)b5 X

2

1

3

4

1 b5 7b3

C m(ma7)b5 X

1

3

2

b3 b5 7

C m(ma7)b5 XI

1

3

4

b5 7b3

2

b5

C m(ma7)b5 XI

1

3

4

b5 71 b3

2

C m(ma7)b5 XI

Page 377: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 377

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

minor ninth (major seventh) fl at fi ve

4

3

1

b57b3

2

2

C m9(ma7)b5 II

7b3 b5

32

4

1

2

C m9(ma7)b5 III

2

1

3

4

27 b3 b5

C m9(ma7)b5 VII

3

1

4

7 b5 2b3

2

C m9(ma7)b5 IX

2

1

3

4

1 b5 7b3

1

2

C m9(ma7)b5 X

2

4

3

b3 b5 7

1

2

C m9(ma7)b5 X

1

3

b57 b3

4

C m9(ma7)b5 XI

Page 378: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 378

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

diminished seventh

43

1 2

b5b3 6 1

C dim7 I

2 3

1 1

1b5 b3 6

C dim7 I

2

43

1

1 b5 6 b3

C dim7 II

4

321

b5 b3 61

C dim7 III

2 3

1 1

b36 b5 1

C dim7 IV

1

3 4

2

1 b3 6b5

C dim7 IV

2

1

43

6 1 b5b3

C dim7 V

6 b3 6 1 b5

1

2

1

3 4

C dim7 V

4

32

1

b3 b5 61

C dim7 V

4

321

6 b5 1b3

C dim7 VI

2 3

11

1 6 b3 b5

C dim7 VII

43

1 2

16 b3 b5

C dim7 VII

2

4

1

3

b5 1 b3 6

C dim7 VIII

2

4

1

3

b5 1 b3 61 1

1 1

C dim7 VIII

4

321

1 6 b3b5

C dim7 IX

3

1

1 b5 6 b3

2

4

C dim7 X

2 3

1 1

6b3 1 b5

C dim7 X

2

4

1

3

6 b3b5 1

C dim7 XI

4

321

b3 1 b56

C dim7 XII

Page 379: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 379

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type

diminished seventh add nine

2 3

11

b3 51 6

4

2

C dim7/9 VII

2

4

1

3

b5 1 b3 6

4

2

C dim7/9 VIII

2 3

1 1

6b3 1 b5

1

2

C dim7/9 X

Page 380: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA CHORD FINGERING

page 380

© 2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Appendix F: Chords By Type