July 27, 2012 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting

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Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and hunting videos and more.

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  • LSONews.com LoneStar Outdoor News July 27, 2012 Page 1

    By Conor HarrisonLONE STAR OUTDOOR NEWS

    Fort Worth angler Tom Pennington doesnt like to run many miles off-shore in his 26-foot Mako in search of big sh when the weather isnt perfect.

    Because of his smaller boat, Pennington feels

    he is limited by the con-ditions on where he can sh. When the weather is rough and Pennington decides to stay closer to shore, he goes to his plan B trolling around anchored ships several miles offshore.

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    July 27, 2012 Texas Premier Outdoor Newspaper Volume 8, Issue 23

    Bass after darkNighttime bite without the heat.

    Page 8

    Low returnsDove band recovery rate

    less than 5 percentBy John KeithLONE STAR OUTDOOR NEWS

    Researchers and vol-unteers around the state band thousands of dove every year to trace migration patterns and harvest rates, but they are running into a prob-lem people arent call-ing in bands from har-vested birds.

    On average, Texas

    bands between 2,200 to 2,600 mourning dove a year, and we want to band about 1,800 whitewings a year, said Dr. Bret Collier, research scientist of wildlife pop-ulation ecology at Texas A&M University. It helps us identify infor-mation to better man-age the dove popula-tion.

    Collier said the recov-

    ery rate of banded dove is only about 2 to 4 per-cent, but he thinks the number could be higher if more people reported the bands they shot. Since a sizeable percent-age of the nationwide dove harvest occurs here in Texas, it makes the information obtained from banding all the LOOK FOR JEWELRY: A small number of dove bands are reported, and of cials stress

    that hunters dont often look for and report the bands. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News. See BANDED, Page 14

    Trading birdies for bass

    LSONews.com

    CONTENTSClassi eds . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Crossword . . . . . . . . . Page 21Datebook . . . . . . . . . Page 25Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10For the Table. . . . . . . . Page 21Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12Heroes. . . . . . . . . . . Page 24Outdoor Business . . . . . Page 24Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 22Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 16Sun, Moon and Tide data . . Page 21

    Inside

    HUNTING

    How to grow big hybrid bluegill.Page 8

    Small ponds, big sh

    Changes apply in West Texas.Page 4

    What does CWD mean for hunters?

    King sh action turning on along coast.Page 9

    Kings ransom

    FISHING Golf course ponds hold untapped

    potential, if you can gain permission

    By John KeithLONE STAR OUTDOOR NEWS

    Maybe joining a country club has more bene ts than one would think.

    Patrick Stack lives in the Stonebridge Ranch community in McKinney, where he said he enjoys spectacular bass shing on the mul-tiple golf course ponds.

    There is a bunch of good sh in there, he said. A lot of these sh have never seen a bait, so you can really get in there and just wreck them.

    Stack often shes in the late after-noon or at night, so he doesnt disturb any of the golfers.

    Its a delicate dance with the golf-ers, so thats why we go sh at night after the course closes, he said. If

    See GOLF COURSE, Page 18

    SLICES AND HOOKS: Though the locations are rare, anglers who can nd golf courses willing

    to allow shing can often nd excellent bass action. Photo by John Keith, LSON.

    Cruising anchored ships

    See ANCHORED, Page 18

    TROLLING AROUND SHIPS: Lots of game sh congregate near ships anchored close to the Texas coast, offering easy access for small boats. Photo by Erich Schlegel, for LSON.

    King sh, ling hanging ontemporary structure

    Applications due soon, but read the rules.Page 4

    Texas Special Permit Hunts

  • Page 2 July 27, 2012 LoneStar Outdoor News LSONews.com

    Alpine Shooting RangeFort Worth

    (817) 478-6613

    Marburgers Sporting GoodsSeabrook

    (281) 474-3229

    MARBURGERS SPORTING GOODS

    Durys Gun ShopSan Antonio

    (210) 533-5431

    Come see us at the Nikon Booth at this years Hunters Extravaganzia near youand check on the New Monarch 7 Binoculars! Houston, TX Aug 3rd 5th,

    Fort Worth TX Aug 17th-19th and San Antonio TX Aug 24th -26th

  • LSONews.com LoneStar Outdoor News July 27, 2012 Page 3

  • Page 4 July 27, 2012 LoneStar Outdoor News LSONews.com

    HUNTING

    Outdoor expos coming soonEvents offer vendors,

    celebritiesBy John KeithLONE STAR OUTDOOR NEWS

    Passing time in the offseason will be a little easier for hunters over the next few months with the help of several hunting expos.

    Deer Fest will be held at the MPEC Exhibit Hall in Wichita Falls August 4, beginning at 9 a.m. The entry fee is $5, and kids under 5 get in free.

    One hundred percent of what we make goes back to kids who cant afford personal hygiene items and clothes in North Texas, said Deer Fest originator Dawn Thompson. Weve stepped it up this year. There are tons of vendor booths and a live and silent auction.

    Duck Dynasty stars Si, Jep, and Jessica Robertson will be at the event selling Duck Commander items, and the crew from The History Channels Mudcats will make an appearance.

    We also have some signed memorabilia from Swamp People, included with a 3-day alligator hunt (not with the TV show), Thompson said.

    Other attractions include a 3-D archery trailer, the Texas Junior Anglers Catch Tank, and the Wall of Shame from Operation Game Thief.

    The Texas Deer Association will hold their annual convention Aug. 9-11 at the JW Marriott

    in San Antonio. The event is open to the public, but patrons must sign up for a TDA membership upon arrival.

    The Texas Trophy Hunters Association is hav-ing their 36th Hunters Extravaganza in three

    Texas cities this August.The event comes to Houstons Reliant Center

    August 3-5, Fort Worths Will Rogers Center August 17-19, and San Antonios Alamodome August 24-26. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for

    kids ages 13 to 17, and free for kids under 12 and active military.

    Not only is it the granddaddy of all hunt-ing shows, but its the hunters supermarket, said Courtney Stolte, director of the event. Its

    Few changes to mule deer hunts due to CWD nding Check stations to be established, processing must be on ranch

    By Craig NyhusLONE STAR OUTDOOR NEWS

    Now that CWD has been found in far West Texas, what does it mean for mule deer hunters?

    Mandatory check stations will be set up in the Containment Zone, likely in Cornudas and Van Horn, although the rules will be nalized after the August meeting of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission.

    In the adjacent High- Risk Zone other check stations are planned, although taking the deer for test-ing will be voluntary.

    Otherwise, no changes are expected in mule deer hunting with one exception. The pro-

    cessing of the deer will have to be done on the ranch.

    Dr. Dan McBride, a veteri-narian who was on the CWD Advisory Board that provides advise to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, provided the reason for the regulations.

    CWD can spread from the car-cass, he said. We didnt want a mule deer carcass traveling from West Texas to the Hill Country and being dumped in the pasture after the deer was processed. We know that deer killed in the area have been taken back to other areas in previous years.

    At the check stations, hunters will be required to bring the ani-mals head to the designated loca-

    tions, said Sean Gray, TPWDs mule deer program leader.

    McBride said the approach taken was sane and sensible.

    The advisory board made sure the response wouldnt be to go crazy and try to kill all the deer, he said.

    Counties affected by the pro-posed rules include El Paso, and portions of Hudspeth, Culberson and Reeves.

    Proposed Texas Animal Health Commission rules apply to the non-indigenous species of cervid species of Texas under its jurisdic-tion, including moose, red deer, elk and sika. TPWDs proposals will regulate white-tailed deer and mule deer.

    UPCOMING OUTDOOR EXPOS AUGUST 3-5: TTHA Hunters ExtravaganzaReliant Center, Houstonttha.com AUGUST 4: Deer FestMPEC Exhibit Hall, Wichita Fallsdeerfestwichitafalls.com AUGUST 9-11: Texas Deer Association 14th Annual Convention and FundraiserJW Marriott, San Antoniotexasdeerassociation.com AUGUST 17-19: TTHA Hunters ExtravaganzaWill Rogers Center, Fort Worth AUGUST 24-26: TTHA Hunters ExtravaganzaAlamodome, San Antonio SEPTEMBER 15-16: Texas Hunting & Outdoor ClassicFreeman Coliseum & Grounds, San Antoniohuntersclassic.com SEPTEMBER 21-22: Central Texas Hunting & Outdoor ExpoApache Pass, Rockdalerockdalechamber.com

    Special Permit Hunts worth the effort

    By Craig NyhusLONE STAR OUTDOOR NEWS

    Studying all of the Special Permit Hunt catego-ries and locations can be a little daunting at rst. But with some time and effort and a little luck hunts can be won.

    With 20 categories for adults, eight for youth, and dozens of locations to choose where to apply, information is the key.

    So what should you look for?Some areas allow baiting, others dont. Some

    hunts are from designated blinds, while others are by compartment. Some areas dont allow ATVs while others almost require them. Most areas have standby hunts if the winner doesnt show, but some dont.

    And some areas are just better than others.When I get the book, I