JUNE 2, 2013 Strategies that Engage Adult Learners Cristie McClendon

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JUNE 2, 2013 Strategies that Engage Adult Learners Cristie McClendon Slide 2 Outcomes for the Session Identify the characteristics of excellent faculty members; Differentiate between a fixed and growth mindset; Compare and contrast mastery learners, strategic learners and performance avoiders; Identify four stages of learning; Preview instructional strategies that engage adult learners Slide 3 Icebreakers Slide 4 Benefit: Requires only the ability to express oneself Allows the learners to get to know one another before they resort to learning style and competition Humanizes the learning experience and builds trust Sets the tone for future communication in the course Conrad, R. and Donaldson, J.A. (2004). Engaging the online learner: Activities and resources for creative instruction. Jossey-Bass Guides to Online Teaching and Learning. Slide 5 In a Word Purpose: Students introduce themselves to others in a new and innovative way Instructions: Think of one word that best describes you or your life right now. Write it on an index card. Find someone else whose word resonates with you. Pair up with them and come up with two other words that you have in common. Conrad, R. and Donaldson, J.A. (2004). Engaging the online learner: Activities and resources for creative instruction. Jossey-Bass Guides to Online Teaching and Learning. Slide 6 Name that Show Purpose: Learners describe their life in a unique way. Part 1: Learners post a short response to the following scenario: If you were to write the script to a movie or TV show of your life, which two songs would you select and why? One song should reflect your life as a whole, and another should reflect your current life. Part 2: Based on your response to part 1, suggest a movie or TV show for that person. Explain. Part 3: Look over all suggested titles. Select the one that best fit your movie or TV show. Explain. Conrad, R. and Donaldson, J.A. (2004). Engaging the online learner: Activities and resources for creative instruction. Jossey-Bass Guides to Online Teaching and Learning. Slide 7 Effective Icebreakers Should be fun and nonthreatening Focuses on the learners instead of content Requires learners to interact with one another or read one anothers posts (online) Requires the learner to find something they have in common with at least 10% of the class Requires learners to be creative, and express genuine emotions and openness Conrad, R. and Donaldson, J.A. (2004). Engaging the online learner: Activities and resources for creative instruction. Jossey-Bass Guides to Online Teaching and Learning. Slide 8 Advanced Organizer 1. Left-brained learners need to see the big picture first so they will be able to pay attention to the presentation. 2. When we present, we usually teach to our right, so we need to be sure and make a concerted effort to look to the left periodically. 3. A good way to see if your audience is paying attention and comprehending your presentation is to monitor their blink rate. 4. Interpersonal learners need time at the end of a presentation to reflect and digest the information in order to retain it. 5. Instructors often have to mismatch their own preferred learning style in order to meet the needs of their learners. Slide 9 The Best Faculty Active and accomplished researchers and scholars Follow the current developments and research in their field Engage in reflection and metacognition within the discipline Use knowledge to build their own understanding and abilities Transmit this knowledge to students in a way they can understand Know how to build foundational knowledge and scaffold content for student understanding Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press. Slide 10 The Best Faculty Realize knowledge is constructed, not received Realize questions and caring are important The more questions we ask, the more we can index thoughts in memory. Ask questions, but teach students to develop their own as well Students have to want to go beyond just memorizing information for the test. We have to motivate them. Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 11 The Best Faculty Slide 12 Realize mental models change slowly Three prerequisites for deep learning: Students must face a situation does not work; Students must care enough that it doesnt work to grapple with the issue at hand; Students must be able to handle emotional trauma that comes with challenging long-held beliefs. Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 13 The Best Faculty Motivation is important. Verbal reinforcement and social approval motivate students Motivation and performance decrease when students feel someone is trying to control them. If students only study to get a good grade or to be the best in class, they do not achieve as much as they do when they actually learn. They cannot analyze, synthesize with the same level of mental skill, nor will they take on challenges. Feel smart only when they engage in activities that they can succeed in avoid struggling grappling and making mistakes want to appear smart Person praise (you are so smart) versus task praise (you did a great job on that paper) Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 14 The Best Faculty Realize people come to and move between the levels Have a strong sense of who learners are Tailor approaches based on how students learn; incremental steps Help students believe that they can learn, build confidence and encourage Help students craft a notion as to what it means to be intelligent and educated Help students learn their strengths and contributions they can make Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 15 The Best Faculty Give students as much control over education as possible Offer nonjudgmental feedback on work and how then how to improve Avoid dividing students into groups based on level of achievement Encourage cooperation and collaboration versus competition Avoid grading on a curve and grade based on mastery of criterion Give students multiple opportunities to show what they know Talk about the promises of the course rather than a long list of requirements Meaningful connections to the course and student prior knowledge Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 16 How Would You Rate Yourself? On a scale of 1-5 with five being the highest, how would you rate yourself on how well you could identify the stage of learning your students are in? What is your best attribute? Where might you be able to grow? Slide 17 Mindset Slide 18 Activity Fixed or growth mindset quiz Slide 19 Application Cards Purpose: New content in the form of theories, principles, or procedures is presented to students. Instructor hands out index cards and has students write down one real, world application for what they have learned What have you learned about growth and fixed mindsets? Slide 20 Video Slide 21 Think-Pair-Share How are adult learners similar to and different from the traditional students you might have in class now? If adult learners were surveyed for this video, what might they say? How might this information change your teaching? Slide 22 Types of Learners Slide 23 Three Kinds of Learners Mastery learners Respond to the challenge of mastering something Get inside the subject and try to examine its complexity Believe they can become more intelligent by learning Work to develop their thinking competence Establish individual learning goals Engage for the sake of learning Take more risks in learning, try harder tasks Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 24 Three Kinds of Learners Strategic Learners Focus on doing well; want high grades React to competition Avoid challenges that will harm their academic performance and record Fail to develop deep understanding View intelligence as fixed Often develop a sense of helplessness Want tasks that they find easy, make them feel smart and require little effort Dont want to grapple with the content to change their own perceptions Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 25 Performance avoiders. Surface learners, Dont want to invest of themselves to probe deeper Fear failure Stick with trying to survive Memorize and reproduce what they hear Avoid competition Pursue answers to questions rather than learning the information Three Kinds of Learners Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 26 Four Stages of Learning Stage 1: Received knowers View learning as a matter of checking with the experts to get the right answers and then memorizing them Truth is external Sit and get Poised and ready to take notes Ingest information but cannot evaluate or create it for herself Banking model: professor deposits the answers into their heads Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 27 Four Stages of Learning Stage 2: Subjective knowers All knowledge is a matter of opinion Use feelings to make judgments An idea is right if it feels right If they get low grades, they say the professor doesn't like their opinion. Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press Slide 28 Four Stages of Learning Stage 3: Procedural knowers Learn to play the game of the discipline, program or class Learn criteria for making judgments and use those standards in their papers. Sharp students What they learn in class doesnt influence what they do outside of class No sustained influence on what they think, act or feel Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA.: